Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 1 – 1910

1910 Sep 1 – Winnipegosis

Lever A. Harrison, employed by the Hudson’s Bay Company of this place, left here on the 20th ult to visit his parents at Fort Qu’Appelle, Sask. Not being well when he left here, he called on the doctor on reaching Dauphin, where it was found that an operation was necessary for appendicitis, but his death in Dauphin Hospital followed. Deceased was a young man much thought of here.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 4 – 1914

1914 Jun 4 – Killed by Stroke Lightning

In the midst of life we are in death. The words of the Psalmist were fully realized on Tuesday when a telephone message from Dublin Bay, a point about 15 miles north of town, conveying the sad message that Thos. R. Baylis, a well-known farmer, had been killed by lightning. It appears that decreased was walking along the road at the time carrying a hoe over his shoulder during the prevalence of a thunderstorm that morning when he was stuck by lightning and instantly killed.

HOE BLADE ATTRACTED LIGHTNING

It is believed that the steel blade of the hoe was the means of attracting the lightning. When found on the roadway his clothes were literally torn to tatters, and the tops of the leather of his boots separated from the soles.

DEATH INSTANTANEOUS

The body was at once removed to the home and Dr. Culbertson telephoned for. Mr. Gurton’s automobile was secured and the Dr. and Mrs. Lys, his daughter, made the trip in fast time. After examining the body Dr. Culbertson gave it as his opinion that death was instantaneous.
Deceased has been a resident of the Dublin Bay district for over 12 years and formerly resided at Madoc, Hastings county, Ontario. He was of retiring disposition, but well liked by all who enjoyed his acquaintance. Besides a window he leaves two daughters and four sons, all grown up. The daughters are Mrs. Hugh Lys, of the town, and Mrs. Wm. Dempsey, of Tisdale, Sask.; the four sons all reside at Dublin Bay, and are William, Fredrick, Arthur and Percy. He was 70 years of age.

BURIED AT RIVERSIDE

The funeral took place today from the late residence of deceased to St. Paul’s Church. After service the body was taken to Riverside Cemetery for interment. The service at the church and grave was conducted by the Rev. A.S. Wiley.

1914 Jun 4 – Winnipegosis

Two of our popular young people Miss Mary A. McArthur and Dr. E.A. Medd, were quietly married at the home of the bride’s parents on the 29th inst. They have the best wishes of all for their future happiness. A ball will be given in their honour at the Hotel Winnipegosis on Friday night.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a visitor in our midst lately, returning to Winnipeg on Monday.
Capt. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Pennycock and little daughter left for Winnipeg on Monday.
Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday to Fork River.
Large shipments of fur were sent out on Monday by the Armstrong Trading Co. and Joe Alex.
Rev. F. Elliott is retiring from the Methodist mission here on account of his health.
The Standard Lumber Co. is running their planning mill steadily at present.
The funeral of the late Richard Harrison took place on Sunday and was largely attended. The Rev. F. Elliott conducted the service. Deceased was an old-timer, having settled in this neighbourhood some twenty years ago. He followed stock raising on the considerable scale. He was liked by all who knew him and his death cast a gloom over the community. Two automobiles brought friends from Dauphin on Sunday to attend the funeral. Among the visitors were Thos. Needham, Stuart Geekie, W.A. Brinkman, Dr. Bottomley, J.B. McIntyre, G.L. Irwin and Ross Walker.
Nurse Cummings, who was called here to nurse the late R. Harrison, returned to Dauphin on Monday.
The telephone and post office have been moved to the old Hudson’s Bay Co. store.
The contract for the new school has been let to Neely & Co. of Dauphin.
Pilgrim & Co. recently put down about 900 feet cement floor in the fox ranch here.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 21 – 1910

1910 Apr 21 – Fork River

Mrs. Tilt came up from Dauphin last Friday.
D. Harrison who came back from England last week, passed through here for Winnipegosis. He reports having had a good rip and enjoyed himself in the Old Land.
Mr. Allan from Grand View has been making acquaintances in this district.
A dance was held in the Orange Hall last Friday night in honour of Miss J. Johnstone, who leaves for Alberta this week. Owning to the stormy night not many turned out, but those that went enjoyed themselves.
Mrs. Johnstone, with her family, left here for Alberta to join her husband.
J. Campbell who has been here for sometime, left for Gilbert Plains on Monday’s train.
Owing to the stormy day on Sunday no Methodist service was held here, and no English church service as held at Winnipegosis, both Ministers being quite unable to meet their appointments.
The English Church Sunday School and Bible Class is held every Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock. The officers are: Wm. King, superintendent; Mrs. Rice, Bible Class teacher; Mrs. Scrase, Sunday School teacher. All are cordially invited to attend.

1910 Apr 21 – Winnipegosis

The game of football is holding sway in Winnipegosis. Several enthusiastic meetings have been held and a splendid team has been organized. Subscriptions have been rolling in and the club has been established on a sound business and financial basis.
The prospects for the future success of the club are bright and hopeful. The following are the officials of the team:
President – Mart Collison
Vice – W. Parker
Sec.-teas. – Rev. W.E. Rowan
Captain – Dr. A.E. Medd
Executive Committee – Messrs. Theriow, Climie, and McCauley.
Several practices have already taken place.
Winnipegosis is established as an exam centre this year, for part 1 and entrance students.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 16 – 1914

1914 Apr 16 – Chas. Best Hanged Himself

Charles Best, aged 47, and one of the first settlers on the Gilbert Plains, committed suicide on Friday by hanging himself to a brace in the granary. Deceased has been of unsound mind for the past two years, only having come home from the asylum about two weeks ago. He leaves a wife, six sons and three daughters, the eldest about 18 years old.
Deceased was well-known in Dauphin, having hauled grain to the market for several years in the early days.

1914 Apr 16 – Fork River

C. Clark of Paswegan, Sask., after spending a few days among his numerous friends at this point left for home. He was one of the old-timers, living here for ten years. He says he would rather live in Manitoba.
Professor Robinson is busy these days and intends trying farming for a little recreation as he states the bottom has fallen out of the fishing “biz”. The other fellow, he says, gets the wad. Try mushrooms, Jack.
J.G. Lockhart has returned from a trip to the east and intends investing heavily in real estate, etc.
Our Scotch friends seem to be taking alternate trips to the Lake Town. What will be the outcome we are not sure, as it’s neither sleighing or wheeling and there is too much wind for wings. Still, where there is a will there is always a way.
The Rev. Canon Jeffery, of Winnipeg, will hold Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, April 10th at 3 p.m.
Mrs. J.D. McAulay, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, arrived with his bride and is spending the Easter holidays with his parents on the Mossey. Frank is one of the boys we are always pleased to see and we with him much happiness and prosperity.
At a meeting of the Horse Breeders’ Association on the 7th it was decided to disband the majority being of the opinion it was cheaper to breed scrubs for another year. We don’t hesitate to say the farmers have made the mistake of their lives. It takes backbone and money, sure, but it has to be undertaken sooner or later. We will have to let the groomers set back if we ever intend raising saleable horses, or, for that matter, any other kind of good stock.
Mrs. J. Rice is off to Dauphin for a few days holidays.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending the Easter holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mrs. Humphreys has returned from a visit to Dauphin.

1914 Apr 16 – Winnipegosis

We are all turning our thought to spring when the lake will be open and the beats skinning the water.
The river is open.
R. Burrell has opened a restaurant in the Cohen block.
Dwellings are scarce and rooming quarters hard to get. This would indicate our little burgh is fording ahead.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley are spending a few days in Dauphin this week.
Sid Coffey, our moving picture man, visited Dauphin this week. Once Sid completes his new hall the moving picture business will become a permanent feature of the town.
Thorn Johnson has broken his arm again. This is the fourth fracture he has suffered.
John Rogelson is busy overhauling boats.
A number of mink have been added to the animal ranch here.
There was a large delegation from here on Monday to attend the Conservative convention at Gilbert Plains. Among the party were J.P. Grenon, C.I. White, J. Denby, J. Dewhurst, Ed. Morris, Thos. Toye, W. Hunkings, K. McAulay, W. Ketcheson, F.H. Hjaluarson, R. Harrison, Rod Burrell.
Four delegates were also along from Pine River: J. Klyne, W. Gobson, G. Pangman, and W. Campbell.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 22 – 1912

1912 Feb 22 – Sentenced to Three Months

The case of John Genik, committed on the charge of unlawfully wounding and causing bodily harm o Anthony Genik, of the Riding Mountain settlement, was tried before Judge Ryan here the latter end of last week. The defendant was found guilty, and sentenced to three months in jail. The judge remarked, however, that he should have three years instead of three months. In a quarrel with his cousin, Anthony, John severed part of the former’s ear with his teeth.

1912 Feb 22 – Fork River

Mr. Fulkernson, of Dauphin, representing the Northern Lumber Co., was here on a business trip lately.
Miss Peal Cooper has returned from Dauphin, where she has been visiting friends.
W. William’s sawmill is idle for a few days waiting for repairs.
Wm. Hunking and R. Harrison were visitors from Winnipegosis last week.
D.N. Cooper, agent for the Stimpson scale firm was here last week installing an up-to-date computing scale in the Armstrong Trading Co.s store.
Nat Little, agent for the Crescent Cream Co., of Winnipeg, is paying thirty-two cents per pound for butterfat. There is money in cows at that price. The other fellows will new have to go some to keep in line.
Some one was “dear” stalking about the 14th. This is excusable at that date.
Don’t get inquisitive but keep quiet as we are busy dodging the cordwood piled on West Main Street when we come into town. The stores will soon have to be moved to make room for traffic.
Captain D. McLean and Mr. Ellis and son were visitors to Winnipeg last week, taking in the bonspiel.

1912 Feb 22 – Winnipegosis

Capt. D.G. McAulay has gone to Southern Manitoba to purchase cattle.
T.H. Whale was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday. It is understood he will open in business here again.
Mrs. J.N. McAulay is visiting at Dauphin this week.
Mrs. G.O. Bellamy and two children went to Dauphin on Saturday for a short visit.
The fishermen are about all down from the north end of the lake.
Peter McArthur returned from a trip to Dauphin on Saturday.
The Standard Lumber Co. will take out about three million feet this winter.
Already it is mooted that several new buildings, will go up here in the spring.
Copies of the herald were in demand last week.