Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 2, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Sept. 25th. Only a small turnout was registered, this without a doubt being due to the fact that the majority were busy threshing, still, all the same, there could and should have been more and the comrades are earnestly asked to remember the meeting on October 9th. A full attendance is desired and, in fact, must be had, and all are asked to make a special effort to attend. Matters of great importance to the association will be dealt with and it is the desire of the executive that a representative meeting give its ruling on these matters.
On the 14th inst. the second entertainment arranged by the Veterans will be placed on at the town hall, viz., The Victorian Serenaders. There will be a dance after the same as the previous show an the co operation of all to secure a good house is asked. Little need be said as to the merits of the company as same is well known to the majority, but it will fully maintain the reputation established by the Castle Squares and good value for money is assured.
We would draw the attention of the reader to the special appeal from the G.W.V.A. in this edition of the paper and ask that they give the proposition their support. This will be the first time that a general appeal has been made in this district by the returned men and we are confident that we shall not ask in vain, but that the public will respond in the same spirit as the men did in the past four years.
Comrades, keep the 9th October in your “bean” and attend the meeting that night.

Presented With Meerschaum Pipe

The employees of the town met at the hall on Wendesday afternoon and presented ex-Chief Bridle with an address and valuable meerschaum pipe. Mr. Bridle and family left on the early morning train for British Columbia.

Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork River did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Chraighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 14, 1919

Fair Notes

Some of the ladies were quite disappointed that there was no baby show this year. The baby show was very popular in past years and it was undoubtedly an oversight that it was not held this year. Mr. John Gorby, who was had charge of this department in past years, is the champion of the ladies and the babies and it will not be his fault if the show is not held next year. The babies are out greatest national asset and their welfare is contributed to by information supplied by physicians and professional nurses at these exhibitions.
The directors worked hard for several weeks to complete the details of the fair and have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts were appreciated and the exhibition a success in every way.
Chas. Murray, the patient and tireless secretary, had a busy three days of it.
The stock parade, headed by the band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was a striking feature on Friday.
Over 5000 people passed through the turnstiles on Friday.
The War Saving and Theft Stamp advertising display was very much in evidence on the grounds. The entrance to the grounds, the main building, grand stand, ticket office and other places throughout the grounds were nicely decorated with different lines of posters. It was evident that Mr. Blackadar intended that the large crowds that gathered each day on the grounds should be thoroughly informed regarding this movement.

Successful Exhibition

The 28th annual fair of the Dauphin Agricultural society, held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of last week, was the most successful in its history. And this, too, in the face of the fact that the farmers were in the midst of the harvest. While it is true there was a falling off in most of the departments it is a noteworthy fact the exhibits generally were of a superior class. The livestock was the best ever shown here. Two notable herds were J.D. McGregor’s Aberdeens and John Graham’s shorthorns. In the Clydesdale, Percherons, Agricultural and light horses many fine animals were shown and nearly all the leading breeders of the district were represented.
The poultry section was by long odds the best in the history of the society. The exhibit was not only large but of the highest quality. Much credit is due the Poultry Association and its energetic secretary. Wm. Murray, for the success achieved.
The attractions were exceptionally good. The band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders from Winnipeg furnished the music on Friday and the splendid program was enjoyed by all.
Credit is due Mr. Wm. Rintoul for the manner in which the numerous young ladies executed the intricate dances. The little girls also did exceptionally well.
The Scotch dancing by the two little Simpson girls, to the music of the bagpipes played by their father, caught the fancy of the big crowd.
At 1.30 several hundred war veterans assembled in front of the grand stand and on behalf of the citizens Mayor Bowman extended them a hearty welcome. In his address he referred to the historic places in France where the Canadians made history and achieved undying fame. Robt. Cruise, M.P., also spoke, Major Williams, in the absence of Brig. Gen. Ketchen, replied on behalf of the men. Major Skinner added a few words in regard to a suitable memorial for those who had made the supreme sacrifice.

Fork River

E. Harris, formerly of Bracebridge, Ont., is visiting at the home of Fred Cooper.
Don’t forget to come to Fork River’s annual agricultural show, Friday, August 15th.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s, Dauphin, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican church, Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24 h, at 3.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake school, has returned home from visiting at Cypress River and Neepawa and is feeling better after her trip.
The White Star Co.’s new elevator is nearly completed. Thus the commercial importance of this centre grows.
Owen Pruder is busy overhauling the Northern elevator so as to have it ready for the fall delivery of grain.

Sifton

The marriage of Miss Anna Farion, daughter of Fred Farion, merchant, of this place, to Mr. W. Belashta of Canora, was celebrated at St. Paul’s parish church, on Wednesday, the 6th inst., at 9 p.m. Bishop Budka, with the assisting priests, officiated. Some two or three hundred invited guests were present. The church had been very tastefully decorated with flowers, which blended very pleasingly with the handsome costumes of the bride and attendants. To the lively strains of a bridal chorus, sung in Little Russian, the bride and groom, showered with confetti, and guests repaired to the large Ruthenian hall, where en exceptionally well appointed supper was served. Covers for at least two hundred and fifty were laid and the tables were used for several relays of guests. The hall was very tastefully festooned and draped, with roses and asters as floral decorations. An orchestra, composed of Ruthenians, four brothers, from Winnipeg, played very pleasingly and tastefully. Bishop Budka, on behalf of the guess, toasted the bride and bridegroom, the latter responded very neatly both in Little Russian and English. Dancing was kept up until daylight. A. Kozak, one of the old national Cossack dances, given most artistically by Miss Belashka, of Winnipeg, and Mr. Dyk, of Dauphin, was much admired; also the tasteful fox-trotting of Mr. Assifat. A number of visitors from Winnipeg were present, amongst others, Mrs. Stefanyk, Mr. and Mrs. Badnac, Dr. Pasdrey, and Lieut. Kreman editor of the Canadian Ruthenian. Mr and Mrs. Belashta have left for Canora, their future home, where Mr. Belashta is in the legal profession.
During the evening Mr. —– spoke at some length about the conflict between the Poles and so-called Ukrainians, the West Galicians, stating that Premier Lloyd George had alone amongst the Allied powers at the peace conference, expressed himself in favor of an independent Ukraina, separate from the claims of the Polish aristocracy. He was followed by Mr. F. Taciuk, of Dauphin. A collection, totaling one hundred and twenty dollars, was taken up to be forwarded to Europe for use against the Poles.

Winnipegosis

Geo. G. Spence, who was formerly manager for the Hudson’s Bay Company here, has bought T.H. Whale’s general store.
There is an average crop in this district in spite of the dry season. The grain is nearly all cut and threshing will soon commence.
All the fishermen in town are bustling getting in supplies and preparing for the fall fishing. Two of the companies large boats leave here within the next few days for points at the north end of the lake.
A party of forty business men came up from Dauphin Sunday and took a trip fifty miles up the lake, upon the steamer “Armenon.” The trip was an enjoyable one and everyone was delighted with it. A net was set on the voyage out and was taken in on the return voyage. Nineteen fish were caught and Mr. Dan Hamilton auctioneered them off and got as much as $2.00 for a “sucker.” A Dominion and a Provincial M.P. were among the party.
The English Church is holding a regular Sunday service at Winnipegosis.
The town council is planning for a new municipal hall and extensive sidewalks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 16, 1919

Dauphin Flour in Belgium

Our readers will remember that shortly after the first reports of the suffering among the Belgian people, due to the Hun invasion in 1914, reached Canada, the Dauphin Milling and Creamery Co. Limited, ground a carload of flour from wheat donated by farmers and others in Dauphin and adjoining municipalities. This carload was duly shipped to Belgium but no official record was ever received of its having reached its destination. The following letter received a few days ago by the company makes very interesting reading, and it is gratifying to note that at least part of the donation reached the people for whom it was intended:
“52 Rue De Mondigny,
“Charleroi, Belgium.
“Dec. 1, 1918.
“Dear Sir,—You will no doubt be greatly surprised to receive this letter from a person that you have never seen nor heard of before, and your surprise will be still greater when you hear that it is written at your request.
“One day, early in 1915, I was present at the opening of a bag of flour which, with several others, had just arrived from Canada. At the bottom of the sack was a strip of paper bearing these words, ‘Whoever gets this bag of flour write and let us know if it is good.’ I would have written at once only the Germans, with their usual kindheartedness, made things so easy for us that letter writing was out of the question. I hope never to see a German again as long as I live. ‘The best of them are bad.’
“Your flour was excellent; it has not been our luck to have such good quality since. For the last three years our bread—it really doesn’t deserve the name of bread—was composed of everything except flour, thanks to Fritz.
“You would not recognize your flour sack. It has been transferred into a beautiful sofa cushion and occupies a prominent place in our drawing-room It is the admiration of all visitors.
“Last week the Canadian troops came to Charleroi; they received a warm welcome on all sides. Everyone here speaks highly of your compatriots, many English regiments passed two or three days in this town before entering Boschland. With every good wish for Xmas and with kindest regards.
“Believe me, yours sincerely,
(Signed) Andree McDonnell.”

Mossey River Council

The first meeting of the council of 1919 took place at Fork River on Jan. 7th.
The clerk swore in the newly elected members – T.B. Venables, reeve; J. Yakavanka, councilor for Ward 1; E.A. Marcroft for Ward 3, and J. Namaka for Ward 5.
Bylaws were passed making the councilors’ fees $4 per day and appointing D.F. Wilson sec.-treasurer at a salary of $875.
The bylaws of 1918 appointing the solicitors and health officer were confirmed for 1919.

COMMITTEES
Finance – Hunt, Marcroft and Paddock.
Bridges – Coun. Reid and Hunt.
Public Works – Coun. Marcroft, Paddock and Namaka be public works committee for Wards 3, 4 and 5, and Coun. Yakavanka, Hunt and Reid be public works committee for Wards 1, 2 and 6.
Paddock-Marcroft – That the bridge committee examine the bridges that are needing repairs and make an estimate of the material that will be required for the season’s bridge work and report to the clerk who is instructed to purchase same.
Hunt-Namaka – That the assistance which has been given to the family of the late Peter Smith be discontinued.
Hunt-Marcroft – That each councilor make a diagram showing the work in his ward which he would prefer to come under the working of the Good Roads Act for the yea 1919, and forward said diagrams to the sec.-treasurer, who is instructed to make a diagram from them showing the whole municipality, which diagram is to be forwarded to the Good Roads board.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the clerk instruct the solicitors to prepare a bill legalizing the assessment roll of 1918, and that the member for the constituency be asked to bring it before the legislature at the coming session.
Marcroft-Hunt – That a grant of $50 be made to ex-Reeve Lacey for miscellaneous expenses.
Hunt-Marcroft – That the assessment roll for the year 1919 is hereby adopted for the years 1919 and 1920.
Reid-Namaka – That Reeve Venables be a delegate to the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and that the delegates receive $25 for expenses.
Council adjourned to meet at the call of the reeve.

Fork River

Mrs. James Rice, of Northlake School, has returned from a trip to Winnipeg.
Mrs. R. McEachren and daughter Helen were recent visitors to Dauphin.
A car of young fat stock was shipped out last train. Good prices were realized by the sellers.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Little have returned from a short visit south.
H. Swartwood, International Implement Co., general agent, was at Fork River last week to hook up the orders of the local agent, W. King, for the coming season. Agent Billy K. is most optimistic as to the coming season’s business and to show his faith, has placed liberal orders.
Sunday school in All Saints Church every Sunday at 2 p.m.
Mr. Jarvis is now teacher of the Mowat School.
The continued fine weather is very favorable to stock and they are in fine condition.
Grain and cordwood are coming to market in considerable quantities every day.
The following are the officers of Purple Star Lodge, L.O.L., No. 1765, for the ensuing term:
W.M., Bro. C.E. Bailey; D.M., W.J. King; chaplain, Edwin King; rec. secretary, Wm. King; fin. Secretary, A. Hunt; D. of O., F. Cooper; treasurer, Sam Bailey; lecturer, F.F. Hanfebrak; dep. lecturer, Sam Reid. Committeemen – M. Cooper, H. Hunter, W. Russell, Ed. Morris, S. King, Jos. Bickel.

Sifton

A crowded schoolroom showed the appreciation of the residents of Sifton district of the Wycliff School Xmas concert. The hit of the evening was a three-piece sketch called “Santa and the Fairies.” Joe Reid acted as Santa, Miss Tilly Farion as Queen of the Fairies, and Witch Doubletongue was impersonated by Mary Braschuk. Patriotic songs opened the program, while several part-song contributed much to the enjoyment of the evening. An effective item was a serenade by the school children, clustering in a semicircle on the platform, with a flashlight playing on them for the darkened auditorium. Mrs. J.A. Campbell contributed the piano and violin accompaniments.
A good old-time dance, at which there was a large attendance, followed the concert. The dance music was given by Mrs. Campbell and Messrs. Marcott, Potoski, Kuczma, Halinski, and others.
The proceeds of the evening, totaling $56.75, have been placed in the bank as the Wycliff School Children’s Amusement fund. Part of it is to be applied at once to the repair of the school toboggan slide, a new concert platform, and ropes for the swings.
The teachers of the school, Mr. Bousfield and Miss Trew, and the children are grateful to the friends who gave the ample and excellent refreshments; to Mr. Paul Wood for the loan of his piano and for the willing assistance given by friends before and during the evening.
The fudge and taffy were provided by the children from their own lunch as a treat to adults, enjoying the Christmas spirit. The artists responsible for the blackboard scenes of the stage were Leslie Kennedy and Tilly Farion.

Winnipegosis

Old Josey Campbell, who resides near Water Hen, had his house and content totally destroyed by fire last Friday. The house was a new frame building, and the loss is ruinous to old Josey.
The council of the Village of Winnipegosis held its regular meeting last Tuesday. The council has been shorthanded for several months but is now complete, being reinforced by the addition of two new councilors, J. Willis and Chas. Denby. The council donated $400 to the Red Cross and discussed the building of a hospital and giving the town better fire protection. These last two matters will come up again at next council meeting.
The interment of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy, Ochre River, formerly of this town, took place on Tuesday. Rev. Mr. Hook conducted the service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 8 – 1910

1915 Dec 8 – Shot for a Deer

What might have proved a fatal accident to a hunter occurred in the Riding Mountain south of Gilbert Plains on Friday last. William, the 18-year-old son of Jas. D. Sutherland was hunting in the mountain and was attired in white. He was coming through the scrub when the white of his legs was noticed by another hunter, by the name of Dimmick from Roblin, who at a distance of 2200 yards fired at him for a deer and hit him in the right leg, the ball breaking it. Sutherland immediately ell and yelled loudly which prevented Dimmick from again firing as he had the rifle to his shoulder a second time when he heard the yells. As the two men were a long distance away from any habitation, Dimmick had to carry the wounded man three miles to a farmer’s house when medical aid was procured and young Sutherland brought to the Dauphin Hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1915 Dec 8 – Fork River

Miss Lane, from Dauphin is spending a few days up here before proceeding to her home in Winnipeg.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of Mowat School was taken seriously ill last week and returned to Dauphin to be under the doctor’s hands. We all hope she will soon be herself again.
F. Storrar paid a visit Dauphin lately.
A Christmas tree and entertainment will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the English Church, on Friday evening, December 23rd, at eight o’clock. A good time is expected for the children. Admission all children free, but a charge for admission will be made to adults.
Mr. Letwin has been appointed as assistant to Mr. D. Kennedy in the Armstrong Store here.

1915 Dec 8 – Sifton

Bert Kennedy, of Canora, Sask., who was a patient in the Dauphin Hospital with typhoid, was a visitor to his brother John Kennedy for a few days before returning to his house at Canora.
Miss Scott, Neepawa, was a visitor at the Presbyterian mission house for a couple of days. Miss Scott is always welcomed at the mission house.
Rev. Johnston, of Gilbert Plains, held services here on Wednesday evening last. The sermon was well put and much appreciated.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held service on Thursday evening. Quite a large crowd congregated.
The moose shooting season is on again. Rudolph Spruhs is one of the number to leave for the haunts of the antlered monarch.
The Manitoba Government Telephones have a construction gang camped in the village doing construction work east of town.
On Tuesday Messrs. Buckwold & Levin shipped out three cars of cattle to Winnipeg.
The elevator of the British America Elevator Co. had to close down on Saturday for lack of cars to ship out. This is said to be the first experience of this kind since the elevator was erected. The opportune arrival of empty cars has now, however relieved the situation.
Rev. J.A. Sabourin is having a furnace and hot water heating system installed by M. Cardiff, of Dauphin, in his new building which is being rapidly completed. A new R.C. Church is expected to be erected next summer.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Melynik a few days ago a pair of twin girls. All three doing well.
With the late fall of snow the farmers are quickly taking advantage of the good sleighing and hustling their grain to market.

1915 Dec 8 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit of the Methodist Church, Winnipegosis, on Sunday next. Subject: The Call to Advance.
Teamsters here have been busy freighting fish from the various fishing grounds up the lake. They are impartment men and must needs be well catered for. Recognizing this fact the Misses Geekie and Black have opened a new restaurant at which good, solid, substantial meals are served at all hours. This is just what was needed in our busy little town. The fact that hot meals can be obtained at all hours, would see to be a guarantee of success. We wish them luck.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 13 – 1919

1919 Nov 13 – Soldiers Tendered Banquet

A year ago Tuesday the bells of the town were ringing and the whistles blowing. It was a day long to be remembered. The Germans had started the war with the object of conquering the world and had, after the great struggle, hoisted the white flag and asked for the cessation of hostilities. It was a different scene that greeted the eye as one entered the town hall on Tuesday night, November 11th, 1919. Here were tables stretched the full length of the hall, artistically arranged and simply groaning under the load of good things that weighed them down.
The occasion was a banquet tendered the returned boys, their wives and lady friends by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the G.W.V.A. and it was worthy of them. The members of the Auxiliary have been tireless workers for the welfare of the men and this banquet crowned their efforts.
There were between three and four hundred present.
During the dinner hour Major Skinner extended a welcome to all on behalf of the Auxiliary.
A vote of thanks was tendered the ladies on motion of Comrades Bates and Batty.
After the tables were cleared there was a short program followed by a dance. Those taking part were Mrs. Grobb, violin selection; Mrs. R. Hawkins, solo; Rev. H.P. Barrett, song; Miss H. Clarke, recitation. The McMurray orchestra furnished the music for the dance.

1919 Nov 13 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 10th.
Mr. Shield and bride arrived last week and have rented John Hayward’s residence on the Mossey River.
John Judge and Mr. Gourlay from Virden, have arrived. They have rented Briggs brothers’ buildings.
A basket social will be held in the school on the evening of Nov. 21st. The proceeds will be devoted to a fund for the purchase of an organ for the school.
The work on the road that leads to the school is still undone. Children from this district east of the muskeg have not been able to attend school of late on this account. The Dept. of Public-Works has provided a special grant from this road. In view of this it seems strange that an effort has not been made to have the work performed.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

A meeting of the directors of the Agricultural Society was held on the 5th inst. It was decided to pay the prize money at once. As this was the first show held by the society the directors are to be congratulated on its success.
Mrs. Rice, for a number of years was teacher at North Lake School has sold her property and has left the community. Mrs. Rice has lived a number of years in the district and has done good work as a teacher. Her departure from our midst is a matter of regret.
Mr. and Mrs. Caswell, of Hartney, Man., are visiting at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. The young people attended the banquet to the returned soldiers.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Briggs.
All Saints’ S.S. staff held a public meeting on the night of the 6th. About 50 were present. Rev. H.P. Barrett presided. Arrangements were made for the annual Christmas tree, and also to hold a social evening every Wednesday at which there will be a varied program.
A public meeting is called for Friday, 14th inst., for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers’ Association.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

Mrs. Emma Rice wishes to thank all who were kind and considerate to her during her recent illness. She is now comfortably provided for in Dauphin and hops to be able to return to our midst within a short time.

LETTER OF APPRECIATIONS.
On behalf the returned boys of the Fork River district we wish to express our appreciation of the banquet tendered us, the gifts of watches and purses and the uniform kindness shown us upon all occasions. We further wish to acknowledge the efforts of the ladies in preparing the excellent supper provided us. The banquet was a most enjoyable event, the pleasure being shared by a number of friends from outside.
THE COMMITTEE.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 2 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 2 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River, on Wednesday, 17th inst. Councillors Richardson and Seiffert absent. The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Union of Manitoba Municipalities, Dauphin Hospital, Heaton’s Agency Co., N.R., the solicitor, Dominion Lands Office, the Minister of Interior, the Department of Education, Standard Lumber Co., T.A. Burrows Lumber Co. and land commissioner of Hudson Co.
Hunt – Bickle – That the clerk investigate the Dauphin Hospital accounts and pay all claims for which the municipality is liable.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk make the necessary entry with the Dominion government, paying the fees, for two acres of the S.E. 4-29-17 for cemetery purposes.
Hunt – Toye – That the reeve and clerk inspect ditch between sections 2 and 11, tp. 30, rge. 19, with a view to having it cleared out.
Bickle – Robertson – That the account for lumber of the Standard Lumber Co. amounting to $29.71 be paid and charged to ward 4.
Robertson – Toye – That the account authorized by Road Commissioner Bailey for deepening the Lockhart ditch and due J.W. Lockhart be paid.
Toye – Robertson – That the following resolution be forwarded to the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities to be brought before the annual Convention:
“That section 644, sub-section of the Municipal Act be amended by striking out the words “or any ward or any portion of a ward thereof” in the second and third lines thereof.”
Hunt – Bickle – That the following resolution be forwarded to Union of Manitoba Municipalities for consideration at the annual convention.
“That section 148 of the Municipal Assessment Act be amended by adding the words, “during the past two years” after the ‘taxes’ in the eighth line ??? ???.”
Toye – Robertson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye – Robertson – That the clerk put up notices that all arrears of taxes must be paid before the first day of November, 1913, or proceedings will be taken to collect.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk order one twenty-four inch corrugated culvert eighteen feet long for the Cooper crossing.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk be authorized to have the pile driver repaired as soon as possible.
A by-law authorizing the purchase of a roadway along the south side of the N.W. 26 and a portion of the N.E. 27-29-19 was passed; also a by-law striking the rate for 1913 as follows: municipal rate 10 mills, municipal commissioner’s rate ½ mill and general school rate 5 mills.
Toye – Bickle – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1913 Oct 2 – Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from Weyburn, where he has been for the summer months. He reports good crops there.
Geo. Tilt paid the Lake Town a visit on important business lately.
Willie Johnston returned from the summer fishing up the lake and reports a fair catch.
E. Williams, of Liverpool, England, has arrived to take up the work of the Anglican mission here.
F.B. Lacey returned from a trip south.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys.
Miss Pearl Wood has left for Winnipeg for a short stay with friends.
Mrs. O’Neill has arrived from Rainy River and is visiting her sister, Mrs. F.B. Lacey, of Mowat.
One of our Winnipegosis friends is of the opinion that the fishing at Fork River is ahead of Winnipegosis. We agree with him every time.
Mr. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, visited our burgh between trains.
Wm. Stonehouse left for Winnipegosis to follow his occupation as inspector for the A.T. Co.
Bert Cooper has returned from Winnipegosis, having spent the summer on the government dredge.
Mrs. Paul Pugon, of Lake Dauphin, while milking a cow was badly hurt, the cow having turned on her. Dr. Medd was sent for but could not go and by the time other assistance arrived it was too late, the woman died. She leaves a family of twelve children.
T.A. Worsey preached his farewell sermon on Sunday evening, the 28th, in All Saints’ Church. There was a good turnout. Mr. Worsey is leaving for St. John’s College to resume his studies. His many friends appreciate the good work he has done here this summer and all wish him prosperity.

1913 Oct 2 – Winnipegosis

The fishing season closes on Oct. 1st. The catch has been good. Fifty cars have been shipped out.
A monster jackfish, weighing 35 lbs., was caught in one of the hauls in Dawson Bay.
A Galician is in the lock-up having stabbed his wife in the arm with a knife. His mind is supposed to be unbalanced.
Ducks are numerous and the shooting is good.
Jos. Grenon is having the grounds around his fine new residence laid out by Mr. Sadler, of Dauphin. The grounds will be planted with hardy perennials this fall which will bloom early in the spring and summer.
Theo. Johnston returned on Wednesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1919 Oct 2 – Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

1919 Oct 2 – Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork Rive did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

1919 Oct 2 – Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Craighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 16 – 1915

1915 Sep 16 – Minutes of Mossey River Council

The Council met at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, August 31st. All the members present.
The minutes of last meeting were adopted as read.
A petition from certain ratepayers of tp. 30, rge. 17, praying for the formation of a school district, to be called Dar. was read. As the proposed district included three sections of Oak Cliff, S.D., the clerk was authorized to notify the people of that district of the petition.
??? were read from the Village of Winnipegosis, the Manitoba Patriotic Fund, J. Namaka, re: certain accounts for work in ward 5, the municipal commissioner’s levy for 1915, the deputy municipal commissioner re: Mossey River and Winnipegosis apportionment Howard Armstrong, re: contract in ward 1, the solicitor, the sec.-treas of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities; the Rumley Products Co., the superintendent of the C.N.R., and the deputy Minister of Education.
Hunt – Reid – That a grant of fifty dollars per month be made to the Manitoba Patriotic Fund while the war lasts.
Hechter – Hunt – That the clerk write to Mr. W.A. Robinson with a view to his surveying the new roadway from the west into Fork River.
Hechter – Reid – That the council make application to the Good Roads Board for assistance to the bridge constructed over the Mossey River between sections 5 and 6, tp. 20, rge. 18.
Bickle – Reid – That the reeve and sec.-treas. be a committee to meet a committee of the village of Winnipegosis in the matter of the apportionment of the two municipalities and also to deal with the matter of the debt of ward 4.
Hechter – Reid – That the following resolution be brought before the convention of the Union of Municipalities:
“That section 52, subsection C, of the Municipal Assessment Act be amended by striking out the words “or if no so resident” in the second hue thereof and substitution the word “and.”
Bickle – Hunt – That the following resolutions be also brought before the convention:
“That whereas, British law provides for water following its natural course and makes provision for the improvement of natural water courses where such improvement may be expedient; and, whereas, in the construction of roads by ditching and grading the natural water courses are frequently obstructed the water diverted in such a way that the roadways are damaged and private property injured; and, whereas, no provision for such cases appears upon the Statute books of Manitoba, we would therefore ask the [1 line missing] such amendment to the Municipal Act as will enable municipal councils to construct or improve watercourses across private property, in cases were it may be necessary to drain roads, providing, always that such drains or watercourses follow or parallel the farm boundaries where-ever possible.”
Hechter – Reid – That the reeve and sec.-treas. be a committee to draft a resolution dealing with the matter of the loss of taxes on dominion lands homesteaded and provincial lands sold which lands were cancelled or abandoned leave municipalities without any means of collecting taxes which may be due against them and that a copy of the resolution when drafted be forwarded to the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities for consideration at the convention.
Hunt – Namaka – That Coun. Hechter be authorized to repair the bridge between sections 19 and 30, tp. 21, rge. 18.
Coun. Bickle tendered his resignation as councillor for ward 3.
Hechter – Yakavanka – That the reeve and council of the rural municipality of Mossey River in accepting the resignation of Mr. Bickle as councillor for ward 3 do so with the deepest regret but in view of the fact that he is leaving the council and his home in order to volunteer his services on behalf of Canada and the Empire we part with his valuable services here with pride and wish him a safe return.
[1 line missing] – be authorized to purchase a wristwatch and have it engraved to read as follows: “Presented by the Municipality of Mossey River to Councillor Charles H. Bickle.”
Yakavanka – Namaka – That Coun. Yakavanka for letting and inspecting work $19.75 be passed.
Yakavanka – Namaka – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Reid – Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

1915 Sep 16 – Fork River

Mr. T. Barnard, plasterer, returned to Dauphin on Wednesday, having finished his contract for plastering the postoffice for Mr. W. King.
There has been considerable rustling around for twine at the tail end of cutting one of the largest crops ever seen here. It takes from three to four pounds of twine to the acre. At the present prices put forward by the market manipulators the farmers will receive very little profit for their labour. Frost is reported in some quarters.
Mr. Wm. Murray, officer C.P.A., of Dauphin, and Nurse Hutchinson, of Sifton, have returned from a trip east of the lake with a child. Mr. Murray left for Dauphin on Wednesday’s train.
Mr. Frank Rosnowski was taken to the Dauphin Hospital, he having been injured by a bridge.
Mr. G.W. O’Neil arrived from Sewell and is renewing acquaintances for a few days.
Mr. A.J. Sngelgrove and family have moved to Winnipegosis for the winter.
Mr. Forrester, of Yorkton, has arrived and will take charge of the Northern elevator. He has moved his family here and rented Mr. Snelgrove’s house for the present.
Mrs. J. Rice has returned from Dauphin, where she had been consulting a physician. She has been on the sick list lately. We all trust she will soon recover.
Mr. Schuchett, merchant, and Mr. Camur, his assistant, spent a few days in Dauphin last attending the Jewish New Year.
Mrs. W. Allan, of Grandview, visited her daughter, Mrs. T. Dewberry lately.
Private Max King, of the 1st Battalion returned to Sewell after spending a month with visiting his parents.