Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 25 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 25 – Fork River

F.F. Hafenbrak, T. Needham and R.C. Sparling, of Dauphin, all old timers, were here renewing old acquaintances on the 16th. We were pleased to see them.
Miss Alice Clark returned to her home at Paswegan, Sask., after spending a month visiting friends here.
Messrs. J. and P. Robinson, of Mowat, have returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis in connection with their fish business at Lake Dauphin. They have shipped a large number of boxes of fish from this point.
Several Americans have been looking over the district lately. They have returned to their home with the impression that this is a good country and promised to pay us a visit later on. They hope to get land where a number can settle together.
Wm. King wishes to thank the ratepayers of Mossey River municipality for their hearty support on the 16th. He says he will do all in his power for the benefit of the municipality.
The many friends of Mrs. A. Snelgrove are pleased to see her around after her recent illness.
Business here is dull, principally on account of the poor condition of the roads. A fall of snow would be much appreciated.
A large party of young folks from here attended the ball at Sifton on Fright night. They report a good time.
The New Year’s ball will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the members of purple Star L.O.L., 1765, on the night of January 1st, 1914. Good music and refreshments. Admission $1.00 per couple. Everyone welcome.

1913 Dec 25 – Sifton

The most successful ball ever given in the history of the village was attended Friday evening last by some sixty couples. From the opening Grand March at 9 p.m. to the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at six o’clock the next morning not a single untoward incident distributed the harmony of the gathering. A number of guests came from Fork River, Dublin Bay, Melton and Dauphin and seemed to thoroughly enjoy themselves. Mrs. Norman Gray and other ladies very kindly and ably accompanied several of the various violinists on the piano. The flute and zither accompaniment was also much appreciated. The music was good, the floor good, and the Sifton cooking of the best. A well-known critic was heard to remark that the hall, owned by the Kennedy Mercantile Co., is the best between Dauphin and Prince Albert. A vocal and instrumental programme, somewhat shortened by the unexpected absence of several of the artists was put on after supper, Mr. Henry Woods very ably acted as chairman. Mr. Paul Wood, on behalf of the hosts, the residents of Sifton, in a few words, bade everybody welcome and the compliments of the season. Amongst other prominent old-timers and friends were noticed. Mr. and Mrs. Mooney, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Woods, Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Gray, Mr. and Mrs. W. Fair, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Love of Melton and Dublin Bay; Mr. H. and Miss Little, the Misses Nelson, Miss Cooper, Miss Weatherhead, Fork River.
Miss (Nurse) Reid’s Sunday school class Christmas tree is to take place in the Kennedy Hall on Tuesday evening, the 23rd. All the kiddies are looking forward to a visit from Santa Claus. A fine program is promised.
While business has not been quite as brisk as in some former years every indication points to better times ahead. But, at this, the festive season, let us for the time, at least, forget our troubles and join in the gaiety and happiness that always prevail at the close of the year.

1913 Dec 25 – Winnipegosis

Constable Hunking took two Indians to Winnipeg on Monday, where they will appear before the chief Indian agent. The redskins have been getting liquor from some quarter and an effort is being made to find out who the guilty parties are. When this is done there is going to be something doing. Up to the present it is not definitely known who supplied the liquor but there are grave suspicions. It is understood some of the officials will visit this district before long.
Mr. McKerchar went to Dauphin on Monday.
Now that the cold weather has set in the fishing industry will take on more life. It’s an ill wind that blows nobody good.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Sieffert left for Brandon on Tuesday to spend Christmas with Mr. S’s parents.
Councillor elect Hechter appears to be hearing the honours of his office with the due gravity. There is one thing we may look for now that the portly Frank is in office, and that is, that the municipality of Mossey River and Winnipegosis will get some publicity. That is all this town and district needs to be appreciated by outside investors. Three Dakota men were in the district last week and they said it was surprising that such a fertile belt was so little known. They are going to move here and say others will follow. Let us advertise like Dauphin and Ochre Rive have done and then we will come into our own.
H. Wilson, L.C. Doran and C. Hober from Dakota were here last week looking over the district. They intend buying lands and with others making their homes here.

1919 Dec 25 – Sleeping Sickness at Swan River

The Swan River Star reports that the Board of Trade of that town has died from “sleeping sickness.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 6 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 6 – Fork River

Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. They report a very pleasant time.
F.B. Lacey from Mowat Centre, returned from a visit to Dauphin on business and to attend the teachers’ convention.
We are informed that Capt. Cain, of Mowat, left for Dauphin to take out a license of some sort. Time will tell whether it is for fish, flesh or fowl.
Mrs. Frost and daughter, of Rathwell, are visiting her daughter, Mrs. Reid, on the Mossey River.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey, is spending the week in Dauphin, with friends.
Archie McDonald, who has been busy with a gang ditching on the company’s farm here, has returned to Winnipegosis, the ground having frozen too hard to do any more work this season.
Miss J. Weatherhead, teacher of the Mossey River School, spent the weekend with friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Roe, of Neepawa, has left for the west with his second consignment of cattle from this point.
John Seiffert, and Steve Letwyn, of Winnipegosis, are busy among the farmers, buying cattle for the company’s at South Bay.
Wm. Coultas has invested in stock and intends stall feeding them for Xmas beef. We believe Billy is on the road to become a millionaire in the near future. Farmers take notice and follow suit.
Frank Clawson, of Dauphin, is here renewing old acquaintances.
Mrs. N. Little, and daughter, Miss Grace, took a trip south on business for a few days.
Mr. O’Callagan, of Portage la prairie, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is visiting the Co.’s store on his semi-annual tour of inspection, and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Messrs. Sturdy, White and Shears, of Winnipegosis, are busy at the Co.’s store this week taking stock.
Mrs. Stonehouse and daughter, Miss Sylvia paid the lake town a visit this week.
Hallowe’en passed off with the usual result. Some are minus their gates, others are looking for strayed buggies. The bell of All Saints’ received its annual visit and was fixed up as usual to keep it from running away, while the other building is left in peace as usual. This is where unity comes in, we suppose; yes, with a vengeance.
Our Winnipegosis friends seem to be grieved at the way they are used by the Mossey River municipal board and would like to know if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map. Better ask somebody else, I guess. But one thing we do know at tax paying time we are not allowed to forget our residence. Not very likely Mike.

1913 Nov 6 – Winnipegosis

Capt. Coffey was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday’s train.
The ice on the lake is firm enough to permit travel between the mainland and Snake Island. If the weather becomes warm again which it threatens now, navigation will be resumed.
Frank Hechter left for Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday. Frank is up and down pretty often and helps keep the C.N.R. running.
J.P. Grenon is off to Quebec, where he will study mink farming. The mink farm at Macaza has proved a decided success and he is anxious to learn something of the methods employed in rearing this little animal which produces such a fine grade of fur. The fox branch of Mr. G’s ranch is making progress, and there is every prospect of it becoming a profitable industry. Fish and fur producing animals abound in this part of the West and if the industries flourish as we hope they will there is no reason why the people here should not become prosperous, if not wealthy. The fishing industry is a great asset and the timber resources are large and are being profitable exploited. With good land for farming and cattle raising at the back of all, no part of he West offers better inducements for settlers than this town and district.
The telephone line is now completed and it is sure to prove a great convenience. Postmaster Ketcheson is in charge of the service. The connections are small at present but they are sure to grow. Those connected up with the service are Canadian Lakes Fishing Co., The Armstrong Trading Co. and Frank Hechter. Dauphin is the Central checking office.
Cattle buyers have been in the district of late but have not secured many animals as that canna Scot, Capt. Dugald McAuley, usually covers the district like a blanket.

1919 Nov 6 – Soldiers Banqueted at Fork River

One of the largest banquets held in Northern Manitoba took place at Fork River on Friday night, the 31st ult. The banquet was gotten up by the people of the Mossey River municipality and tendered to the returned soldiers. The supper was held in the Orange Hall, and it is estimated that fully two hundred and fifty people sat down to the splendid spread prepared by the ladies of the district.
Mossey River municipality was well represented by her sturdy sons in France and Flanders, and, like all Canadians, they did their part well. Some of the boys were destined not to return and today rest under the sod across the ocean. Others survived their wounds. The occasion was one for rejoicing.
Each soldier was remembered in a tangible form and presented with either a gold watch and guard or a well-filled purse. It was a recognition of the men well worthy of any community.

TOAST LIST.
Following the supper there was a short toast list. Mr. Geo. King, of Dauphin, was toastmaster. The list included “The King.”
“The British Empire,” proposed by Geo. Spence, of Winnipegosis, and responded to by Principal Jonasson, of Winnipegosis, and the Rev. Mr. Roberts.
“The Municipality of Mossey River,” proposed by ex-Reeve F.B. Lacey, and responded to by Coun. Hunt and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
“Our Hosts and Hostesses,” was proposed by the Rev. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin.
The address to the soldiers was read by Mr. Wm. King, and the presentations made by Sergt. Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
The men made suitable replies, in which they each returned their heartfelt thanks.
At the conclusion of the speech making the hall was cleared and the young people indulged in a dance.
There were a number of guests present from Dauphin, Winnipegosis and other points.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 2 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 2 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River, on Wednesday, 17th inst. Councillors Richardson and Seiffert absent. The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Union of Manitoba Municipalities, Dauphin Hospital, Heaton’s Agency Co., N.R., the solicitor, Dominion Lands Office, the Minister of Interior, the Department of Education, Standard Lumber Co., T.A. Burrows Lumber Co. and land commissioner of Hudson Co.
Hunt – Bickle – That the clerk investigate the Dauphin Hospital accounts and pay all claims for which the municipality is liable.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk make the necessary entry with the Dominion government, paying the fees, for two acres of the S.E. 4-29-17 for cemetery purposes.
Hunt – Toye – That the reeve and clerk inspect ditch between sections 2 and 11, tp. 30, rge. 19, with a view to having it cleared out.
Bickle – Robertson – That the account for lumber of the Standard Lumber Co. amounting to $29.71 be paid and charged to ward 4.
Robertson – Toye – That the account authorized by Road Commissioner Bailey for deepening the Lockhart ditch and due J.W. Lockhart be paid.
Toye – Robertson – That the following resolution be forwarded to the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities to be brought before the annual Convention:
“That section 644, sub-section of the Municipal Act be amended by striking out the words “or any ward or any portion of a ward thereof” in the second and third lines thereof.”
Hunt – Bickle – That the following resolution be forwarded to Union of Manitoba Municipalities for consideration at the annual convention.
“That section 148 of the Municipal Assessment Act be amended by adding the words, “during the past two years” after the ‘taxes’ in the eighth line ??? ???.”
Toye – Robertson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye – Robertson – That the clerk put up notices that all arrears of taxes must be paid before the first day of November, 1913, or proceedings will be taken to collect.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk order one twenty-four inch corrugated culvert eighteen feet long for the Cooper crossing.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk be authorized to have the pile driver repaired as soon as possible.
A by-law authorizing the purchase of a roadway along the south side of the N.W. 26 and a portion of the N.E. 27-29-19 was passed; also a by-law striking the rate for 1913 as follows: municipal rate 10 mills, municipal commissioner’s rate ½ mill and general school rate 5 mills.
Toye – Bickle – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1913 Oct 2 – Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from Weyburn, where he has been for the summer months. He reports good crops there.
Geo. Tilt paid the Lake Town a visit on important business lately.
Willie Johnston returned from the summer fishing up the lake and reports a fair catch.
E. Williams, of Liverpool, England, has arrived to take up the work of the Anglican mission here.
F.B. Lacey returned from a trip south.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys.
Miss Pearl Wood has left for Winnipeg for a short stay with friends.
Mrs. O’Neill has arrived from Rainy River and is visiting her sister, Mrs. F.B. Lacey, of Mowat.
One of our Winnipegosis friends is of the opinion that the fishing at Fork River is ahead of Winnipegosis. We agree with him every time.
Mr. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, visited our burgh between trains.
Wm. Stonehouse left for Winnipegosis to follow his occupation as inspector for the A.T. Co.
Bert Cooper has returned from Winnipegosis, having spent the summer on the government dredge.
Mrs. Paul Pugon, of Lake Dauphin, while milking a cow was badly hurt, the cow having turned on her. Dr. Medd was sent for but could not go and by the time other assistance arrived it was too late, the woman died. She leaves a family of twelve children.
T.A. Worsey preached his farewell sermon on Sunday evening, the 28th, in All Saints’ Church. There was a good turnout. Mr. Worsey is leaving for St. John’s College to resume his studies. His many friends appreciate the good work he has done here this summer and all wish him prosperity.

1913 Oct 2 – Winnipegosis

The fishing season closes on Oct. 1st. The catch has been good. Fifty cars have been shipped out.
A monster jackfish, weighing 35 lbs., was caught in one of the hauls in Dawson Bay.
A Galician is in the lock-up having stabbed his wife in the arm with a knife. His mind is supposed to be unbalanced.
Ducks are numerous and the shooting is good.
Jos. Grenon is having the grounds around his fine new residence laid out by Mr. Sadler, of Dauphin. The grounds will be planted with hardy perennials this fall which will bloom early in the spring and summer.
Theo. Johnston returned on Wednesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1919 Oct 2 – Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

1919 Oct 2 – Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork Rive did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

1919 Oct 2 – Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Craighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 25 – 1913

1913 Sep 25 – Fork River

John Robinson spent a few days here among his friends after returning from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Weaver left for Winnipegosis, where Mr. W. intends residing having taken a position in the A.T. Co.
Mrs. F.F. Hafenbrak and family returned from a week’s visit to her sister, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis.
Miss Buie and Miss Weatherhead, of Dauphin, spent the week-end here the guests of Miss Weatherhead, teacher.
Miss M. Millidge, ravelling organizer of the Woman’s Auxiliary for the English church, will address the members of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on Monday, September 29th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon in the church.
W. Williams has received another separator, which makes four threshing outfits working within a radius of two miles and all are busy these days, the trouble is to get men to run the machines to their full capacity.
John Richardson is going around with a broad smile. It’s a bouncing boy.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Coomber of Selkirk, are visiting R. Coomber, on the Fork River for a few days.
The Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on the 21st. The church was very tastefully decorated with grain, leaves, fruit and flowers by the ladies and the congregation was the largest on such an occasion. T.A. Worsey, of St. John’s College, preached a very appropriate sermon. There was a good offertory to the Home Mission Fund.
Miss Ena Fredrickson, of Winnipegosis, has taken a position at the A.T. Co. store here.
The C.N.R. telegraph gang are repairing old poles and putting up new ones between here and Winnipegosis.
The members of All Saints’ W.A. are holding an ice cream social in the Orange Hall on Friday night, September 26th. Everybody welcome.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 21 – 1913

1913 Aug 21 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Patrick McLeod, a half-breed, aged 16 years, was drowned at Winnipegosis on Sunday afternoon. He and some other boys were playing about the steamer Manitou, when he fell overboard and was drowned.

1913 Aug 21 – Fork River

Mrs. Jas. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, is spending the week with her daughter at C.E. Bailey’s on the Mossey.
Mr. Noble, Methodist student at Mafeking, is here renewing acquaintances for a few days.
The Methodist picnic was held on the 13th. It was an ideal picnic day and a good crowd turned out considering the busy season. There were sports of all kinds and the booth did a roaring trade. The baseball game between the married and single ladies was won by the single ladies.
Professor Sas Poo was kept busy telling fortunes during his stay here. There is some thing he ken and there’s other things he don’ ken, as the Scotchman would say.
Professor Weaver has severed his connection with the A.T. Co. and is making for his farm at Million. Whether there’s millions in it for Gordon remains to be seen.
Gerald Stuart has left for Winnipeg, where he intends taking up school teaching.
Dunk. Kennedy and wife and S. Bailey returned from the Stampede at Winnipeg and report a lively time.
Mrs. Tallbath and family of Winnipeg, and visiting at the home of her sister, Mrs. Sam Reid, on the Mossey River.
The Power Co. of Dauphin have their survey party busy taking levels on the Mossey River one mile north of town.
The farmers are busy cutting their fall wheat and barley now and by the end of this week cutting will be general. Thee are some fields of real good fall wheat in this district and prospects are away ahead of what was expected considering the wet season.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 7 – 1913

1913 Aug 7 – First Rat Seen at Dauphin

One swallow does not make a summer but the indications always are that when one makes its appearance others will not be long in following. The first rat, so far as our information goes, was seen at the railway station a few days ago by O. Law, of the express office. The rodent was a large one and run under the platform when a rock was thrown at it.

1913 Aug 7 – Fork River

Mr. Dryden returned from a short stay in Dauphin and is going into the hay business.
Mrs. Murray, of Selkirk, has been spending a week with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Miss Weatherhead has returned from her holidays and the Mossey River School stated on Monday.
The herd law came into force August 1st for one day only and another was substituted in its place of no earthly use as we see. There endeth another municipal shuffle.
Mr. Jones agent for the London Assurance Co. has been around inspecting their business in this part. He thinks this part of the country all right.
Master Laurie Rowe invited a number of his young friends to his home at the farm one day last week. All present report having a jolly time.
A number of young folks spent a very pleasant evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt in honour of Miss Nixon, who is leaving to resume school duties after the holidays.
H. Armstrong returned from Dauphin where he was working and intends to go into farming again.
D. Kennedy was a visitor at the Lake Town Sunday.
Mr. O’Callaghan, chief auditor, and Mr. Shears, accountant, were at the A.T. Co’s store on Wednesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 10 – 1913

1913 Jul 10 – Greek Church Burned

The Greek Catholic Church at Fishing River, near Fork River, was struck by lightning during an electric storm sat week and was burned to the ground. There was no insurance on the building.

1913 Jul 10 – Ethelbert

K.F. Slipetz, sec.-treasurer is visiting Winnipeg this week and taking in the exhibition.
Fine rains of late and crops looking good.
Road work is progressing throughout the municipality. We all want good roads.
Wild strawberries are coming in small quantities. The crop will be a light one this season, although the late rains have improved the berries some.
Ethelbert is preparing for a big celebration on the 18th inst. There will be races and other sports and we invite all our neighbours to come and have a good time.

1913 Jul 10 – Fork River

R. Bell is taking a vacation with his friends at Dauphin.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending her holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mr. Noble, Methodist stunt who has had charge of the circuit during the last 12 months, left to take up his summer’s work at Mafeking mission.
Miss C. Grant, teacher of Pine View School, is spending her holidays at Foxwarren.
Mr. Comber was a visitor to the Lake Town on business last week.
Miss. M. Nixon is spending her summer holidays with her sister, Mrs. A. Rowe.
Mrs. D. McLean and Mrs. A.J. Snelgrove are taking a month’s holiday’s visiting friends at Regina.
Mrs. J. Rice, of North Lake district, was in town on important business lately.
James Johnston and family, who have been spending the winter at the government hatchery on Snake Island, have returned to the farm for a time.
July 1st was warm and bright, just the day for a holiday and quite a number took advantage of it. Where were all those teams loaded with old-timers and their wives going? Why, to help Mrs. Wm. Northam to celebrate her 62nd birthday to be sure. On arriving at her beautiful place on the banks of the Fork River our hostess conducted us to a pretty grove beside the house, where tables were laid for dinner. The tables were decorated with flowers and were well loaded with turkey, chicken and other good things to temp the inner man. Dinner over, the afternoon was spent in talking over old times and other pleasant themes. Mrs. Northam was the recipient of many ??? ??? ??? ??? the good wishes of all conveyed to her. After supper all left for home having had a very pleasant time. We trust this will only be one of such pleasant gatherings.
A severe electric storm passed over this district last week. The Greek Catholic Church at Fishing Rive was destroyed by lightning and the brick chimney on the Armstrong Trading Co.’s store here was badly shaken up and it will have to be rebuilt. The water is higher than it has been for years.
James Campbell and W. Foley, of Winnipegosis, are starting to summer fallow the Snelgrove farm lately purby F.P. Grenon, of the A.T. Co.