Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 3 – 1921

1921 Nov 3 – Fire at Winnipegosis

Fire early Wednesday morning destroyed the stores of Isaac Bradbery and Nate Kessler. The loss will be considerable. Some insurance was carried by the firms.

1921 Nov 3 – G.W.V.A. Notes

The next regular meeting will b held on November 9th –will the members keep this date in mind and attend the meeting.

Anyone who has a supply of magazines that they are done with and have no further use for will oblige by leaving them in the reading room of the home. The reading matter will be much appreciated. The magazines will also be sent to the homesteads where reading matter is always acceptable.

Only a year now left in which to take up the soldiers’ insurance. Have you taken up any of this insurance? Over five thousand returned men have taken up the insurance; there are many more who are entitled to take advantage of it and become insured. It is a good thing to take up while it is going.

Don’t forget to support the “Poppy Ladies” on Armistice Day. Every veteran should have a poppy on that day.

Don’t fail to attend the bazaar of the Ladies’ Auxiliary to the G.W.V.A. on Thursday, November 3rd, as well as the ball at night.

Will every member see to it that he is in good stand if with the local branch. We are trying to get the new home fitted up and need all the help that we can get it.

1921 Nov 3 – H.E. Hunt Loses His Leg

H.E. Hunt, who now resides at Stettler, Alta., met with a bad gun accident on Tuesday, 1st inst. he received the charge of the gun in his leg below the knee and later had to have the leg amputated. Mrs. Hunt left for Stettler this (Thursday) morning.

1921 Nov 3 – Jury Verdict Accidental Death

The coroner’s jury empanelled at Winnipegosis on the 27th ult., to enquire into the death of Duncan Crerar, who was thrown from a wagon when his horses ran away, brought in a verdict that his death resulted from the accident.

1921 Nov 3 – October Police Records

The police records for October show that these were 13 convictions for October as follows: Two were fined for speeding, four drunks, one for breach of license by-law, two for disorderly conduct, two for running autos with cut outs on, two for breach of traffic by-law. The town’s share of the fines amounted to $110.

1921 Nov 3 – Poppies! “Lest we Forget.”

With the world-wide call to prayer for the disarmament of the Nations, there comes through “The Imperial Order Daughters of Empire” a national call to service. The fingers that were used so long to plying the busy knitting needles are not content to remain idle. There is work yet to be done—great and noble work, and every loyal Canadian must feel it a privilege to share the responsibility which the Daughters of Empire have assumed. The Poppies bloom in Flanders Field over the graves of many an unknown hero, who, when he gave his life for his country, have his all; and somewhere under the British flag his children may be struggling through life without the advantages that would make of them men and women worthy to fill the gaps left by the war. Many an inventive genius, many a brilliant mind may be lost to the wold because of the lack of resources to finance an advanced education.

And herein lies the work of The Daughters of Empire for many future years—to maintain the fund established, by them for enabling the worthy sons and daughters of fallen British soldiers, sailors and aviators, to obtain the best educational advantages the country can afford, thus making of them an asset of which the nation may be proud.

Has any monument so grad yet been erected to the memory of our Canadian heroes?

To keep alive the spirit of patriotism, and inspire the sentiment in the minds of the young, the women of our National Chapter, and all its auxiliaries, have, during the past weeks been engaged in marking “Poppies”, which they expect will be purchased and worn on “Armistice Day” by every loyal British subject. Though it is “Only a scrap of paper” it will be the duty of every parent and teacher in the land to wear one and tell the children the “Old Old Story” of that for which the Poppy stands the story of—

“The day when our hearts were wrung

And our Country’s Banner a half-mast hung

For the loss of our lads in brown

‘Twas a Nation’s grief, but an Empire’s gain

For they fell, that Empire to maintain

And that peace and liberty still might reign

In every man’s home town.

How best can we honor our noble dead—

Can storied marble a halo shed

To glorify Khaki Brown?

No! Let us open the doors of learning wide

To the sons and daughters of those who died

At Ypres and Vimy and Somme’s red tide,

For the sake of their own home town.

And in future years when the mists roll by,

And a world shall ask the reason why

These sleep in Khaki Brown,

Old Time will flutter his hoary wing,

And say in a voice with a gladsome ring,

“They died that a nobler race might spring

From the boys of our own home town.”

1921 Nov 3 – Thieves Enter Tailor’s Shop

Solomon’s tailor shop was entered Sunday night and two pair of pants and a grey jacket taken. Entrance was gained through a window in the rear of the shop. The window was being repaired and had been left unsecured.

1921 Nov 3 – Wife Beater Given Two Months

Edward Radford, a homesteader of the Shergrove district, appeared before magistrate Rheaume at Ste. Rose du Lac, on Saturday, October 29th, charged with beating his wife. He was found guilty and sentenced to two months in the Dauphin jail at hard labor.

1921 Nov 3 – Winnipegosis

The hatchery boat is now bringing in the roughfish which were caught while taking spawn.

Messrs. Toye, McDonald, Joe Bickel, Shears, Ketcheson, Sieffert, Denby, Brown, and Giggins attended the Union government convention at Dauphin, when Robert Cruise was again nominated as a government supporter.

A community club is being formed at this point, under the direction of Mr. Shears. Singing will be taken up as one of the first features of the winter’s programme.

Coroner’s juries do some funny things. In his evidence at the inquest of Duncan Crerar, Dr. Bottomley gave it as his opinion that deceased came to his death as a result of apoplexy. Yet in the face of this evidence the jury brought in a verdict that death was due to his being thrown out of a wagon, due to deceased’s horses running away.

Mrs. Theo. Johnson returned to town on Tuesday, from Dauphin. She shortly leaves for Fort William, where she will spend the winter.

The politicians are beginning to get busy. Handshaking has started, but the campaign cigar has not yet made its appearance.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 29, 1920

G.W.V.A.

We regret to learn that Comrade Roy Armstrong has resigned the secretaryship of the association. His work with the soldier settlement board as supervisor takes him away from town so much he could not attend to the duties.
Comrade Bates was in the city last attending a meeting of the executive of the provincial command when a lot of routine work was put through.
A number of returned boys are looking for homestead and soldier grant lands these days and the country south of Dauphin Lake will be well taken up this spring and a large amount of breaking will be done if we only get the right weather from now on. The rooms are proving of great service to these men.
We are sorry to learn that a great number of the soldier settlers lost a large amount of stock on account of the hard winter and the shortage of feed.
At a meeting of the executive Comrade E.C. Batty was asked to act as secretary-treasurer for the local branch of the association to fill in the term of Comrade R. Armstrong, who has resigned. Comrade Batty has agreed to fill the breach.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary held a very successful dance on Friday last. The ladies are doing good work and same is appreciated by the association.
Returned men should note that school lands are now open for soldier settlement, and any returned man may apply for an examination and estimation on any particular parcel.
Capt. Scrase has gone to Banff to take treatment and it is hoped by all the comrades that he will greatly benefit and will return to Dauphin fully restored to good heath.
Comrades Lys and Armstrong are waiting on the roads to dry up till they try out their Henry Fords. Watch for smoke when Hugh gets at the wheel.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 12th inst., all members being present. He minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Bank of Nova Scotia, re line of credit; The C.N. Town Properties, re roadway; the Dept. of Education; the H.B. Co.’s, re road divergence, 3-3-16, and the Provincial Board of Health, re district nurse.
Yakavanka-Panageika — That the clerk write the municipalities of Ethelbert and Winnipegosis and ask if they will cooperate with this municipality in the matter of a district nurse.
Marcroft-Thorsteinson — That the discount and penalty, amounting to $9.14 against the s.w. 13-41-19, be cancelled.
Hunt-Yakavanka — That the account of Peter Drainian for delivering [pilng] at Fork River, $11.40, be paid.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the action of the committee on seed grain in securing wheat, barley and flax be endorsed, and that the two samples of oats now sown are satisfactory.
Hunt-Marcroft — That the gravel which will be required for the foundation of the soldiers’ monument be procured at once and that the matter be placed in the hands of the reeve.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the secretary write the returned soldiers’ committee thanking the organization for its kind appreciation of the council’s action regarding the mater of a monument in memory of the fallen soldiers.
Hunt-Marcoft — That the services of an engineer be procured to lay out certain roads throughput the municipality and giving an estimate of the cost. This with a view to borrowing money by the issue of debentures for the building of such roads.
Marcroft-Yakavanka — That the clerk ask for tenders for the peeling of the timber now in the municipal yard. Tenders to be received up to April 30th, and that the reeve and clerk be a committee to deal with the matter.
Hunt-Marcroft – That Robert Allen be employed to run the road engine for the season of 1920, and that his remuneration be $1 an hour.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the clerk ask for applications for man to run grader for the season of 1920.
Yakavanka-Namaka — That the declaration of the reeve $23.60, and Coun. Marcroft, $12.70, for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Hunt-Yakavanka — That Coun. Marcroft be authorized to call for tenders for the building of a bridge, 20 feet, on road allowance east of 34-31-19.
Panageika-Yakavanka — That a grant of $25 be made to the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ club for the year 1919.
The accounts as recommended by the finance committee were ordered paid.
Marcorft-Thorsteinson — hat the reeve, clerk and Coun. Hunt be a committee to look for suitable sites for the soldiers’ memorial.
By-laws were passed authorizing the purchase of seed grain and cancelling soldiers’ taxes.

Ethelbert

The meetings took place on Thursday evening of Mr. William S. K[illegible], of Dauphin and Miss Florence J. [illegible], of Ethelbert.
[illegible] Adams, of Winnipegosis, has been appointed registration clerk for the east half of the Ethelbert constituency, and [illegible] Skaife, of Ethelbert, has been appointed registration clerk for the west half.

Winnipegosis

The Dramatic society have two performances of “The Private Secretary” last week. Mr. Shears in the title part was very good indeed. We did not know he could be so funny. Mr. Lamont as the Uncle from India was excellent; his acting was perfectly smooth and full of life. A new addition to the society was r. D.C. Brown, of the Bank of Nova Scotia here. He had an easy stage presence on the whole and a good voice. Our old friend Mr. Wilis is getting into a habit of trotting about too much. He is an old favorite and we don’t want to see him acquiring bad habits. The ladies all did well. Mrs. Shears’ voice was all it should have been in calling upon the spirits for a sign. Miss McMartin, as the daughter of the house and Miss Leith McMartin, as the widowed landlady, were both good. Miss Woodiow, who possess a striking beauty, was a most charming little girl on the stage n her flame colored dress. The make-ups were all good, some of them exceptionally so. Mr. Ketcheson, as the tailor, was very good indeed also Mr. Roberts.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 3, 1919

Case Transferred to Winnipeg

The case of the Armstrong Trading Co. vs. J.P. Grenon and J. McInnes, which was among the list of King’s Bench cases here, has been transferred to Winnipeg. This has been done for the benefit of the counsel who are all Winnipeg residents. The case starts today (Thursday).

Great War Veterans Hold Big Celebration

Fortune smiled on the Great War Veterans on Tuesday. Their first celebration was a splendid success viewed from all standpoints. The weather was ideal, and the crowds the largest that ever visited the town. Between four and five thousand people were on the Exhibition grounds in the afternoon. There was not a hitch to mark the day’s program.
The parade in the morning attracted much attention and favorable comment was heard on all sides on the many and varied representations in the line of march. There were cars decorated with flags without number, and it appeared as if every boy and girl in the town carried the colors.

Verdict for Mrs. Haley

Mrs. Jos. Haley has secured a verdict for $10,000 in the count at Saskatoon against the Canadian National Railway for the death of her husband. Joseph Haley was killed at Hawke’s spur, a mile west of Hudson’s Bay Junction in the fall of 1918 by being caught between a loading platform and a freight car. Action was instituted in the province of Saskatchewan owing to the accident having occurred there. The case came to trial at Saskatoon on June 25th, when judgment was given for $10,000. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented the plaintiff.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, June 10th, Coun. Yakavanka absent. The minutes of last meeting were read and adopted.
Communication were read from the solicitor re Bowlen judgment; Fred Wenger, account against ward 2; the teacher of South Bay S.D.; W.H. Paulson re taxes; three applications for the position of road commissioner; Bank of Nova Scotia re line of credit; Dept. of Public Works re road across 3-31-18; Geo. Lvon re wood on road; the estimates of Mossey River S.D., and a largely signed petition from ratepayers in south-east corner of the municipality and Lawrence municipality praying for a road on boundary line.
Hunt-Namaka – That a grant of $250 be made to the Fork River agricultural society.
Marcroft-Paddock – That after hearing the circumstances the taxes on the se 2-31-19 be allowed to stand over till the coming December, and that the penalty on them be cancelled.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $150 be made to the Returned Soldiers’ committee for the purpose of giving a banquet to returned soldiers.
Marcroft-Reid – That the secretary obtain designs of monuments from the different marble works with a view to erecting a monument to the memory of all Mossey River soldiers who were killed in the war.
Marcroft-Namaka – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be a committee to select, stake out and authorize the use of a nuisance ground for Fork River.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $10 be made to the South Bay Boys and Girls’ club.
Hunt-Namaka – That a special meeting of the council be held at Fork River on Saturday, June 14th.
Reid-Namaka – That Mrs. Domeric be refunded the taxes of 1918, with the exception of the special school tax.
Reid-Namaka – That the reeve and sec.-treasurer be a committee to deal with matters regarding the council chamber at Winnipegosis.
Marcroft-Namaka – That the account of Coun. Reid ($22) for letting and inspecting work be printed.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the auditor’s report be printed.
Reid-Namaka – That the accounts of the meeting of Jan. 7th, March 5th, and those of today, as recommended by the finance committee, be passed.
Bylaws were employing the collector at $5 per day when instructed to go out by the reeve and sec.-treasurer, appointing James Bickle road commissioner, and repealing the bylaw making the councilors road commissioners. Also authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of Mossey River School District, No. 999, on a $12,000 debenture bylaw.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

A gang of men are engaged building a new elevator. This will make the second elevator at this point.
Gus. Andrus, Jim Parker and G. Lacey have invested in tractors and are busy turning over the soil.
The heavy rain of Saturday gave the hand a good soaking and the crops are greatly befitted by it.

Mossey River School Report

The following is a list of pupils who were successful in the recent mid-summer exams:
Grade VII—Honors; Bob Williams. Pass; Ben Shuchett.
Grade VI—Nathan Shuchett, David Nowasod.
Grade V—Honors; Arthur Jamieson.
Grade IV—Mildred Carlson, Amos Carlson, Bill Williams, Sofie Beyko.
Grade III—Goldie Shuchett, Edna Hafenbrak, Earnest Hafenbrak, Donald McEachern, Tony Beyko.
Grade II—Birdie Stonehouse, Roy Dewbury, Allie Dewbury, Steve Nowasod, Jack Puchaylo.
Grade I sr—Kate Williams, Milo Carlson, Peter Zerba.
Class A—Clarice Carlson, Mary Stefishon, Tommy Hafenbrak, Cornie Chipley.
Gertrude M. Cooper, teacher.

Winnipegosis Public Schools

Grade IV to Grade V—Honors; Theary Frederickson, Benjamin Ketcheson, Lawrence Marchenaki. Pass; Gladys Cartwright, Jos. Mikit, Clara Hubble, Alexina Dumas, Charlie Adam, Mary Langlois, Harry Whale, Muriel Snelgrove, Rae Spence.
Primary to Grade II—Pass; Olive Shears, Vera Wills, Christine Schaldemose, Glen Dunby, Marie Loire, Hugh Johnson, Elizabeth Bradbury, Brynhildur Bjornsson, Grace Campbell, Bert Hubble, Chas. Spence, Harriet McLeod, Paul Lemchuk.
T. Tozer, Teacher.

Grade IV jr. to Grade IV sr.—Honors: John Marchenski, Rose McAuley. Pass: Agnes Burrell, Mary Chermak, Margaret Sanderson, M. Mapes, Albert Dumas, Sarah Klyne, Mary Richard, Donald McAuley, Violet Groff, Wm. Mapes, Olivina Langlois, Blennie St. Matt, Jessie Paddock, Jas. Richard, Hilliard Denby, Beverley Scchaldemose.
Grade III to Grade IV—Pass: Jos. Ponliot, Daisy Walmsley, Frank Wallace, Myrtle Snelgrove, Lawrence McDonell, Martha Sanderson, Wall. Pouliot, Ralph McAuley.
Following is a list, in order of merit, of successful pupils in the recent yearly examinations in Winnipegosis public schools:
Grade VII to Grade VIII—Pass: Tina Marchenski, Margaret Robinson, Ernest Needham.
Grade VI to Grade VII—Honors: Margaret Magnusson, James Brown, Kathleen Dempsey, Margaret McAuley, Charlotte Bradley. Pass: Paul Rudiak, Grace Whale, Cecil Paddock, Frank Needham.
Conditional—Alice Mapes, Harvey McAuley.
Grade V to VI—Honors: Mary Marcuenski, Evelyn Groff, Svava Frederickson, Charlotte Adam, Addie Ketcheson, Gordon Rognvaldson, Edith Hubble. Pass: Muriel Burrell, Annie Denby, Archie McLellan, Amelia Adam, Hjalmtyr Thorarinsson, Jos. Schaldemose.
Grade V Jr. to Grade V Sr—Honors: Leo Magnusson. Pass: Harvey Grenon, Verna Denby, Esther Hechter, Evolda Whale, Felix Magnusson, Gifford Campbell, George Campbell.
M. McMartin, Teacher.
Leith McMartin, Teacher.

Grade II to Grade III—Honors; Fred Magnusson, Jennie Ogryzlo, Margaret McLellan, Annie Dubinak, Stearnie Fredrickson, Stephen Zawrich, Alvina St. Godard, Sarah Alex, Mary Lyons, Myrtle Clarkson, Roderick St. Matt, Jos. Hechter, Mark Brown, Annie Zuk, Alex Klyne, Uric Lavergna. Pass; Wm. Wallock, D’Elroy Pouliot, Medos Langlois, Wm. Flamand.
Conditional: Ernest Seiffert, Bruce McAuley, Florence Paddock.
Grade I to Grade II—Honors: Viva Burrill, Lilian Bilenduke, Mary Kruchek, Donald Morris, Iva Whale, Vera Rognvaldson, Dolly Morris, Annie Marchenski, Armand Langlois, Nora Demery, Keitcha Snelgrove. Pass; Chas. Kachoe, Roderick Klyne, Dan McKay, Stephen Ogryzlo, John Semchuk, Fred St. Matt, Jos. Vermette, Helen Fiddler.
L. Levites, Teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 3, 1919

Reception to Major Barker

Major W.G. Barker, V.C., D.S.., M.C., has been granted three months leave of absence to visit his home and is expected to arrive within the next two weeks. Winnipeg will tender him a civic reception.
Dauphin will also tender Major Baker a right royal reception, the details of which will be announced later.

Winnipegosis

At a meeting of the Dramatic Society held at the home of Mr. F.G. Shears, the profit and loss statement of the play, “The Arrival of Kitty,” was discussed. It was agreed that of the surplus from the play $25 should be given to the Red Cross, the balance, $5.58 being held as a working fund for future productions. The society then dissolved, with a view to reorganization on a wider and more democratic basis. Discussion resulted in the following findings: Mr. Shears was appointed president, Mr. Ketcheson vice and Mr. Campbell, sec.-treasurer. It was further decided to open the society to all persons interested in the drama, such persons to become members on payment of an annual membership fee of 50 cents. Mr. T. Needham, Mr. Jack Denby, Miss McMartin, Mrs. Giggins and Mr. Ketcheson were formed into a committee to obtain new members. A committee to search for suitable plays and people to act them, was formed of Mr. Wills, Mrs. Shears, Mr. Campbell, Mrs. St. Amour and Mrs. Giggins. Some further detail business was transacted and the new society well and very favorably launched. The first production will be put in hand immediately and produced in about two months.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 28 – 1912

1912 Nov 28 – Fork River

The annual meeting of Mossey River School, No. 999 will be held at D.F. Wilson’s office on Monday, Dec. 2nd at 10 o’clock, for the closing of the year’s business and electing a trustee.
C. Clark spend Sunday at Dauphin among friends.
Rec. H.H. Scrase returned from a few days visit among his parishioners at Winnipegosis.
Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, accountant for the A.T. Co., spent a short time at the Co.’s store on business.
Several of our citizens collapsed the other morning and on investigating it was caused by trying to meet the train which arrived five minutes ahead of time from Dauphin, which was an unheard of thing before in this burgh. We trust they will keep it up instead of keeping the farmers in the cold two or three hours every day as heretofore.
Mr. Darroch, of Dauphin, was here for a short time on business.
Miss Olive Clark left for a short vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Mrs. Humpherys and family, of Dauphin, are staying at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson. They have the sympathy of the people of this community in their said bereavement in the death of Mr. Humphreys, who was held in ugh esteem in by all who knew him here.
Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, attended a hurried call to the home of Willis Miller of Mowat and we are pleased to hear Mrs. Miller is improving. The Dr. is under the impression that paying a night call over the new grade on the south road is equal to passing through a cyclone. As Dunk is used to travelling the north road and did not put the break on in time, things were well shaken before taken according to prescription for one.
The Orangemen of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, will have a grand masquerade ball on Dec. 13th, in the hall. Grand march at 9 o’clock. Supper provided. Admission tickets, gentlemen $1.00. Everybody welcome.
Nomination for reeve and councillors for the year 1913 will be held in the Municipal hall, Winnipegosis, on Tuesday, Dec. 3rd, between the hours of one and two, for Mossey River Municipality.

1912 Nov 28 – Sifton

The late fine weather has done much to help out conditions in this part of the country. Many farmers now have all the feed they will require.
From present indications it looks as if the output of wood this winter is going to be large.
General regret is felt here at the departure of Coun. Ogryslo for Dauphin. He’s a good councillor and a good fellow.
The question now is frequently asked, “Who is going to be our new councillor?” The names heard mentioned are John Kennedy, P. Wood and several of our prominent Galician residents. We hope it will be a good man as there is much work to do in Ward 6 the coming year.
With the crop not as good as usual the lower price of grain is more severely felt. It is becoming to be generally regarded that mixed farming is the sure and safe way to succeed. Batter, eggs and livestock find a good market all the time.
$1.00 pays for the Herald from now until the end of Dec. 1913.

1912 Nov 28 – Winnipegosis

The Christian League topic for this week is given out as “Anticipation.” A correspondent deems it permissible to remark, that, if it would retrace its steps and board the public it would perhaps more quickly realize its object and be in less danger of being overtaken by the ego.
The Card Circle last week entertained a guest, Mr. Wilson, of the Western Fancy Goody Co., who was delayed in town. Clem Bradley was somewhat consoled for his recent unlucky play in Dauphin, by winning fat prize in the first home game.
The entertainment intended to be given by the W.A. on the 6th. Dec. has to be postponed till the 20th, owing to the advent of a moving picture company for the first week of December, and a masquerade ball to be held in Fork River on the 13th.
The teachers are to attend the Dauphin convention, and Mrs. Ketcheson and Miss Bardley will ail themselves of a holiday in good company.
The school being closed for a week gives the children a chance of revelling in pond skating though minus 5 (sense).
The lake is new frozen over.
Miss Evelyn Burrell, who has been quite ill from the effects of a severe cold is able to be up again, but is still under the doctor’s case.
J.P. Grenon has returned.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 24 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 24 – Typhoid Fever Outbreak

Typhoid fever has broken out among the school children at Winnipegosis and the school has been closed.

1912 Oct 24 – Fork River

J.H. Martinson, of Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, real estate agent, was here on business last week.
Alex. Cameron, of Mowat Centre, was a visitor to Dauphin on business a few days ago.
Mr. Sturdy, who has been all summer at the A.T. Co. store at Winnipegosis, is assisting Mr. Kennedy in the store here now.
Samuel Reid, returned home after a week’s holiday with friends at Brandon.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family spent a few days in Dauphin lately with friends.
J. Parker, of the Stark farm, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Captain Russell, of Sifton, was a visitor at D. Kennedy’s lately.
Miss Comber returned home after spending the summer at Selkirk.
Mr. Silverwood, of Dauphin, was in town for a short stay the guest of Wm. Williams, lumber merchant.
George Sumpton, of Dauphin, is here for a short stay with Mr. Snelgrove.
The railway traffic is getting so heavy on this line that it takes two locomotives to handle a train, especially when they take the side track for it.
The Press of October 17th refers to Macdonald election as a “Howling Farce” and has not got sand enough to print the exact majority.
F. Champion, of Cleveland, England, was here a few days ago in connection with a business transactions.
Harvest festival service at All Saints’ will be held in the church at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon, Oct. 27th.

1918 Oct 24 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Lloyd Winters, Ashville, killed in action. (Lloyd Levi Winters, 1896, 2129348)
Lieut. Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, killed. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Arthur Day, Dauphin, gassed and wounded. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
Pte. J.W. Lane, Dauphin, wounded. (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
Pte. Go.F. King, Dauphin, wounded. (George Francis King, 1891, 151775)
Pte. W.K. Goodman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Wilbert Karl Goodman, 1894, 294203)
Pte. W.J. Bothwell, Makinak, wounded. (Wilfred James Bothwell, 1899, 2184456)
Pte. L. Ward, Grandview, wounded. (Lewis Ward, 1896, 2129152)
Pte. J. Lahaie, Makinak, wounded. (Joseph Lahaie, 1889, 291727)
Lance Corp. D. Stewart, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. E.L. Abrey, Dauphin, wounded. (Ernest Lincoln Abrey, 1889, 865837)
Pte. C.A. Blackmon, Ochre River, wounded. (Charles Alexander Blackmon, 1897, 1001157)

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair was held on Oct. 10th. The weather was perfect but this militated against the attendance for threshing was going on. The attendance of children was good, still some of the schools were very poorly represented owing to the rush of work on the farms. The lack of teachers for some of the schools and the many changes in teachers in others, was a serious handicap to the welfare of the club during the past years.
Lawrence Rowe won the Bank of Commerce prize for the vest pair of pigs at either the Fork River or Winnipegosis fairs, with a very creditable pair of Yorkshires.
It is to be hoped that the club will receive greeter interest from the parents in the coming year and so encourage the children in this work.

PRIZE LIST.
The following is a list of prize winners at the fair:
Grain growing:
Wheat sheaf – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Wheat, 20 lbs – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Rye sheaf – Albert Janowski 1st.

Stock, Calves:
Dairy – Donald McEachern 1st, Arthur Jamieson 2nd, Dave Nowosad 3rd.

Calves:
Beef – Bob Williams 1st, Kate Williams 2nd, Steve Beyko 3rd, Bill Williams 4th.

Pigs:
Pair – Lawrie Rowe 1st, Alice Nowosad 2nd.

Poultry:
Pen of Barred Rocks (3) – Kate Williams 1st, Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Pen Buff Orpingtons – Dave Nowosad 1st, Stanley Lundy 2nd.
Pen White Leghorns – Stanley Benner.
Pen Black Minorcas – Mike Borowski 1st, Bob Williams 2nd.
Pen Brown Leghorns – Bill Williams 1st.
Pen White Rocks – Arthur Jamieson 1st.

Gardening: Half bushel potatoes – Rosie Sowenski 1st, Alex. Zaplitney 2nd, Nicola Poctylo 3rd, Annie Sowinski 4th.
Six carrots – Charlie Jager 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Lawrie Rowe 3rd.
Six turnips – Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Six beets – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Two cabbages – Annie Beyko 1st, Mike Borowski 2nd, Charlie Jager 3rd.
Pumpkins – Nellie Kolokicvk 1st.
Onions – Alice Nowosad 1st, Charlie Jager 2nd.

Cooker:
Loaf of bread – Viola Rower 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Buns – Viola Rowe 1st.

Sewing – Viola Rowe 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Patching – Viola Rowe 1st, Emily Strasdin 2nd.
Fancy work – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Canning – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Longest ??? thistle root – Peter Zaplitney 1st, Fred Jager 2nd.
Woodwork – Bob Williams 1st, Dave Nowosad 2nd, Belle Williams 3rd.
Ducks – Sophie Beyko 1st.
Butter – Rosie Sowskine 1st, Mary Mieke 2nd.
Knitting – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Scribblers – Yumtaska 1st, Annie Chornoboy 2nd, Nellie Karwstski 3rd.

Writing:
Grade I – Horace Thompson 1st, Clara Dewberry 2nd.
Grade II – Ivor Humphreys 1st, Alley Dewberry 2nd.
Grade III – Bernard Hunt 1st, Lulu Thompson 2nd, Golkie Schuchett 3rd.
Map of Manitoba – Dave Nowosad 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Arthur Jamieson 3rd.

Handwork:
Grade I – Mossey School.
Grade II – Mossey School.
Nature Book – Beatrice Rowe 1st.
Collection of butterflies – Irene Bailey 1st.

1918 Oct 24 – Winnipegosis Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Boys’ and Girls’ Cub Fair was held at Winnipegosis on Friday, Oct. 11th. This was the fist event of the kind ever held in this locality and thanks to the efforts of the public school teachers, was a decided success. Keen interest was displayed by the residents of South Bay, and a large number were on hand to view the fair.
The judges were Miss Speechley and Mr. Murray, of the Extension Department of the M.A.C.
The sewing exhibit, largely due to the efforts of Miss M. McMartin, was a credit to Winnipegosis schools. The chickens were good, as were also the display of vegetables. With a greater interest taken by the surrounding schools we hope to double or treble our entries another year.
The secretary and organizer was Mr. H.L. Williams, public school principal.

PRIZE LIST.
Class I: Pair of pigs – Harry Whale 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Single pig – Wallie Pouliet 1st, Evelyn Groff 2nd, Harry Whale 3rd, Gordon Rognvaldson 4th.
Class II, Chicken Raising: Pen of 3 Barred Rocks – Walter Keen, South Bay, 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd, Wilfred Moyer, South Bay, 3rd, Ignace Bobinsky, South Bay, 4th, Mike Samimski, South Bay, 5th, Anthony Bobinsky, South Bay, 6th.
Pen of 3, any other breed – Daisy Walmsley 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Class III, Gardening: One dozen potatoes – Beverly Schaldemose 1st, Elizabeth Moyer, South Bay, 2nd, Ruth Groff 3rd, Evelyn Groff 4th, Mike Verchaski 5th, Gladys Cartwright 6th.
Dozen large onions or 3 large turnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, Elizabeth Moyer 4th.
Dozen parsnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd.
Dozen carrots or beets – Mary Marchenski 1st, Mike Samimski 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, John Moodry 4th, Elizabeth Moyer 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Class IV, Cooking: Two loaves of bread – Lottie Moore 1st, Attie Hechter 2nd.
Dozen oatmeal cookies – Margaret McAuley 1st, Lottie Moore 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd, Alice Hechter 4th.
Dozen cornmeal muffins – Ruth Groff 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Lottie Moore 3rd.
Class V, Sewing: Work bag – Mary Magnuson 1st, Ester Hechter 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd.
Knitted article – Cecil Paddock 1st, Mary Marchinski 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Evolda Whale 4th.
Sewing apron – Mary Magnuson 1st, Verna Denby 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Esther Hechter 4th, Evolda Whale 5th, Charlotte Adam 6th.
Red Cross Collection – Evolda Whale 1st, Mary Magnuson 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Charlotte Adam 4th, Addie Ketcheson 5th.
Night gown or tea apron – Charlotte Adam 1st, Addie Ketcheson 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Amelia Adam 4th.
Table runner – Helen Macaulay 1st, Lenore Denby 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Dust cap and work apron – Lenore Denby 1st, Tina Marchenski 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Piece of crochet work – Attie Hechter 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Lenore Sehaldemose 4th, Mary Marchenski 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Two Red Cross articles – Lenore Sehaldemose 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Ruth Groff 4th.
Middy suit – Lottie Moore 1st, Lenore Sehaldemose 2nd.
Class VII, Weed Contest: Collection of seeds of 10 noxious weeds – Ignace Bobinsky 1st, Mary Fleming 2nd, Ella Martin 3rd, Arthur McLellan 4th.
Class VIII, Woodwork Contest – Stanley Miket 1st, John Wallace 2nd, Nieh Rudiak 3rd, Alec. Ogryzlo 4th.

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River

Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, spent the week-end with his parents.
There was a very good turnout to the Thanksgiving service on Sunday.
Mr. Fred Tilt is building a house next to the Orange Hall. He has retired from farming and will reside in town.
Dunc Kennedy and party from Ochre River passed through the town on Sunday on their way to Winnipegosis.
Pte. Venables, who has just returned from overseas, is visiting his brother, T.B. Venables.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ Church and the attendance was good. It is hopeful sign when interest is taken in our young people.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 22 – 1914

1914 Oct 22 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughter, are spending a few days in Winnipeg with friends.
Miss Gertrude Cooper spent the week-end with her parents and returned to Dauphin on Monday.
Mrs. I. Humphreys has left for a few days visit to Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin. They were accompanied by Mrs. W. Johnston, of Fork William.
Mrs. W. Davis’ sale on Thursday, was a very successful one. Dan Hamilton, of Dauphin, wielded he hammer and good prices were realized on everything put up, particularly his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Joe Johnston, of Fort William, is spending a few days here visiting his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end here with Miss Gertrude Bradley, teacher of Mossey River School.
The mayor and alderman of Winnipegosis, were visitors to this burgh one day last week.
Mr. Simpson, of Winnipeg, was here lately paying the money for work done in this municipality. The Armstrong Trading Co.’s store was used as a paying office.
The first dance of the season came off in the Orange Hall on Friday last. It was well attended and all had an enjoyable time.
Alex. Cameron returned on Wednesday from a business trip to Dauphin.

1914 Oct 22 – Winnipegosis

Our town is again assuming the even tenor of its way now that many of the fishermen are at the north end of the lake.
Mrs. P. McArthur has gone to the Pas to visit her daughter.
Inspector James made an inspection of the post office here last week. He stated that Postmaster Ketcheson had everything in good order.
J.W. McAuley took a carload of cattle to Winnipeg a few days ago.
Coun. F. Hechter was a Dauphin visitor in the early part of the week.
It is learned that there is every prospect of the township of swamp lads on the west of the town being thrown open for homesteading. Should the Dept. of the Interior consent to do this it will do much to help the development of the town. The land is good and with thrifty settlers on it would yield prolifle crops.
Mrs. W. Johnston has returned from Dauphin.
The sensation of late was the arrest of the man who had charge of the dredge here during the summer. He pleaded guilty and was let off on suspended sentence by the police magistrate at Winnipeg. It is learned that when the total of the goods taken was summed up to amounted to a large sum. The question now comes up, who was it that squealed, and did the squealer participate in the spoils. Yes, there is going to be further developments and one sensation is likely to follow another.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 23 – 1912

1912 May 23 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 23 – Mail Robbery
Mail Bag Disappears Between Fork River and Sifton
Contains Much Money

A few days ago the postmaster at Fork River, D. Kennedy, gave the mail bag from that point to one of the C.N.R. brakeman on the train on that particular day. This man acknowledges receipt of the bag and states that he placed it in the car in the usual way. It may be stated that there is no mail clerk on the Dauphin-Winnipegosis trains and the mail pouches along the line are taken in charge by the railway employees. This necessarily involves much risk to the bags as the employees are engaged at each station for a considerable time in switching and performing other duties.
The bag in question was not missed until Dauphin was reached and a search made for it when it was found to have disappeared. The postoffice authorities at Winnipeg were at once apprised of the matter and Inspector Hicks sent to investigate. He was here on Tuesday and looked into the matter without being able to solve it. Later, however, two special service men were put on the case and developments are expected.
The theory advanced is that the bad disappeared at Sifton.
The registered mail was particularly heavy on this day and besides cheques and money orders there were several hundred dollars in cash.

1912 May 23 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 23 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 23 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 16 – 1912

1912 May 16 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 16 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 16 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 16 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 25 – 1912

1912 Apr 25 – Postmaster Resigned

Mr. Collison, postmaster at Winnipegosis, has tendered his resignation and will cease his labors on May 1st. It is understood that Walter Ketcheson will receive this appointment.
Mr. Collison has also resigned as Fishery Inspector In connection with this appointment the name of A. Parker is prominently mentioned.

1912 Apr 25 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Williams is spending a few days in Dauphin visiting friends.
Will the Winnipegosis fellow who borrowed the crank off the jigger kindly settle up as it so used to a crank that it will not very will run without a crank.
Lance Tilt who has been laid up with inflammatory rheumatism, returned home from Montana, after an absence of four years. We trust the change will be beneficial.
Miss Eva Storrar is visiting in Dauphin this week.
Mrs. G. Shannon has been very sick. Her numerous friends will be pleased to learn she is recovering.
F.B. Lacey, postmaster general of Oak Brae, returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. G. Tilt, who has been spending a few days on the farm, returned to Dauphin on Saturday. We are always pleased with a visit from Nurse Tilt.
Just as we were thinking of taking another week off, our Mowat friend in the Press puts in his oar, and we know he will take offence at the scribe if he was overlooked. It is very good of him to admit the scribe only gets made sometimes. we have nothing but pity for our friend as we are aware his complaint is chronic and he cannot help it. He goes on to state the scribe can’t get the job of removing the nuisance at Oak Brae. We are not anxious to remove him. We were just making a deal for the purchase of a certain kind of spreader when our attention was called to his ravings. If the deal goes through we may come up some time and attend to the nuisance as it is said: The man that maketh two blades of grass grow where only one grew before, He is a greater benefactor to the world at large. So cheer up my Mowat friend you will then be of more use to the future generation than you have been in the past. And you say in the meantime the (nuisance) will be put on ice to await our arrival. Foolish man, try saltpetre. I am afraid you are too far gone for either saltpetre or ice to ??? you now that the hot weather is coming on. Take the scribe’s advice and plant your onion patch, or we might get made and then there will be wig on the green for sure. As we sympathize with the Press, after congratulating themselves on getting rid of one Jackass to put up with another “Oak Braying” around them.
We are sorry to hear of Mrs. Condon’s death at Mowat. She had been sick for sometime and the family have the sympathy of the people of this district.
Sydney Howlett who has been living here the last four years, moved out east to his homestead and in taking the last load his team of horses broke through the ice and were drowned. Hard luck. Duncan Kennedy has started a subscription list to help towards paying for another team.

1912 Apr 25 – Sifton

Seeding has commenced and will be rushed if the weather keeps fine.
Paul Wood, one of our old-timers, has sold his property in town and three-quarter sections to two monks of the Greek Orthodox Church. The price, it is understood, was about $10 000.
Wm. Barrie was a visitor to Dauphin on Monday.
The foreigners are fast buying up all the property and business enterprises of the English speaking people. another deal is likely to take place shortly.
A little work, or if you like, a little more work on the roads in this vicinity would be to our great benefit.
Thos. Ramsey lost a nice team of ponies this week by the animals straying away. We hope he finds them.
The Herald is gaining in popularity in this district. It is a bright paper.

1912 Apr 25 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd went to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Fred E. McDonald is taking in Dauphin this week.
Jackfish and pickerel are numerous in the small streams.
It is reported that Mart Collison has resigned both his government jobs and is leaving this burg for Edmonton. He is one of the old-timers and is widely known.
Who will be the new postmaster? Will Walter Ketch the job?
Another meeting of the citizens was held on Monday to further discuss the organization of a Board of Trade and place before the people the advantages of our progressive little town. Satisfactory progress is being made with the work. Winnipegosis will go forward once our town is better known.
Building promises to be lively in our little burg this season. Among the large buildings contemplated is a $12 000 store for the Armstrong Trading Co., to be located on property alongside the Winnipegosis hotel.
Mrs. Johnson took young Johnny Dilworth to Dauphin Hospital on Saturday night. The little fellow was successfully operated on for appendicitis and is recovering.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 16 – 1914

1914 Apr 16 – Chas. Best Hanged Himself

Charles Best, aged 47, and one of the first settlers on the Gilbert Plains, committed suicide on Friday by hanging himself to a brace in the granary. Deceased has been of unsound mind for the past two years, only having come home from the asylum about two weeks ago. He leaves a wife, six sons and three daughters, the eldest about 18 years old.
Deceased was well-known in Dauphin, having hauled grain to the market for several years in the early days.

1914 Apr 16 – Fork River

C. Clark of Paswegan, Sask., after spending a few days among his numerous friends at this point left for home. He was one of the old-timers, living here for ten years. He says he would rather live in Manitoba.
Professor Robinson is busy these days and intends trying farming for a little recreation as he states the bottom has fallen out of the fishing “biz”. The other fellow, he says, gets the wad. Try mushrooms, Jack.
J.G. Lockhart has returned from a trip to the east and intends investing heavily in real estate, etc.
Our Scotch friends seem to be taking alternate trips to the Lake Town. What will be the outcome we are not sure, as it’s neither sleighing or wheeling and there is too much wind for wings. Still, where there is a will there is always a way.
The Rev. Canon Jeffery, of Winnipeg, will hold Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, April 10th at 3 p.m.
Mrs. J.D. McAulay, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, arrived with his bride and is spending the Easter holidays with his parents on the Mossey. Frank is one of the boys we are always pleased to see and we with him much happiness and prosperity.
At a meeting of the Horse Breeders’ Association on the 7th it was decided to disband the majority being of the opinion it was cheaper to breed scrubs for another year. We don’t hesitate to say the farmers have made the mistake of their lives. It takes backbone and money, sure, but it has to be undertaken sooner or later. We will have to let the groomers set back if we ever intend raising saleable horses, or, for that matter, any other kind of good stock.
Mrs. J. Rice is off to Dauphin for a few days holidays.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending the Easter holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mrs. Humphreys has returned from a visit to Dauphin.

1914 Apr 16 – Winnipegosis

We are all turning our thought to spring when the lake will be open and the beats skinning the water.
The river is open.
R. Burrell has opened a restaurant in the Cohen block.
Dwellings are scarce and rooming quarters hard to get. This would indicate our little burgh is fording ahead.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley are spending a few days in Dauphin this week.
Sid Coffey, our moving picture man, visited Dauphin this week. Once Sid completes his new hall the moving picture business will become a permanent feature of the town.
Thorn Johnson has broken his arm again. This is the fourth fracture he has suffered.
John Rogelson is busy overhauling boats.
A number of mink have been added to the animal ranch here.
There was a large delegation from here on Monday to attend the Conservative convention at Gilbert Plains. Among the party were J.P. Grenon, C.I. White, J. Denby, J. Dewhurst, Ed. Morris, Thos. Toye, W. Hunkings, K. McAulay, W. Ketcheson, F.H. Hjaluarson, R. Harrison, Rod Burrell.
Four delegates were also along from Pine River: J. Klyne, W. Gobson, G. Pangman, and W. Campbell.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 3 – 1913

1913 Apr 3 – Nellie McClung Recitals

Mrs. Nellie L. McClung, the popular Manitoba novelist, favoured Dauphin with her first visit this week. She came under the auspices of the Presbyterian Ladies’ Aid, and gave two recitals in the town hall on Monday and Tuesday evenings, respectively. Mrs. McClung gave all her numbers from her own books, “Sowing Seeds in Danny,” The Second Chance,” “The Black Creek Stopping House.” The selections contained variety of wholesome humour and pathos. The splendid character of the author is reflected in her works. Each reading had many lessons to teach. One might go as far as to say some of them were sugar coated sermons. The entertainer was assisted by some of our best local talent including Miss Harvely, the ladies’ quartette, Misses Johnston, Gunne, Coutts, and Cadman; the male quartette, Messrs. Park, Argue, Johnston and Stelck; Mrs. Jewsbury, Miss Astley and Mr. Main. On Tuesday evening the McMurray orchestra was in attendance.

1913 Apr 3 – Ethelbert

Mr. Finch, of Minitonas, took the services at the Methodist Church on Easter Sunday, to full congregation. He gave two very instructive sermons, and was very much appreciated.
We had a novel and spirited debate at the church on Friday night, when six debaters dealt with the subject of “Should women be allowed to vote?” Mr. McPhedran, Mrs. Munro and H. Brackman took the affirmative and Mr. Brown, teacher, Cyril Skaife and N. Booth took the negative.
Two men were arrested on Friday night for a savage attack upon one of the councillors named Mandryk. A preliminary trial was held and upon taking the evidence a fresh summon was taken out and the case will be dealt with Thursday, the 3rd inst.
The council intend putting two cells into the lock up of a substantial and safe character like those at Dauphin. We need a good man as constable.

1913 Apr 3 – Fork River

C. Bradley and family, were visitors from the Lake tow at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mrs. McQuigge and family, of Dauphin, returned home from visiting with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper on the Fork.
Miss Alice Godkin and Katie Williams have returned from a short visit to Dauphin.
A car load of young stock were shipped from here by a farmer for his ranch at Lloydminster, Sask.
The elevator has closed down for the season and John Clemens and family left for Dauphin, where they will reside.
Dave Shinks, general manager for the Williams Lumber Co., east of Lake Dauphin, is renewing acquaintances around town this week.
Mrs. Scrase and Mrs. Kennedy and family spent the weekend at Winnipegosis with friends.
Harcourt Benner returned to his duties at Dauphin and his many friends are pleased to hear his vacation here has been beneficial to him. Come again Harcourt.
Mrs. R. McEacheron and son, Donny, returned from a two months visit to friends in Nova Scotia.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held their annual meeting in the church on Wednesday, March 26th. Quite a number were present. The secretary’s and treasurer’s report were received, showing a good year’s work with a cash balance on hand. The officers elected for the coming year are president, Mrs. W. King; vice. Mrs. Lacey, Mowat; secretary, Mrs. H. Scrase; treasurer, Wm. King.
F.B. Lacey, of Oak Brae, who has been under the weather for some time, is getting around again.
Mr. Gordon and family, of Mowat, have left for North Dakota for a change of climate.
Dunk Kennedy paid the lake town a visit on Sunday.
“Say, Mike, some one’s wife got sick, I am told, and they phoned for a doctor and by the time he arrived the baby had grown bald headed and was crying with the toothache.”
“Well, Pat, that shows we are not paying $600 a year for speed. If we are it got miscarried that time.”
“Now, Mike, don’t put your foot into it again. You know that unless you can yell like “Hell-o” they don’t catch on. It’s the fellow at the other end. Wow.”
“Say, Mike, did yees catch on to the way the members of parliament from the different provinces voted on the proposal of the government to build three Dreadnoughts, to be added to the British fleet, pending the formation of Canada’s permanent naval policy? It’s instructive.”
Our readers should note whence came the opposition. The vote against the government’s proposal as the division recorded in Hansard, was made up thus:

Against
Quebec (with 65 members) 44
Prince Edward Island (with 4 members) 2
Nova Scotia (with 18 members) 9
New Brunswick (with 13 members) 5
Saskatchewan (with 10 members) 6
Alberta (with 7 members) 6
Manitoba (with 10 members) 2
British Columbia (with 7 members) 0
Ontario (with 66 members) 11
Total opposition 85

It is not significant that 75 out of 85 members from the province of the United Empire Loyalist (Ontario) supported the measure, while 44 out of 65 from Quebec opposed it? Besides the 44 members from Quebec, at least 9 members from other provinces who voted against the proposal represented French ridings, making a total of 53, so that at the very outside figure only 32 coming from English speaking ridings, out of a total 221 members, tried to force the government to the country. If time were taken to go further into details it could be shown that one-half of these 32 members represented ridings in which there was a considerable sprinkling of French-Canadian and foreigners. So there is every reason for the assertion that the British people of Canada are well content with Borden’s naval.

1913 Apr 3 – Winnipegosis

The Armstrong Trading Co. has purchased and received a car load of horses from Winnipeg which they have deposited on their farm. A chance is open for any one wishing to purchase a good team. The company is preparing to build an addition to their store, also a house on the farm.
Mr. McArthur and daughters are again residents of their home here. We hope Mr. McArthur will soon join hem, fully recovered.
Mr. Scrase and Master Archer visited in town last week, and were the guests of Mrs. Bradley.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and children, of Fork River, are visiting her mother for the week past. Mr. Kennedy joined her on Sunday to avail themselves of a trip to Snake Island with Inspector and Mrs. White.
Mrs. Langlois and sons have gone on a trip to Le Pas to visit friends there.
The Anglican Church entertainment had to be postponed owing to the interest taken in the moving pictures exhibited here the past week and contined this one, which will make it difficult to satisfactorily produce the playette, “When Greek meets Greek” on the 4th as intended. An interesting competition is being held to raise extra church funds. The cigarette quilt won by Mr. Bradley at a raffle recently being the reward.
Messrs. Coffey, Whale, Ketcheson, White and others are attending a meeting of the masonic order this week in Dauphin.
The spring, though tardy, is likely to prove a delightful one at the Lake.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 5 – 1914

1914 Mar 5 – Brattiko Shot Kuzyk

A coroner’s inquest was held on Thursday in the town hall to inquire into the shooting of Mike Kuzyk at Volga, a point 10 miles southeast of Winnipegosis, on Feb. 21st. Dr. Culbertson was the coroner.
The following composed the jury; T. Jordan, D.D. McDonald, W.A. Brinkman, H.G. Hills, S. Vance, J. Blanchflower, E. Webb, Geo. King, foreman.
The evidence of a number of Galicians, including Brattiko himself, was taken. The others heard were Dr. Medd and Constable Hunking, of Winnipegosis.
Brattiko told a rambling story saying that his gun was accidentally discharged and in this way Kuzyk was shot. All circumstances pointed to Brattiko having shot Kuzyk in mistake for a deer. He afterwards admitted he did.
The verdict of the jury was that Kuzyk came to his death by a wound inflicted by a bullet from a rifle in the hands of Nicola Brattiko.
Brattiko was afterwards arrested and appeared before Magistrate Munson on Saturday charged with shooting Kuzyk. After hearing the evidence Brattiko was remanded till Friday, the 6th.
Brattiko is out on bail.

1914 Mar 5 – Killed in Saw Mill

Gilbert Plains, March 2 – An accident at McKendrick’s saw mill, on the Riding Mountain, 21 miles south-east of this town at 5 o’clock on Saturday evening, resulted in the instant death of William Hickle. A young Scotsman, 23 years of age. Something had gone wrong with the cable feed and the engine was slowed down while the men were fixing it. Hickle working up around the saw alone, is suppose to have slipped and fallen with his shoulder against the saw, killing him instantly.

1914 Mar 5 – Fork River

Mrs. J. Parker and daughter are spending a few weeks in Winnipeg.
Gordon Weaver left for the south on important business. We wish him a pleasant trip.
D. Kennedy returned from a short visit to Dauphin, where he attended the Masonic school of instruction.
W. Williams is very busy these days with teams drawing lumber from his limits to his planning mill.
Dr. Gofton, veterinary surgeon, of Dauphin, was here on a professional trip lately.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
J. Angus, of Winnipegosis, was a visitor to this burgh with his dog team. He reports a good trip as the roads are Al. Scotty will vouch for this providing the dogs will keep the road.
Dr. Medd, health officer, was a visitor here this week. Some are still quarantined. It’s better to be sure than sorry.
Ed. Morris, of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend at the home of Fred. King.
Our new settler, Mr. W.I. Brown, is stirring around and getting in shape to start farming in earnest in the spring time.

1914 Mar 5 – Fork River

Thomas Secord, homestead inspector, was here last week inspecting quite a number of claims.
Mr. W. Brown, of Hamilton, Ontario, has purchased the S.E. ¼ of 6-29-17, and intends erecting dwelling house and is bringing his family out shortly.
Nat Little and daughter Miss Grace have returned from a week’s visit in Winnipeg.
Dr. Medd was a visitor here on Saturday on his was from Dauphin.
The storm here on Friday night was the worst experience in years.
I.F. Hafenbrak, Sam Bailey and Wm. King, Country Orange Master, have returned from attending grand lodge meeting in Winnipeg.
D.F. Wilson is away again sporting at the fair at Brandon. “Lucky, Jim, oh, how I envy him.”

1914 Mar 5 – Winnipegosis

Well, this burg is certainly going ahead this spring. Just a few of the things that have happened this week. Sid Coffey bought a lot on Main street from Rod Burrell and is busy hauling material to erect a large theatre. We understand the price paid was a fancy one.
Ed. Cartwright and family of Mafeking, having arrived and are preparing for move in the place he bought from Sid. Coffey.
Wm. Christianson is taking possession of the place he recently purchased from John Seiffert.
Alex Bickle is remodelling his house.
J.O. Grenon has returned from his holiday trip looking the picture of health.
Harry Watson and Jack Angus left on Monday for Dauphin to take in the bonspiel.
Miss Clara Bradley left on Friday for Winnipeg, she intends taking a course in a business college.
Miss Gertie Bradley has arrived home from Brandon.
Miss Jane Paddock is leaving soon for Biggar, Sask., where she was accepted a position.
Miss Hanna Stevenson left last week for Winnipeg.
The curling season being over, the boys are preparing the ice for hockey. We expect they will be trying for the Allan Cup.
A great time is looked for Wednesday night in the Methodist Church. They are giving a box social and concert. A good programme is being prepared.
Postmaster Ketcheson has hone to Dauphin to meet Mrs. Ketcheson, who is retuning from the east.