Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 30, 1919

Can a Doctor Sell Liquor?

Dr. Wilmot, of Roblin, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday, on several charges preferred by the inspector for selling liquor contrary to the provisions of the act. One charge was dismissed and decision reserved in the others.

Chief Little Issues Warning

Young men and boys would be well advised to take warning as regards their conduct on Hallowe’en. Annually there has been a wanton destruction of the citizens’ property by the gangs of organized rowdies. This year steps have been taken by Chief Little and staff to put an end to this class of amusement. All damage done will have to be paid for, as well as the appearance of the parties in court.

Daughters of Empire Rally

The rally of the Daughters of the Empire here on Tuesday, the 28th inst., was largely attended, every Chapter being represented, which included the Pas, Grandview and Gilbert Plains. The meeting was held in the town hall and was presided over by the Rev. J.A. Cormie.
Mrs. Aldridge was the first speaker and she spoke in the interest of the establishment of a hospital for the people of Servia. She related in a pathetic and impressive manner the great sufferings of these people and the heroic way in which they had faced and overcome every difficulty. Mrs. Aldridge spent much time in Servia during the war and incidents she related were from personal experience.

Details of War Memorial

In explaining the war memorial, Mrs. G.H. Smith, National Educational secretary of the order, told the meeting that in detail the plan of the I.O.D.E. is to establish ideals of patriotism and give the children in the schools a truly British education by acquainting them with the ideals, the traditions and the institutions of Britain. Illustrated lectures on the history and geography of the Empire will be given in schools. All non-English will be supplied with one of I.O.D.E. British historical libraries within the next few years. A lecture fund for the teaching and study of British history will be established and some eminent lecturer brought to Canada at least once a year. Pictures of Canada’s part in the war will be given to 1000 schools, 100 schools in Manitoba to be among the number. Travelling scholarships to the extent of $1200 to university graduates in history will be awarded to each province. A second scholarship of greater value may then be established for these nine scholarship winners. An endowment fund of $500,000 is being collected for this purpose.
On rising to speak, Ms. Colin H. Campbell, provincial president, was warmly greeted. After expressing her great pleasure at having the privilege of again speaking to a Dauphin audience, se made a strong appeal on behalf of the Victory Loan. She pointed out that it was the duty of everyone to the best of their ability to assist the country at this time by subscribing what they could. Mrs. Campbell also spoke for a few minutes on the war memorial.
During the evening Mrs. Rogers sang a solo and miss Pear M. Tucker and Miss Irma Struthers contributed instrumentals.
At the conclusion of the meeting the visitors and the members of the chapter repaired to the rest room, where refreshments were served, and a couple of hours spent in social intercourse.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 27.
Mrs. Sharp has left for Winnipeg and will shortly cross the ocean to visit London.
Mr. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has returned from Brandon, and will conduct meetings at different points in our district. Some of the methods of the Army may be open to criticism but there is much to commend them. They hit out straight from the shoulder every time.
The rally meeting of the Grain Growers, recently held at the house of Thos. Toye, was well attended. Mr. Dixon, barrister, of Winnipegosis, was the sparker. The farmers’ platform and other issues were clearly explained.
The Ontario elections have given the farmers a big boost. The west is awaiting its opportunity.
Mr. Frank Sharp and bride arrived home from Winnipeg a few days ago. We wish the bride and groom every happiness and when their troubles come, may they be nothing worse than “little Sharps.”
Tom Toye grew a potato this season which weighted 4 lbs. The late Capt. Coffey brought the seed of these potatoes to Canada from the United States. There has bot been anything in the potato line to equal them for heavy yielding or excellent flavor.
An October cold dip is not common, but during the last few days the thermometer has been hovering round the zero mark.

Fork River

J. Shuchitt has opened a pool room and barber shop on Main Street.
Misses L. and K. Briggs are attending the wedding of one of their sisters at Hartney. Mr. Russell is teaching the Fork River School during their absence.
Don’t forget the returned soldiers’ banquet in the Orange Hall, Friday night, Oct. 31st. Supper will be served at 6.30. Tickets, $1.00.
Jim Parker returned from a two weeks’ trip to Saskatchewan points.
It begins to look as if winter has come to stay.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 9, 1919

Fork River

Miss Millidge, organizer of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Anglican Church, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. W. King.
Mrs. Vinning and daughter, of Winnipeg, have returned home after spending a week with Mrs. J. Reid.
T.N. Briggs has invested in an oil pull tractor. This power will turn over the land more rapidly. It’s more speed that counts these times.
Bert Little has taken a trip to Chicago. Fred Tilt is in charge of the store during his absence.
The Cypress River paper, in a recent issue contains the following item:
“Mr. and Mrs. N. Little both old time residents of Cypress River and town this week. They left home in May for an overseas tour, and visited the battlefields of France and Belgium, securing many photos of great interest. They sailed to New York on a French boat and went from there to Toronto near which city Mr. Little purchased a new model 1920 McLaughlin 6 cylinder car and motored to Cypress. They are now on their way home. The same cherry Nat as of old looking as young as ever.”

Fork River Fair Prize Winners

The following is a list of the prizes awarded at the Fork River fair, held on the 26th ult.:
HORSES.
Draft stallion, A. Rudkanvitch. Pair draft mares or geldings, P. Toperasky. Draft filly or gelding, Fred King. Pair agricultural, mares or geldings, Fred King; J. Bodnarchuk 2nd. Brood mare, J. Bodnarchuk. Agricultural, 2-year-old, mare or gelding, M. Bayko; T.B. Venables, 2nd. One-year-old, mare or gelding, Chas. Pereski. Foal, John Bodnarchuk. T.B. Venables’ special, foal by Baron Regal, W. Williams. Pair of drivers, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
Beef cattle (pure-bred), bull over 1 year, 1 and 2, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
T.B. Venables took first prize for cow 3 years and over, 2 year-old heifer, bull calf, and heifer calf.
Grade cattle (beef type), heifer, 1 year old, S. Narvasod; W. Williams 2.
Dairy cattle (pure-bred), bull, 1 year old and over, F.F. Hafenbrak. Grade dairy cattle, cow 3 years old, 1 and 2, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
Fat cattle, yearling steer, W. Williams.
Sheep—Ram, 1 year and over, D.F. Wilson and Sons; T.B. Venables 2nd. Pair of ewes D.F. Wilson and Sons; T.B. Venables 2nd. D.F. Wilson and Sons took first and 2nd prizes for pair shearling ewes, pair ewe lambs and pair fat sheep. Ram, any age, P. Soloman.
Pigs, bacon types—Boar under 1 year, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Sow, under 1 year, D.F. Wilson and Sons, 1st and 2nd. Pair pigs, under 6 months, F.F. Hafenbrak. Lard type—Boar under 1 year, F.F. Hafenbrak. Pair pigs, under 6 months, F.H. Richardson; F.F. Hafenbrak, pair pigs by boar Gladstone, J.H. Richardson.

POULTRY
Wyandottes, white. D.F. Wilson, jr. Buff, 1st and 2nd, D.F. Wilson, sr. Plymouth Rocks, barred, W. King. White, W. King. Leghorns, white, F.H. Benner. Brown, T.B. Venables. Rhode Island Reds, F.F. Hafenbrak. Any other variety, W. King; 2nd, S. Narvasod. Pair spring chickens, any variety, D.F. Wilson, jr; 2nd, W. King. Pair geese, D.F. Wilson; 2nd, T.B. Venables. Pair ducks, S. Narvasod; 2nd, M.A. Munroe. Best collection of poultry, W. King.

DOMESTIC AND DAIRYY PRODUCE.
Homemade bread, Mrs. Pruden; 2nd Mrs. Rawson. Twelve buns, Mrs. A. Rowe. Homemade pickles, Mrs. Rawson; 2nd, Mrs. F.F. Hafenbrak. Collection of preserved and canned fruit, Mrs. Brunsden; 2nd, Mrs. King. 5lbs butter, Mrs. Shiels; 2nd, Mrs. King. Home cured bacon, D.F. Wilson; home cured ham, D.F. Wilson.

GARDEN PRODUCE.
Potatoes, white, G.H. Tilt; 2nd F.H. Benner. Colored, W.H. Johnson; 2nd, T.B. Venables. Turnips, P. Solomon; 3rd W. King. Carrots, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Beets, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd G.H. Tilt. Mangels, T.B. Venables; 2nd, N.H. Johnston, Cabbage, R. Senieuk; 2nd G.H. Tilt; Cauliflowers, Charles Pereski; 2nd, G.H. Tilt. Pumpkins or squash, F.F. Hafenbrak; 2nd W. King. Cucmbers, W. King; 2nd, R. Senieuk. Corn, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd W. King. Tomatoes, F.F. Hafenbrak; 2nd W. King. Parsnips, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Celery, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd G.H. Tilt. Onions, G.H. Tilt. Rhubarb, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Lettuce, S. Narvasod. Beans, T.B. Venables 2nd W. King. Peas, W. King.
Grain and Grana—Sheaf of barley—H. Harrineuk; 2 nd J. Smiduke. Sheaf of oats, L.V. Hafenbrak. Sheaf of rye, F.H. Bennes. Sheaf of flax. H. Herrineuk.

LADIES’ WORK.
Tray cloth, Mrs. Rowe; 2nd Mrs. Eales. Tea cosy, Mrs. McEcheran; 2nd, Ms. A. Rowe. Table centre, Mrs. McEcheran; 2nd Miss K.E. Briggs. Table mats, Miss S. Briggs; 2nd, Mrs. A. Rowe. Eyelet embroidery, Mrs. A. Rowe; 2nd Miss K. E. Briggs. Punch work, Mrs. A. Rowe. Handmade pillow cases, Miss S. Briggs. Homemade towels, Miss S. Briggs. Handmade bedspread, Miss K.E. Briggs. Homemade ladies’ underwear, Miss K. Briggs. Homemade corset cover, Mrs. Pruden; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Sofa cushion, Miss K.E. Briggs; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Fancy workbag, Miss K.E. Briggs; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Knitted stockings, Mrs. Venables; 2nd Miss Lacey.

The baby show brought out 12 entries, Mrs. A. Rowe taking first honors and Mrs. Garnet Lacey second.

Winnipegosis

The Anglican church held a successful entertainment at the Rex hall last week. The programme consisted of a whist drive, musical entertainment and a tombola. Mrs. Paddock won the lady’s prize at whist and Mr. T. Johnason the gentleman’s. Miss E McArthur and Mr. J Campbell’s songs were especially good. Mrs. Campbell’s playing of the violin was greatly applauded. A large crowd was present and the church netted $125. After paying the church debts there is a balance of $75.00 left, which will form a nucleus for a building fund.
The fishermen have pulled up their nets a few days ago on account of the fish being dropped in price. The men subsequently promised that the price would be raised and returned to work and the companies obtained a week’s extension of the fishing period from the Government.
An epidemic of broken legs and arms is going around. Three children and an adult have met with such accidents in the past month.
Hechter Bros. have sold their store to M. Popenski.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 24, 1919

Boys Plead Guilty to Robbery

On Sunday night, April 6th, the Clothes Shop, Mr. Benedickson’s store, was entered and a quantity of goods stolen. The matter was placed in Chief Bridle’s hands and he at once got busy with the result that two boys, about 17 years of age, were arrested at Wadena, Sask. The boys’ names are Fred Beach and Norman Clubb, and hail from Winnipeg. They were brought from Wadena on Tuesday and appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday, and pleaded guilty to the charge. They were remanded till Friday for sentence. The boys are known to the city police and their previous history is to be investigated. The most of the stolen goods were recovered.

G.W.V.A. Notes

A meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, April 17th, some 40 members being in attendance.
The question of a memorial for the fallen comrades was discussed by the comrades, and it was suggested that the memorial should take the shape of a home for the returned men, and that a committee be formed to confer with the memorial committee organized by the town.
It was moved by Comrade Armstrong, seconded by Comrade H. Harvey, “that this branch of the G.W.V.A. endorse the Imperial Veterans’ resolution, and request that the government take up the matter of insurance by the state for returned men who, owing to injuries received whilst in action, are at the present time unable to get insurance, or who have to pay excessive rates for such.
Moved by Comrade H. Harvey, seconded by Comrade Oliphant, that this branch endorse the resolution of the G.W.V.A. Winnipeg, and protest against the sect known as ‘Hutterites’ from being allowed to settle in this country.
A delegation was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary, and arrangements made as to taking care of soldiers’ widows, who come to this town in connection with land, etc. It was decided that the auxiliary should provide rooms, as it was not considered that the G.W.V.A. rooms were suitable accommodation for ladies, and that they would be more comfortable in a separate house.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on April 7th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting wee read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Children’s Hospital, Winnipeg; the solicitor, re passing of social legislation; R. Flett, re reduction of taxes; The Red Triangle Fund, R. Cruise, M.P., re Hudson’s Bay Railway; copies of letters from the weed commission, C.B. Martin, re seed grain, and Sawinski Bros., re car of plank.
Hunt-Reid – That in consideration of the large amount of money that has been expended in the buildings of the Hudson’s Bay railroad, and, further, very large amounts in construction of harbor accommodation on the bay, and, whereas, a comparatively small amount will be required to finish the railway and thus render the large expenditure useful; this council is therefore, of the opinion and most empathically recommends that the Hudson’s Bay railroad be completed as soon as possible, thus giving to Western Canada the benefits to be derived from it and for which it has waited so long. That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Sir Thomas White.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the council of the rural municipality of Mossey River hereby makes formal application to the Good Roads Board of the Province of Manitoba that the following roads within the municipality be brought under the provisions of “The Good Roads Act, 1914,” and amendments thereto;
Road from south boundary of the municipality, making connection with the Dauphin good road system; due north to the village of Fork River, and from that point north and easterly to the village of Winnipegosis.
Road from the village of Fork River due west to the western boundary of the municipality road from corner on Fork River-Winnipegosis road to west side of range 19, along township line between tps. 29 and 30. Also from corner on same road westerly two miles between tps. 30 and 31.
Road from n.w. corner 12-29-19, easterly six miles, thence south to Lake Dauphin and then following lake shore to south boundary of the municipality.
Road from Winnipegosis north-westerly through tp. 31, rge. 18, and continuing into tp. 31, rge. 19.
Road from Winnipegosis south-easterly through tp. 3, rge. 18, and continuing easterly across tp. rge. 17.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. Paddock and Marcroft be a committee to inspect road northwest of Winnipegosis, and report what can be done in the matter of making it passable at net meeting.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the municipal bank account be moved from the Bank of Ottawa, Dauphin, to the Winnipegosis branch of the same bank.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask its council of it is prepared to pass a bylaw similar to those passed for the last two years covering work on the boundary road between the two municipalities.
By laws authorizing a line of credit of $15,000, amending the collector’s bylaw by reducing the salary to $125 pre month, and a bylaw authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of the Mossey River School district to issue expenditures for the borrowing of $12,000 to purchase grounds and build and equip a school. The vote to be taken June 14th.
The council adjourned to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society was held on Friday evening, April 18th, at 8 p.m., in the Union Church. It being Good Friday the musical part of the programme consisted of Easter hymns. Mrs. J.E. McArthur gave an excellent paper on “Ventilation and Well-Lighted Rooms,” and Mr. Hook spoke in his usual pleasing manner on the subject, “Associates for the Young,” bringing foremost in his speech the necessity of child training. Ten cent tea was served, proceeds in aid of the library fund, when the meeting was brought to a close by singing he National anthem.
The Home Economics Society library is open every Saturday from 3 o 5 p.m., in Mrs. Honchin’s ice cream parlor.
Mr. D.G. McAulay and family have moved from the farm into town and taken up residence in the house formerly owned by J. Alexander.
The executive of the Order of the Needle wish to thank all those who helped to make the bazaar on the evening of Monday, the 21st, so successful. Mr. J.R. Burrell and her assistants, Mrs. K. McAuley and Mrs. Thomas, are especially to be lauded for the efficient way in which they handled the tea room, which was very popular. Mr. Hamilton very kindly gave his time in arranging the booths, which were very prettily decorated by Mrs. Steele, Mrs. St. Amour, Mrs. J.E. McArthur and Mrs. J.A. Campbell. A number of ladies and gentlemen assisted on the programme of music for dancing after the booth closed. Mr. Ketchison acted as floor manager and as usual made things go. The receipts for the evening were $119.10. Paid out for working material $3.75, for decorations $1.40, cartage 75 cents, rent of hall $6; total $11.90. To be divided between Red Cross and Belgian Fund, $107.20.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 3, 1919

Reception to Major Barker

Major W.G. Barker, V.C., D.S.., M.C., has been granted three months leave of absence to visit his home and is expected to arrive within the next two weeks. Winnipeg will tender him a civic reception.
Dauphin will also tender Major Baker a right royal reception, the details of which will be announced later.

Winnipegosis

At a meeting of the Dramatic Society held at the home of Mr. F.G. Shears, the profit and loss statement of the play, “The Arrival of Kitty,” was discussed. It was agreed that of the surplus from the play $25 should be given to the Red Cross, the balance, $5.58 being held as a working fund for future productions. The society then dissolved, with a view to reorganization on a wider and more democratic basis. Discussion resulted in the following findings: Mr. Shears was appointed president, Mr. Ketcheson vice and Mr. Campbell, sec.-treasurer. It was further decided to open the society to all persons interested in the drama, such persons to become members on payment of an annual membership fee of 50 cents. Mr. T. Needham, Mr. Jack Denby, Miss McMartin, Mrs. Giggins and Mr. Ketcheson were formed into a committee to obtain new members. A committee to search for suitable plays and people to act them, was formed of Mr. Wills, Mrs. Shears, Mr. Campbell, Mrs. St. Amour and Mrs. Giggins. Some further detail business was transacted and the new society well and very favorably launched. The first production will be put in hand immediately and produced in about two months.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 6, 1919

Cold Weather

After January furnishing us with a delightful brand of weather. February started in with a falling temperature. The Government thermometer registered as follows: Monday, 10 below zero; Tuesday 19 below and Wednesday 5 below.

The Great Air Battle of Major W.G. Barker

(By Mrs. Thos. Playford)

Among the deeds that have been done
By airmen brave and skilled,
This last great air feat of the war,
With wonder all has filled.

O’er Mormal fores, all alone,
One brave aerial knight,
Flew searching for the British troops,
Or foe air craft in sight.

He soon espied a German plane;
Attacked it then and there,
And soon the enemy machine
Was broken in the air.

But still another hostile craft
Was coming very nigh,
Just then the young Canuck was stunned,
A shot had pierced his thigh!

But soon the major was alert,
There, in the dangerous spot,
For fifteen Hun planes now came near,
To fire the deadly shot.

But the brave boy his shots did fire,
So deftly and so well,
That though against such odds he fought
Three of the foe craft fell.

But he another wound received,
And fainted clean away,
But again he mastered his machine,
And did once more hold sway.

He flew at one great hostile craft,
It fell, but in his pride.
Just then his left arm, bruised and smashed
Hung useless by his side

With one hand left to steer and shoot,
While foes the air did fly
Those watching saw and held their breath,
At that cool, deadly skill.

Some minutes longer in the air
He played the awful game,
Put out of action two more for fair,
Then to the earth he came.

Our boy! Who nigh on sixty plane;
Single handed fought that day,
Now lies a sorely wounded lad
In Rouen far away.

And all who watched him on that day
So nobly act his part,
That he’ll soon recover from his wounds
Is hoped by each brave heart.

Dauphin’s brave boy has laurels won
From our Allies o’er the sea,
But for this great deed of valor done
He got the prized V.C.

And when he comes back home again
Having won so much renown
Won’t be proudly welcome by
Dauphin, his native town!

And while, at home, his parents wait
The coming of their boy,
All hearts that love the Maple Leaf,
Heard of his deeds with joy.

And when she had this story heard,
Of daring, skill and pluck,
Old England bowed her head and said,
“God bless our young Canuck.”

And when in after years we read,
In history, song and story,
Of man a great heroic deed.
That won both fame and glory.

Of all the deeds of airmen brave,
Not many will compare
With this fight of our Major hold,
Knight-errant of the air.

Dauphin, Jan. 31st, 1919.

Fork River

Wm. Williams has left for Lake Winnipegosis, where his new timber limit is located. He intends commencing operations on the limit this winter. C. Bugg and W. Tuck went with him.
Miss H. Lacey has returned from a week’s visit in Winnipeg.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, have left on a trip to the coast.
Owen Pruder, of the Northern elevator, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
A number of cars of baled hay have been shipped from this point this winter. A good price has been realized. This is an industry that might be greatly developed.

Winnipegosis

A delightful old-fashioned evening party was held in the Rex Hall on Wednesday, Jan. 29th, under the direction of Miss McArthur, in aid of the Red Cross Society. Many old-time dresses were resurrected, and especially winning was Mrs. Shears in a costume representing Dickens’ Mrs. Sarah Gamp, Mr. Shears caused many a laugh as Mr. Pickwick. Mrs. Steele, the Misses Grenon, Mrs. (Dr.) Medd, Mrs. Morrison, Mrs. Campbell (of Sifton), Miss Paddock, Mrs. Ummell and many other ladies in old-time dresses made one feel they had stepped back fifty years. Mrs. A. Snelgrove had her hair dressed in a pretty Victorian fashion, while many other styles made one think of the Middle Ages. Everyone was delighted with the violin selections rendered by Mr. Shears and Mrs. Campbell. We would also like to thank Mrs. Medd, Miss Arnason, Miss Macarthur, the Misses Grenon, Mrs. F.S. Giggins and Mr. Wills for their help with the program. The ladies on the refreshment committee also deserve great credit. A dance finished up a most successful event.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 30, 1919

Winnipegosis

Miss Pearl Wilson, who for some time has been assistant in the post office here, has left to accompany Mrs. Wilson on a visit to Victoria, B.C. Miss Wilson has served the public well. She will be missed by social as well as business friends and our best wishes go with her.
Fishing operations here are quiet, owing to the dull market. It is reported that a number of fishermen have taken out their nets.
The Red Cross weekly entertainment of last week, under the management of Mr. C.L. White, was a bright and pleasant event and quite a number were present.
Miss Olive Hawkins, of Dauphin, has arrived to take the position of assistant at the post office.
Mrs. J. Campbell, of Sifton, is spending a few days in town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 16, 1919

Dauphin Flour in Belgium

Our readers will remember that shortly after the first reports of the suffering among the Belgian people, due to the Hun invasion in 1914, reached Canada, the Dauphin Milling and Creamery Co. Limited, ground a carload of flour from wheat donated by farmers and others in Dauphin and adjoining municipalities. This carload was duly shipped to Belgium but no official record was ever received of its having reached its destination. The following letter received a few days ago by the company makes very interesting reading, and it is gratifying to note that at least part of the donation reached the people for whom it was intended:
“52 Rue De Mondigny,
“Charleroi, Belgium.
“Dec. 1, 1918.
“Dear Sir,—You will no doubt be greatly surprised to receive this letter from a person that you have never seen nor heard of before, and your surprise will be still greater when you hear that it is written at your request.
“One day, early in 1915, I was present at the opening of a bag of flour which, with several others, had just arrived from Canada. At the bottom of the sack was a strip of paper bearing these words, ‘Whoever gets this bag of flour write and let us know if it is good.’ I would have written at once only the Germans, with their usual kindheartedness, made things so easy for us that letter writing was out of the question. I hope never to see a German again as long as I live. ‘The best of them are bad.’
“Your flour was excellent; it has not been our luck to have such good quality since. For the last three years our bread—it really doesn’t deserve the name of bread—was composed of everything except flour, thanks to Fritz.
“You would not recognize your flour sack. It has been transferred into a beautiful sofa cushion and occupies a prominent place in our drawing-room It is the admiration of all visitors.
“Last week the Canadian troops came to Charleroi; they received a warm welcome on all sides. Everyone here speaks highly of your compatriots, many English regiments passed two or three days in this town before entering Boschland. With every good wish for Xmas and with kindest regards.
“Believe me, yours sincerely,
(Signed) Andree McDonnell.”

Mossey River Council

The first meeting of the council of 1919 took place at Fork River on Jan. 7th.
The clerk swore in the newly elected members – T.B. Venables, reeve; J. Yakavanka, councilor for Ward 1; E.A. Marcroft for Ward 3, and J. Namaka for Ward 5.
Bylaws were passed making the councilors’ fees $4 per day and appointing D.F. Wilson sec.-treasurer at a salary of $875.
The bylaws of 1918 appointing the solicitors and health officer were confirmed for 1919.

COMMITTEES
Finance – Hunt, Marcroft and Paddock.
Bridges – Coun. Reid and Hunt.
Public Works – Coun. Marcroft, Paddock and Namaka be public works committee for Wards 3, 4 and 5, and Coun. Yakavanka, Hunt and Reid be public works committee for Wards 1, 2 and 6.
Paddock-Marcroft – That the bridge committee examine the bridges that are needing repairs and make an estimate of the material that will be required for the season’s bridge work and report to the clerk who is instructed to purchase same.
Hunt-Namaka – That the assistance which has been given to the family of the late Peter Smith be discontinued.
Hunt-Marcroft – That each councilor make a diagram showing the work in his ward which he would prefer to come under the working of the Good Roads Act for the yea 1919, and forward said diagrams to the sec.-treasurer, who is instructed to make a diagram from them showing the whole municipality, which diagram is to be forwarded to the Good Roads board.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the clerk instruct the solicitors to prepare a bill legalizing the assessment roll of 1918, and that the member for the constituency be asked to bring it before the legislature at the coming session.
Marcroft-Hunt – That a grant of $50 be made to ex-Reeve Lacey for miscellaneous expenses.
Hunt-Marcroft – That the assessment roll for the year 1919 is hereby adopted for the years 1919 and 1920.
Reid-Namaka – That Reeve Venables be a delegate to the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and that the delegates receive $25 for expenses.
Council adjourned to meet at the call of the reeve.

Fork River

Mrs. James Rice, of Northlake School, has returned from a trip to Winnipeg.
Mrs. R. McEachren and daughter Helen were recent visitors to Dauphin.
A car of young fat stock was shipped out last train. Good prices were realized by the sellers.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Little have returned from a short visit south.
H. Swartwood, International Implement Co., general agent, was at Fork River last week to hook up the orders of the local agent, W. King, for the coming season. Agent Billy K. is most optimistic as to the coming season’s business and to show his faith, has placed liberal orders.
Sunday school in All Saints Church every Sunday at 2 p.m.
Mr. Jarvis is now teacher of the Mowat School.
The continued fine weather is very favorable to stock and they are in fine condition.
Grain and cordwood are coming to market in considerable quantities every day.
The following are the officers of Purple Star Lodge, L.O.L., No. 1765, for the ensuing term:
W.M., Bro. C.E. Bailey; D.M., W.J. King; chaplain, Edwin King; rec. secretary, Wm. King; fin. Secretary, A. Hunt; D. of O., F. Cooper; treasurer, Sam Bailey; lecturer, F.F. Hanfebrak; dep. lecturer, Sam Reid. Committeemen – M. Cooper, H. Hunter, W. Russell, Ed. Morris, S. King, Jos. Bickel.

Sifton

A crowded schoolroom showed the appreciation of the residents of Sifton district of the Wycliff School Xmas concert. The hit of the evening was a three-piece sketch called “Santa and the Fairies.” Joe Reid acted as Santa, Miss Tilly Farion as Queen of the Fairies, and Witch Doubletongue was impersonated by Mary Braschuk. Patriotic songs opened the program, while several part-song contributed much to the enjoyment of the evening. An effective item was a serenade by the school children, clustering in a semicircle on the platform, with a flashlight playing on them for the darkened auditorium. Mrs. J.A. Campbell contributed the piano and violin accompaniments.
A good old-time dance, at which there was a large attendance, followed the concert. The dance music was given by Mrs. Campbell and Messrs. Marcott, Potoski, Kuczma, Halinski, and others.
The proceeds of the evening, totaling $56.75, have been placed in the bank as the Wycliff School Children’s Amusement fund. Part of it is to be applied at once to the repair of the school toboggan slide, a new concert platform, and ropes for the swings.
The teachers of the school, Mr. Bousfield and Miss Trew, and the children are grateful to the friends who gave the ample and excellent refreshments; to Mr. Paul Wood for the loan of his piano and for the willing assistance given by friends before and during the evening.
The fudge and taffy were provided by the children from their own lunch as a treat to adults, enjoying the Christmas spirit. The artists responsible for the blackboard scenes of the stage were Leslie Kennedy and Tilly Farion.

Winnipegosis

Old Josey Campbell, who resides near Water Hen, had his house and content totally destroyed by fire last Friday. The house was a new frame building, and the loss is ruinous to old Josey.
The council of the Village of Winnipegosis held its regular meeting last Tuesday. The council has been shorthanded for several months but is now complete, being reinforced by the addition of two new councilors, J. Willis and Chas. Denby. The council donated $400 to the Red Cross and discussed the building of a hospital and giving the town better fire protection. These last two matters will come up again at next council meeting.
The interment of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy, Ochre River, formerly of this town, took place on Tuesday. Rev. Mr. Hook conducted the service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 23 – 1915

1915 Dec 23 – News from War Front

Lieut. Denis Cockrill, who was recently wounded, has sufficiently recovered to return to the trenches. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
Private Jos. Gallant who enlisted at Dauphin last winter, has been recommended for the D.S. medal. He rescued two officers after they had been wounded by the Germans near their trenches. (Joseph Gallant, 1892, 424019)

1915 Dec 23 – Sixty now Enlisted

Recruiting for the battalion with headquarters at Dauphin is going on briskly. The officers and men here now total 60, and it is expected by the 1st of the New Year will be over 100 strong.
The officers state that the men enlisted are well suited for the service and are engaged drilling every day. Physical drill exercises are held in the town hall and platoon work at the agricultural grounds. The officers in command and privates are as follows:

OFFICERS
Lieut.-Col. R.A. Gillespie, O.C. (Robert Alexander Gillespie, 1881, xxx)
Capt. and paymaster, H. Hunter (Henry Cecil Hunter, 1888, 234232)
Lieut. V.N. Severn, keeper of records (Vernon Nicholl Severn, 1890, xxx)
Lieut. J.W. Skinner (Joseph Winstanley Sinner, 1875, xxx)
Sergt. M.A. Young (Martin Albert Young, 1880, 460218)
Sergt. A.C. Wade (Arthur Ca?ebourne Wade, 1871, 693015)

PRIVATES
F. Crowe (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
H.R. Tarzwell (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
R. Merrell (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Meader (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
J.C. Henwood (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
T.M. Jones (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
H.V. Cousans (Henry Victor Cousans, 1885, 1000003)
F. Kilborn (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
W. McClernon (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.E. Hooper (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
C.W. Elliott (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
H. Gardiner (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
C. Klyne (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
W.E. Demery (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
J. Gough (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
M. Jacobson (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
E. Sandgrew (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)
A. Douglas (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
J.W. Lane (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
R. Pollard (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
W. Hatt (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
J. Hickie (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
A.F. Tigg (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
T.G. Kirk (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
W. Greenshields (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
J.E. Donnelly (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
S. Hesson (Samuel Hesson, 1880, 1000071)
G. Montgomery (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W.J. Crittenden (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
J.F. Calder (???)
A.E. Taylor (Albert Edward Taylor, 1893, 1000063)
J.H. Codd (John Codd, ???, 1000064)
J. Love (John Love, 1877, 1000067)
A. Love (Andrew Love, 1883, 1000072)
J. Minnis (James Minnis, 1876, 1000073)
M.W. Primrose (Malberry Whittington Primrose, 1894, 1000077)
J. McLetchie (John McLetchie, 1885, 1000070)
F. Hicks (Fredrick Hicks, 1891, 1000080)
C. Benson (Christian Benson, 1887, 1000081)
J. Humphry (???)
W.F. Terrell (William Francis Terrell, 1890, 1000141)
M.J.T. Cathcart (William Joseph Tidmarsh Cathcart, 1898, 1000147)
G. Douglas (George Douglas, 1897, 1000148)
J.G. Cathcart (John George Cathcart, 1872, 1000146)
C. Wilkey (Charles Henry Wilkey, 1895, 1000149)
G. Wilkey (George Wilkey, ???, 1000155)

NOTES
Tuesday was pay day, and the bank tellers were given a heavy bombardment for an hour.
Marsh Cathcart has enlisted as regimental bugler.

1915 Dec 23 – Had Head Cut Off

Ochre River, Dec. 21 – A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, Dec. 21, about noon when Charlie Blackman, a farmer of this district was instantly killed by the bursting of a circular wood saw. Mr. Blackman had just returned from the poll where he had been recording his vote and was cutting wood
Deceased was an old resident of the district and leaves a wife and ten children, 5 sons and 5 daughters. The eldest being a son 17 years of age. The saw that Mr. Blackman was operating was known to be cracked, but had been working for some time in that condition.
Coroner Rogers, from Dauphin visiting the scene of the accident, and after learning the facts decided an inquest was not necessary.

1915 Dec 23 – Young Ruthenian Accidentally Shot

A young Ruthenian, 24 years of age, accidently shot himself at Ethelbert on Monday evening. He was hunting rabbits at the time, and pushed the butt end of the gun in a hole, discharging it, the contents entering his abdomen, making a bad wound. Drs. Culbertson and Bottomley were sent for and went to the northern town on Tuesday morning. They dressed the wound but have little hopes for the recovery for the young man.

1915 Dec 23 – Fork River

Mrs. N. Little and daughter, Grace have returned from two weeks’ trip south.
Mrs. A. Hunt and children left on Wednesday’s train for a two months’ vacation with her friends at Ottawa.
It seems to be the order of the day of late for the Dauphin train to arrive late and take a rest at Winnipegosis for from 4 to 3 hours while they catch a load of fish for the return ship. Passengers waiting to go to Dauphin have to hang around all day. How long will the suffering public have to put up with this kind of service?
Mrs. Craig, of Weyburn, is here on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Northam.
Mr. W. Williams, our lumber magnets, has a gang out on his Lake Dauphin limits preparing for the winter’s out of lumber.
The returned hunters report big game hard to get this year. They have not had the success of other years. In a few years, if the present slaughter goes on, there will be no big game left to hunt. To preserve these fine animals a close season of two or three years should be put in force at once by the government.
F.O. Murphy paid the burg a long visit between trains last week. Fred took a cargo of eggs with him as he says “Murphys” are not too bad an old time. The only thing that it takes the train so long to go to Dauphin the eggs might hatch out on the road and he would have to get a hen coop on his arrival.
The Orangemen of Fork River will [1 missing line] ball on December 31st in the Orange Hall. Admission, gents $1, ladies free. Good music and supper provided. An invitation is extended to all.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

A grand patriotic concert, including a ladies Indian Club display song tableaux, a dramatic dialogue and the orchestra will be held in the Rex Theatre, on Tuesday, Jan. 4th, 1915, at
Eddie Chermok’s new store is all ready for business now. His stock arrived last train.
Mrs. McEachern, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
The whist drive of the Cosmopolitan Club took place on Friday evening. The prize winners were Miss Margaret Goodman and Mr. Wiseman. The bobby prize went to Miss Bertha Magunson and Mr. J. Campbell.
The Xmas tree held n the Presbyterian Church was a great success and the turn out was the nest in the annals of the town. Miss Gracie Whale was presented with a prize for the best attendance at Sunday school for the yea and John Wallace won second prize. Santa Claus did not forget any of the children.
Jas. McInnes, Walter Grenon, Joe Mossington, and Capt. Buck, returned from their hunting ground and report a good time. They brought back some good specimens of the wild steers of the Northlands.
Settlers are still flocking into the vacant lands north of here. There is room for all comers yet.
The school is closed for the festive season and we regret to say that we are losing Miss Whitemore who will attend Normal at Winnipeg after holidays. Miss Whitore will be greatly missed as she has endeared herself to her pupils and her many friends alike in this town.
Miss McMartin left on Wednesday’s train for her home at Franklin to spend the holiday season.
D.S. Hatties’ rink beat E.R. Black’s rink by 9-7. The ladies are taking an active interest in curling this season and can throw as good a rock as many of the boys.
Harry Hunter, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
Mr. Goodman returned from a business trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday’s train.
Miss Augusta Crawford arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday’s train to spend Xmas at her home here.
If the mail gets any heavier Comf. will have to get a horse and rig. What price, Casey.
Mrs. Ben Hechter left on Wednesday’s train for Winnipeg on a visit.
F. Hechter left, for Waterhen on Tuesday afternoon.
We had a special train up for fish on Tuesday.
Don’t forget the Red Cross concert next week. Buy your ticket now.
The secretary treasurer of the village reports the taxes coming in very will and a great many took advantage of the discount up to the 15th Dec. The taxes are payable at par up to July 1st.
The Council of the Village meet in the Council Chambers at 2 p.m. on Monday, 3rd, of January.
Mrs. Ben Hechter and Miss Molly Hechter left on Wednesday for Winnipeg on a visit.
Ray Burley, Bert Arrowsmith, G. Johannason, A. Allan and Rev. Clixby are up from Brandon for the holidays.
On the night of the 21st inst. the Bicton Heath children were coming to Winnipegosis to the Xmas tree with Supt. Tom Toye as driver and on arriving inside the town limits a few of our children in happy spirits were singing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” which patriotic song so scared the wild quadrupeds that they bent it for the tall timbers leaving Supt. Toye and his whole school in the ditch singing “Will Ye Na Come Back Again?” However, nothing daunted by this little mishap Supt. Toye marched with his flock to the Presbyterian Church, where they enjoyed a most pleasant time.
Last week an old Frenchman at Waterhen left his nephew’s house to go to the house of a neighbour and got lost and froze to death.
Geo. Adam, of the Fishery spent Wednesday in town.
Jas. Alex and W. Walmeley returning from Waterhen Saturday and report fishing good.
Alex. Bickel arrived to town on Saturday with two loads of fish and returned from there Friday.
We are glad to report all well at Ed. Morris’ camp. The teams returned from there on Friday.
We regret to lose for a little while, and yet we are so proud to report that our worth citizen, Mr. Frank Hechter has enlisted for active service with the 107th Battalion and will be leaving us to join his regiment about the 10th of January. Frank will be badly missed but we hope to give him a royal welcome on his return. We understand he takes the rank of quarter-master sergeant. The business will be carried on by his brother, Ben Hechter until his return.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd and Rev. Kirkpatrick returned last week from the hunting ground. Rev. Kirkpatrick got a nice elk.
The trains are very late in arriving and leaving lately.
Mr. Robertson, surveyor, is in town after inspecting the roads at Cowan and Camperville.
The snow low left for the north at the latter end of last week.
Mr. James, of Winnipeg, is spending a few days in town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 14 – 1916

1916 Dec 14 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. A.C. McPhee, Minitonas, killed. (Alexander Campbell McPhee, 1896, 425152)
Corp. H.A. Hickman, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. H.L. Pearson, Dauphin, missing. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)

1916 Dec 14 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little shipped a team of Shetland drivers to his daughter, Mrs. E. Cameron, at Neepawa.
The annual Christmas tree will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of All Saints’ S.S. on Friday night, Dec. 22nd. Everybody come and help the kiddies have a good time.
W. King, P.M., has received word from his son Edwin, who is a scout at headquarters in France, that he is well. Max, who is with the Scotch-Canadians, and was wounded at the Somme in September, is in the trenches again doing his bit. Aubrey the youngest son, is stationed in England, is reported getting on fine.
Mrs. Paul Wood has returned to her home at Sifton, after having spent a few days with Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. Birch, provincial constable, was here a week regarding the burning of A. Redurik’s stacks. P.M. Venables sentenced John Phycolo to $300 and to keep the peace for two years or six months in jail. John preferred the latter alternative.
Mr. Jasper, of Harding, Man., who has been visiting two weeks with Thos. Glendenning on his ranch, returned home on Thursday.
Messrs. Williams, Briggs, and Rowe, took a joy ride to Dauphin in “Billy’s automobilly.” They found the walking very good on the return trip from Valley River home.
Fred King and f. cooper are having a few days at Dauphin this week.
We are in the midst of a campaign for the reeveship. It is well to have our municipal affairs intelligently brought before the ratepayers every once in a while. It makes for a better condition of affairs.

1916 Dec 14 – Sifton

The Wycliffe School holds its Xmas concert and dance on Dec. 20th, Wednesday evening. The lunch will be in the form of a box social and promises to be a pleasing feature of the entertainment. The girls are busy making their boxes, so boys don’t forget the date. Everybody welcome. Program holders entitled to reserved seats. Come early and be prepared to revel in a good time. We present you with Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar tragedy, Red Riding Hood and all kinds of items suited to the varying hour.
Pte. Frank Mealing paid a flying visit to his home on Saturday to bid goodbye to his relations and friends here. At a previous visit his friends presented him with a handsome wristwatch, the time being visible in the dark. He carries with him our sincere best wishes for success at the front and a safe return.
Home Economic Society at the annual meeting five of the old officers with the addition of miss Munson were re-elected as follows:
Mrs. Paul Wood, president.
Miss Reid, vice.
Miss Baker, chairman of Red Cross committee.
Miss Munson, chairman program committee.
Mrs. J.A. Campbell, sec.-treasurer.
Mrs. Oulette kindly provided refreshments and she and Miss peal Ashmore gave musical selections.
The Society new has a membership of nineteen and regularly hold meetings for Red Cross work at different members’ homes. The next meeting will be at the home of Mrs. John Kennedy.
On Friday a social evening was given by the Society at the home of Mrs. Oulette, when the members have themselves up to unrestricted frivolities for one evening. The single ladies ran off with the prizes; the winners being Misses Munson, Baker and Wood.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Dec 7 – Municipal Nominations

Reeve
Nominations for rural Municipalities throughout the province took place on Tuesday. In these municipalities two weeks elapse before election day.

MOSSEY RIVER.
Reeve – F.B. Lacey, acclamation.

COUNCILLORS.
Ward 2 – A. Hunt, acclamation.
Ward 4- J.S. Seiffert, acclamation.
Ward 6 – No nomination.

1911 Dec 7 – Fork River

An ice gang left here for the put up ice for the Armstrong Trading Co., Winnipegosis, composed of Messrs. Munro, Johnston, Gower and others.
We have been informed that Lake Winnipegosis is to be opened for summer fishing again. It will be a great blunder if it is. As it is winter fishing is of great benefit to the resident fisherman and farmer, where as summer fishing is for the benefit of the 102 American companies and means clearing out the lake in about two seasons.
George Tilt left last week for Dauphin on a business trip.
Rev. Mr. Cruikshank held a service in the Methodist Church on Tuesday evening assisted by Mr. Malley, of Winnipegosis. A business meeting was held after service.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Breiver, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Armstrong.
Our trains here have not been on time more than twice for the last month. We were informed by a traveller from Winnipeg that instead of the train leaving Dauphin on time they had to wait while they manufactured a conductor and when he was manufactured they had to wait while he got some breakfast and then it did not matter when they started. Farmers wait hours for their mail and freight. Of course we sympathized with the traveller as we are used to waiting in Dauphin while they manufacture an engine to take a train out, but this is our first experience in making conductors. What’s next?
The office of the municipality will be closed from the 12th to 14th of the month. The Sec.-treasurer will be at the council chamber, Winnipegosis, during this period.

1911 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sec-treasurer of the municipality will be here at the council chamber Winnipegosis, from the 12th to the 14th of this month.

1916 Dec 7 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. J.L. Godkin, Minitonas, died of wounds. (John Laurence Godkin, 1897, 2382826 ??? (not found on virtual memorial))
Pte. J.T. Taylor, Winnipegosis, wounds. (???)

1916 Dec 7 – Death of Pte. Harold Curtis

Private Harold Curtis succumbed to his wounds last week. By his death Mrs. Curtis has sacrificed her tow and only sons on the alter of her country. The loss is inestimable, but the Empire must be saved, and many more such sacrifices will have to be made by mothers, fathers and some before the war is brought to a successful completion. Our deep sympathy goes out to the grief-stricken mother.

1916 Dec 7 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Northam has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin.
Metro Boyko has purchased he old ???.
W. Stonehouse, of Oak River, is in town.
Miss Leone Stonehouse has returned to Dauphin, after having spent the week-end with her mother.
F.F. and V. Hafenbrak, Fred and A. King and Jack Richardson, have returned from the deer chase with a bull moose each.
David Briggs has returned to Rathwell after a week’s visit to T.N. Briggs.
Thos. Barnard contractor of Dauphin, is busy plastering Will Northam’s new residence.
Mr. Kasmir has purchased a car of fat cattle for S.B. Levins, of Winnipeg.
The ladies of the Home Economics Society have sent a number of Xmas boxes to gladden the hearts of our soldier laddies at the front.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, and J.P. Grenon, of Winnipegosis, paid a short visit to W. King, P.M., when passing through Fork River to Dauphin.
The municipal nominations took place on Tuesday, Reeve Lacey is opposed by F.B. Venables. Mr. Venables is also running against G.E. Nicholson in Ward 1. Archie McDonnell was elected by acclamation in Ward 3, as also was John Namaka for Ward 5.

1916 Dec 7 – Sifton

We much regret the illness of our popular station agent, Mr. Oulette, who was removed to the Dauphin Hospital by special on Sunday morning. Mrs. Oulette returned, however, Monday with more reassuring news of her husband’s speedy recovery.
News from Lance-Corp. Walters this week informs us that he is fast recovering from his wounds, but the shock of the shell, which buried him, has in a great measure robbed him of hearing in his right ear.
Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore entertained this evening (4th) at their residence a large number of old friends on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of their marriage. Mrs. Ashmore decorated her table with the top tier of her wedding cake, which she hopes to have an evidence for her 25th. After Mr. Paul Wood had made the presentation of a cut glass service in ??? evening was spent in music and song, Mrs. Campbell presiding at the piano with her usual brilliancy.
Look out for Wycliffe School concert and dance Wednesday, 20th.

1916 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sunday school Christmas tree and concert will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 20th. This annual event has, in the past always been held in the Presbyterian Church but on the present occasion will be given in the Rex Hall. This change will given room for more stage effect and also better accommodation for the parents and friends, who have always filled the church to its utmost capacity. The programme will be a good one including a representation by the children of the famous Christmas story of Charles Dickens, entitled “The Christmas Carol.” The message of the carol is of universal interest Under the touch of the spirit of Christmas the selfish man is rid of his selfishness, plum pudding and roast beef are found to be indigestible without kindness, charity mercy, and forbearance. The story will be given in the form of a three-act play and several tableaux.
We ask everybody to reserve his evening and appreciate the efforts of the children by giving them a full house. This year the Christmas presents ??? Sunday school without the aid of gifts from the parents and friends. This is partly to save time and also to avoid the inequality in the gifts received by the children.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 26 – 1914

1914 Nov 26 – Ethelbert Children Do Well

To the Editor of the Herald:
Please allow me some room in your paper to state how well the boys and girls in my room have done towards helping to relieve the suffering of the Belgium children. A little over a week ago I mentioned the subject to them and they immediately decided to try and do something. The result is that they have collected in the neighbourhood of $25. This, I think, is a credit to them and I am writing this to show how the boys and girls are willing to help if they are given the chance and how they will make good.
W.H. WHITE.
Principal Ethelbert School.

1914 Nov 26 – Soldiers Return Thanks

To the Editor of the Herald:
Sir – On behalf of the boys allow me, through the medium of your paper to thank all those very kind townspeople who have in such substantial and many ways subscribed to their welfare.
During the time of our enforced visit to Berlin or Constantinople we hope the town will prosper and so afford us some chance of again taking up a more peaceable occupation on our return.
Orders will be taken for scalps and other trophies.
ARTHUR C. GOODALL.
Reg. Serg. Maj., 32nd M.H.

1914 Nov 26 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Oct. 29th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Good Roads Association, the health officer, G.A. Warringon, C.E., the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and St. Joseph’s Orphanage.
Hechter-Lacey – That the clerk write Mr. McGilvray and ask him to come to this municipality and lecture on the Good Roads Act.
Lacey-Hunt – That in all cases where a contractor calls for inspection of work that is found incomplete, according to the terms of the contract, the contractor shall be charged with the cost of the inspection fees and mileage.
Lacy-Richardson – That the health officer’s livery account in connection with the diphtheria cases be certified to by Dr. Medd and paid, the said expense to be charged in the tax accounts of the parties involved.
Hechter-Lacey – That each councillor be authorized to collect voluntary subscriptions for the patriotic fund. All money so collected to be sent in to the treasurer of the municipality.
Toye-Bickle – That the clerk be instructed to credit Ward 1 with 23 pieces of tamarac pilling and charge the same to the public works account, the piles having been expended n the Bailey Bridge.
Hunt-Richardson – That all road commissioners’ certificates issued after this date be payable only to the parties to whom they are issued.
Lacey-Richardson – That any representatives of the council attending the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities be allowed $15.00 for expenses.
Bickle-Toye – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter be representatives to the Convention.
Hunt-Richardson – That Coun. Lacey take the place of J.D. Robertson, resigned, on the public works committee.
Lacey-Richardson – That the council suggest to the Minister of Public Works that in future all grants to the municipality be paid through the office of the municipality and that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to our member, Mr. Hughes.
Toye-Lacey – That the clerk write the Minister of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to inspect the bridges recently completed over German Creek.
Hunt-Hechter – That the municipal collectors be bonded to the extent of $500 each.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hechter-Richardson – That the following accounts for letting and inspecting work, T. Toye $25.30, C.H. Bickle $39.10 and A. Hunt $28.70, be passed.
Toye-Lacey – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Nov 26 – Fork River

Reeve W. King and D.F. Wilson are attending the convention of the Union Municipalities at St. Boniface this week. Coun. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, is also attending the convention.
The company’s auditor, assisted by Messrs. John Sieffert and Jas. Campbell, is taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co. store here this week.
A pie social was held at the home of Mrs. W. King for the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on the 18th inst. All report a pleasant time and the disposal of much pie.
Mr. Thomas, our grain buyer, is kept busy pretty much all the time. The quantity of what being marketed here this season is surprising considering the adverse conditions prevailing during part of the year.
Wood has started to come in since the snow arrived. It is expected that there will be considerable quantities brought in for shipment here this winter.
All old acquaintances hereabouts learned with regret of the misfortune which befell Thos. Glendenning last week in the burning of his barn last week. He had doors, windows and other material with which to erect a new house stored in the buildings when the fire occurred and all was burned. He also had about $1500 worth of grain burned. No insurance was carried on the building or the contents. With the true spirit of the pioneer he is starting to rebuild.
Many have taken out big game hunting licences and it looks as if the fleet-footed deer will have a warm time this season.
There is some talk of a contest for the reeveship. It seems only fair that the present reeve should have another term.
Mrs. Wm. Williams has just undergone a serious operation in the Dauphin Hospital.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 17 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 17 – Committed for Trial

One night last week several windows were broken in the store of Katz & Brackman at Ethelbert. I.J. Katz, who happened to be in town, swore that he saw Peter Pundy and another party that he could not recognize in the dark, break the windows with an axe. Pundy was brought before Magistrate Skaife, on the charge, and after two nights were consumed in hearing and evidence, was committed for trial. F.E. Simpson appeared for the prosecution and J.L. Bowman for the defence.

1912 Oct 17 – Ethelbert

A preliminary hearing was held before Police Magistrate R. Skaife on the evenings of the tenth and eleventh of Oct. An information, charging Peter Pundy, was laid by H. Brachman of the firm of Katz & Brachman, with breaking four panes of glass and other damages, amounting to over $20, during the night of Oct. 10th, to their store on Main Street. Considerable interest was manifested by the Ruthenian population, the court being crowded each night until midnight and feeling ran high. Mr. Simpson, of Dauphin, put the case for prosecution, and Mr. Bowman for the defence. After a prolonged and careful hearing, it was thought by the magistrate, the charge needed further investigation and Pundy was remanded for trial at Portage la Prairie. He was allowed at large, after entering into bail himself in $200, and two others for $150 each, for his appearance at Portage to stand his trial.
The Elevator is nearing completion and will need only a few more days to make it ready to receive the crop.
Norman Booth, the buyer for the Elevator Co., went west a few days ago, where he was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Olive Ward, the daughter of Cross Ward, postmaster of Deepdale. Mr. Booth and his wife have returned to Ethelbert, where they will reside until the grain season is over. Cross Ward is an old resident of Ethelbert and our hearty congratulations are given to the newly wed couple, that they may live long, and prosper in their new undertaking.
Geo. Marantz has commenced business in John McLean’s store, and is doing his best to attract customers by a good display of new goods in his windows.
J. McLean expects to transfer the balance of his stock still unsold at an early date. He retains the grist mill which he hopes to run as usual this winter.
The ever present and crying need of the hour, is now, and ever will be, good roads to move the crops.
There are rumours that something will be done, in this direction, by the Council availing themselves of the government’s offer to pay two-thirds of the cost of constructing main roads through the district.

1912 Oct 17 – Fork River

J. McCaulay, Massey-Harris travelling agent, was here a few days on business with D. Kennedy.
Peter Ellis, after spending the week-end with his family, has returned to Kamsack.
Samuel Bailey took a trip to Dauphin on business last week.
Clem Kennis, who has been at Prince Albert for some months, returned home and states the harvest very late all over the West.
Robertson & Snelgrove are shipping their threshing outfit to Yorkton for the season and Pat Powers is going along. Nothing like lots of “Power.”
Miss L. Clark, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of her parents.
Rev. H.H. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit lately to meet some persons from Meadow Portage on church business.
Mrs. G. Tilt, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the farm on the Mossey.
Miss Margaret and Gertrude Kennedy are visiting with Mrs. Chas. Wilkes of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Scelly was up last week from Dauphin visiting Mr. Clemons.
Mr. Glendenning is visiting his uncle, Thos. Glendenning, on the Mossey for a few days.
Next Sunday, Oct. 20th, special children’s service at the English church at 3 o’clock, and on Sunday, Oct. 27th, the annual harvest festival service will be held and a suitable sermon for the occasion will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. All are welcome to the services.
Rev. Sam. Cruch, late of Glenella and family, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Kennedy for a few days on their way to Tullesford, Sask.

1912 Oct 17 – Sifton

Church of England services are held regularly every fortnight at Sifton (Tuesday evening) and also at other times by arrangement.

1912 Oct 17 – Winnipegosis

Harvest festival service will be held at Winnipegosis school house at 7.30 on Oct. 20th. Collection will be made for the Home Mission Fund. The sermon will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase, minister in charge.
J.R. Parker, of the Standard Lumber Co., has gone to Winnipeg to endeavour to secure men for work in the woods.
Jos. Birrell took his child to the hospital at Dauphin on Monday.
Active preparations are being made for the winter’s fishing. The prospects for fishing are said to be exceptionally poor.
The cattle industry in these parts is proving most profitable. Several shipments were recently made to Dauphin. Campbell Benson was the purchaser.

1918 Oct 17 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. William Alfred Cleland, Dauphin, killed. (William Alfred Cleland, 1894, 865829)
Pte. Chas. Gray, Dauphin, killed. (???)
Pte. Francis Ingram Rogers, Asheville, wounded. (Francis Ingram Rogers, 1899, 1001239)
Pte. Harold Allan Dunlop, Dauphin, wounded. (Harold Allan Dunlop, 1897, 718788)
Pte. Campbell, Winnipegosis, wounded. (???)
Pte. Chris Benson, Dauphin, wounded. (Christian T Benson, 1887, 1000081)
Pte. Orval Wood Struthers, Dauphin, gunshot wound in right leg. (Orval Wood Struthers, 1895, 151250)
Pte. J.H. Paulson, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Johann Hannibal Paulson, 1891, 2504017)
Pte. W.S. Hamilton, Dauphin, gassed. (???)
Pte. George Edward Buchannon, Dauphin, wounded. (George Edward Buchannon, 1894, 1000633)
Pte. Ray Neely, Dauphin, wounded. (Ray Neely, 1897, 1000556)
Pte. William Meldrum, Dauphin, wounded. (William Meldrum, 1897, 1000280)
Pte. Harry Hamilton Olson, Dauphin. (???)
Pte. E.N. Humphries, Dauphin, wounded. (???)

1918 Oct 17 – Churches and Schools Closed

By order of the health officer of the town all churches, schools and public places of amusement have been closed on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

1918 Oct 17 – The Man of the Hour
Gen. Spanish Flu.

1918 Oct 17 – TOWN OF DAUPHIN
SPANISH INFLUENZA
WARNING TO THE PUBLIC

This disease is very prevalent in some parts of the world today, and has reached our Town. It is therefore advisable that people generally should know something about it, its symptoms, and the measure and method of its communicability; and should be advised as to the general rules for its restraint and cure.
Spanish Influenza is generally believed to be a variety of the old type of Influenza with which we have been long familiar, with in addition possibly some increase of virulence, due to the conditions and places in which this present epidemic had its origin.
It is a “Germ” disease, and is conveyed from one suffering from it to others, by the secretions of the mouth, nose, throat and lungs. The use of towels or cups in common will readily spread it. Coughing, spitting or sneezing by anyone who has it, in the company of others, will readily spread it. Crowded and ill ventilated living rooms and sleeping places, as well as ill ventilated and insanitary places of work are conductive to its dissemination.
The following are the symptoms which generally accompany an attack:
Fever, headache, backache, inflamed throat, and often bleeding from the nose. In addition to these symptoms, in more severe cases a troublesome cough with a sense of constriction in the chest follows. From these develop the case of Broncho-Pneumonia which is the feature of the disease mainly responsible for deaths.
If cases should come to your neighbourhood, think first of Prevention. Don’t go to any house or place in which there may be persons with the above symptoms. Don’t let any person suffering from these symptoms come to your home or place of business. Don’t use common towels or drinking cups in any place. Keep away from people who have the disease, if you do you won’t get it. If on the other hand, you mingle with people who have it there is no known method of disinfection which would prevention your taking it. Therefore stay away and keep in he open air and sunlight as much as possible.
If you should be attacked by the disease, go to bed at once. Rest and Warmth are very important factors in its cure. Take warm drinks, live on fluids, and send for your Physician. Having done these things promptly, there is usually little danger. Not doing them, and taking chance, may turn a very mild illness into a very serious and sometimes a fatal one.
Attendants on all cases should wear gauze masks.

E. BOTTOMLEY,
Health Officer, Town of Dauphin.

1918 Oct 17 – Fork River

Mr. Hanson, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., spent a few days in town lately.
Leo Beck has purchased the threshing outfit of Charles Bugg and is making the straw fly.
There are now five outfits threshing within a radius of three miles so good progress is being made with the work.
Potatoes, yes sir. From a pound of Victory seed 50 lbs. were produced. When I comes to grain or vegetables Fork River district stands at the top.
Mrs. Moxam, from Winnipeg, is visiting at the home of Mr. Sam Reid.
So far the Spanish Flue has laid its hand lightly on us. However, we must not be behind the times or out of fashion, so that anyone from now on who gets a cold will claim to have had an encounter with His Nibbs King Flu. But, say, if we could only resort to the remedy of happy memory, hot toddy, wouldn’t the male portion of the population be suddenly afflicted.

1918 Oct 17 – Sifton

Sunday automobile travelling is just as prevalent as ever. The writer counted nine in town last Sunday. There are lots of places where yellow paint and rotten eggs could be used a plenty.
The foundations for the large Ruthenian hall has been laid and the material is on the ground.
It is about time the foreigners (and most of them are still foreigners and pride themselves on it) learned to take notice of our national statutory holidays. On Thanksgiving Day may loads of grain drove into market, the owners knowing nothing of the day, caring less, and most indignant at not being able to unload. But let an Anglo-Saxon try t hire one on a saint’s or holy day – nothing doing!
Philip Wood and Leslie Kennedy and Miss Lottie Isaacovitch and enjoying a short holiday here.
This district is not behind most of the districts in grain yields. Thirty bushels to the acre is quite common, and as high as 40 and even 50 bushels to the acre has been threshed.
W. Terin still delivers fresh fish to town, easing up the H.C.L.
An average of two car loads of live stock are shipped from here each week throughout the year, excepting possibly three months.
Several gas tractors have been sold at this point, with a promise of many more next season.
Our roads, and especially our culverts, are generally speaking, a disgrace. The wear and tear to rolling stock and automobiles, not to mention horse flesh, is beyond calculation. A culvert one foot or more above the grade was responsible for a small automobile wreck on Saturday in ward 6. The council will be asked to pay the damages.
Glorious Indian summer, with a forecast of winter within the next two months at least.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 21 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 21 – Sifton

The elections are now over and we are all glad we can now get down to business.
The threshing has been interrupted in this district by the frequent showers of rain.
The Misses Goforth and Reid, who spent their vacation in Saskatchewan, returned to town on Friday last. The ladies in question are well known as the nurses of the Presbyterian hospital here. The nurses are very popular here and on their return were tendered a reception at the Manse, which was decorated for the occasion. During the evening the ladies were presented with an address, which contained many complimentary terms, showing the esteem in which they are held and the appreciation of their work. The address was signed by J. Kennedy, J. Reid, Wm. Barry, W.J. Ashmore and C.A. Jones. At the conclusion of a very pleasant evening spent socially, refreshments were served by the ladies.

1911 Sep 21 – Winnipegosis

Wm. Sifton is spending a few days in town renewing acquaintances (before election).
Miss Sarah Hjalmerson is spending a few days at Snake Island the guest of Mrs. N. McAuley.
Miss M. Crawford left Thursday for Winnipeg, where she will attend business college.
Mr. and Mrs. Dennit and Miss Hansford are leaving town in October for England.
Miss Lily McAuley of South Bay, is visiting with Mrs. J.W. McAuley.
Mr. Paul Paplson and bride returned last week, after spending a two weeks’ honeymoon in Winnipeg.
Sunday, Sept. 24th, a confirmation service will be held in Victoria hall, conducted by Rev. B. Thorinson.
Misses Emma and Margaret Good, man of Red Deer Point, are the guests of Mrs. T. Schaldemose.
The Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.’s tug left Monday for Shoal River with Ted Cartwright in charge.
Ken McAuley, of Kamsack, is renewing acquaintances in town.
Wm. Walmsley in again managing the Lake View Hotel. His many friends are pleased to see his genial smile again at the hotel.

1916 Sep 21 – Maxwell King Wounded

Wm. King, postmaster at Fork River, received a cablegram this week from France stating that his son, Private Maxwell King, has been wounded.

1916 Sep 21 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on Wednesday, the 30th ult., all the members being present.
The minutes of the last meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner, re Fishing River Bridge, and from J.L. Bowman, re Cooper ditch.
McDonell – Reid – That the Basham Bridge be put in repair at once and that Coun. Reid be authorized to use any means to accomplish it that he may find necessary.
McDonell – Reid – That J.S. Seiffert be paid $25 for repairing the McAuley Bridge and that it have a further covering of two-inch tamarac plank eight feet long in the centre and that the clerk be authorized to issue orders for the plank and one leg of six-inch spikes.
McDonell – Reid – That the municipality make a grant of $50 to the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin; $25 to be paid now and $25 at the end of the year.
Reid – Namaka – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt – Campbell – That the accounts [1 line missing] in work be passed, $19.50.
McDonell – Reid – That the clerk notify Lawrence municipality that the council will pay 50 percent of any improvements made on the boundary line between the municipalities and that the construction of a ditch running into Lake Dauphin, which has been under consideration by the councilors of the adjourning wards be let by public auction by Reeve Lacey and Coun. Radcliff to arrange a date for such letting.
Hunt – Campbell – That Coun. McDonell, Reid and Namaka be a committee to inspect the Fork River-Winnipegosis road with a view to its improvement and report at the next meeting of the council.
Reid – McDonell – That the six pieces of timber purchased from W. Williams by the reeve be paid for.
Reid – Hunt – That as the plank ordered for the Fork River sidewalks has not been delivered for the purpose be purchased from W. Williams.
A by-law striking the rate for 1916 was passed. Municipal rate 12 ½ mills municipal commissioner’s rate, 4 mills, and general school rate, 5 ½ mills.
Hunt – Campbell – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

1916 Sep 21 – Fork River

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 18 – 1913

1913 Sep 18 – Dynamite Will be Used

Although the lake at the point where young Romeo Fleury was drowned last week has been thoroughly dragged and tramped no trace of the body has been found. Dynamite will now be used to bring the body to the surface.

1913 Sep 18 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Williams and family left for Winnipegosis’ summer resort for a few days.
Mrs. Tarbath and family left for their home in Winnipeg after spending a few weeks wit her sister, Mrs. S. Reid.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and daughter returned from a visit among friends at Dauphin.
The Mowat correspondent has woke up again after being dormant several months, and remarks that the energetic Herald’s correspondent’s criticism on road making, scrapers, etc., is about right, but goes on to state I never refer to mail matte which are going on around our P.O. For the benefit of our Mowat friend I beg to state that I do not know of anything to say against the management of our P.O. here. The P.O. inspector was here a short time ago and found everything in order. There has been no friction here since the Oak Brae P.O. was changed to fresh quarters. This act did not seem to agree with the Mowat correspondent. This reminds us of the Bailey Bridge here. It was condemned by our council over a year ago and notices put up and nothing has been done to it up o date. The people have to go over it safe. A child was thrown out of a rig at this spot and barely escaped with her life. Again the Tilt Bridge has been in use for years and never was properly finished. The Cameron Bridge stringers are so rotten you can pick some of them to pieces. Despite this our council has left its tenders for another bridge; this in the face of a largely signed petition from the ratepayers opposing it.
The ratepayers invited the reeve and council to meet them in the Orange Hall last Saturday night to hear their views on the bridge question and other matters. Only one councillor had backbone enough to face the music. Under the circumstances those present decided there was only one thing to do and that was have a general housecleaning in December. The majority of those present left to serenade Professor Weaver and his bride, who arrived home from their wedding trip. We wish Gordon and his wife long life and happiness.
James Campbell and wife passed through here on their way to spend the winter at the north end of the lake. Jimmy is well-known here and one of the right sort and we wish them both happiness and prosperity.
A very pleasant afternoon was spent recently at the home of Mrs. S. and Mrs. C. Bailey on the Mossey River by their lady friends. Amusements were indulged in and our old friend Sam was quite at home as umpire. If our friends get as efficient with the baseball bat as Ma is with the rolling pin, there’s nothing left but to give them the franchise with as good grace as we can and save our pates.
The harvest festival will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church next Sunday, Sept. 21st at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.
Don’t forget the clearing sale at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store. Now you have your chance. The prices you can’t beat.

POST OFFICE STAFF REPLY.
To the Editor of the Herald:
SIR: – We notice in last week’s issue of the Press some remarks from Mowat regarding our correspondent for the Herald in connection with municipal matters, which we have no particular interest in, but we wish to draw the attention of our readers to the items regarding mail matter trouble at Fork River P.O., which are very much out of place at best as coming from a gentleman and one who holds a position in our midst from whom we expect better things, from whom we should be taking example. We would like to say that personally we are not aware of any trouble in mail matters at this office and if our friend has any complaint he has up to now not made any mention of same to any of our staff here. If there is any trouble we should like to hear it straight and we shall certainly remedy it. If it is a case of soreness or petty personal spite, we shall ignore it. Some of us have made mistakes and are only too willing to admit it but we like to hear our faults to our faces. We are sorry to have taken up so much of your valuable space and thank you for same.

POST OFFICE STAFF.
Fork River.

1913 Sep 18 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Coben is in Dauphin to visit her husband who is in the hospital. Friends here were sorry to hear he had to have his foot taken off.
Mrs. White is visiting with friends at Dauphin.
The fishing has been extra good and large quantities are being brought down from the north end of the lake. Some of the fishermen have returned to town.
On Friday evening the 12th inst. A few of Miss Mabel Shannon’s friends gave her a very pleasant surprise by assembling at the house without invitation and suspending the amusements of the evening to read the following memorial: –
“We the undersigned, express our regret that miss Mabel Shannon is leaving Winnipegosis, but we feel that the business training she is the undergo will enlarge her sphere of usefulness and we wish to show our estimation of her high moral character and our appreciation of her services in post office, church and society by the accompanying token of remembrance from her friends at Winnnipegosis.”
The Rev. R. Turnbull made a very humourous and appropriate speech, and Miss Hayes presented the gift, gloves and bank cheque. Mr. Hulme made a few closing remarks.
The young people enjoyed themselves until time was forgotten. The moon seem especially kind to them as it was light as day, excusing to some extent the lateness of the hour. The entertainment closed with best wishes for Miss Shannon’s success in her business course.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 14 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 14 – Political Meetings at Fork River

Glen Campbell held a meeting at Fork River on the 8th inst., which was well attended and much enthusiasm shown. There was no Government speaker and the Grits were conspicuous by their absence.
On the night of the 11th, Mr. Cruise held his meeting supported by Messer. McKinstry and McDonald, and quite unexpectedly Mr. Campbell turned up just before the meeting began. The Orange Hall was well filled as the Conservatives of Fork River were not afraid to hear both sides of the question for they did not know that Glen would be at the meeting. Had they not attended Mr. Cruise’s meeting would have been a small one.

1911 Sep 14 – Fork River

Mr. A. Harvey, an old timer who still owns property in this district, is on a visit to Mr. S. Bailey and renewing acquaintances.
T.N. Briggs’ threshing outfit arrived on Tuesday’s train and is guaranteed to thresh anything in sight from pumpkins to gerkins.
Reciprocity seems to have upset even the clerk of the weather, as we are having very poor harvest weather and a slight tinge of frost.
Mr. Glen Campbell held a meeting in the Orange Hall on the 8th, which was well attended. There were over 100 farmers and a large number of ladies present. Mr. Campbell spoke on reciprocity from a farmer’s standpoint in a plain telling way. His arguments were convincing and plainly showed the audience the reciprocity pact in its true colour and that it would be to Canada’s disadvantage. Mr. Cruise was invited bout did not put in an appearance.
Mr. Forbes of Rivers, has been in the district a few days looking over the land. He is well satisfied with Fork River and is likely to invest in a farm.
The following are a few reasons why the scribe cannot support Cruise, the non-resident candidate and why he objects to the Laurier Government. Look them over and see how few of the ministers retain public confidence. Has there ever been anything worse than Mr. Pugsley in public life in Canada. The corruption exposed in his department exceeds the McGreevy scandal during the Conservative regime. Sir Wilfred has not retired Pugsley as Sir John Thompson retired Langevin. A commission of Liberals has declared the Marine Department under Mr. Broduer, corrupt from end to end, yet he has been retained and now goes not he Supreme Court Bench. The administration of the Militia Department has been as bad as any. The printing bureau scandals have been covered up. The Oliver charges were sidetracked by the dissolution of parliament, notwithstanding pledges given by the Government upon which an adjournment was secured. Sir Wilfred Laurier made the late Mr. Prefontaine, his minister of Marine, when he knew he was corrupt. In fact he had a national reputation for corruption. But Sir Wilfred gave him one of the big spending departments. Mr. Fielding allowed the Farmers’ Bank to open its doors when he had abundance of evidence that it was a crooked organization from its very inception. Look over the ministers in the Laurier Government as it appeals for supper in 1911 and compare the administration with that of 1896 and see how are they mighty fallen. What a descent from Sir Oliver Mowat to Pugsley; from Sir Louis Davis to Broduer; from Sir Henri Joly to Oliver. Sir Wilfred does not want such a comparison to be made. He has introduced the reciprocity issue to cover up the corruption of his colleagues. The Press would try to persuade farmers to vote for the Grit candidate and put back into power Laurier and the most corrupt Government in existence. They might fool a few Jackdaws. The scribe’s advance is turn them out and try a new broom which in our experience always sweeps clean.

1916 Sep 14 – Fork River

P. Zack, of Winnipeg, has purchased the stock of J.S. Nowosad and intends carrying on the business. Mr. Nowosad has accepted a position with the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Sergant, of Kamsack, and late of Dauphin, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. W. Coultas on the Fork River.
Miss Pearl Wilson is teaching the Pine View School for the present.
On Sunday morning Mrs. Archie McMillian passed away after a period of illness. Deceased was one of the old settlers. The last three years the family resided at Kindersley, Sask. Of late Mrs. McMillian has been residing with her daughter, Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
The harvest home festival services in All Saints’ Church were well attended and the services were interesting throughout. The church was tastefully decorated for the occasion with flowers, fruit and vegetables and those who took part deserve credit. Mr. Butler preached his farewell sermon. He left for Wycliffe College on Monday to take up his studies. His departure is regretted.
Rain has delayed thrashing operations.
The duck pond opposite the post office is increasing in area. There should be good shooting when the season opens.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 7 – Fork River

Pathmaster Briggs and his gang are busy laying a sidewalk from the post office to the station and stores, which is quite an improvement this muddy weather.
Mrs. H.H. Scrase and son returned from Dauphin after a two weeks’ visit.
The C.N. Ry. is building a stock yard here. We sincerely hope they will provide a raft to float them over the ditch to the shoot.
Mr. McLeod is busy buying cattle and shipping a car a week.
Mr. J.M. Littler returned from Gilbert Plains on Wednesday.
Mr. Glen Campbell, M.P., will hold a meeting in the Orange Hall on Friday night, September 8th.

1916 Sep 7 – Fork River

Mr. Ducker, engineer, was here for a few days inspecting roads and bridges.
Mrs. Dobson, of Winnipeg, returned home after a two weeks’ visit with Mrs. Cameron on the Mossey River.
Mr. E. Hunter, of Severn Bridge, Ont., is visiting his brothers, Harry and Tom Hunter at Lake Dauphin.
Mr. Joe McMillian, of Lac du Bonnett, returned home after a few days’ visit to his mother at Mrs. C. Bailey’s.
Mr. Hawkins, P.M. of Dauphin, and Mr. McCaul, of the Bank of Commerce, spent a short time touring the district in a motor lately.
Mr. W. Williams started thrashing on the farm of John Mushoski.
The heavy rain on Saturday night has stopped the harvesting and thrashing a couple of days.
Rev. Mr. Price, of Swan River, and rural dean of Dauphin, held Holy Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon, which was well attended. He left in the evening for Winnipegosis.
The annual Harvest Festival service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock on September 10th. This will be Mr. Butler’s farewell sermon as he leaves for Wychiffe College, Toronto, on Monday. A cordial invitation to all to come and take part in this service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 2 – 1915

1915 Sep 2 – More Recruits for Sewell

Recuriting-Sergant Weeks has enlisted 12 more men during the week. Among the new men are A. Schoole and J.P. Cunningham, Ochre River; F.J. Storrar and Wm. Johnston, Fork River; John Cahill, East Bay, and James Brown, Dauphin. Besides these several Ontario men have also enlisted. These men left for Sewell this (Thursday) morning.

1915 Sep 2 – Fork River

The bridge gang of the C.N.R. are here putting our new station house that arrived on a flat car the other day in the place of the old one which is to be transferred to Fishing River siding. There is something remarkable about the size of our new station house which has fooled several already. Mike had several hen coops made out of packing cases and one went astray and Pat told him he might find it at the siding. On Mike’s arrival there he came to the conclusion and the only difference between the station and his stray hen coop was there had been some paintspot on the state some time ago. He suggested [1 line missing] track train day to keep the trains from passing the station without knowing it.
Another carload of horses arrived from Mr. Levins, of Winnipeg, for Mr. Masshosky, horse dealer.
“Say, Mike, is it true that company men pay so much a month for doctor?” “I believe so Pst. It is done from a humane point of view as by the time three or found pounds of crab apples have been sampled out of a case besides plums, peaches and oranges the doctor has to be called in. They are sick and so is the merchant who pays freight and express and loses his profits.”
Mr. Shouldice, of Valley River, is a visitor here for a few days on business.
Messrs. Glendenning and Hunter have received a New Daisy Separator, which is larger, and more up-to-date than the old one. It will be ready for business as soon as grain is ready to thresh.
Dr. Evans, of Brandon, was the guest of Mr. Nat Little for a short stead.
Nurse Tilt has returned and is spending a few weeks at the homestead.
Everything has been pretty dead around this burg since election, but things brightened up for a short time on Wednesday. One of the company’s team of horses [1 line missing] while standing in front of the express office and hiked for the bush, taking up trees by the roots for some distance. The whole town rushed out to gather fragments. Strange to say the ??? ??? though without a scratch. Archie says that’s where educated horses come in.
Mr. Nat Little has been appointed payee for the Northern elevator at this point.

1915 Sep 2 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Coffey is spending a few days, the guest of her daughter, Mrs. J.W. Macaulay.
The tugs Iona and Isabelle arrived Saturday with a raft of lumber from the mill at Grave’s Point.
The tug Odenae left Sunday for the north with Mr. Plunkett’s survey parties.
Sid. Coffey motored to Dauphin Sunday.
Mrs. Hall Burrell and Miss Evelyn left for Winnipeg on Wednesday. Miss Evelyn is undergoing an operation.
Charles Macrothur, of Winnipeg, is a visitor in town for a few days.
New settlers still keep flocking in here and we are glad to welcome them. They all seem greatly satisfied with our country here and intend staying and locating.
Mr. Rosenbaum, cattle buyer of Winnipeg, is in town looking up another car of fat stock.
The school is now in full swing under an efficient staff of teachers.
Wm. Campbell, of Camperville, spent Monday in town.
Mr. Max Resnuik, of Winnipeg, arrived in town Friday to take a position with Mr. Frank Hechter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 14 – 1913

1913 Aug 14 – Ethelbert

Captain (Mrs.) Tutte, of the Salivation Army, is visiting her mother, Mrs. A. Willey, for a few days.
Mrs. McVicar, formerly of Garland, now of Brandon, is renewing old acquaintances at Ethelbert, and is stating at the station agent’s home.
Mrs. McDonald of Fort William, youngest sister of J. McLean, is visiting old scenes hereabout.
Mrs. Rod Campbell, the oldest sister of Mrs. McPhedrian, is visiting relatives in this neighbourhood.
H. Brachman has been gazetted as J.P.
There is a fear amongst the famers that the copious rain may injure the crop prospects.
Great quantities of berries are being shipped east and west; more than 100 pails a day.
This is a great country for fruit, wheat, hay, eggs, and last but not the least in mosquitoes. They come and go in millions.

1913 Aug 14 – Fork River

Mrs. Walter Cooper, Sr., left for a two weeks’ vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Sam Bailey left for a week’s visit to his son Frank at Winnipeg.
James McDonald, assistance express agent, left for a well-earned vacation at Winnipeg.
Miss Pearl Wilson has left for Dauphin for a short visit.
Mrs. W. Williams returned from a week’s rest in the south.
J. Stewart, of North Lake, was in town lately and reports the roads out that way very bad.
Postmaster Kennedy and wife are off to Winnipeg to take in the stampede in company with the Mayor of Winnipegosis and several others from this point.
Miss Alice Godkin is spending a week with Mrs. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, with the Misses Kennedy.
Miss M. Nixon left for Winnipeg, after a month’s vacation here with friends.
St. John Butler, of Winnipegosis, has charge of the A.T. Co. store, during manager Kennedy’s absence.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, who has been visiting with her grandmother, Mrs. R. Snelgrove for some time, has returned home.
Although the council passed a by-law to the effect that all stock was to be on the owners property during sunset and sunrise and not allowed to run at large, we find cattle and ponies running at all hours of the night, and in places it is unsafe to drive along the roads dark nights for fear of tumbling over them.
The heavy rains of this week have stopped the haying and road making for a short time.
Councillor Hunt let several contracts for roads to Contractor Briggs and others. We trust there will be an open fall so this work can be done.
John Mathews, electrician for the A.T. Co., is intending to go into the pork raising business as a side issue. We wish him all kinds of success as Jack’s a pretty good fellow.
Our esteemed friends, Fred. Storrar, has charge of the cream department and is giving good satisfaction.
Much interest is being taken in the baseball match between the married and single ladies which is to come off on the 13th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 21 – 1910

1910 Jul 21 – Fork River

D.F. Wilson is visiting Winnipeg this week.
Mr. Stonehouse is building a house for P. Ellis in town.
F.B. Lacey Councilor, was taken sick in the council chambers last Thursday. The incessant heat was the cause of it.
S. Bailey has been appointed by the Reeve and Council to look after the new road now being build from Fork River to Winnipegosis. This is what has been needed for years.
Mrs. Scrase has been visiting friends at Winnipegosis.
The Orangeman’s picnic here on the 12th was a very successful event. The following is a list of the winners of the day’s sports.
Boys’ sixteen years and under – H. Shannon, A. King.
Needle contest for ladies – Mrs. Shannon, Mrs. Hafenbrak.
Men’s pony race – H. Shannon, H. Little.
Men’s sack race 50 yards – W. King, F. Wilson.
Men’s hop skip and jump – R. King, S. Campbell.
200 yard race for men – R. King, W. King.
Men’s long running jump – J. Lockhart, R. King.
Ladies race 25 years and older – Mrs. H. Snelgrove, Mrs. Shannon.
Men’s relief race 50 yards – R. King, D. Briggs, C. Wilson and H. Benner.
Baseball between South Bay and Fork River, South Bay won.
Girls’ race 5 years and under – G. Dallas, B. Rowe.
Boys’ race five years and under – D. Lockhart, Sloper John.
Girls’ race eight years and under – E. Hunt, E. Shannon.
Boys’ race eight years and under – T. Lockhart, M. Brasduse.
Girls’ race ten years and under – H. Shannon, N. William.
Boys’ race ten years and under – M. Cooper, W. Shannon.
Girls’ race twelve years and under – E. Storrar, M. Brasduse.
Boys’ race twelve years and under – S. Fillipcuke.
Girls’ race sixteen years and under – J. Paddock, L. Clarke.
Lively game of baseball between Fork River and Winnipegosis was won by Fork River. Score 19 – 4.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 16 – 1914

1914 Jul 16 – Both Drew Gun

There was a lively time at Ashville on Monday and it looked like a shooting bee at one stage. John Burnison, a section man, has been acting strange of late and among other things was threatening to shoot residents. He drive his wife and family from the house and shot a cow belonging to Fred Kemp, the storekeeper. He services of Constable Levins, of the town force, were called into requisition and in company with John Campbell, son of Glen, he went to the house. Burnison told the men to get out and to enforce his order moved emphatically reached for his gun. As he raised the weapon Levins flashed out his revolver and Burnison wilted, dropped the gun. He was then placed under arrest and brought to Dauphin by automobile.

JOHNNY SPRINTED.

When Burnison raised the gun, Johnny Campbell, who was in the room, waited for no further display of hostility, but bolted out the door, dashed through the potato patch and over the back fence. As far as known at Ashville he holds all records for this kind of a sprint up to the present.

1914 Jul 16 – Cadets at Sewell Camp

For the first time in cadets history of this province a camp has been conducted and found to be a success, the boys coming from all parts of the province. The days were given over to drills and training in the various branches of cadet work. Reveille call for rising at 6:30, breakfast at 7:00, cleaning up lines to 8:30, when Divine service was conducted, making it impressive with the boys taking part in the singing and responsive reading; 9 to 11 inspection in drills, musketry signalling, first aid, physical training. 12:00, noon dinner; 1:00 to 2:15, rest; 2:30 to 4:00, drilling and general training work; from 4:00 to 5:00, rest, shower bath, etc.; 6:00 p.m., tea; 7 to 9 games and sports; lights out at 9.45. The above makes up the daily routine of camp life, and for the men in charge there were not many idle moments.

SPORTS CURTAILED

It was planned to have Saturday given over entirely to games and sports, but owning to the great storm that passed over the camp this programme was greatly curtailed, only eleven events being run off. Dauphin won five firsts and one second in these events. Our boys, however, kicked because they could not make it an even six firsts. This was a very creditable showing, however, hen you consider tat there were over 20 contingents of cadets in camp, most of who entered teams for the sports.

SUNDAY ROUTINE

Sunday was given over to drying clothes and blankets after the washing of Saturday’ storm, we were able, however, to have our church parade on Sunday afternoon, when the boys made a fine showing in the march past Col. S.B. Steele, Camp Commandant.

GIMLI NEXT YEAR

The camp this year has been largely in the nature of an experiment, and both officers and men profited by the experience gained, which will be conductive to better results in next year’s camp, which we are informed, on good authority, will be held at Gimli, making a more interesting camp for the boys.

PRESENTATION OF PRIZES

Presentation of prizes won by the Dauphin Cadets will take place as soon as the prizes active from Winnipeg, when both Messers. Manby and Batty will express their appreciation of the boys in camp.

PRIZES WON

The following were won by the Dauphin cadets:
Seniors – 220 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st. 440 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st.
Juniors – Standing broad jump – C. Bossons, 1st.
Horse and rider – C. Bossons and E. Struthers, 1st.
Relay Race – Struthers, Bossons, Dunstan and C, Dickerson, 2nd.

1914 Jul 16 – Notes From the Firing Line

Our boys were seldom late for the Knife and Fork Parade.
Some boys were sick, but after one visit to the hospital tent and a taste of the medicine, were able to appear again at the dining tent.
It was a surprise to the officers in charge what a lot of food the boys could consume.
Sammy Dunstan only had seven eggs, three cups of coffee and five slices of bread and butter for breakfast on Friday morning.
It took a special dish to hold the porridge for the Tierney Bros.
2nd Lieut. Lowes’ tent was the quietest one in the whole came at 6.30 a.m.
After dinner on Wednesday G. White could hardly see and had o be taken to the hospital.
Who stole the pies from the cook’s tent on Friday, July 10th?
Instructors Manby and Batty were on duty from 6 a.m. to 11.45 p.m.; everybody here sleeps with one eye open.
The Dauphin Mouth Organ Band and Quartette, consisting of Messrs. Lowes, C. Batty, Gougeon, C. Fickerson, Dunstan and Murphy, made night horrible after hours.
Sammy Dunstan, with his long blue shirt, was the star of the baseball diamond.
Our four boys, who attended the ambulance class, passed with such high honours, that they have decided to stand practice here. The charge will be moderate.
With the aid of our expect signallers, Dauphin Cadets won the sham fight on Friday night.
We wonder by whose order the mixture was put into the tea on Friday night.
Instructors Manby and Batty had their beds made every day by the cadets. We don’t think.
Gougeon and Kuryk are open to give lessons in wrestling. Charges very moderate.
Our boys were always the first in the grub tent and the last out.
Mr. Campbell, of Souris (late of Dauphin), took some interesting group photos of our boys.
The mud fight a 8.30 p.m. Saturday night was a sight never to be forgotten.
The thanks of the boys are due to Mr. Moor and Mrs. Smithers, of the Winnipeg Y.M.C.A., for the assistance rendered us in various ways.

1914 Jul 16 – Fork River

Mr. Sinstiski, who has been here the last two weeks, took great interest of the Liberal party. He is said to be a cattle buyer but no stock has been shipped up to date. All the bests are off. Nuff said.
Hurrah for Sam Hughes! This northern county knows a good man when we have him, and what we have we will hold, as Scotty says.
Edwin King, of Kinistimo, Sask., is spending his holidays at his home here.
The members of L.O.L., No. 1765, attended the Methodist Church on Sunday, the 12th. Rev. Bro. Clixby, of Winnipegosis, preached the sermon. There was a fair turn out considering the hot weather.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, is spending her holidays with her grandmother. Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove, on the Mossey.
Walter Clark, of Paswegan, Sask., has returned home after spending a few days among friends here.
Mr. Runny, of Saskatchewan, liberal representative, has returned home with an enlarge cranium, as an election souvenir in remembrance of Fork River.
The Misses Briggs, of Brandon, are visiting at their aunt’s Mrs. T.N. Briggs.
Dr. Shortreed, at his meeting here, stated that the Roblin government was supported by the rabble. As the people here did not agree with these sentiments they did their best on the 10 h to leave him at home to think over the errors of speech, trusting that in future he will have respect for the opinion of others.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son returned from a week’s visit with friends at Million.
Mr. Sam Lowery returned to Winnipeg after a week’s visit here in connection with his farm.

1914 Jul 16 – Winnipegosis

Progress is being made with the new four rooms brick school. The building promises to be adequate to our needs for the present.
Contractor Neely returned on Monday from Dauphin.
Several new residences are going up in town. Among those building are Donald Hattie, Capt. Mapes and Steven Bros.
Coun. Hechter and J.P. Grenon are taking in the exhibition at Winnipeg this week.
The steamer Manitou will commence making trips to the north end of the lake this week.
Capt. Coffey and Jos. Grenon, Sr., are building a boat with a 65 foot keel. The boat will be operated by steam power.
The elections are over and a feeling of goodwill towards all pervades us. The stress of battle is often trying and during the heat of it we are prone to lose our tempers. But this we are glad to say is only a temporary lapse. Misrepresentation should never be resorted to even in the heat of battle. In the report sent the Press of the meting at Fork River, Mr. Lacey went far out of his way to misrepresent sent Mr. Grenon and others. There was no disturbance at the meeting as Dr. Shortreed will readily admit if appealed to. The truth should be the first consideration in sending out newspaper reports.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 30 – 1910

1910 Jun 30 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Disa Brown, aged 12 years, daughter of Goodman Brown, was drowned in the mouth of the Mossey River, Winnipegosis this week. She was bathing with several others, when one of her schoolmates, Miss Myrtle Parker got into deep water. Miss Brown went to her rescue. The bed of the river at this point is of treacherous soft mud and Miss Brown in trying to release her, sank in the mud, going over her head. Mr. Neil McAulay who happened to be near at hand rescued Miss Parker and then went for Miss Brown, but when her body was brought to the surface life was extinct.

1910 Jun 30 – Fork River

H. Nicholson from Dauphin came up here Wednesday and sold off the stock of Mr. Stonehouse who sold his farm some time ago.
Mr. Hughes, Conservative candidate for Gilbert Plains constituency is up here visiting the district and a meeting of the party will be held Thursday night when Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P. and Glen Campbell M.P., also Mr. Hughes will address the people.
Miss Alice Finch, teacher of the Mossey River School left here for her vacation to her home at Carman.
W. King came back from Gilbert Plains last week.
The Armstrong Trading Co. have bought out T.H. Whale’s business here and will open on the 1st of July with an up-to-date stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 19 – 1910

1910 May 19 – A Brilliant Sight

The sight of Halley’s comet as witnessed by a few of Dauphin’s citizens early Thursday morning will not be forgotten. It did not appear on regulation time of scientists at 11 Wednesday evening but came in view about 4 a.m. Thursday. It was a fine sight, appearing like a huge ball of fire with brilliant colour of light radiating from it. It was in plain view for twenty minutes.

1910 May 19 – Arrested at Dauphin

John Demoria, a half-breed was arrested at Dauphin Tuesday by Constable Hunking of Winnipegosis. Demoria is accused of breaking into the house of P. McLeod at Winnipegosis and stealing a quantity of goods, which were subsequently recovered. Constable Hunking took his man to Sifton Wednesday, where he was met with a rig and drove to Winnipegosis. Demoria will be tried on the charge of house breaking.

1910 May 19 – Death of Mrs. Glen Campbell

The wife of Glen Campbell, M.P., died at Gilbert Plains on Tuesday.

1910 May 19 – Travelled with a Corpse

Sitting with a corpse for several miles was the gruesome experience of Peter McEwen of Spruce Creek, Saturday last. He was bringing an aged neighbour, Wade Rothwell, to the hospital, when the gentleman expired on the road. Mr. McEwen’s feelings can be better imagined than described, when he made the discovery that Rothwell was dead. The remainder of the trip was hurriedly made and medical aid summoned, but the spark of life had fled.
Deceased was 74 years of age and resided at Spruce Creek for several years. He had been suffering from an old complaint from some time before his death. The remains were taken to Wawanesa for entertainment.

1910 May 19 – Winnipegosis

Dredging the mouth of the Mossey River commenced this week and will be continued during the summer, T. Poquette, of Selkirk, is in charge of the work.
Constable Hunking is at Dauphin, where he went to arrest a half-breed named John Demoria, who broke into the residence of P. McLeod and helped himself to various articles.
Capt. Coffey made a trip north last week in his boat. He was accompanied by Messrs. W. Sifton and F. Herchmer.
Trappers who brought in their catches of muskrat skins lately met with a surprise when they learned that the price had fallen about 25 percent.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 21 – 1910

1910 Apr 21 – Fork River

Mrs. Tilt came up from Dauphin last Friday.
D. Harrison who came back from England last week, passed through here for Winnipegosis. He reports having had a good rip and enjoyed himself in the Old Land.
Mr. Allan from Grand View has been making acquaintances in this district.
A dance was held in the Orange Hall last Friday night in honour of Miss J. Johnstone, who leaves for Alberta this week. Owning to the stormy night not many turned out, but those that went enjoyed themselves.
Mrs. Johnstone, with her family, left here for Alberta to join her husband.
J. Campbell who has been here for sometime, left for Gilbert Plains on Monday’s train.
Owing to the stormy day on Sunday no Methodist service was held here, and no English church service as held at Winnipegosis, both Ministers being quite unable to meet their appointments.
The English Church Sunday School and Bible Class is held every Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock. The officers are: Wm. King, superintendent; Mrs. Rice, Bible Class teacher; Mrs. Scrase, Sunday School teacher. All are cordially invited to attend.

1910 Apr 21 – Winnipegosis

The game of football is holding sway in Winnipegosis. Several enthusiastic meetings have been held and a splendid team has been organized. Subscriptions have been rolling in and the club has been established on a sound business and financial basis.
The prospects for the future success of the club are bright and hopeful. The following are the officials of the team:
President – Mart Collison
Vice – W. Parker
Sec.-teas. – Rev. W.E. Rowan
Captain – Dr. A.E. Medd
Executive Committee – Messrs. Theriow, Climie, and McCauley.
Several practices have already taken place.
Winnipegosis is established as an exam centre this year, for part 1 and entrance students.