Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 23, 1919

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Jan. 20th.
William Little was a visitor at the home of Tom Toye. Seems like old times to see Bill around again.
Mr. Lonn has bought the Seiffert farm on the Mossey. He has also bought section 11, the Grenon farm, and has bought his seed from the Bicton Heath seed farm for the coming season.
James Playford is going to turn the land upside down on the Hudson Bay holding. This land has been waiting for just such treatment for a long time.
James Laidlaw is busy hauling logs on to his homestead to build. Jim is a hustler and we would like to see a few more of his kind come to this district.
What about the corduroy leading to the Bicton Heath School? Is has not yet been completed. Does this mean that the children living on the east of this swamp are going to have another summer holiday? It is about time that the government stepped in and saw the work done.
Co-operative Grain Growers’ meeting will be held at the Bicton Heath schoolhouse on Wednesday, January 29th, at 7. Every farmer should be present.
Mr. Dumas, from North Dakota, has bought John McAuley’s farm in this district, and will be here in the early spring.
George Lyons was through this district this week. George is a good fellow, but is not always welcome in his capacity as tax collector.
Frank Sharp will leave shortly for Winnipeg. Frank says that there will be no mistake this time.

Fork River

Miss Katie Robertson has left on a visit to Neepawa.
Reeve Venables and Coun. Hunt are attending the convention of the Union of Municipalities at Winnipeg this week. Mrs. Venables accompanied Mr. Venables to the city.
Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, was a recent visitor to our town.
F.F. Hafenbrak, M. Cooper and H. Hunter went to Dauphin to attend the degree meeting of Coronation lodge, L.O.L.
Mrs. D. McEachren and son Donnie are visiting in Winnipeg.
Ed. Humphreys has returned to town. He is still smiling.
Miss Nellie Briggs, of Hartney, is a visitor at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs.
Mr. D. McLean and Miss Birdie McLean have gone to Regina. Birdie intends to spend the rest of the winter with her aunt, Mrs. Vance.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 21 – 1912

1912 Nov 21 – Ethelbert

Kenneth McLean has fully recovered and has now taken a trip to Vancouver for a change, and whilst there, will look into the prospects as to Coquitlam’s progress.
The British American elevator, is now taking its share of the wheat offering, but owing to the unfavourable and late season there is not much being offered.
A case came up before the P.M. for cruelty to a calf, and was decided in favour of the defendant. During the evidence it developed that there were a great number of barking and chasing dogs and in many cases even biting at teams and pedestrians, as they passed. Owners such of such dogs, were warned, that unless the dogs were kept under, they would be liable to be destroyed upon short notice.
Postmaster Scaife was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
The Pundy case was thrown out on technical grounds; had it not been so the results to all concerned might have been very serious. It is time that these petty exhibitions of spite and I’ll will should cease. The motto should be, live and let live and fair play for all, whether he be Jew or Greek, Barbarian or free, or as some might put it, everyone for himself, and the d—– take the hindmost.
Snow feel in considerable quantities on the 10th and the winter is now fairly inaugurated with us.
The danger of the arrangement of the switch, were nearly leaving bad results. A train backing up quietly, was not noticed and as the mail contractor was getting the mail from the car, he turned quickly across to reach the platform, and was within a few inches of a moving flat car before it was noticed, and he drew back. It behooves people to be careful, but all the same, the present system is full of danger, and some better provision as to lights and signals are needed, to protect the public, whilst going or coming in by train. It is now a long time, since the Ethelbert people, were promised by the company to make radical changes as to the switch and station. It seems as if nothing will be done, until someone is killed, or there is a bad fire.
J. McLean has now closed up his store business, and J. Marantz, another Jew, now carries on the business.
The Rev. Father Kraney is now stationed at Ethelbert, and conducts the services for the Greek-Roman religionists.
There are quite a number of marriages here at present, which incidentally, indicates hopeful prospects for the future.

1912 Nov 21 – FROM ANOTHER CORRESPONDENT

Mr. Marantz is right into business. He indeed deserves credit as a store manager as he is already doing a thriving business.
Miss Ethel Marantz, of Sifton, spent the week-end in Ethelbert.
Alex Katz, who is at present with Campbell & Simpson, at Dauphin, visited Ethelbert on a business trip Saturday. He reports the town looking as good as ever.
Threshing is going on at a good rate and will soon be finished.
Galicians of Ethelbert and the surrounding district had a concert on Saturday night following which was a dance.
At a recent meeting of the council the reeve and one of the councillors had a lively set-to, in which blows were exchanged.

1912 Nov 21 – Winnipegosis

J.P. Grenon, manager for the Armstrong Trading Co., who has been away the past three weeks on an extended trip to Lower Canada via the States, is expected home on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Steele, who have charge of the branch store at Mafeking, are making their semi-yearly sojourn hear at present.
Rev. H.H Scrase, anglican minister, is spending a couple of days in town visiting his parishioners.
Our senior teacher, Mr. Hulme, is suffering from a protracted cold. We are pleased to note that his interest in his pupils is extend to music; no doubt some of whom will benefit from free lessons on the organ in the school-room.
Dr. Medd is feeling the benefit of a recent vacation.
The Winnipegosis Christian League holds its weekly meetings Thursday evening at 8 o’clock in the Methodist Church, so far the interest has been well maintained and we trust that it will be beneficial.
Miss Isabelle McArthur, who has been visiting in Winnipeg for the past few weeks, is expected home early this week.
Mr. Scott, of the Standard Lumber Co., has returned from a trip to the city.
A Winnipegosis card circle is being formed by the enthusiasts which we trust will prove to be a large one.
Donald Hattie’s gasoline circular saw is in great demand at present, though the present weather is not consuming much of its product. We regret the open season is so unpropitious for the fishermen.
The Hudson’s Bay Co.’s business has been permanently closed.

1912 Nov 21 – Death of Ivor Humphreys

Ivor Humphreys, after several weeks’ illness, passed away on Sunday afternoon last at the comparatively early age of 42 years. Deceased came to the district from Brandon some eight or nine years ago and worked at Sifton for some time, afterwards removing to Dauphin. He filled the position of bookkeeper for the Steen-Copeland Co. for a considerable time and later entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, Fleming Wilson, under the firm name of Humphreys & Wilson, when they purchased the gents’ furnishing business of W.C. Turner. After continuing as a member of the firm for a couple of years, during which time his health was not good, he retired and accepted a position in the Dominion Lands office. This he filled until a few weeks ago when stricken down with his final illness.
The late Mr. Humphreys was of a retiring disposition but was held in esteem by all who enjoyed his acquaintance. He was a vocalist of conservable note and for several years was leader of the Presbyterian choir. He was a prominent Knight of Pythias and was one of the hardest works in No. 31, the first Pythian lodge organized here, and to his efforts much of its success is due. He was also one of the chief movers in instating the second Pythian lodge here, Empire No. 35.
The funeral took place on Monday and was held under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias, the members of both lodges attending in a body, as also the members of the uniform rank. The members of the Sons of England lodge were too in attendance. The service was held in the Presbyterian Church, which was crowded to the docs. Rev. D. Flemming conducted the service and in his remarks paid a warm tribute to the worth of the deceased.
The pallbearers were all past chancellors of Lodge No. 31 – S. Cohen, E. Mayo, J.W. Johnston, F.R. Copeland, G.A. Nicholson and J. Watson.
A widow and two small children are left to mourn the loss of a loving husband and father.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 17 – 1910

1915 Nov 17 – Burglary at Sifton

On the night of November 8th, the office of Paul Wood, Sifton, was broken into and some $1500 in notes stolen. The lock was wrenched and broken from the door, showing how admittance was gained. As soon as the robbery was known, Provincial Constable Rooke was telegraphed for. Up to the present no clue has been found, but it is generally thought to have been done by someone familiar with the premises.

1915 Nov 17 – Fork River

Miss Pearl Wilson is visiting her sister Mrs. Ivor Humphreys in Dauphin.
Miss Millidge, Organizing Secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary of the English Church paid us a visit this week and gave an excellent magic lantern entertainment in the Orange Hall. The subjects given were views of Japan and Bunyan’s Pilgrims Progress etc. A large crowd turned out and all were satisfied with the evening’s enjoyment.
Mrs. M. Snelgrove paid Dauphin a visit this week.
The young people around this district are now busy skating and having a good time.

1915 Nov 17 – North Lake

John Strasdin was up before P.M. Munson last week, for shooting on Sunday. He is going around singing a song entitled “There will come a time some day.”
Inspector Walker visited the schools around here.
Although Councillor Lacey gets mixed up with missing Post Offices, we notice he did not get mixed up with missing the tamarac swamp, on sec. 17, this year for we can now get through it with ease.
W. Williams has finished threshing around here.
Thos. Glendenning shipped the finest car of wheat this year, that ever went out of Fork River. Tom says its better than “our’n” and we guess he’s rights.
Jack Robertson still knocks around although he had a nasty smash.

1915 Nov 17 – Sifton

About four inches of snow fell on Saturday night. The sleighs are making a good showing already.
Isaac Silverwood, Dauphin, who had the contract of moving the R.C. Greek Rite Chapel at Sifton has successfully complete moving it to its new foundation across the road from its former position.
Craig Bros., of Dauphin, who are building the new R.C. mission building, having the building well under way. It is quite a credit to the appearance of the village or will be when finished.
W. Hewey, of Dauphin, who was in this vicinity boring wells, returned to Dauphin last week after a couple of days at unsuccessful attempts at penetrating the earth’s crust.
A C.N.R. bridge gang outfit were here for a few days building a much needed stock yard which will be a great convenience to stock shippers.
The daily train service lately inaugurated on the Winnipeg Prince Albert line via Dauphin is being much appreciated and marks another accommodation and is a credit to the management.

1915 Nov 17 – Winnipegosis

The Council met at Winnipegosis last week when some important business was done.
Dr. Medd, who has been in this district for some time, residing at Winnipegosis, left here this week for pastures new.
Miss Millidge, Organizing Secretary of the Anglican Women’s Auxiliary, gave an entertainment, in the schoolhouse, which was attended by a large crowd. During the interval Miss Doris Hurst and Miss D. Parker sang some songs. Mrs. Bradley and several ladies of the local auxiliary had a chat with Miss Millidge.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 2 – 1911

1911 Nov 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron of Mowat Centre is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mat Little has finished his implement warehouse on Main Street and has his machinery under cover.
Miss Alterton, teacher of Mossey River School; Miss M. Nixon, of Pine View; H. Benner, of Tobeski School; J Spearing, of North Lake School and John Nowside are attending the teachers’ convention at Dauphin and no doubt education will advance by leaps and bounds on their return.
D. Kennedy, manager of the Armstrong Trading Co., is busy preparing for winter with an up-to-date stock of all kinds. Miss Pearl Wilson has charge of the dry goods department, and Carpenter Stonehouse is erecting a wood house and tin house and other improvements, while Prof. Gordon is busy wielding the paintbrush trying to beat Jack Frost.
Our Grit friends seem to be having a high old time hunting mission ballot boxes. When Fork River disfranchised the deputy returning officer was missing. They seem to have a way of losing something every election and now Sir Wilfy missed the premiership and since then Joe has been missing and the other little fellow was floundering around in the Press a week ago and he’ll soon be missing too if this weather continues.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 24 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 24 – Typhoid Fever Outbreak

Typhoid fever has broken out among the school children at Winnipegosis and the school has been closed.

1912 Oct 24 – Fork River

J.H. Martinson, of Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, real estate agent, was here on business last week.
Alex. Cameron, of Mowat Centre, was a visitor to Dauphin on business a few days ago.
Mr. Sturdy, who has been all summer at the A.T. Co. store at Winnipegosis, is assisting Mr. Kennedy in the store here now.
Samuel Reid, returned home after a week’s holiday with friends at Brandon.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family spent a few days in Dauphin lately with friends.
J. Parker, of the Stark farm, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Captain Russell, of Sifton, was a visitor at D. Kennedy’s lately.
Miss Comber returned home after spending the summer at Selkirk.
Mr. Silverwood, of Dauphin, was in town for a short stay the guest of Wm. Williams, lumber merchant.
George Sumpton, of Dauphin, is here for a short stay with Mr. Snelgrove.
The railway traffic is getting so heavy on this line that it takes two locomotives to handle a train, especially when they take the side track for it.
The Press of October 17th refers to Macdonald election as a “Howling Farce” and has not got sand enough to print the exact majority.
F. Champion, of Cleveland, England, was here a few days ago in connection with a business transactions.
Harvest festival service at All Saints’ will be held in the church at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon, Oct. 27th.

1918 Oct 24 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Lloyd Winters, Ashville, killed in action. (Lloyd Levi Winters, 1896, 2129348)
Lieut. Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, killed. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Arthur Day, Dauphin, gassed and wounded. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
Pte. J.W. Lane, Dauphin, wounded. (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
Pte. Go.F. King, Dauphin, wounded. (George Francis King, 1891, 151775)
Pte. W.K. Goodman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Wilbert Karl Goodman, 1894, 294203)
Pte. W.J. Bothwell, Makinak, wounded. (Wilfred James Bothwell, 1899, 2184456)
Pte. L. Ward, Grandview, wounded. (Lewis Ward, 1896, 2129152)
Pte. J. Lahaie, Makinak, wounded. (Joseph Lahaie, 1889, 291727)
Lance Corp. D. Stewart, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. E.L. Abrey, Dauphin, wounded. (Ernest Lincoln Abrey, 1889, 865837)
Pte. C.A. Blackmon, Ochre River, wounded. (Charles Alexander Blackmon, 1897, 1001157)

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair was held on Oct. 10th. The weather was perfect but this militated against the attendance for threshing was going on. The attendance of children was good, still some of the schools were very poorly represented owing to the rush of work on the farms. The lack of teachers for some of the schools and the many changes in teachers in others, was a serious handicap to the welfare of the club during the past years.
Lawrence Rowe won the Bank of Commerce prize for the vest pair of pigs at either the Fork River or Winnipegosis fairs, with a very creditable pair of Yorkshires.
It is to be hoped that the club will receive greeter interest from the parents in the coming year and so encourage the children in this work.

PRIZE LIST.
The following is a list of prize winners at the fair:
Grain growing:
Wheat sheaf – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Wheat, 20 lbs – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Rye sheaf – Albert Janowski 1st.

Stock, Calves:
Dairy – Donald McEachern 1st, Arthur Jamieson 2nd, Dave Nowosad 3rd.

Calves:
Beef – Bob Williams 1st, Kate Williams 2nd, Steve Beyko 3rd, Bill Williams 4th.

Pigs:
Pair – Lawrie Rowe 1st, Alice Nowosad 2nd.

Poultry:
Pen of Barred Rocks (3) – Kate Williams 1st, Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Pen Buff Orpingtons – Dave Nowosad 1st, Stanley Lundy 2nd.
Pen White Leghorns – Stanley Benner.
Pen Black Minorcas – Mike Borowski 1st, Bob Williams 2nd.
Pen Brown Leghorns – Bill Williams 1st.
Pen White Rocks – Arthur Jamieson 1st.

Gardening: Half bushel potatoes – Rosie Sowenski 1st, Alex. Zaplitney 2nd, Nicola Poctylo 3rd, Annie Sowinski 4th.
Six carrots – Charlie Jager 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Lawrie Rowe 3rd.
Six turnips – Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Six beets – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Two cabbages – Annie Beyko 1st, Mike Borowski 2nd, Charlie Jager 3rd.
Pumpkins – Nellie Kolokicvk 1st.
Onions – Alice Nowosad 1st, Charlie Jager 2nd.

Cooker:
Loaf of bread – Viola Rower 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Buns – Viola Rowe 1st.

Sewing – Viola Rowe 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Patching – Viola Rowe 1st, Emily Strasdin 2nd.
Fancy work – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Canning – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Longest ??? thistle root – Peter Zaplitney 1st, Fred Jager 2nd.
Woodwork – Bob Williams 1st, Dave Nowosad 2nd, Belle Williams 3rd.
Ducks – Sophie Beyko 1st.
Butter – Rosie Sowskine 1st, Mary Mieke 2nd.
Knitting – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Scribblers – Yumtaska 1st, Annie Chornoboy 2nd, Nellie Karwstski 3rd.

Writing:
Grade I – Horace Thompson 1st, Clara Dewberry 2nd.
Grade II – Ivor Humphreys 1st, Alley Dewberry 2nd.
Grade III – Bernard Hunt 1st, Lulu Thompson 2nd, Golkie Schuchett 3rd.
Map of Manitoba – Dave Nowosad 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Arthur Jamieson 3rd.

Handwork:
Grade I – Mossey School.
Grade II – Mossey School.
Nature Book – Beatrice Rowe 1st.
Collection of butterflies – Irene Bailey 1st.

1918 Oct 24 – Winnipegosis Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Boys’ and Girls’ Cub Fair was held at Winnipegosis on Friday, Oct. 11th. This was the fist event of the kind ever held in this locality and thanks to the efforts of the public school teachers, was a decided success. Keen interest was displayed by the residents of South Bay, and a large number were on hand to view the fair.
The judges were Miss Speechley and Mr. Murray, of the Extension Department of the M.A.C.
The sewing exhibit, largely due to the efforts of Miss M. McMartin, was a credit to Winnipegosis schools. The chickens were good, as were also the display of vegetables. With a greater interest taken by the surrounding schools we hope to double or treble our entries another year.
The secretary and organizer was Mr. H.L. Williams, public school principal.

PRIZE LIST.
Class I: Pair of pigs – Harry Whale 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Single pig – Wallie Pouliet 1st, Evelyn Groff 2nd, Harry Whale 3rd, Gordon Rognvaldson 4th.
Class II, Chicken Raising: Pen of 3 Barred Rocks – Walter Keen, South Bay, 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd, Wilfred Moyer, South Bay, 3rd, Ignace Bobinsky, South Bay, 4th, Mike Samimski, South Bay, 5th, Anthony Bobinsky, South Bay, 6th.
Pen of 3, any other breed – Daisy Walmsley 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Class III, Gardening: One dozen potatoes – Beverly Schaldemose 1st, Elizabeth Moyer, South Bay, 2nd, Ruth Groff 3rd, Evelyn Groff 4th, Mike Verchaski 5th, Gladys Cartwright 6th.
Dozen large onions or 3 large turnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, Elizabeth Moyer 4th.
Dozen parsnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd.
Dozen carrots or beets – Mary Marchenski 1st, Mike Samimski 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, John Moodry 4th, Elizabeth Moyer 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Class IV, Cooking: Two loaves of bread – Lottie Moore 1st, Attie Hechter 2nd.
Dozen oatmeal cookies – Margaret McAuley 1st, Lottie Moore 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd, Alice Hechter 4th.
Dozen cornmeal muffins – Ruth Groff 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Lottie Moore 3rd.
Class V, Sewing: Work bag – Mary Magnuson 1st, Ester Hechter 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd.
Knitted article – Cecil Paddock 1st, Mary Marchinski 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Evolda Whale 4th.
Sewing apron – Mary Magnuson 1st, Verna Denby 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Esther Hechter 4th, Evolda Whale 5th, Charlotte Adam 6th.
Red Cross Collection – Evolda Whale 1st, Mary Magnuson 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Charlotte Adam 4th, Addie Ketcheson 5th.
Night gown or tea apron – Charlotte Adam 1st, Addie Ketcheson 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Amelia Adam 4th.
Table runner – Helen Macaulay 1st, Lenore Denby 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Dust cap and work apron – Lenore Denby 1st, Tina Marchenski 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Piece of crochet work – Attie Hechter 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Lenore Sehaldemose 4th, Mary Marchenski 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Two Red Cross articles – Lenore Sehaldemose 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Ruth Groff 4th.
Middy suit – Lottie Moore 1st, Lenore Sehaldemose 2nd.
Class VII, Weed Contest: Collection of seeds of 10 noxious weeds – Ignace Bobinsky 1st, Mary Fleming 2nd, Ella Martin 3rd, Arthur McLellan 4th.
Class VIII, Woodwork Contest – Stanley Miket 1st, John Wallace 2nd, Nieh Rudiak 3rd, Alec. Ogryzlo 4th.

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River

Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, spent the week-end with his parents.
There was a very good turnout to the Thanksgiving service on Sunday.
Mr. Fred Tilt is building a house next to the Orange Hall. He has retired from farming and will reside in town.
Dunc Kennedy and party from Ochre River passed through the town on Sunday on their way to Winnipegosis.
Pte. Venables, who has just returned from overseas, is visiting his brother, T.B. Venables.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ Church and the attendance was good. It is hopeful sign when interest is taken in our young people.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 23 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 23 – Committed Suicide

Douglas Casey, aged 27 years, was found dead in a bedroom in the King Edward hotel, Gilbert Plains, on Wednesday. The man had committed suicide by taking carbolic acid. Little is known about Casey. He worked during the fall for a Joseph Carbert and is supposed to hail from Vancouver.
Coroner Harrington went to Gilbert Plains and after hearing the facts of case decided an inquest was not necessary.

1913 Oct 23 – Sad Drowning Accident

Isaac, the three year old son of Wm. Miner, who lives three miles south-west of town, was drowned in the Vermillion River on Wednesday afternoon. The little fellow strayed to the river and in some way fell in.

1913 Oct 23 – Telephone Line to Winnipegosis

The Manitoba Government telephone line has been completed to Winnipegosis.

1913 Oct 23 – Fork River

Mrs. Albert Cooper left to meet her husband at a place where they will take up their residence for the winter months.
Mr. Rowe, of Rathwell, came in on Saturday’s train and rustled up two cars of stock. He left on Monday’s train. Mr. Rowe is a record buyer as he pays the price and gets the goods in short order.
Miss Cox. From Ontario is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Fred. Cooper, on the Fork River, for a short time.
Wm. Northam left for Weyburn, Sask., where he will spend a few months on business in connection with his trade.
Wm. Hunkins, assessor is busy these days traveling a round among the settles west.
The long distance government telephone has been installed in the post office
Several automobiles passed through here on Sunday. The cars were bound for Winnipegosis.
Mrs. J. Gunness and Mrs. I. Humphreys returned from a visit to the Lake Town and enjoyed the ride on the C.N.R. local express.
We notice W. King has a very nice bunch of Berkshire pigs from registered stock which he is clearing out at $5.00 a piece.
Wm. Houston has returned from Winnipegosis and intends assisting in the A.T. Co. store for the winter. “Scotty” is a real hustler behind the counter and we are glad to see him back.

1919 Oct 23 – Fork River

Will Northam, has purchased a house and lot in town from J. MacDonald and will take up his residence with us.
E. Lockwood and family have arrived from Regina. Mr. L is the new station agent.
Bert Little and family have arrived from Chicago to take up their residence.
Ben Cameron has charge of the White Star elevator and is handling considerable grain.
A pleasant time was spent at the Orange Hall on Friday evening, when a dance and presentation was given to our returned boys. Proceedings started at nine sharp and a good crowd turned out for the occasion. Dancing occupied those present until eleven o’clock when an address was read by the se.-treasurer of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee. Presentation of watches was next on the program. Corp. Briggs, Pte. Briggs, Pte. Gasena, Pte. Reader and Drive S. Craighill each receiving a watch as a small token for the service they have rendered their country. Pte. A. King who was “over there” for four years returned while the dance was on but for some reason did not get his watch with the rest. I wonder why? The banquet for the boys is to be given on Friday evening, Oct. 31. Let us hope everyone will turn out and have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 22 – 1914

1914 Oct 22 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughter, are spending a few days in Winnipeg with friends.
Miss Gertrude Cooper spent the week-end with her parents and returned to Dauphin on Monday.
Mrs. I. Humphreys has left for a few days visit to Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin. They were accompanied by Mrs. W. Johnston, of Fork William.
Mrs. W. Davis’ sale on Thursday, was a very successful one. Dan Hamilton, of Dauphin, wielded he hammer and good prices were realized on everything put up, particularly his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Joe Johnston, of Fort William, is spending a few days here visiting his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end here with Miss Gertrude Bradley, teacher of Mossey River School.
The mayor and alderman of Winnipegosis, were visitors to this burgh one day last week.
Mr. Simpson, of Winnipeg, was here lately paying the money for work done in this municipality. The Armstrong Trading Co.’s store was used as a paying office.
The first dance of the season came off in the Orange Hall on Friday last. It was well attended and all had an enjoyable time.
Alex. Cameron returned on Wednesday from a business trip to Dauphin.

1914 Oct 22 – Winnipegosis

Our town is again assuming the even tenor of its way now that many of the fishermen are at the north end of the lake.
Mrs. P. McArthur has gone to the Pas to visit her daughter.
Inspector James made an inspection of the post office here last week. He stated that Postmaster Ketcheson had everything in good order.
J.W. McAuley took a carload of cattle to Winnipeg a few days ago.
Coun. F. Hechter was a Dauphin visitor in the early part of the week.
It is learned that there is every prospect of the township of swamp lads on the west of the town being thrown open for homesteading. Should the Dept. of the Interior consent to do this it will do much to help the development of the town. The land is good and with thrifty settlers on it would yield prolifle crops.
Mrs. W. Johnston has returned from Dauphin.
The sensation of late was the arrest of the man who had charge of the dredge here during the summer. He pleaded guilty and was let off on suspended sentence by the police magistrate at Winnipeg. It is learned that when the total of the goods taken was summed up to amounted to a large sum. The question now comes up, who was it that squealed, and did the squealer participate in the spoils. Yes, there is going to be further developments and one sensation is likely to follow another.