Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 12 – 1914

1914 Nov 12 – Men for Second Contingent

The following have successfully passed the preliminary medical examination here this week conducted by Dr. Bottomley. The men are now drilling at the barracks under Sergeant-Major. Goodall and Sergeant Highfield. There are 50 men wanted from district No. 10., which territory is almost all in the Dauphin district, for the Second Contingent.
A.G. Cockrill, Dauphin. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
T. Boakes, Swan River. (Thomas Boakes, 1892, 81084)
A. Kerr, Swan River.
F. Conley, Benito.
S.J. Ellis, Dauphin.
W.J. Falconer, Dauphin. (William John Falconer, 1894, 106218 SGT)
J.L. Younghusband, Dauphin.
J.W. Cleaver, Dauphin. (John Wesley Cleaver, 1890, 106138)
Andrew Andrew, Dauphin. (Andrew Andrew, 1883, 81019 CSM)
J.W. Meek, Dauphin. (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578 QMS)
Glen H. Pettis, Dauphin. (Glen Haslome Pettis, 1893, 81704 SGT)
H. Knight, Dauphin.
A. Richmond, Swan River.
W.H.G. Cattermole, Grandview. (William Harry Gage Cattermole, 1879, 81140)
H. Wade, Dauphin.
D. Leigh, Ashville. (Duncan Blake Leigh, 1893, 106356)
A. Towns, Grandview. (Alfred Towns, 1893, 81894 LCP)
Jas. Walkey, Dauphin.

1914 Nov 12 – Fork River

Mr. R.M. Bell has left for a short vacation to Brandon and Russell.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown, of Alexandria, Ont., are visiting their daughter, Mrs. A. Snelgrove.
Mrs. Joe Hunter left for home at Severn Bridge, Ont., after spending a few weeks with her sons, Sam and Harry.
The school was closed on Wednesday. The kids enjoy a holiday in the middle of the week or at any other time.
Mr. T.B. Venables has left for a vacation trip to Boissevain. Major Humphries is in charge of the farm during his absence.
Mr. Sam Hunter has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mr. Sydney Howlet, of Million, paid his friends of this burgh a visit, while passing through from Winnipegosis.
The Orangemen’s patriotic ball on November the 5th was admitted by all to be the best event of the kind ever held in this little burgh. There were fifty couple present, Dauphin, Dublin Bay, Sifton and Winnipegosis represented. The music was furnished by the Russell family and several others. From the opening at nine o’clock with the grand march till the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at 4:30, everything moved along pleasantly and most enjoyably. The ladies furnished a good supper. Speeches and songs were given during that interval. The song, “It’s a Long, Long, Way to Tipperary” by the three Russell children was well received. Ice cream was served by the ladies of the Women’s Auxiliary and a nice sum realized for the fund. The Orangemen wish to thank the public for the assistance given towards making it a success.

1914 Nov 12 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Bradley is fast recovering from the effects of the burning she received on Hallowe’en night.
Mr. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Monday.
Dr. Medd took Mrs. R.C. Birrell to Dauphin on Monday for treatment. Mrs. B. has been in unsatisfactory health for some time past.
Capt. Coffey arrived on Wednesday’s train.
We see that Charlie White has been appointed fishery overseer for the province. We hope that this does not mean that our old friend may have to pull up stakes and locate elsewhere.
What Winnipegosis would be without a curling club it is hard to say. It is truly our chief winter sport. A meeting was held recently to organize and the feeling prevails that the game will be as popular as ever this season. Dr. Medd is president and Fred McDonald secretary-treasurer. The curlers have taken over the rink from Mr. Whale, and will manage it themselves this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 22 – 1914

1914 Oct 22 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughter, are spending a few days in Winnipeg with friends.
Miss Gertrude Cooper spent the week-end with her parents and returned to Dauphin on Monday.
Mrs. I. Humphreys has left for a few days visit to Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin. They were accompanied by Mrs. W. Johnston, of Fork William.
Mrs. W. Davis’ sale on Thursday, was a very successful one. Dan Hamilton, of Dauphin, wielded he hammer and good prices were realized on everything put up, particularly his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Joe Johnston, of Fort William, is spending a few days here visiting his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end here with Miss Gertrude Bradley, teacher of Mossey River School.
The mayor and alderman of Winnipegosis, were visitors to this burgh one day last week.
Mr. Simpson, of Winnipeg, was here lately paying the money for work done in this municipality. The Armstrong Trading Co.’s store was used as a paying office.
The first dance of the season came off in the Orange Hall on Friday last. It was well attended and all had an enjoyable time.
Alex. Cameron returned on Wednesday from a business trip to Dauphin.

1914 Oct 22 – Winnipegosis

Our town is again assuming the even tenor of its way now that many of the fishermen are at the north end of the lake.
Mrs. P. McArthur has gone to the Pas to visit her daughter.
Inspector James made an inspection of the post office here last week. He stated that Postmaster Ketcheson had everything in good order.
J.W. McAuley took a carload of cattle to Winnipeg a few days ago.
Coun. F. Hechter was a Dauphin visitor in the early part of the week.
It is learned that there is every prospect of the township of swamp lads on the west of the town being thrown open for homesteading. Should the Dept. of the Interior consent to do this it will do much to help the development of the town. The land is good and with thrifty settlers on it would yield prolifle crops.
Mrs. W. Johnston has returned from Dauphin.
The sensation of late was the arrest of the man who had charge of the dredge here during the summer. He pleaded guilty and was let off on suspended sentence by the police magistrate at Winnipeg. It is learned that when the total of the goods taken was summed up to amounted to a large sum. The question now comes up, who was it that squealed, and did the squealer participate in the spoils. Yes, there is going to be further developments and one sensation is likely to follow another.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 11 – 1917

1917 Oct 11 – Week’s Casualties

Pte. Thos. Roy, Ste. Amelie, wounded. (???)
Pte. R.C. Irven, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Russell Clarmont Irven, 1896, 696917)
Pte. L.H. Lacey, Fork River, prisoner of war. (Lorne Henry Lacey, 1897, 1001230)
Pte. L. Tortignon, Ste. Rose, prisoner of war. (???)
Lieut. W.W. Code, Dauphin, has been wounded by shrapnel in left arm and thigh, and was admitted to a hospital in France on the 3rd inst. (William Wellis Code, 1892, 246)

1917 Oct 11 – Fork River

G.A. Warrington, surveyor from the public works dept., Winnipeg, has been here laying out roads for the municipality.
Mr. Wipplewind is here from Montana looking over the land with a view to locating.
The harvest home festival in All Saints’ Church was well attended. Rural Dean Price, of Swan River, was the preacher for the afternoon service. Mr. and Mrs. R. Forster sang a duet during the offertory which was much appreciated. The church was tastefully decorated with flowers and grain.
Ernest Munro, of Brandon, is visiting his sister, Mrs. A. Hunt.
D.F. Wilson, secretary-treasurer, has been appointed on the local exception board under the Military Act.
We regret to learn that Pte. L.H. Lacey is reported to be a prisoner in Germany.
Mr. and Mrs. John Allan, of Grandview, spent the week-end with Mrs. T. Dewsberry.
Much interest is taken in the liquor cases which come up for trial next Tuesday in Winnipegosis.
Renew your subscription to the Herald promptly.

1917 Oct 11 – Winnipegosis

The Winnipegosis Home Economics Society held is regular monthly meeting on Friday evening, Sept. 21st. The special feature of the evening’s programme was an excellent talk on “Fall Sewing in the Home,” by Mrs. E. Bickle. She also have a very practical demonstration of a neat and cosy outfit for a small school girl. Two pleasing contributions to the programme were a solo my Miss Jarrett and a dainty 10 cent tea served by Mrs. Thomas in aid of the H.E.S. library fund.
On Tuesday, Oct. 2nd, the society held an auction rummage sale in aid of the Red Cross. The people of the town contributed liberally towards the collection of goods and a large crowd of both men and women attended the sale. Miss McMartin acted in the capacity of auctioneer. Bidding was high and spirited, particularly among the ladies. Two of the most gratefully received donations were a beautiful band painted satin pillow given by Mrs. George Spence, and a 7-weeks’ old pig given by Mr. Harold Bradley, and selling for $10.15. Net proceeds of the sale amounted to a considerable sum.
The excitement of late was the liquor cases. Four of the “boys” had to come across with the coin. The balance of the cases come up next Tuesday for hearing. Inspector Gurton, of Dauphin, is prosecuting. Mayor Whale is hearing the cases.
Pte. H.C. Irven, of this town, is reported among the wounded.
Dr. Rogers, of Dauphin, was among the outsiders in town this week.
What about the “informer?”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 9 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 9 – Accidently Shot

Robt. Charlier, a young man 23 years of age, was brought from Ochre River on Monday to the hospital here. He was pulling a shotgun out of a wagon when it was accidently discharged, the contents lodged in his groin. He is reported progressing satisfactorily.

1913 Oct 9 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy and daughters were visitors to the Lake Town with Mr. Theo. Johnston.
E. Williams returned from Dauphin after attending the rural deanery meeting at that point.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, was visiting friends at Fork River and returned home on the “All Saints” special.
The long distance telephone gang are busy here getting ready to put up the wire which will fill a long felt want.
The elevator is in full swing, with John Clements, in charge he having moved his family from Dauphin here for the winter.
Miss N. Millidge, organizer and managing secretary of the Church of England Women’s Auxiliary, gave an address in the church to the W.A. members, which was well attended
Miss Millidge is the guest of Mrs. W. King, president of the W.A. until Tuesday when they both drove to Winnipegosis to hold a meeting with the members of the W.A. at that point. A successful meeting was held.
Mr. Monnington, of Neepawa, arrived here for a few days chicken shooting and is the guest of his uncle, John Robinson on the Mossey.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. King and Mr. and Mrs. E.E. McKinstry and G.F. King paid our burg a visit in an automobile. They were after the fleet winged prairie chicken. The party were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dunc. Kennedy.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Winnipegosis, spent a short time with her aunt, Mrs. T.N. Briggs lately.
John Robinson and Mr. Monnington have returned from a pleasure trip to Winnipegosis. Both were delighted with that hustling town.
We hear that the government dredge Laurier, which was been under the water for three years, was resurrected. Why was the dredge not left where it was as it was less expense to the country under water, as the other dredge has been all summer poking around a little island that Pat and Mike would take away in a wheelbarrow in less time. The sooner there is a change in the present management the better the settlers will like it as we have competent men around here who are able to run this part of the bis.
Mr. Brandon & Sons, of Mowat, have purchased a large gasoline threshing outfit and are in the field for business. With the number of machines at work if the weather continues fine, the threshing will wind up in another week.

1919 Oct 9 – Fork River

Miss Millidge, organizer of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Anglican Church, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. W. King.
Mrs. Vinning and daughter, of Winnipeg, have returned home after spending a week with Mrs. J. Reid.
T.N. Briggs has invested in an oil pull tractor. This power will turn over the land more rapidly. It’s more speed that counts these times.
Bert Little has taken a trip to Chicago. Fred Tilt is in charge of the store during his absence.
The Cypress River paper, in a recent issue contains the following item:
“Mr. and Mrs. N. Little both old time residents of Cypress River and town this week. They left home in May for an overseas tour, and visited the battlefields of France and Belgium, securing many photos of great interest. They sailed to New York on a French boat and went from there to Toronto near which city Mr. Little purchased a new model 1920 McLaughlin 6 cylinder car and motored to Cypress. They are now on their way home. The same cherry Nat as of old looking as young as ever.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 8 – 1914

1914 Oct 8 – Boy Found

The four-year-old son of Joseph Lareche, of McCreary, who was lost for four days, was found on Saturday alive, but nearly exhausted. He has since recovered entirely.
Twenty-five of the boy scouts from here, under direction of Scoutmaster D.S. Woods, participated in the hunt.

1914 Oct 8 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Davis and Mrs Grenon have returned from a short visit to Dauphin.
Professor Robinson and several young folks took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Friday night. They report a good time.
All will be pleased to hear that Andy Rowe is getting around again after his two weeks’ illness.
Mr. Bradley, of Saskatchewan, has disposed of a car load of horses while here and is returning with a car of stock.
School has commenced again and the “pimple scare” is about over. What will we have next? We seem to be catching something all the time since the telephone arrived.
Miss Eva Storrar has returned from Rainy River, Ont., and intends living on the homestead for the present.
Children’s day will be on Sunday, Oct., 18th. There will be a special children’s service and singing in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock. All are invited to come and help to make this a rally day for the children to remember.
The rain of Sunday was the means of putting out the running fires.

1914 Oct 8 – Winnipegosis

The finishing touches are being put on the school by the painter this week. Contractor Neely finished his work and left on Saturday for Dauphin. The school is a credit to the town.
Our new police magistrate, Mr. J. Seiffert, has tried several cases of late and his decisions go to show he has good judgement. It is a good idea to mix common sense with judicial decisions sometimes. Some of the cases brought before the P.M. would test the ability of the historic “Philadelphia lawyer.”
The fishermen have commenced to prepare for the winter camp. The steamer Manitou went north with a cargo of supplies this week.
The P.M. has laid a charge against a local official and Wm. King, J.P., of Fork River, will try the case.
Mr. Wallace Dudley and Miss Phoebe Denby were married on Monday, the 5th, by the Rev. D. Flemming, of Dauphin. The young people are popular and their many friends wish them every happiness.
Mrs. John Denby is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Mrs. Kenneth McAuley is visiting at Dauphin.
Fred. McDonald has returned to spend the winter months with us. The great question the boys now ask is, will Freddy repeat his curling stunts this winter.
Rev. B. Thorensson, of Winnipeg, united Miss Toby Oddsson and Mr. John Goodman in the holy bonds of matrimony on the 7th inst.
Watch the Herald for more marriage notices. We have more coming, but “mum’s the word just now.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 1 – 1914

1914 Oct 1 – Fork River

Mr. Lintick and F. Storrar attended the Teachers’ Convention and report an interesting time. What with summer, Christmas, Easter and Bank holidays and conventions, there are very few teaching days left, and yet we are told the teachers have a hard time and are underpaid and grant us a favour to teach our rural schools a few weeks for a year’s pay. Where does the farmer’s holidays come in who has to pay the piper.
George Lyons, weed inspector for ward 5, paid this burgh a visit on business with the necessary documents.
A fire set out by some of our western friends has been raging the last week and considerable hay has gone up in smoke. Where are all our fire rangers? They generally turn up in winter time.
Mrs. Venables and daughter, who have been spending a few weeks with Mr. T. Venables, on the Mossey River, left for their home at Boissevain.
Mr. D. Kennedy has received from Winnipeg another bow wow for his dog emporium. No doubt a large cash prize will be offered for a suitable name for his dogship.
Miss Brady left for her home at Winnipegosis, the health officer having closed the Mossey River School for a short time on account of chicken pox. The kiddies are having a high old time singing “everyday will be a holiday in the sweet by and by.”
Mr. Swartwood, agent for the International Harvester Machine Co., is here taking stock of the surplus machinery and repairs.
Mrs. R. McEachern has returned from a few days visit with friends at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that D.F. and F.R. are to draw cuts to see which shall climb and fix the pulley on to of ??? staff. The gate receipts are to be donated to the ??? fund. It will be quite a climb for such featherweights. Next.
One day last week some evil disposed person broke into the house of Mr. T. Glendenning at Lake Dauphin and turned everything over, but failed to find what they were looking for. We trust the parties will be found and made an example of.

1914 Oct 1 – Winnipegosis

The school will be finished this week.
Frank Hechter was a passenger to Dauphin on Tuesday.
D.G. McAuley returned from Dauphin on Wednesday.
The teachers from these parts who attended the convention at Dauphin returned home on Saturday.
The fishing season closes this week and the fishermen are returning. The fishing was exceptionally good and everyone appears to be satisfied. Forty cars were shipped out. About 175 men were engaged in the work.
Boys shooting about the neighbourhood make it dangerous for parties who are about. A bullet the other day struck Harold Bradley’s house. The gun was taken from the boys.
John Tidsberry, high constable of Dauphin, was here on Wednesday. John says “we’ll lick the Germans or know the reason why.”