Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 29 – 1914

1914 Oct 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Davis has sold off all her stock and rented her farm and left with her mother for her old home in Illinois.
Mrs. W.D. King and daughter, of Dauphin, were visitors at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. Stevenson, Dominion government engineer, of Winnipeg, was here in connection with finishing the dredging work of Fork River and Mossey River. Wm. King and Sandy Munro went over the proposed work with Mr. Stevenson, who later left for Winnipeg to report.
Sam Hunter has rented the Davis farm. Sam’s a hustler.
Mrs. Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have left for a trip east.
James Parker has rented the Company from Mr. Grenon.
The pupils of All Saints’ Sunday school, spent the afternoon on Saturday at the farm of W. King, superintendent. Games of ball, running and other sports were indulged in until supper time. Mrs. King, Mrs. McEachern and Mrs. C.E. Bailey, attended to their “inner wants” at the supper table, after which a tired, but happy bunch of kiddies left for their several homes.
Nat Little has completed his new livery farm. It looks well with a coat of red paint.
Mrs. J. Robinson, of Mowat, has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
The Orangemen of Fork River are advertising a patriotic ball is to be held in the Orange Hall on the right of November the 5th. The proceeds are to be donated to the Patriotic Fund. Everyone is cordially invited to come and help in making this a successful ball. God Save the King.

1914 Oct 29 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. C.L. White were passengers to Winnipeg on Monday. Mrs. W. is to have her eyes treated in the city.
Constable W.H. Hunking was a Dauphin visitor this week.
A number from here will take in the Patriotic Ball at Fork River on Nov. 5th, Guy Fawkes anniversary.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston is visiting at Dauphin this week.
The lake is several feet lower than in past years, in fact, it is said to be lower than in the recollection of the oldest inhabitants.
The winter fishing season opens on Nov. 15th, and most of the fishermen and supplies have gone north. The indications are that there will be a good winter’s fishing.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 22 – 1914

1914 Oct 22 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughter, are spending a few days in Winnipeg with friends.
Miss Gertrude Cooper spent the week-end with her parents and returned to Dauphin on Monday.
Mrs. I. Humphreys has left for a few days visit to Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin. They were accompanied by Mrs. W. Johnston, of Fork William.
Mrs. W. Davis’ sale on Thursday, was a very successful one. Dan Hamilton, of Dauphin, wielded he hammer and good prices were realized on everything put up, particularly his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Joe Johnston, of Fort William, is spending a few days here visiting his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end here with Miss Gertrude Bradley, teacher of Mossey River School.
The mayor and alderman of Winnipegosis, were visitors to this burgh one day last week.
Mr. Simpson, of Winnipeg, was here lately paying the money for work done in this municipality. The Armstrong Trading Co.’s store was used as a paying office.
The first dance of the season came off in the Orange Hall on Friday last. It was well attended and all had an enjoyable time.
Alex. Cameron returned on Wednesday from a business trip to Dauphin.

1914 Oct 22 – Winnipegosis

Our town is again assuming the even tenor of its way now that many of the fishermen are at the north end of the lake.
Mrs. P. McArthur has gone to the Pas to visit her daughter.
Inspector James made an inspection of the post office here last week. He stated that Postmaster Ketcheson had everything in good order.
J.W. McAuley took a carload of cattle to Winnipeg a few days ago.
Coun. F. Hechter was a Dauphin visitor in the early part of the week.
It is learned that there is every prospect of the township of swamp lads on the west of the town being thrown open for homesteading. Should the Dept. of the Interior consent to do this it will do much to help the development of the town. The land is good and with thrifty settlers on it would yield prolifle crops.
Mrs. W. Johnston has returned from Dauphin.
The sensation of late was the arrest of the man who had charge of the dredge here during the summer. He pleaded guilty and was let off on suspended sentence by the police magistrate at Winnipeg. It is learned that when the total of the goods taken was summed up to amounted to a large sum. The question now comes up, who was it that squealed, and did the squealer participate in the spoils. Yes, there is going to be further developments and one sensation is likely to follow another.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 15 – 1914

1914 Oct 15 – Gasoline Boat Burned

The gasoline boat, “Lake View,” owned by Mr. Frank Hechter, was burned at the north end of Lake Winnipegosis last week, together with supplies and fishing nets. The boat was in charge of Dan Martin. Mr. Hechter places his loss a near the $3000 mark. There was no insurance.

1914 Oct 15 – Doctors on Strike

It is said that since the declaration of war, the Swan River physicians have refused to threat German measles.

1914 Oct 15 – Fork River

Max King and Karl Erikson have left for the north end of the lake for he winter’s fishing.
Mr. W. Howitson has left for Winnipegosis and is working in the A.T. Co store. “Scotty” is always in great demand.
Mrs. Peter Ellis has returned from a trip to Ontario.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor with Mrs. D. Kennedy this week.
Miss M. Craighill and Mrs. W. Davis have returned from a short visit to Winnipegosis and report a pleasant time.
Mrs. Bert Cooper and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with Mr. W. Cooper, Sr., on the Mossey River.
Mr. D.F. Wilson has been confined to the house for a short time. It’s nothing “catching.” We trust he will recover.
Next Sunday, Oct. 10th, will be Children’s day. Special services will be held for the children. We trust there will be a good turn out to this service. All are welcome.
Mr. Mullens and friend here motored from Cypress River and are spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. A. Cameron, of Mowat Centre.
Mr. Eloftson, from Ontario, was up to W. King’s for the surveying teams and outfit which have been here all summer. He is moving them to Gimli ready for the winter’s work in that section.
Some one was enquiring of us last week if the A.T. Co. was still running the dredge at Winnipegosis.

1914 Oct 15 – Winnipegosis

Sid Coffey is going fishing and Harold Bradley will run the picture show while he is away.
Frank Hechter was a passenger Dauphin bound on Monday.
C.F. Stewart, insurance agent returned to Dauphin on Monday after a short business trip here.
Alex Bickel went to Dauphin on Monday.
Frank Hechter’s gasoline boat was burned at the north end of the lake last week. The loss is considerable as the boat was loaded with fishing apparatus and supplies for the winter. Dan Martin was in charge of the boat, and he says the origin of the fire is a mystery.
The Standard Lumber Co. is putting in a camp for the winter at Graves’ Point.
The steamer Manitou has already made several trips to the north end of the lake with supplies for the fishermen. Capt. McDonald is in charge of the boat.
It is expected that fully 150 men will be engaged in fishing this winter. The wages paid will be considerably lower than in the past two seasons.
Joe Johnston, from Fort William, is among the late arrivals. He reports times dull at the lake town. He will fish this winter.
Capt. Coffey’s new boat made her first trip to the north end of the lake last week. The boat has not been christened yet, but when the sparkling bottle of wine is broken the word “Mildred” will appear.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 8 – 1914

1914 Oct 8 – Boy Found

The four-year-old son of Joseph Lareche, of McCreary, who was lost for four days, was found on Saturday alive, but nearly exhausted. He has since recovered entirely.
Twenty-five of the boy scouts from here, under direction of Scoutmaster D.S. Woods, participated in the hunt.

1914 Oct 8 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Davis and Mrs Grenon have returned from a short visit to Dauphin.
Professor Robinson and several young folks took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Friday night. They report a good time.
All will be pleased to hear that Andy Rowe is getting around again after his two weeks’ illness.
Mr. Bradley, of Saskatchewan, has disposed of a car load of horses while here and is returning with a car of stock.
School has commenced again and the “pimple scare” is about over. What will we have next? We seem to be catching something all the time since the telephone arrived.
Miss Eva Storrar has returned from Rainy River, Ont., and intends living on the homestead for the present.
Children’s day will be on Sunday, Oct., 18th. There will be a special children’s service and singing in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock. All are invited to come and help to make this a rally day for the children to remember.
The rain of Sunday was the means of putting out the running fires.

1914 Oct 8 – Winnipegosis

The finishing touches are being put on the school by the painter this week. Contractor Neely finished his work and left on Saturday for Dauphin. The school is a credit to the town.
Our new police magistrate, Mr. J. Seiffert, has tried several cases of late and his decisions go to show he has good judgement. It is a good idea to mix common sense with judicial decisions sometimes. Some of the cases brought before the P.M. would test the ability of the historic “Philadelphia lawyer.”
The fishermen have commenced to prepare for the winter camp. The steamer Manitou went north with a cargo of supplies this week.
The P.M. has laid a charge against a local official and Wm. King, J.P., of Fork River, will try the case.
Mr. Wallace Dudley and Miss Phoebe Denby were married on Monday, the 5th, by the Rev. D. Flemming, of Dauphin. The young people are popular and their many friends wish them every happiness.
Mrs. John Denby is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Mrs. Kenneth McAuley is visiting at Dauphin.
Fred. McDonald has returned to spend the winter months with us. The great question the boys now ask is, will Freddy repeat his curling stunts this winter.
Rev. B. Thorensson, of Winnipeg, united Miss Toby Oddsson and Mr. John Goodman in the holy bonds of matrimony on the 7th inst.
Watch the Herald for more marriage notices. We have more coming, but “mum’s the word just now.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 1 – 1914

1914 Oct 1 – Fork River

Mr. Lintick and F. Storrar attended the Teachers’ Convention and report an interesting time. What with summer, Christmas, Easter and Bank holidays and conventions, there are very few teaching days left, and yet we are told the teachers have a hard time and are underpaid and grant us a favour to teach our rural schools a few weeks for a year’s pay. Where does the farmer’s holidays come in who has to pay the piper.
George Lyons, weed inspector for ward 5, paid this burgh a visit on business with the necessary documents.
A fire set out by some of our western friends has been raging the last week and considerable hay has gone up in smoke. Where are all our fire rangers? They generally turn up in winter time.
Mrs. Venables and daughter, who have been spending a few weeks with Mr. T. Venables, on the Mossey River, left for their home at Boissevain.
Mr. D. Kennedy has received from Winnipeg another bow wow for his dog emporium. No doubt a large cash prize will be offered for a suitable name for his dogship.
Miss Brady left for her home at Winnipegosis, the health officer having closed the Mossey River School for a short time on account of chicken pox. The kiddies are having a high old time singing “everyday will be a holiday in the sweet by and by.”
Mr. Swartwood, agent for the International Harvester Machine Co., is here taking stock of the surplus machinery and repairs.
Mrs. R. McEachern has returned from a few days visit with friends at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that D.F. and F.R. are to draw cuts to see which shall climb and fix the pulley on to of ??? staff. The gate receipts are to be donated to the ??? fund. It will be quite a climb for such featherweights. Next.
One day last week some evil disposed person broke into the house of Mr. T. Glendenning at Lake Dauphin and turned everything over, but failed to find what they were looking for. We trust the parties will be found and made an example of.

1914 Oct 1 – Winnipegosis

The school will be finished this week.
Frank Hechter was a passenger to Dauphin on Tuesday.
D.G. McAuley returned from Dauphin on Wednesday.
The teachers from these parts who attended the convention at Dauphin returned home on Saturday.
The fishing season closes this week and the fishermen are returning. The fishing was exceptionally good and everyone appears to be satisfied. Forty cars were shipped out. About 175 men were engaged in the work.
Boys shooting about the neighbourhood make it dangerous for parties who are about. A bullet the other day struck Harold Bradley’s house. The gun was taken from the boys.
John Tidsberry, high constable of Dauphin, was here on Wednesday. John says “we’ll lick the Germans or know the reason why.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 17 – 1914

1914 Sep 17 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, Sept. 4th. Coun. Richardson absent. The minutes of last meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from Mr. P. McArthur, the Bank of Ottawa, Winnipeg Industrial Bureau, Highway Commissioner, Western Municipal News, the Solicitors, the Land Patent branch of the Department of Interior, Dauphin Press, A.H. Corbett, and the Municipal Commissioner.
Lacey – Bickle – That the clerk look up the accounts of money expended on the boundary line between Mossey River and Dauphin municipalities and then notify the Dauphin municipality of a claim for 50 percent of the amount.
Lacey – Toye – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt – Hechter – That the clerk prepare a list of the lands liable to be sold for taxes.
Bickle – Hechter – That the accounts presented for the building of the Fork River – Winnipegosis road and the corduroy between wards 2 and 3 be passed.
Lacey – Bickle – That road commissioner Toye supply the clerk with a description of the work done on the Fork River – Winnipegosis road giving starting and finishing points and number of miles constructed.
Bickle – Lacey – That the clerk have notices posted in all the schools in the municipality notifying the ratepayers to pay arrears of taxes within two weeks after which time action will be taken to collect.
Toye – Bickle – That the clerk write the Dept. of Public Works and ask that steps to taken to inspect the work done under the government grant and that a cheque for the amount of the grant to send to the office of the municipality.
Bickle – Toye – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the Reeve.

1914 Sep 17 – Fork River

The official national prayer service for this mission was held in All Saints church on Wednesday evening. Mr. Wilson gave an address on the present national crisis and prayers were offered up for the restoration of peace. Very few turned out. It was not a dance or a picture show. Further comment is unnecessary from a patriotic point of view.