Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 17 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 17 – Committed for Trial

One night last week several windows were broken in the store of Katz & Brackman at Ethelbert. I.J. Katz, who happened to be in town, swore that he saw Peter Pundy and another party that he could not recognize in the dark, break the windows with an axe. Pundy was brought before Magistrate Skaife, on the charge, and after two nights were consumed in hearing and evidence, was committed for trial. F.E. Simpson appeared for the prosecution and J.L. Bowman for the defence.

1912 Oct 17 – Ethelbert

A preliminary hearing was held before Police Magistrate R. Skaife on the evenings of the tenth and eleventh of Oct. An information, charging Peter Pundy, was laid by H. Brachman of the firm of Katz & Brachman, with breaking four panes of glass and other damages, amounting to over $20, during the night of Oct. 10th, to their store on Main Street. Considerable interest was manifested by the Ruthenian population, the court being crowded each night until midnight and feeling ran high. Mr. Simpson, of Dauphin, put the case for prosecution, and Mr. Bowman for the defence. After a prolonged and careful hearing, it was thought by the magistrate, the charge needed further investigation and Pundy was remanded for trial at Portage la Prairie. He was allowed at large, after entering into bail himself in $200, and two others for $150 each, for his appearance at Portage to stand his trial.
The Elevator is nearing completion and will need only a few more days to make it ready to receive the crop.
Norman Booth, the buyer for the Elevator Co., went west a few days ago, where he was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Olive Ward, the daughter of Cross Ward, postmaster of Deepdale. Mr. Booth and his wife have returned to Ethelbert, where they will reside until the grain season is over. Cross Ward is an old resident of Ethelbert and our hearty congratulations are given to the newly wed couple, that they may live long, and prosper in their new undertaking.
Geo. Marantz has commenced business in John McLean’s store, and is doing his best to attract customers by a good display of new goods in his windows.
J. McLean expects to transfer the balance of his stock still unsold at an early date. He retains the grist mill which he hopes to run as usual this winter.
The ever present and crying need of the hour, is now, and ever will be, good roads to move the crops.
There are rumours that something will be done, in this direction, by the Council availing themselves of the government’s offer to pay two-thirds of the cost of constructing main roads through the district.

1912 Oct 17 – Fork River

J. McCaulay, Massey-Harris travelling agent, was here a few days on business with D. Kennedy.
Peter Ellis, after spending the week-end with his family, has returned to Kamsack.
Samuel Bailey took a trip to Dauphin on business last week.
Clem Kennis, who has been at Prince Albert for some months, returned home and states the harvest very late all over the West.
Robertson & Snelgrove are shipping their threshing outfit to Yorkton for the season and Pat Powers is going along. Nothing like lots of “Power.”
Miss L. Clark, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of her parents.
Rev. H.H. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit lately to meet some persons from Meadow Portage on church business.
Mrs. G. Tilt, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the farm on the Mossey.
Miss Margaret and Gertrude Kennedy are visiting with Mrs. Chas. Wilkes of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Scelly was up last week from Dauphin visiting Mr. Clemons.
Mr. Glendenning is visiting his uncle, Thos. Glendenning, on the Mossey for a few days.
Next Sunday, Oct. 20th, special children’s service at the English church at 3 o’clock, and on Sunday, Oct. 27th, the annual harvest festival service will be held and a suitable sermon for the occasion will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. All are welcome to the services.
Rev. Sam. Cruch, late of Glenella and family, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Kennedy for a few days on their way to Tullesford, Sask.

1912 Oct 17 – Sifton

Church of England services are held regularly every fortnight at Sifton (Tuesday evening) and also at other times by arrangement.

1912 Oct 17 – Winnipegosis

Harvest festival service will be held at Winnipegosis school house at 7.30 on Oct. 20th. Collection will be made for the Home Mission Fund. The sermon will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase, minister in charge.
J.R. Parker, of the Standard Lumber Co., has gone to Winnipeg to endeavour to secure men for work in the woods.
Jos. Birrell took his child to the hospital at Dauphin on Monday.
Active preparations are being made for the winter’s fishing. The prospects for fishing are said to be exceptionally poor.
The cattle industry in these parts is proving most profitable. Several shipments were recently made to Dauphin. Campbell Benson was the purchaser.

1918 Oct 17 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. William Alfred Cleland, Dauphin, killed. (William Alfred Cleland, 1894, 865829)
Pte. Chas. Gray, Dauphin, killed. (???)
Pte. Francis Ingram Rogers, Asheville, wounded. (Francis Ingram Rogers, 1899, 1001239)
Pte. Harold Allan Dunlop, Dauphin, wounded. (Harold Allan Dunlop, 1897, 718788)
Pte. Campbell, Winnipegosis, wounded. (???)
Pte. Chris Benson, Dauphin, wounded. (Christian T Benson, 1887, 1000081)
Pte. Orval Wood Struthers, Dauphin, gunshot wound in right leg. (Orval Wood Struthers, 1895, 151250)
Pte. J.H. Paulson, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Johann Hannibal Paulson, 1891, 2504017)
Pte. W.S. Hamilton, Dauphin, gassed. (???)
Pte. George Edward Buchannon, Dauphin, wounded. (George Edward Buchannon, 1894, 1000633)
Pte. Ray Neely, Dauphin, wounded. (Ray Neely, 1897, 1000556)
Pte. William Meldrum, Dauphin, wounded. (William Meldrum, 1897, 1000280)
Pte. Harry Hamilton Olson, Dauphin. (???)
Pte. E.N. Humphries, Dauphin, wounded. (???)

1918 Oct 17 – Churches and Schools Closed

By order of the health officer of the town all churches, schools and public places of amusement have been closed on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

1918 Oct 17 – The Man of the Hour
Gen. Spanish Flu.

1918 Oct 17 – TOWN OF DAUPHIN
SPANISH INFLUENZA
WARNING TO THE PUBLIC

This disease is very prevalent in some parts of the world today, and has reached our Town. It is therefore advisable that people generally should know something about it, its symptoms, and the measure and method of its communicability; and should be advised as to the general rules for its restraint and cure.
Spanish Influenza is generally believed to be a variety of the old type of Influenza with which we have been long familiar, with in addition possibly some increase of virulence, due to the conditions and places in which this present epidemic had its origin.
It is a “Germ” disease, and is conveyed from one suffering from it to others, by the secretions of the mouth, nose, throat and lungs. The use of towels or cups in common will readily spread it. Coughing, spitting or sneezing by anyone who has it, in the company of others, will readily spread it. Crowded and ill ventilated living rooms and sleeping places, as well as ill ventilated and insanitary places of work are conductive to its dissemination.
The following are the symptoms which generally accompany an attack:
Fever, headache, backache, inflamed throat, and often bleeding from the nose. In addition to these symptoms, in more severe cases a troublesome cough with a sense of constriction in the chest follows. From these develop the case of Broncho-Pneumonia which is the feature of the disease mainly responsible for deaths.
If cases should come to your neighbourhood, think first of Prevention. Don’t go to any house or place in which there may be persons with the above symptoms. Don’t let any person suffering from these symptoms come to your home or place of business. Don’t use common towels or drinking cups in any place. Keep away from people who have the disease, if you do you won’t get it. If on the other hand, you mingle with people who have it there is no known method of disinfection which would prevention your taking it. Therefore stay away and keep in he open air and sunlight as much as possible.
If you should be attacked by the disease, go to bed at once. Rest and Warmth are very important factors in its cure. Take warm drinks, live on fluids, and send for your Physician. Having done these things promptly, there is usually little danger. Not doing them, and taking chance, may turn a very mild illness into a very serious and sometimes a fatal one.
Attendants on all cases should wear gauze masks.

E. BOTTOMLEY,
Health Officer, Town of Dauphin.

1918 Oct 17 – Fork River

Mr. Hanson, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., spent a few days in town lately.
Leo Beck has purchased the threshing outfit of Charles Bugg and is making the straw fly.
There are now five outfits threshing within a radius of three miles so good progress is being made with the work.
Potatoes, yes sir. From a pound of Victory seed 50 lbs. were produced. When I comes to grain or vegetables Fork River district stands at the top.
Mrs. Moxam, from Winnipeg, is visiting at the home of Mr. Sam Reid.
So far the Spanish Flue has laid its hand lightly on us. However, we must not be behind the times or out of fashion, so that anyone from now on who gets a cold will claim to have had an encounter with His Nibbs King Flu. But, say, if we could only resort to the remedy of happy memory, hot toddy, wouldn’t the male portion of the population be suddenly afflicted.

1918 Oct 17 – Sifton

Sunday automobile travelling is just as prevalent as ever. The writer counted nine in town last Sunday. There are lots of places where yellow paint and rotten eggs could be used a plenty.
The foundations for the large Ruthenian hall has been laid and the material is on the ground.
It is about time the foreigners (and most of them are still foreigners and pride themselves on it) learned to take notice of our national statutory holidays. On Thanksgiving Day may loads of grain drove into market, the owners knowing nothing of the day, caring less, and most indignant at not being able to unload. But let an Anglo-Saxon try t hire one on a saint’s or holy day – nothing doing!
Philip Wood and Leslie Kennedy and Miss Lottie Isaacovitch and enjoying a short holiday here.
This district is not behind most of the districts in grain yields. Thirty bushels to the acre is quite common, and as high as 40 and even 50 bushels to the acre has been threshed.
W. Terin still delivers fresh fish to town, easing up the H.C.L.
An average of two car loads of live stock are shipped from here each week throughout the year, excepting possibly three months.
Several gas tractors have been sold at this point, with a promise of many more next season.
Our roads, and especially our culverts, are generally speaking, a disgrace. The wear and tear to rolling stock and automobiles, not to mention horse flesh, is beyond calculation. A culvert one foot or more above the grade was responsible for a small automobile wreck on Saturday in ward 6. The council will be asked to pay the damages.
Glorious Indian summer, with a forecast of winter within the next two months at least.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 19 – 1913

1913 Jun 19 – Fork River

George Tilt, noxious weeds inspector, is very busy serving notices on the farmer at their homes.
Wm. Stonehouse, builder and contractor, has left for Winnipegosis to help build a mansion for J.P. Grenon.
Mrs. Ivor Humphreys has opened an up-to-date boarding house, which will fill a long felt want in this burgh. We wish her success in the undertaking.
Frank Chase and John Clemens, of the Northern Elevator Co., Dauphin, were here on business lately.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy has returned from a few days’ visit with friends at Dauphin.
Wm. Northam left for Weyburn, Sask., to spend the summer months with friends and intends combining business with pleasure.
F.B. Lacey, of Mowat Centre, has returned from a short visit to the Lake Town on business.
Pat Powers was here renewing acquaintances. He still wears that genial smile, by the Powers.
The seeding is over and everyone is looking for a bumper crop as the weather is ideal and everything is looking O.K. Butter and cream are coming so fast that it keeps that white apron in a continual whirl.
Dr. Leadbeater, veterinary surgeon, paid us a visit lately.
We are sorry to hear Charles Clark, one of our most respected old-timers, is leaving us for Saskatchewan.
R.C. Sparling, real estate agent, of Dauphin, spent a couple of days here lately on business. He left for Sifton on the Fork River special.
T.B. Venables has purchased an Evinreede motor engine for his new boat from Max. King, agent for the Scott Motor Co.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 16 – 1910

1910 Jun 16 – Dauphin Man Drowned

The body of John Mitchell, a former employee of Johnson & Andrews merchant tailors of this town was found in the Red River near Middlechurch, five miles from Winnipeg, on Tuesday of this week. Deceased will be remembered by many of our citizens, having lived in Dauphin for a year and a half.

1910 Jun 16 – Fork River

M. Snelgrove and Mr. Stonehouse visited Dauphin last week.
J. Butler, Frank Ballard and Reeve Grenon of Winnipegosis visited Fork River on Tuesday last.
C. Parks sold out to the Armstrong Trading Company and they have put Mr. Kennedy who has been managing their Fishing River store in charge. They intend doing an up-to-date trade.
Pat Powers opened up a butcher’s business here this week. This is what was wanted.
A large sign petition is being got up here for government elevator. Everything points that this village is determined to go forward.
F.B. Lacey and daughter Harriet, visited Dauphin last week on business.
W. King returned on Saturday from the north.
Mrs. M. Snelgrove left here on Friday for a visit to her home in Ontario.
A very well represented meeting of the women’s auxiliary was held at the Mission House last Saturday and it was decided to send a delegate to attend the annual meeting in Winnipeg on the 13th inst. The choice feel to Mrs. H.H. Scrase, secretary.
Mrs. Stonehouse left here on Friday to see her brother in Ontario.
J. Spearing and A.B. Hodgson visited Dauphin last week.
Miss Collins who has been visiting her sister here returned to McCreary last Friday.
Mr. Waddington representing Messrs. Somerville & Co., of Brandon was here last week doing business.
R.J. Avison from Gilbert Plains came here last Tuesday and held a meeting of the Grain Growers Association. The attendance was very good and Mr. Avison spoke well on the work the Association was doing for farmers in Manitoba. The following officers were elected:
President, S. Bailey; vice, W. King; secretary-treasurer, D.F. Wilson; directors, A. Hunt, G.E. Nicholson, T.N. Briggs, C.E. Bailey, F. Cooper, J. Pokyla; auditor, G. Nicholson. The meetings will in the future be held on the second Saturday of each month at 8 o’clock at D.F. Wilson’s office.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 15 – 1911

1911 Jun 15 – Died From Injuries

Anthony Lefia, a Galician, had both his legs taken off by a box car passing over them in the railway yards here on Sunday morning last. How the accident happened will remain a mystery as the unfortunate man could not speak the English language and was unable to make any explanation. It is suppose that he was attempting to steal a ride when he fell under the moving wheels.

He was taken to the hospital immediately after the accident and everything possible was done for him but Dr. Harrington, who had charge of the case, held out little hope for recovery and as anticipated he passed away early Wednesday morning.

Lefia had been out from Austria but a few months and leaves a wife and family in that country.

1911 Jun 15 – Struck by Lightning

Jas. Bedard, who had been employed on the Burrows’ lumber drive at Grandview, was returning from driving a number of men to the camp on Wednesday last, when he was caught in a thunderstorm and struck by lightning. The electric fluid struck him on the back of the head and ran down his back and side, severely burning him. When discovered Bedrad was unconscious and was immediately taken to Grandview and afterwards brought to the hospital here, where he received treatment and is now on a fair way to recovery.

Bedard is well-known in Dauphin, having been connected with Clark Bros. livery stable the greater part of last year.

1911 Jun 15 – Fork River

Miss M. Nixon; teacher of Pine View School is taking a trip to Winnipeg on business.
It has been raining everyday for about a week and the roads are bad, yet Mr. A. Hunt is smiling, twin girls.
Mr. C. Clark is visiting Dauphin this week.
W. Williams is busy making the sawdust fly. The mill is in full swing under the management of Pat Powers, of Missouri.
The Rural Dean, Rev. S. Wiley, of St. Paul’s Church, Dauphin, will hold a service in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, on Sunday, June 18th, at 3 o’clock and at Winnipegosis in the evening at 7:30.
A. Hodgeson is visiting among his numerous friends at the Fork. He says mosquitoes are a nuisance.
E.H. Walker, school inspector of Dauphin, is here visiting the schools.
Mr. McLeod of Winnipeg is busy buying fat cattle for shipment.
The ladies of All Saints W.A. held a meeting at the rectory recently, considerable business was arranged for the coming years work.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 18 – 1912

1912 Apr 18 – Fork River

Rev. A. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, visited Messrs. H.H. Scrase and Wm. King, warden, on church business.
R. Rowe and bride, returned from their wedding trip and were greeted at the station with the usual rice fusillade. We wish them good luck. Next.
Mr. B. Tate returned to Dauphin, having spent her Easter holidays with Mr. and Mrs. T. Bailey and renewing old acquaintances. Her numerous friends are always pleased to meet their old friend and teacher.
Pat Powers returned from a visit to Winnipegosis and intends starting business shortly in the Albert Edward block.
The C.N.R. will have to put on a watchman to keep those ponies from devouring the ties and rails as they have things about cleaned up, barring the wire for the cemetery, which comes next to culvert pipes.
Nat Little is busy unloading a car of Cockshutt implements of all kinds.
A concert was held in the Orange Hall on Thursday the 11th. A good programme was furnished and there was a very good crowd present. We appreciate the assistance given by people from Winnipegosis and others in helping to make the program a success financially. Mrs. D. Kennedy and Miss Pearl Wilson of the committee instructed Mr. W. King, chairman, to present the proceeds to Mr. Scrase, on their behalf. After supper a good time was spent tripping the light fantastic until morning.
Mr. Biggs, teacher of Pine View School, returned from a trip to Winnipeg.
Miss Gertie Cooper returned to Dauphin after spending Easter holidays with her parents.

1912 Apr 18 – Winnipegosis

Business Men Organize Board of Trade 40 Members Enrolled $1000 Subscribed
A meeting of the business men of Winnipegosis was held on Monday evening to consider the advisability of forming a Board of Trade. There was a large attendance and everyone present were unanimously in favour of this and determined that an aggressive policy of publicity and advertising be put in hand at once. Over 40 members were enrolled at the termination of the meeting and nearly $500 subscribed; it is anticipated that over $1000 will be received in membership fees by the time the new Board of Trade is constituted.
The growth of business at this point has been rapid during the past two years the fish catch which produces a revenues of over $150 000 each winter will soon be overshadowed by farming and other industries that ill utilize the natural resources of the country adjoining the lake. The surrounding district is vert fertile and with a very low expenditure on draining the land can be made the best in Canada; frost is practically unknown of the prairie farmer are unknown. Farmers here have been shipping wheat out west for seed this spring, and for the rancher and dairy man hay can be had in unlimited quantities and an up-to-date creamery has already made a success and is now paying the highest prices.
The new railway that is being built along the West shores of Lake Manitoba will soon be here, opening up a splendid country that will be quickly settled. The dredging of the river to Lake Dauphin will be copulated this summer by the Government dredges and Winnipegosis will become the natural shipping port for the produce form an already prosperous and tickle settled district.
Any advice and assistance from the Dauphin Board of Trade will be greatly appreciated, or, better still, come and spend a week end at Winnipegosis; there is to be another meeting on Monday next, April 22, the business men here will sure give you a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 10 – 1913

1913 Apr 10 – Titanic Disaster Just a Year Ago

The sinking of the Steamship Titanic occurred on the Atlantic Ocean on April 15th, 1912. It will be a year next Tuesday, April 18th, since the disaster occurred, which resulted in the greatest loss of like in the history of marine travel.

1913 Apr 10 – Fork River

Bert Steele passed through from Mafeking on his way to Winnipegosis.
Dave Shinks has left for his homestead at Vonda, for the summer.
Several left here the other evening chaperoned by Captain Storrar, to take in the dance given by the ladies of Winnipegosis. They returned in the wee sma’ hours of the morning singing “the girls we left behind us.” We are not sure whether it’s the ones here or at Winnipegosis. They ought to know.
Wm. Davis and J.W. Lockhart have returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
The council has given us the auditors report in book form at last and they are to be commended for a step in the right direction. We trust that they will go farther and state what the money is paid out for. The report states Jack Smith got $20 and we don’t know whether it’s for cutting lamb’s tails or scrub or rubbing down a large pair of calves to take the selling down or what. Let’s know what the money is paid for in future, please.
Rev. S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, was here on church business between trains.
Harold Clark, of Dauphin, spent the weekend with his parents.
Pat Powers returned from his winter’s work with the Williams Lumber Co. at Lake Dauphin. Sid. Gower, engineer of that Co. is also taking a vacation and renewing acquaintances around town.
The annual vestry meeting of All Saints’ Church was held on April 3rd in the church. The chair was taken by the Rural Dean, the Rev. A.S. Wiley, M.A. The minutes of the last meetings were read out by the sec.-treasurer also the treasurer’s report, which was accepted and found satisfactory. The Rev. H.H. Scrase acted as vestry clerk and the officers elected for the coming year were Mr. W. King, minister’s warden; C. Baily, people’s warden; Wm. King, sec.-treasurer; Delegate to synod, Wm. King.
The snow is leaving us fast and there is water everywhere and yet the “philosopher” is heard to remark this is getting to be a “darned dry hole” to live in. We don’t know exactly what he means, but still this is a great country for guessing, and we are wondering if our municipal fathers are in possession of the deed of land they intend building that boundary bridge on? Or is it to be the same old chestnut like the north ditch, just ask for it or whistle for it after. We are informed there is a largely signed petition against the building of the bridge. Its time to call a halt of this bridge building and repair, for safety, what we have and give us good roads to them before we go bust entirely. We have a good country and good settlers and all we need is a little common sense and judgement by those at the head of affairs and we will be all right and leave those brainy problems alone.
A vote of thank was passed to Mr. Wm. King for his work as warden for the past 10 years. The Sunday School has been kept open all winter and there has been a very fair attendance. A vote of thanks was passed to the rural dean for coming up and acting as chairman also to Mr. and Mrs. Scrase for their work in the mission.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 14 – 1912

1912 Mar 14 – Fork River

Pat Powers, having finished his lumber contract has accepted the position of head chef for the Williams Lumber Co.
F.B. Lacey of Oak Brae, visited Winnipeg and interviewed the Government regarding a grant for this municipality.
Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, visited H.H. Scrase and finds he is doing nicely and will soon be around again. We are all pleased to hear it.
The young people of Fork River took in the Leap Year ball in the Victoria Hall, Winnipegosis and report a good time. Some tried to discover the north pole but did not locate it. Better luck next time.
Wm. King took a business trip to Winnipeg to interview the Government regarding an elevator at this point and other business. He also attended the Provincial Grand Orange Lodge in session which was well represented from all parts of Manitoba and good work accomplished.
Mrs. Johnston and son, of Winnipegosis, are visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
A children’s service was held in All Saints’ Church by Mr. H. McCartney, to which a special invitation was extended to the parents. There was a large turnout and all were well pleased with the service.
Miss Pearl Wilson has kindly taken the place of Miss Dixon as organist.
The scribe wishes to thank the other fellow in the Press for correcting him, for when he said five dollars he was giving him the benefit of the doubt. Open confession they say is good for the soul and he must feel relieved after telling us it cost seven dollars a rod which knock his year about gratis work higher than a cocked hat. As for the P.O. and P.M. still doing business at the old stand is one of the greatest farces for wasting Government money we know of. The catalogue and circular trick must be about run out. How about those maps and pamphlets he mentions. Just the thing to start a picture gallery in our friend’s hen house so he can give biddy lessons in geography while she’s laying right in your mitt, friend.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 13 – 1913

1913 Feb 13 – Baran Committed For Murder

The adjourned preliminary trial of John Baran, under arrest for the murder of Constable Rooke, was concluded on Saturday. Magistrate Munson remanded the prisoner to Portage la Prairie, to stand his trial at the next criminal court on a charge of murder.
The court was called to order at eleven o’clock, the court house being crowded by a throng who were anxious to hear the outcome of the trial.
The prisoner had to be assisted into the court by two officers and appeared in a very weak condition. Later he fell from his chair to the floor, where he was allowed to lie during the trial.
Dr. Harrington gave evidence as to his attendance on Constable Rooke, and stated death to have been caused by the bullet wound, and resultant weakness.
When the charge was read the prisoner declined to make any statement. Bertram Ryan, for the defence, admitted that Baran had fired the shot which killed Constable Rooke, but pleaded justification on a plea of provocation, claiming Baran could not have known it was an officer of the law who was demanding entrance and then breaking in the door of his house, and that Baran had a right to defend his home and had fired the shot with the intention only of frightening away whoever was forcing his door. He asked to have the charge at least modified to one of manslaughter.
In passing sentence, Magistrate Munson severely criticized the past character of the prisoner and had no hesitation in committing him on a charge of murder to stand his trial at the Portage spring assizes.

1913 Feb 13 – Salt Wells to be Worked

That there is abundance of salt in the Lake Winnipegosis region is well known. For years the springs there have been running freely with brine and thousands of tons of the best salt going to waste each year. It is now proposed to tap the springs and install machinery to reduce the brine and manufacture the output into salt for various uses. The quality of the salt, after it has gone through a purifying process is reported by those who have made experiments with it, to be of the highest grade. It is probable that a salt reducing plant will be built at Winnipegosis town. The salt can be brought down the lake in its raw state and later manufactured into various grades to suit the market demand. During the past three months three entries were made at the Dominion Lands office here for mines and as the capital to develop them is already assured the enterprise will undoubtedly be established.

1913 Feb 13 – Section Foreman Loses His Life

Harry Mushynski, section foreman for the C.N.R. at Pine River lost his life on Saturday in a peculiar manner. The pipes at the water tank froze up and Mushynski and another man descended into the well with a pot of live coals to thaw them out. When the two men got down the well the gas from the pot became too strong for them and Mushynski was overcome and fell into the water and was drowned. His companion managed to get out of the well. Coroner Harrington held an inquest on Mushynski on Sunday and the jury rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts.
Mushynski was highly spoken of by Supt. Irwin as a faithful employee of the company. He was 28 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.

1913 Feb 13 – Fork River

Howard Armstrong left for a trip up the lake teaming.
Herman Godkin, one of Dauphin’s energetic real estate agents, is spending the weekend at W. Williams.
C.E. Bailey and Wm. King returned from attending the county L.O.L. meeting at Dauphin.
Pat Powers, who has been running a threshing outfit at Winnipegosis, returned and is renewing acquaintances.
Henry Benner left here with a car of cows and young cattle for his ranch at Lloydminster.
Professor G. Weaver of East Bay, passed through here en route to the North Pole to lecture on diversified farming, etc.
Mr. and Mrs. C. White, of Winnipegosis, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s on Sunday.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson is visiting her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, of Neepawa, returned home after spending a few weeks with A. Cameron at Mowat Centre.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, was in town on business lately.
Sid Howlett and family have returned from the north end of the lake, where he spent the winter fishing and reports fishing good. He is going out on his homestead at Million.
“Say, Pat, it seems too bad the Mowat correspondent cant’s get his proper rest lately.” “What’s the matter now Mike?” “Well, he says the blooming politicians at Ottawa will keep haggling over the $35,000,000 Borden is sending to the dear old mother country after the assistance she has given us financially and otherwise for years. You remember a short time ago in the Press the M.C. wanted and howled for an all-Canadian navy. Now he turns around and poses for peace and spend the money in P.O. and roads.” Pat, “Well, I prefer it in Dreadnoughts as we have had enough of the sort of roads he has been instrumental in dishing up to us the last two or three years. I wonder which way he will jump next.” Mike, “Don’t be too hard on him, chure you know he handled the Liberal cheque book for years and there is a few blank forms left and our friend expected to be Admiral of Sir Wilfy’s dinky navy, but the election knocked that into a cocked hat and the blank cheques are no use now and the P.O. is like the elevator he twitted us about some time ago lost, strayed or stolen. When dear T.A. got licked we lost our telegraph office here and now we are getting the peace racket put up to us. Now someone has got to the end of their rope.” “Say, Pat, did yees notice divil a word does our Liberal friends print or say regarding the dredge contract let by the late Liberal government and that is being looked into by Borden.” “Oh, that’s a horse of another color.” M.C. stop grouching.
Wm. Amos, of Deloraine, travelling agent for the Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., was a visitor at Wm. King’s.
Miss Lizzie Clark paid a short visit to her parents here.
J. McAulay, traveller for the Massey-Harris Co., stopped over to see D. Kennedy on business for that firm.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church every Thursday evening at 8 o’clock during Lent and next Sunday, Feb. 16, at 3 o’clock, D.D. at 2 o’clock.
Geo. Dickason, of Dauphin, is around soliciting patronage for the Laurentia Milk Co., at Neepawa, and offers these prices till Mar 1st. $2.50 per hundred lbs, of sour cream; thirty-seven cents per pound of butter fat; sweet cream; forty-two cents per pound butter fat.
Our genial friend, Andrew Powers, is wearing a broad smile these days owning to the arrival of a new baby girl and Bob Rowe is also the happy father of a little baby girl. We wish them both the best of luck.
We notice in the correspondence from our Mowat friend in the Press of last week’s issue some very sensational items, more especially the one referring to so much grouching at outside points on account of the high cost of living and would like to say the prices quoted are far from correct. We always were under the impression that our Mowat friend was at all times ready to advertise this district at its truth worth and endeavor to get more land settled up, but by the remarks referred to we are at a loss to know just what is meant by this sarcasm and would refer him to some time ago and his remarks regarding the loss of the late P.O. at Oak Brae to the district and the damage it would do to this part of Manitoba in the way of getting this land settled up. For the benefit of our Mowat friends and the public in general we would like to give the correct prices of the products of the farm and forest at Fork River today. He quotes wheat 50c to 60c, barley 25c, potatoes 35c, pork 9c, beef 6c, seasoned wood $1.65, greed wood, $1.25. Now the correct prices of these are as follows: (Elevator prices), wheat 89c, 88c, ble, according to grades. Barley 32c and 40c being offered by outside parties and refused. Green pole wood $1.75 a cord and season poplar $1.75; butter 30c, eggs 30c, pork 10c, beef 7c and 7 ½ in trade.
Council meets at Winnipegosis on Thursday, the 20th inst.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 8 – 1912

1912 Feb 8 – Girl’s Clothes Caught Fire
In a Moment She was Aflame
Father to Rescue Both Burn

What might have been a fatal burning accident occurred at the home of Robt. Fair, whose farm is located about 10 miles south east of Dauphin the later end of last week. His daughter Hattie, who is 22 yeas of age, was suffering from a pain in her face, and her mother advised her to soak a rag in coal oil, heat it and apply. The young woman took the oil can near to the stove and kept pouring the oil on the rag and then placing it on the stove to warm. In doing this some of the oil dripped over her clothes. The last time she applied the rag to the stove it suddenly ignited and in a twinkling her clothes were a mass of flame. She screamed and her father, who had just gone to bed, rushed to her rescue ad with the assistance of a sheet endeavoured to smother the flames. Before the fire was extinguished the fire was burned considerably about the legs, hands and face.
Mr. Fair also had his hands badly burnt. It was a miraculous escape. Had Mr. Fair not been right at hand his daughter would have been burned to death in less than two minutes as the coal oil on her clothes added greatly to the rapidity with which the flames spread over her body.

1912 Feb 8 – Fork River

Mr. Biggs has returned after a month’s stay at Bethans and has accepted the position of teacher of the Mowat School for another term, which is satisfactory to the ratepayers.
We are pleased to hear Rev. H.H. Scrase is making good progress at home.
The Leap Year ball in the Orange Hall on Friday, Jan. 26th, under the management of the ladies of Fork River, was a big success. “Wall flowers” were conspicuous by their absence. Most of the evening the ladies attended to that part of the programme and deserve great credit as the hall was well filled with people from Winnipegosis, Mowat, East Bay and all parts and every one seems to have enjoyed themselves. The break-up came at six o’clock in the morning to the strains of the “Home sweet home waltz”: and a frosty drive.
Mrs. Wm. King and son Roland, returned home after a three months’ stay at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Morris, of Mosse Island, Winnipegosis.
A. Rowe’s little girl was unfortunate enough to have her arm broke in two places while playing. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, was sent for and the patient id progressing nicely.
Mr. Powers, provincial government auditor, spent a few days at the municipal office going over the books of the municipality. Which means getting out another financial report three inches by four. It should be larger and more comprehensive.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy and little son returned from Dauphin after a two weeks’ visit.
Fred Cooper, with Peter Ellis, paid a flying visit to Dauphin on business; also D.F. Wilson in connection with his immigration trip. Not knowing the time of the trains arrival the Fork River band was not in attendance. Still we gave them a hearty welcome.

1912 Feb 8 – Winnipegosis

If the man from Roblin, who skinned out about the middle of January would be kind enough to come back and settle for his board bill and also for the hay and oats he took from the freighters the people of Winnipegosis would be very grateful.
It would be far better for the fish companies to let the people here freight the fish than send out for freighters.
Born on Jan. 8th, 1912, to Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Morris, a son.
Some of the fishermen are complaining of the timber wolves breaking open their boxes and eating the fish.