Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 26 – 1912

1912 Sep 26 – Fork River

Several people from here took in the Methodist revival meeting at Winnipegosis.
Mr. Fitzsimmon, of the Ont. L. & D. Co., was here for a short time lately.
H. McCartney, Methodist student, has left for Winnipeg.
H.H. Scrase, who has taken charge of the mission, spent several days among his friends at Winnipegosis last week.
The Fork River correspondent in the press used the word regret in one item. It sounds funny from him now. He reminds us of the fellow who tried to run with the hare and hunt with hounds. He also wants whiners to take notice. It surely must mean that for the Mowat Correspondent and himself. It’s right in their line.
John Chipla, who has been in the section all summer, has left with his family for Saskatchewan.
Wm. Ashmore, of Sifton, was here on business in connection with the Massey-Harris Co.
Harold Clark made a short visit at the home of his parents.
John Clawson was here renewing acquaintances for a short time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 12 – 1912

1912 Sep 12 – Arm Broken in Runaway

A spirited team belonging to Geo. Lampard ran away on Wednesday afternoon. The driver, Thos. McKay, was thrown out of the rig and had his left arm broken.

1912 Sep 12 – Infantry for Dauphin

A movement is on foot in town to organize a military regiment. A preliminary meeting was held in Harvey & Bowman’s office on Monday evening, when Dr. Walker was appointed chairman and L. Shand secretary. It is proposed to have four companies if possible. A public meeting will be held shortly at which Col. Steele will be the speaker and afterwards officers selected.

1912 Sep 12 – Ethelbert

The awful thunderstorm, and the great rain of Wednesday has left things in very bad shape here, and unless we have a spell of fine weather the prospects are none too good.
K. McLean is still improving and is able to be up and about, but he is still very weak and thin.
All the material and engine for the elevator are on the ground, but as yet no signs of the builders. They will have to get a hustle on.
There were two cases before R. Skaife on Saturday. Mrs. J. Rewniak asked that her husband, J. Rewniak, be bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months. The evidence went to show that John had been persistently ill-treating her ever since their marriage over two years ago, and that he had very recently threatened to shoot her father, an old man who is close on seventy, with the handle of a hay fork twice on the arm, making it black because he tried to protect her. He was bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months or forfeit $100.
The next case was a mixed up affair. Marko Dubyk sold a pig to N. Tkatchzuk, for five dollars, the pig to be delivered as soon as possible. Marko brought the pig to town, met some friends; they went and had drinks together, and entrusted the pig to Olexa Stassuk, to take to Tkatchzuk, but instead he took it home. Then he have it to S. Basaraba, who put it in his stye, and kept it for some weeks. Ultimely Olexa asked $3 for Tkatchzuk, and he should have his pig. This Tkatchzuk refused to give, but instead he wanted the pig, and $5.50 as a sort of fine for them keeping the pig. The case was decided as follows: Basaraba was ordered to take the pig to Tkatchzuk, and without any compensation for the feed of the pig. O. Stassuk had to pay the costs of the court, as his share of the fun, and Tkatchzuk as told that it was only the magistrate who had the privilege of extracting penalties.
Later Rewniak wanted the magistrate to order his wife to go back to him, but he was advised to treat her kindly in future, and then perhaps she might go back. But Maru says no, never.
The station has got the name “Ethelbert” printed in bold letters at both ends of the building, so that all who run can read.

1912 Sep 12 – Fork River

Sydney Howlett, of E. Million, spent a few days here and took a trip to Winnipegosis on business.
Garent Lacey has returned home after a few months vacation south looking for a high spot.
“Bishop” McCartney took a trip to Winnipegosis hunting his carriage. “Bejiggered if they get it again,” says the Bishop.
Nat Little has returned from a week’s visit to the States.
Our Mowat friend seems surpassed to see a gasoline boat about the size of a coffee pot, go from Winnipegosis to Lake Dauphin and return, and pats himself on the back, as its the dredge that did the trick. Why good sized boats loaded with freight passed up and down the Mossey, fifteen and twenty years ago.
Mrs. Wm. King who has been visiting at Vancouver and California. She says the Fork looks more like home.
D. Kennedy has purchased another “gee gee” for his delivery wagon. Just see the dust fly.
Duck shooting is the order of the day. It’s hard on the feathers.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from a visit to Dauphin and Sifton.
Thomas Shannon has been treating fall wheat for the farmers for seed and several have commenced sowing it.
We are informed some one is looking for a schooner to find the levels after the storm and he is not alone. There’s schooners and schooners.
Lost or strayed, the minutes of three or four council meetings.
Teacher, “What is it Tommy.” “Dad says we will get them all right if we had an assistant. We must not expect too much after such an electric storm. It’s so depressing.”
John Clements and family of Dauphin, arrived to take off his crop in the Chase farm.
Nat Little has put on a new wagon for delivering cream at the station.
The planer has started up again, and Billy Williams is making the shavings fly.

1912 Sep 12 – Sifton

Stephen Kosy’s stable was struck by lightening last Thursday. There were in the stable, a team of horses, harness and fifty hens. Fortunately the horse broke the board and ran out but the harness and hens were burned. Stephen had his stable insured.
On the same date Hnat Skarnpa’s stable was burned, lightening being the cause.
The harvest has been checked for a few days by bad weather.
Four of our well-known citizens have formed a company and will build a big store. Our Fedor of Blue Store does not like to see any more stores in own. He would rather buy out Pinkas and have the while business to himself.
The rumour is abroad that in a short time some of the Ruthenians intend to organize a co-operative store. Building is to begin next week.
Thos. Ramsay is busy building a new postoffice and boarding house.
Paul Wood has bought three lots in block one from Nicola Haschak.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 15 – 1912

1912 Aug 15 – Appointed Manager of Fish Hatchery

Joseph Grenon, one of the oldest fishermen on Lake Winnipegosis, has been appointed manager of the fish hatchery, which is located on Snake Island. Mr. Grenon’s appointment dates from August first.

1912 Aug 15 – Damage at Gilbert Plains

A hail storm passed over Gilbert Plains on Sunday night and did much damage in the vicinity of the town and covered about two miles in width by eight in length.

1912 Aug 15 – Gypsies For Dauphin

A dispatch from Gretna, Man., states that a large party of Syrian gypsies crossed the international boundary at that point from the United States Saturday, and continued their journey northward at noon. They were heading for the Dauphin district. There were seven caravans, 25 people, and a large number of horses. The gypsies had no difficulty in passing the immigration officials, as they were plentifully supplied with money and goods.
From what can be learned the party will locate on the east side of the lake where they will take up homesteads. They are expected to reach town by the latter end of the week.

1912 Aug 15 – Fork River

Miss Alice and Herman Godkin left the early part of the week on a trip to Saskatchewan.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Williams were visitors to the Dauphin fair.
S. Bailey, F. Cooper, and W.R. Bell returned Saturday from attending the Dauphin exhibition.
Bishop McCartney of All Saints’, and Prof. T. Biggs of Mowat Academy, took a trip south on business.
Mrs. N. Little and daughter Grace, are taking a short vacation.
Mr. Maxim of Winnipeg, spent a week looking over the district. He is well pleased with this part and intends returning shortly with his family. There is plenty of good land within a short distance of the village waiting for settlers.
John O’Neil and family, of Rainy River, returned home after spending a week with Postmaster Lacey of Oak Brae.
Mrs. Peter Robinson spent a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Robinson on the Mossey River.
Mr. McAuley, traveller for the Massey Co., was here a few days on business.
A remark was overheard the other day that our Municipality was run rather loose. On July 5th, our health officer’s attention was drawn to the rubbish dumped a few yards from the Orange Hall. We were promised it would be attended to at once, but we are sorry to say nothing has been done as yet. Ten days after a ratepayer notified the council and they instructed the clerk to notify the health officer. A month has passed and nothing has been done. At the same meeting a by-law was passed presenting the said gentleman with $600 a year. We don’t object doing a fair thing, but in the name of justice let’s have something for it and not be told gone to Winnipeg, Duck Bay or Hong Kong. There is also a by-law against bulls running at large all summer. On numerous occasions complaints have been made. The head beadle remarked that they will have to erect a stable, but at the present rate of going probably nothing will be done. Great Caeasar this is comforting to men who look after their animals. Not long ago Government engineers were up here to lay out roads and make profiles which cost the Municipality a handsome sum of money. Our commissioners instead of following engineers’ instructions make roads so narrow that a man with a wheelbarrow had to wait at cross roads to let a buggy by coming in the opposite direction. Say they dog by-laws are peaches. Have one for every month in the year. What’s the matter Winnipegosis?

Re. the writeup of the Mowat picnic in last week’s Herald and Press. The remarks re certain individuals in Fork River wishing the picnic to be a failure were certainly very uncharitable whoever the writer was as for there being a shortage of lemons that was up to the general manager. Concerning freezers they could have been had as usual for the asking. This is supposed to be a free country and surely people can suit themselves about going to such places without being called to account by some evil thinking person like the writer of the Mowat article.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 13 – 1912

1912 Jun 13 – Fork River

Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove left for a visit to her friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Adams and son of Big Stone, are here loading cordwood for the Armstrong Trading Co., when there are cars.
Mr. McAuley, travelling agent for the Massey Co., spent a few days with D. Kennedy. Travelling agents are all right in their place. What the farmers here want is a better supply of repairs.
The King’s birthday passed off quietly. The Lake Town team failed to appear for the return match. A good dance was held in the Orange Hall by the football team and friends.
Saturday, registration day here, passed off quietly. Several names were added to the list.
Gordon Weaver, of Million, spent a few days with his friends. Gordon scored one goal at football.
There was a ghost around the hall two nights last week and the fair sex did not seem to mind at all.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove returned from Dauphin after spending a few days.
The Fork River football team killed the fatted calf and invited the Winnipegosis team for the return match from the home team and the rustlers. Latest, the Winnipegosis team has the whooping cough and the dropsy caught on the 24th. We trust the doctor will get them in line for the July picnic.
It is rumoured that we are to have an elevator. We hope the rumour is correct as we needs it bad.
K.T. Biggs, the only delegate appointed to represent the Fork River mission, is attending the Synod in Winnipeg this week.
Captain McCartney left for Winnipeg on business.
A very much concert, arranged by Mr. Biggs in aid of the W.A., was held on June 7th in the Orange Hall. The proceeds were given to swell the parsonage fund. The covert was opened by the Mossey River School children singing “Flag of Britain,” which was well rendered, and which gave their teacher, Miss Alserton, much credit. “The Diver” by Mr. McCartney, was well sung and encored. A duet by Ray and Elva Ellis, entitled, “A Boy Called Taps,” was well sung. The next song “Flanagan,” sung by Mr. Culverhouse, was splendid and he was heartily cheered and encored, and a recitation by W. Davis, entitled the “Englishman” was highly appreciated. A quartette by Miss Pearl and Bessie Wilson, Mr. Biggs and Mr. Culverhouse was well rendered. After an interval of a few minutes the Mossey River School children started again and with a chorus, “Summer, Gladsome Summer,” which was well sung, and then another song by Mr. McCartney entitled, “Sleep in the Deep,” and then a song by Mr. Culverhouse “Sang Mackie” and then another recitation by H.H. Benner entitled, “A Minister’s Grievances,” was very laughable and enjoyed by all. This was encored and he came on again and gave another, the last song was “Sweet Genevieve,” by Mr. Culverhouse, Miss Pearl Wilson, Mr. Biggs and Miss Bessie Wilson. The accompanist was Miss Comber, who played well. The chair was taken by W. King and after the sale of ice cream a vote of tanks was given to the chairman and to all who had so very kindly helped. God save the King was sung.
In talking with a farmer about the weather he informed us the moon had a good deal to do with it. To get posted on the matter we looked for the almanac and could now find it, so we turned to the Dauphin Press to see if there was anything from our Mowat friend. Sure there was, we know at a glance how the moon was as at a certain stage of every month it affects his capacious meddle. He seems to be weary of posting as the Mowat Jackass and wants to turn over his troubles to the Fork River scribe. Thanks; we are sure we could not do the same justice as a representative of that animal as our Mowat friend has had long experience in that line. It’s kind of him to compliment us writing funny things to interest the kids, which goes to show he must be in his dotage. The old saying has come true in his case “first a child, then a man,” etc. Our Mowat friend needs something to cheer him up judging from his appearance on his return from the summer resort.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 2 – 1912

1912 May 2 – Fork River

Archie McMillan and family left here with a carload of stock and settlers’ effects as he intends taking his homestead duties at Kindersley, Sask.
Mr. Briggs of Mowat, has moved into Fork River and his friend Mr. Culverhouse lately arrived from Yorkshire, England, is staying with him for a time.
Wm. Davis, one of our bonanza farmers, returned from a few days visit to Dauphin on business.
J. Robinson took a trip to Winnipegosis on business and we are informed that since a Board of Trade has been formed in that burg. the citizens have nothing to do but sit on the sidewalk and sun themselves waiting for the golden tide to roll in. Good luck Winnipegosis.
Captain McCartney returned from a trip to Dauphin, where he was give a magic lantern lecture of the Roll Call.
There was a very good turn out at the last ball of the season in the Orange Hall. The Honourables A. Hunt, T.N. Briggs, The King and Senator Kennedy and others were present and a good time was spent. Professor Robinson and other supplied the music and kept it up till the morning.
Mr. Chard was here in connection with his business.
The scribe is inclined to think the item in he Press of the 25th by a Fork River correspondent was out of place. Surely the leaders of the Episcopal elements as he calls them should be allowed to manage their own affairs without his interring through the Press. He must be hard up for news. If the students must have a parrot to voice their opine,. they should train it up in the way it would go before sending him out on a pilgrimage in the Press.
Captain McLean, foreman of the Government dredge and his gang are busy getting the dredge in shape for the summer’s work on the Mossey River.
Jack Clemence’s gang is up putting Frank Chase’s and Alf. Snelgrove’s places into shape for this year’s crop.

1912 May 2 – ANSWER TO FORK RIVER CORRESPONDENT IN DAUPHIN PRESS.

The Fork River correspondent for the Dauphin Press of the 25th April makes the following most unwarranted remarks regarding our Church of England Parsonage. “Some of our church leaders are agitating for a parsonage in connection with the Episcopal Element here. It seem an unwarranted expense.” now the writer of this cannot possible belong to that body or his remarks would never have been uttered and if he was at all cognizant of facts in connection with what he refers to he would have worded his phrases quite differently. The Church of England congregation and management are not agitating but are going to build a parsonage and should be glad of any help financially from the press correspondent. Perhaps our friend is one of the few who objected to our building a church a few years ago, yet the church is built and fully equipped and out of debt. Also under the same management a ten team stable is almost completed and also paid for as are the lots in connection with same. We should like to say the wardens and congregation should be proud of what they have done and as they know what they are doing and can overlook any disparaging remarks of an enterprising news correspondent who passes disparaging statements re the good work going on.
The management of All Saints’ Church have found through experience it is better to build than to pay from $60 to $100 a year for rent for an unsuitable house and by so building they will have something permanent. If the correspondent in the Press has anything to say in regard to the present or past management of this church I am sure they will gladly listen to him and receive any donation as there is nothing proud about this management. If the corespondent has nothing but wind to offer her should utilize this on a football field as we already had a sufficient supply of that commodity to the detriment of this church. It is good actions they want, not wind.

Wellwisher

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 11 – 1912

1912 Apr 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the Council held in the Council chamber, Fork River, Wednesday, March 27, 1912, all member present.
The minutes, having been read were adopted as read on motion of Coun. Nicholson, seconded by Coun. Seiffert. Carried.
Nicholson-Robertson – That this Council donate ten bags of flour to Sefat Mochka and that Councillors McAuley and Seiffert be requested to see that the same is delivered. Carried.

COURT OF REVISION
McAuley – Hunt – That protests No. 10, No. 12, No. 16 and No. 17, respectively, be lowered from $880 assess to $800; and that in protest No. 15 the assessment be lowered from $800 to $720. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That all other protests remain as they are. Carried.
McAuley – Seiffert – That W.H. Paddock’s assessment be changed from 150 acres to 100 acres. Carried.

REGULAR BUSINESS
McAuley – Nicholson – That the taxes of John Frend, N.E., 1-29-20, be reduced by $40. Carried.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the taxes on N.E. 25-29-20 be reduced rom $82.25 to $22.24, owing to taxes having been charged on abandoned homestead. Carried.
Seiffert – Hunt – That Wm. Walmslay be asked to move his house off the public streets of Winnipegosis at once. Carried.
Sieffert – Robertson – That the Health Officer at Winnipegosis be asked to see that all back-yards and out-houses are cleaned up at an early date. Carried.
Sieffert – McAuley – That Wm. Hunking be asked to see that all cattle and horses be kept off the sidewalks in Winnipegosis; also that all parties found driving over the same be prosecuted. Carried.
Sieffert – Robertson – That Peter Saunders be appointed pound-keeper for Winnipegosis for the year 1912, in the place of Archie Stuart, resigned. Carried.
McAuley – Hunt – That the accounts of T.R. Nicholson ($11) and F.B. Lacey ($15.75) be passed. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That sections 3 and 4 of dog by-law No. 84 be amended as follows: That the words “sleigh dogs” be struck out and the words “all dogs in village of Winnipegosis” be interred in their place. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That J.A. Snelgrove’s account of $77.47 for tamarack piling and stringer, be paid, and that $15 be deducted from the same in payment for cable. Carried.
Hunt – Sieffert – That the council procure six comfortable chairs for the Council chamber at Fork River, and that the clerk be instructed to get the same without delay. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That Panko Solomon be instructed to furnish material and build fence at the north end of sec. 1-29-19; all posts for same to be sound tamarack, to be placed 1 rod apart, and 3 wires to be used. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That the Council now adjourn to meet again at Winnipegosis at call of Reeve. Carried.
H.H. Benner,
Sec.-treasurer, pro tem.

1912 Apr 11 – Ethelbert

Mrs. A. Willey is visiting Ethelbert during Easter and is visiting Mrs. A. McPhedran.
Miss Shaw, of Gilbert Plains, stayed a day at James Miller’s on her way home to the Plains.
Mrs. A. Clark is visiting her parents and nursing her mother. Mrs. Skaife, who has been seriously ill for the last month.
Taking advantage of the fine weather Mrs. Skaife is now able to take short walks.
Both Catholic Churches are having their usual Easter services, and the attendance at both are good.
The Union Church of Ethelbert members invited Mr. Smith Jackson to preach the Easter sermons. Special Easter hymns were provided by the choir all of which went well. Mr. Smith Jack spoke in the afternoon basing his remarks upon Paul’s words to Timothy, “Lay Hold on Eternal Life,” and he gave a powerful and sympathetic exposition of his subject. There was also a quartet “The Portals of Glory” rendered by the following: Mrs. A. Phedran, soprano; Mrs. A. Clark, contralto; R. Skaife, tenor; and Kenneth McLean, basso. It is needless to say all did well and the music, which was accompanied by Miss Ella May was rendered with harmony and precision. In the evening Mr. Jackson spoke from Revelations and took for his Text “He that Overcometh,” and again gave a good and impressive discourse. The musical numbers were also well rendered and included a duet, “Go Home and Tell,” Mrs. C.F. Munro taking the soprano and Mrs. A. Clark the contralto. The voices blended together well, and it was a treat to hear such music. There was a good attendance of hearers at both services, and the general verdict was that the services had even very successful and reflected credit on all concerned. There are also Evangelistic meetings being held at John McLean’s by Evangelists Howard and Fleming May. The old story is being proclaimed to good audiences. The meetings will be continued on Tuesday and Wednesday nights this week.
Everybody is decked out in Easter holiday attire, and the village has quite a festive appearance and all seem disposed to make the season one of general rejoicing.
The snow has nearly all gone. Spring is with us in earnest and soon every one will be busy turning over the land and preparing for a bumper crop.
I almost forgot to say we have got a new police magistrate, so now the people will be able to spend their money at home. Patronize home industries is a good motto far all.

1912 Apr 11 – Fork River

Mr. Briggs, teacher of the Mowat School, is visiting Dauphin this week.
P. Ellis is leaving this week to take up a position at Miles’ store, Kamsack.
Rev. H.H. Scrase was a visitor at W. King’s last Monday.
A magic lantern show entertainment was given by Mr. McCartney at the Orange Hall last Thursday. Some very nice pictures were shown, consisting of the Passion of our Lord. Owing to the bad roads only a small attendance turned out.
The farmers are getting ready for ploughing. Quite a lot to be done in this district.
Mrs. Rice from East Bay has been visiting Mrs. Cameron’s, Mowat.
Fleming Wilson and Paul Wood paid Fork River a visit on Tuesday.
G. Shannon, F. Cooper and R. Rowe were visitors to Dauphin on business.
Mr. Walker of Dauphin, is around inspecting Mossey River, Mowat and Pine View Schools.
Edwin King returned home from a week spent in Winnipeg and states that the trains going west are crowded with new comers. Lots of room here for them.
Mrs. T. Shannon returned from visiting friends in Dauphin.
Mrs. Comber and daughter arrived here from Selkirk and are staying with Mrs. McQuay for the present.
Miss Gertie Cooper and Miss Clark came up from Dauphin and are spending the Easter holidays at the homes of their parents.
Our Mowat friend of the Press invites the scribe to see these documents which is unnecessary as we have some of his documents covering the last six years, also his savings for the Press for about eight years and when we sum them up her reminds us of a Biblical charade who betrayed his friend and master. What a pity he seems to have these spells worst coming on spring. We sincerely hope he will be recovered in time to plant his onions.
The Hon. Joseph Lockhart returned from spending some time in the south and is looking as healthy as ever.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove, who has spent some time with Mrs. F. Chase in Dauphin, returned home Tuesday.
There are lots of wild geese on the wing, to judge from the reports it is harder on the ammunition that the geese.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 4 – 1912

1912 Apr 4 – Fork River

Duncan Kennedy has been appointed a commissioner for taking affidavits for use in the courts of the province.
Mr. Jangerman, who has been homesteading east of the Mossey, left for Dauphin with his family for a few months.
Mr. and Mrs. J. McAuley of South Bay, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s.
Mr. Combers of Selkirk, a relative of Capt. D. McLean, arrived here with a car of settlers’ effects and intends farming in this vicinity.
Mr. and Mrs. J McMillian and family who have been spending the winter here, have left for the west.
J. Seiffert of Winnipegosis, was here attending Court of Revision and Council meeting.
The bridge gang of the Canadian Northern Railway are busy fixing bridges in this vicinity.
Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, held their general meeting on Thursday night last. A. McKerchar, J. Bickle and Martin, Winnipegosis, and W. Weir of Dauphin, visited the lodge and an interesting evening was spent.
The heaviest fall of snow of the season occurred on Friday, and puts an early spring out of the question. The horses and cattle are looking fairly well considering the long winter.
Our Mowat friend of the Press evidently declines our advice. We wish to tell him that we had a short conversation with the Dr. as he wished. The Dr. did not seem to be ??? all over the scribe’s health ?? not be a benefit to the public ??? health officer would take a trip ??? to the vicinity of Oak Brae and investigate the nuisance there, and have it removed as soon as possible before the hot weather sets in.
What has been become of the Fork River correspondent to the Press? Did he get snowed under as he has not been heard of lately. He must have gone across the herring pond for those letters that never arrived. Quite a fake.
Our friend Jimmy Johnston stole a march on the boys. We congratulate him and his bride and wish them a long life and a happy one. So say all.
A. Cameron is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
The council meeting held last week went off quiet well.
A nice little children’s party was held at the home of Mrs. Scrase, when Mr. McCartney gave a magic lantern entertainment. The pictures shown consisted of St. Paul’s Cathedral, Japan and Jessica’s first Prayer. When this was over the children had candies, cakes &c. and played all kind of games. At 10 o’clock they all went home after having enjoyed themselves.
Mr. McCartney returned from visiting friends at Grandview.

1912 Apr 4 – Sifton

The roads are very poor where Galicians live. They are not doing their share to advance these country places. There is a marked difference in the roads where English speaking people live. One hears that Canadians and English settlers give their time and their horses gratis for so many days each year to “grade” the roads. The Galicians are unwilling to help in any way unless they get from $1.50 to $2 daily. They, however, use the roads that others make. This is unfair! We need extra laws and to have them enforced. If a man does not help the country that helps him and he at “loggerheads” with the community in which he dwells he ought to leave the country. We have too many such in Canada now. They take all they get and hinder all progress to wit, the effort to get money for bridges in the municipality, etc.
The school at Sifton is making great progress under Capt. A. Russell. Sifton is fortunate in getting such an able man. He has an average of 59, a far from easy task daily instructing them. He must be congratulated in one feature especially the teaching of patriotism and love for the country. The exercising of his thoroughbred stallion keeps his health up. “Bunkus” is the pride of the place.
Nurses Goforth and Reid do excellent work at Sifton. They are always busy, and work on so untiringly in caring for Galicians. Not all the heroes work along the plaudits of the crowd. Many heroes work on unknown by the many. We wonder if Galicians are grateful enough for the services given them in these hospitals.
The mill formerly owned by Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie is now being run by Galicians.

1912 Apr 4 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Munro, who has been working for the Presbyterian Church in Winnipegosis, South Bay, Fairville and Sifton, for the Winter, closed his ministry last Sunday, March 31. He had large attendances at his closing services at each place, including people of all denominations. Attendances were favourable right through the winter. He never before experienced such a beautiful winter. He leaves soon for Saskatchewan Presbytery, where he takes up work for the Summer months.
The Presbyterian Church at Winnipegosis voted in favour of union unanimous all but two. Some did not vote. Those who voted against union and those who did not vote have the greatest standing in the church. At the closing service, which was a united one, Mr. Munro urged union for Winnipegosis even if organic union failed to be realized.