Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 19 – 1914

1914 Nov 19 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred five miles west of Sifton on the 18th, when Joseph Thomashewski, aged 30 years, lost his life. He was out hunting rabbits at the time. He wounded one and as the little animal started to run away he raised the gun and struck at struck at it. The gun was discharged by the act and the contents lodged in his stomach. The unfortunate man died on the spot.

1914 Nov 19 – Fire at Mossey River

Thos. Glendenning, whose farm is at the mouth of the Mossey River at Lake Dauphin, had his stables destroyed by fire on Friday last, the 13th isn’t. All the contents of the stables were burned. There was no insurance.

1914 Nov 19 – Had Hand Taken Off

Leslie Nash, a boy 14 years of age, was brought from Roblin on Tuesday and placed in the hospital here. He was out hunting rabbits at Roblin, when his gun was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his left arm. The wound was a bad one and was found necessary to amputate the hand. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.

1914 Nov 19 – Little Girl Smothered

A sad fatality happened at Gilbert Plains on Wednesday, when Thos. Poole’s two-year-old daughter was smothered. The little girl, 2 years old and her brother, 4 years, were left in the home, while Mrs. Poole was absent for a short time. In the meantime fire started with the result that the little girl was smothered. The boy will recover.

1914 Nov 19 – Ethelbert

The sleighing is fine. Farmers are bringing in wood now.
The Ethelbert mill is running all right now. This is what is wanted, a good mill.
Henry Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Nov 19 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, municipal tax collector, spent a short time here on business lately.
Mr. Fleming, of the Northern Elevator has returned from a few days visit to his old home in Veregin, Sask.
Mr. D. Kennedy, manager of the A.T. Co., returned from a short vacation south and reports having enjoyed his outing.
Mrs. C. Clark’s friends will be pleased to hear she has arrived safely at her home in Paswegan, Sask.
The threshermen’s annual ball came off on Friday night and proved an enjoyable affair. Everyone enjoyed the outing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” and we trust all arrived safe.
The Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, took the service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Sid Gower, who has been spending the summer at Winnipeg, is renewing acquaintances here.
Mr. Green has returned from Dauphin, having taken Mr. Wiley’s place at St. Paul’s on Sunday.

1914 Nov 19 – Winnipegosis

Miss Bernice Walker, of Dauphin, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Ross, returned home by Monday’s train.
Hon. Hugh and Mrs. Armstrong are visiting at the home of Mrs. Bradley.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele arrived in town on Saturday’s train from Warroad, en route to Mafeking. They are visiting at the home of Mrs. J.P. Grenon.
A number of young folks took this season’s first sleigh ride to Fork River to the Threshermen’s ball. All report having a good time.
The curling and skating rinks are fast getting into shape. E.R. Black has the contract for making the ice.
The bachelor apartments were the scene of an enjoyable evening last week. A whist drive and any oyster supper finished a very pleasant evening.
Ed. Cartwright and family left on Monday’s train for Mafeking, where Mr. Cartwright looks after the interests of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.
Ben Hechter has been laid up trough sickness for the past few days.
When are we going to have the formal opening of the new school?
Jos. Grenon, manager of the Winnipegosis hatchery, left on Monday’s train for Fort Qu’Appelle, with sixteen million whitefish eggs, for the new government hatchery there.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 3 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 3 – Fined $50 and Costs

Fred Buchij, a Galician, had a row over cattle with another Galician at Valley River. In the melee Buchij ran a pitchfork into the other man. The case was tried before P.M. Munson on Wednesday and Buchij fined $50 and costs. He paid up.

1912 Oct 3 – Killed at Kamsack

Thos. Powell, formerly of Dauphin, was killed at Kamsack on Monday. He was a car repairer. He was working under a car when a train shunted on the track and shoved the car over him. He was badly crushed. Powell was at one time an employee in the railway shops here.

1912 Oct 3 – Threshing Progress

Threshing commenced in several parts of the district this week and will be general if the fine weather continues. A great deal of the grain is being stacked this fall with the object of going ahead with the plowing.

1912 Oct 3 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 25th Sept. All members present.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Sarnia Bridge Co., Supt. Irwin, of C.N.R., the solicitors, the Highway Commissioner, J.P. Grenon and the Million for the Manitoba League.
A report of the public works committee condemning the Bailey Bridge unsafe for traffic was read.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Minster of Public Works be asked to send an engineer to examine the site of the Bailey Bridge and that government aid be asked for to construct it.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the clerk write Supt. Irwin, of the C.N.R., re ditch from Mossey River north to the Sanderson Creek and also re crossing on Cocker Road.
Seiffert – Nicholson – That the council pass a by-law to expropriate a roadway sixty six feet wide along the west side of the C.N. through the N.W. 18-30-18.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask that some of the members of its council meet Reeve Lacey and Coun. Robertson at the bridge across the Mossey River on the boundary line between the two municipalities to consider what is best to be done as the bridge is becoming unsafe.
Nicholson – Toye – That no action be taken towards collecting the price of the Shannon road from Thomas Shannon till Dec. 1st, 1913.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the declarations of Councillors McAuley, Toye and Nicholson for $13.80, $17.70 and $24.30 respectively for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Nicholson – Robertson – That no person be allowed to dump garbage within 200 yards of any residence, street or road in the village of Fork River, and that the Armstrong Trading Co., be notified to remove the refuse deposited by them behind the Orange Hall immediately.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the Minister of the Interior re memorialized to throw the swamp lands in the municipality open for the homesteads.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the C.N.R. be asked to place an agent at Fork River during the shipping season.
A by-law to establish the rate for 1912 was passed, the rates being municipal rate, 12 mills; municipal commissioner’s rate ½ a mill, and the general school rate 4 mills.
McAuley – Toye – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis on November 1st.

1912 Oct 3 – Fork River

The Rev. H.H. Scrase visited Rural Dean Wiley and on his return visited Sifton on church business.
Thomas Shannon returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The northern Elevator Co., has a gang here putting up an elevator. An elevator is needed here and it will fill a long felt want.
Archie McKerchar and W. Clarkson of Winnipegosis, spent Wednesday evening with the boys at the Orange Hall and report things booming among the fishermen there.
The cattle buyers are getting busy. One shipped part of a car of sheep last week.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Donnie, visited Mrs. J.E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, last week.
Mrs. H. Scrase returned from Winnipegosis after spending a few days with her friends and while there attended the installation of officers of the W.A. at the point.
A large number attended the council meeting but no miracles have been performed so far to the satisfaction of the people as promised year ago.
Mrs. C.L. White, of Winnipegosis, is visiting at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Jim Parker is now living on the old Parker farm and keeps his gang moving. We are always glad to see new faces among us.
Rev. H. Scrase will hold divine service in All Saints’ Church every Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at Fork River and Winnipegosis school house every Sunday at 7.30 p.m. and at Sifton on Mondays and Tuesdays evening as will be arranged there by next Sunday.
Nat Little arrived home on the special Saturday evening from his trip south. Specials seem to be the order of the day. Nothing like lots of train service, if they only come the same day as advertised. Nuff said.

1912 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

Fine weather is again with us and our people are wearing pleasant faces. Do you know, people are a good deal like the weather, they change quickly. When the sun is shining all have pleasant faces; when it is dull and overcast long dismal countenance surround us. Give us the man who smiles whether it rains or shines. He’s the one worth while.

Friend, life will frequently grow
Dreary: no fortunate isles
Lie where time’s dun water flow
Give me the fellow who smiles.

Peter McArthur returned to town on Saturday from Dauphin.
All Saints’ Church was the scene of a pretty wedding on Monday, when William Christensen was united in the holy bond of wedlock to Marie Louise Lebel. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Derome of Makinak.
The “old-timers” sketches running in the Herald are quite interesting. Winnipegosis has a few men who are well worth writing up. They have seen the country under all conditions, and what’s more, have made good. We’ll name just a few. peter McArthur, Jos. Grenon, Sr., Tom Whale, and Hughie McKellar, the fish expert. To have Hughie tell the history of the little fishes from the cradle to the table, would prove a mighty interesting chapter. In a future issue of the herald Hugie will be asked to tell what he knows.
Capt. Coffey has been here during the past week. The Capt. is nothing if not optimistic. He looks for a good season fishing.

1918 Oct 3 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. T. Grenier, Makinak, killed in action. (Telesphore Joseph Grenier, 1895, 291698)
Pte. Chas. W. Skinner, Dauphin, wounded and missing. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)
Pte. Harold Tomalin, Dauphin, killed in action. Pte. Tomalin was a fireman on the C.N.R. when he enlisted last January. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Tomalin, reside at Magnet, Man. (Harold Tomalin, 1896, 2129193)

1918 Oct 3 – Dramatic Meeting on Battle Front

One of the Dauphin boys writes the Herald of a dramatic meeting he had with another local boy at night. “We were,” he writes; “on the move and had come to a stop on account of the congestion of traffic. A fleet of Fritz’s planes came out and dropped about fifty bombs around us. Looking around by the light that the bombs made I saw another Dauphin boy about ten feet away. We only had time for a handshake and wish for “good luck” when the traffic moved on.

1918 Oct 3 – Fork River

Mr. Pettit, of Winnipeg, paid this burgh a visit in the interest of the new Victory War Bond campaign.
Mrs. Tait, of Indian Head, Sask., is visiting at her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Timewell.
Mr. Love has arrived from Lake Manitoba and has taken charge of the Salada School, west of town.
Max King was a visitor to Winnipeg for a few days on business with the Military branch.
We notice Dauphin merchants are closing their stores at 6.30 p.m. What a contrast to some of our stores in this burg which are kept open much longer hours and sometimes on Sundays. The latter should be stopped at once.
James McDonald has finished his residence and moved into it.
T.A. Briggs has received a shipment of horses for Bonanza farm. The man who is able to receive a bunch of horses these days must have a bonanza bank account.
Fork River farms are in demand a good prices. Several deals are likely to go through shorty.
A Herald subscriber tells your correspondent he is mistaken when he states that “King potato” has not been crowned. He sure is the crowned potentate of this part of the country at any rate.

1918 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

RED CROSS NOTICE.
The annual meeting of the Red Cross Society will be held on Tuesday evening, the 8th of October, at 8 o’clock, in Rex Hall. Every member is requested to be present. A report of work done during the year will be made by the secretary, and officers will be elected for the coming year. It is for the purpose of electing officers that a full attendance is requested.
Don’t forget that this work is for the wounded men of our army and navy, who have been winning the victories we are so jubilant about just now.

E.L. MACARTHUR,
Sec.-Treasurer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 15 – 1911

1911 Jun 15 – Died From Injuries

Anthony Lefia, a Galician, had both his legs taken off by a box car passing over them in the railway yards here on Sunday morning last. How the accident happened will remain a mystery as the unfortunate man could not speak the English language and was unable to make any explanation. It is suppose that he was attempting to steal a ride when he fell under the moving wheels.

He was taken to the hospital immediately after the accident and everything possible was done for him but Dr. Harrington, who had charge of the case, held out little hope for recovery and as anticipated he passed away early Wednesday morning.

Lefia had been out from Austria but a few months and leaves a wife and family in that country.

1911 Jun 15 – Struck by Lightning

Jas. Bedard, who had been employed on the Burrows’ lumber drive at Grandview, was returning from driving a number of men to the camp on Wednesday last, when he was caught in a thunderstorm and struck by lightning. The electric fluid struck him on the back of the head and ran down his back and side, severely burning him. When discovered Bedrad was unconscious and was immediately taken to Grandview and afterwards brought to the hospital here, where he received treatment and is now on a fair way to recovery.

Bedard is well-known in Dauphin, having been connected with Clark Bros. livery stable the greater part of last year.

1911 Jun 15 – Fork River

Miss M. Nixon; teacher of Pine View School is taking a trip to Winnipeg on business.
It has been raining everyday for about a week and the roads are bad, yet Mr. A. Hunt is smiling, twin girls.
Mr. C. Clark is visiting Dauphin this week.
W. Williams is busy making the sawdust fly. The mill is in full swing under the management of Pat Powers, of Missouri.
The Rural Dean, Rev. S. Wiley, of St. Paul’s Church, Dauphin, will hold a service in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, on Sunday, June 18th, at 3 o’clock and at Winnipegosis in the evening at 7:30.
A. Hodgeson is visiting among his numerous friends at the Fork. He says mosquitoes are a nuisance.
E.H. Walker, school inspector of Dauphin, is here visiting the schools.
Mr. McLeod of Winnipeg is busy buying fat cattle for shipment.
The ladies of All Saints W.A. held a meeting at the rectory recently, considerable business was arranged for the coming years work.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 23 – 1912

1912 May 23 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 23 – Mail Robbery
Mail Bag Disappears Between Fork River and Sifton
Contains Much Money

A few days ago the postmaster at Fork River, D. Kennedy, gave the mail bag from that point to one of the C.N.R. brakeman on the train on that particular day. This man acknowledges receipt of the bag and states that he placed it in the car in the usual way. It may be stated that there is no mail clerk on the Dauphin-Winnipegosis trains and the mail pouches along the line are taken in charge by the railway employees. This necessarily involves much risk to the bags as the employees are engaged at each station for a considerable time in switching and performing other duties.
The bag in question was not missed until Dauphin was reached and a search made for it when it was found to have disappeared. The postoffice authorities at Winnipeg were at once apprised of the matter and Inspector Hicks sent to investigate. He was here on Tuesday and looked into the matter without being able to solve it. Later, however, two special service men were put on the case and developments are expected.
The theory advanced is that the bad disappeared at Sifton.
The registered mail was particularly heavy on this day and besides cheques and money orders there were several hundred dollars in cash.

1912 May 23 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 23 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 23 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 16 – 1912

1912 May 16 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 16 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 16 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 16 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 18 – 1912

1912 Apr 18 – Fork River

Rev. A. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, visited Messrs. H.H. Scrase and Wm. King, warden, on church business.
R. Rowe and bride, returned from their wedding trip and were greeted at the station with the usual rice fusillade. We wish them good luck. Next.
Mr. B. Tate returned to Dauphin, having spent her Easter holidays with Mr. and Mrs. T. Bailey and renewing old acquaintances. Her numerous friends are always pleased to meet their old friend and teacher.
Pat Powers returned from a visit to Winnipegosis and intends starting business shortly in the Albert Edward block.
The C.N.R. will have to put on a watchman to keep those ponies from devouring the ties and rails as they have things about cleaned up, barring the wire for the cemetery, which comes next to culvert pipes.
Nat Little is busy unloading a car of Cockshutt implements of all kinds.
A concert was held in the Orange Hall on Thursday the 11th. A good programme was furnished and there was a very good crowd present. We appreciate the assistance given by people from Winnipegosis and others in helping to make the program a success financially. Mrs. D. Kennedy and Miss Pearl Wilson of the committee instructed Mr. W. King, chairman, to present the proceeds to Mr. Scrase, on their behalf. After supper a good time was spent tripping the light fantastic until morning.
Mr. Biggs, teacher of Pine View School, returned from a trip to Winnipeg.
Miss Gertie Cooper returned to Dauphin after spending Easter holidays with her parents.

1912 Apr 18 – Winnipegosis

Business Men Organize Board of Trade 40 Members Enrolled $1000 Subscribed
A meeting of the business men of Winnipegosis was held on Monday evening to consider the advisability of forming a Board of Trade. There was a large attendance and everyone present were unanimously in favour of this and determined that an aggressive policy of publicity and advertising be put in hand at once. Over 40 members were enrolled at the termination of the meeting and nearly $500 subscribed; it is anticipated that over $1000 will be received in membership fees by the time the new Board of Trade is constituted.
The growth of business at this point has been rapid during the past two years the fish catch which produces a revenues of over $150 000 each winter will soon be overshadowed by farming and other industries that ill utilize the natural resources of the country adjoining the lake. The surrounding district is vert fertile and with a very low expenditure on draining the land can be made the best in Canada; frost is practically unknown of the prairie farmer are unknown. Farmers here have been shipping wheat out west for seed this spring, and for the rancher and dairy man hay can be had in unlimited quantities and an up-to-date creamery has already made a success and is now paying the highest prices.
The new railway that is being built along the West shores of Lake Manitoba will soon be here, opening up a splendid country that will be quickly settled. The dredging of the river to Lake Dauphin will be copulated this summer by the Government dredges and Winnipegosis will become the natural shipping port for the produce form an already prosperous and tickle settled district.
Any advice and assistance from the Dauphin Board of Trade will be greatly appreciated, or, better still, come and spend a week end at Winnipegosis; there is to be another meeting on Monday next, April 22, the business men here will sure give you a good time.