Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 3, 1919

Case Transferred to Winnipeg

The case of the Armstrong Trading Co. vs. J.P. Grenon and J. McInnes, which was among the list of King’s Bench cases here, has been transferred to Winnipeg. This has been done for the benefit of the counsel who are all Winnipeg residents. The case starts today (Thursday).

Great War Veterans Hold Big Celebration

Fortune smiled on the Great War Veterans on Tuesday. Their first celebration was a splendid success viewed from all standpoints. The weather was ideal, and the crowds the largest that ever visited the town. Between four and five thousand people were on the Exhibition grounds in the afternoon. There was not a hitch to mark the day’s program.
The parade in the morning attracted much attention and favorable comment was heard on all sides on the many and varied representations in the line of march. There were cars decorated with flags without number, and it appeared as if every boy and girl in the town carried the colors.

Verdict for Mrs. Haley

Mrs. Jos. Haley has secured a verdict for $10,000 in the count at Saskatoon against the Canadian National Railway for the death of her husband. Joseph Haley was killed at Hawke’s spur, a mile west of Hudson’s Bay Junction in the fall of 1918 by being caught between a loading platform and a freight car. Action was instituted in the province of Saskatchewan owing to the accident having occurred there. The case came to trial at Saskatoon on June 25th, when judgment was given for $10,000. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented the plaintiff.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, June 10th, Coun. Yakavanka absent. The minutes of last meeting were read and adopted.
Communication were read from the solicitor re Bowlen judgment; Fred Wenger, account against ward 2; the teacher of South Bay S.D.; W.H. Paulson re taxes; three applications for the position of road commissioner; Bank of Nova Scotia re line of credit; Dept. of Public Works re road across 3-31-18; Geo. Lvon re wood on road; the estimates of Mossey River S.D., and a largely signed petition from ratepayers in south-east corner of the municipality and Lawrence municipality praying for a road on boundary line.
Hunt-Namaka – That a grant of $250 be made to the Fork River agricultural society.
Marcroft-Paddock – That after hearing the circumstances the taxes on the se 2-31-19 be allowed to stand over till the coming December, and that the penalty on them be cancelled.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $150 be made to the Returned Soldiers’ committee for the purpose of giving a banquet to returned soldiers.
Marcroft-Reid – That the secretary obtain designs of monuments from the different marble works with a view to erecting a monument to the memory of all Mossey River soldiers who were killed in the war.
Marcroft-Namaka – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be a committee to select, stake out and authorize the use of a nuisance ground for Fork River.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $10 be made to the South Bay Boys and Girls’ club.
Hunt-Namaka – That a special meeting of the council be held at Fork River on Saturday, June 14th.
Reid-Namaka – That Mrs. Domeric be refunded the taxes of 1918, with the exception of the special school tax.
Reid-Namaka – That the reeve and sec.-treasurer be a committee to deal with matters regarding the council chamber at Winnipegosis.
Marcroft-Namaka – That the account of Coun. Reid ($22) for letting and inspecting work be printed.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the auditor’s report be printed.
Reid-Namaka – That the accounts of the meeting of Jan. 7th, March 5th, and those of today, as recommended by the finance committee, be passed.
Bylaws were employing the collector at $5 per day when instructed to go out by the reeve and sec.-treasurer, appointing James Bickle road commissioner, and repealing the bylaw making the councilors road commissioners. Also authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of Mossey River School District, No. 999, on a $12,000 debenture bylaw.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

A gang of men are engaged building a new elevator. This will make the second elevator at this point.
Gus. Andrus, Jim Parker and G. Lacey have invested in tractors and are busy turning over the soil.
The heavy rain of Saturday gave the hand a good soaking and the crops are greatly befitted by it.

Mossey River School Report

The following is a list of pupils who were successful in the recent mid-summer exams:
Grade VII—Honors; Bob Williams. Pass; Ben Shuchett.
Grade VI—Nathan Shuchett, David Nowasod.
Grade V—Honors; Arthur Jamieson.
Grade IV—Mildred Carlson, Amos Carlson, Bill Williams, Sofie Beyko.
Grade III—Goldie Shuchett, Edna Hafenbrak, Earnest Hafenbrak, Donald McEachern, Tony Beyko.
Grade II—Birdie Stonehouse, Roy Dewbury, Allie Dewbury, Steve Nowasod, Jack Puchaylo.
Grade I sr—Kate Williams, Milo Carlson, Peter Zerba.
Class A—Clarice Carlson, Mary Stefishon, Tommy Hafenbrak, Cornie Chipley.
Gertrude M. Cooper, teacher.

Winnipegosis Public Schools

Grade IV to Grade V—Honors; Theary Frederickson, Benjamin Ketcheson, Lawrence Marchenaki. Pass; Gladys Cartwright, Jos. Mikit, Clara Hubble, Alexina Dumas, Charlie Adam, Mary Langlois, Harry Whale, Muriel Snelgrove, Rae Spence.
Primary to Grade II—Pass; Olive Shears, Vera Wills, Christine Schaldemose, Glen Dunby, Marie Loire, Hugh Johnson, Elizabeth Bradbury, Brynhildur Bjornsson, Grace Campbell, Bert Hubble, Chas. Spence, Harriet McLeod, Paul Lemchuk.
T. Tozer, Teacher.

Grade IV jr. to Grade IV sr.—Honors: John Marchenski, Rose McAuley. Pass: Agnes Burrell, Mary Chermak, Margaret Sanderson, M. Mapes, Albert Dumas, Sarah Klyne, Mary Richard, Donald McAuley, Violet Groff, Wm. Mapes, Olivina Langlois, Blennie St. Matt, Jessie Paddock, Jas. Richard, Hilliard Denby, Beverley Scchaldemose.
Grade III to Grade IV—Pass: Jos. Ponliot, Daisy Walmsley, Frank Wallace, Myrtle Snelgrove, Lawrence McDonell, Martha Sanderson, Wall. Pouliot, Ralph McAuley.
Following is a list, in order of merit, of successful pupils in the recent yearly examinations in Winnipegosis public schools:
Grade VII to Grade VIII—Pass: Tina Marchenski, Margaret Robinson, Ernest Needham.
Grade VI to Grade VII—Honors: Margaret Magnusson, James Brown, Kathleen Dempsey, Margaret McAuley, Charlotte Bradley. Pass: Paul Rudiak, Grace Whale, Cecil Paddock, Frank Needham.
Conditional—Alice Mapes, Harvey McAuley.
Grade V to VI—Honors: Mary Marcuenski, Evelyn Groff, Svava Frederickson, Charlotte Adam, Addie Ketcheson, Gordon Rognvaldson, Edith Hubble. Pass: Muriel Burrell, Annie Denby, Archie McLellan, Amelia Adam, Hjalmtyr Thorarinsson, Jos. Schaldemose.
Grade V Jr. to Grade V Sr—Honors: Leo Magnusson. Pass: Harvey Grenon, Verna Denby, Esther Hechter, Evolda Whale, Felix Magnusson, Gifford Campbell, George Campbell.
M. McMartin, Teacher.
Leith McMartin, Teacher.

Grade II to Grade III—Honors; Fred Magnusson, Jennie Ogryzlo, Margaret McLellan, Annie Dubinak, Stearnie Fredrickson, Stephen Zawrich, Alvina St. Godard, Sarah Alex, Mary Lyons, Myrtle Clarkson, Roderick St. Matt, Jos. Hechter, Mark Brown, Annie Zuk, Alex Klyne, Uric Lavergna. Pass; Wm. Wallock, D’Elroy Pouliot, Medos Langlois, Wm. Flamand.
Conditional: Ernest Seiffert, Bruce McAuley, Florence Paddock.
Grade I to Grade II—Honors: Viva Burrill, Lilian Bilenduke, Mary Kruchek, Donald Morris, Iva Whale, Vera Rognvaldson, Dolly Morris, Annie Marchenski, Armand Langlois, Nora Demery, Keitcha Snelgrove. Pass; Chas. Kachoe, Roderick Klyne, Dan McKay, Stephen Ogryzlo, John Semchuk, Fred St. Matt, Jos. Vermette, Helen Fiddler.
L. Levites, Teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 4 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 4 – Fork River

The fowl supper and concert held in the Orange Hall on Friday night last, by the Methodist Church was a success. There was a large turnout and the ladies are to be congratulated on the way they handled the supper. A number came from Winnipegosis. After the concert the young folks hired the hall and a good time was spent the remainder of the night, all leaving for home in the wee small hours of the morning.
There was a fair turnout to the horse breeders meeting on Saturday night last. Much business was done. The choice of the horse went to the Shire breed, the choice being closely contested by admirers of the Punch Everything passed off in a very pleasant manner, after which the meeting adjourned to be called later on by the president. Those who wish to join should call on Secretary Wilson as soon convenient and help on the horse breeding industry of this district, as only members of the association are eligible for use of the horse. Fee for membership is one dollar per annum. Anyone can become a member.
Freddie Storrar is home after spending the summer in the west. He reports a very good time.
Mrs. George Tilt left for Dauphin, having spent a month among her relatives on the Mossey.
Mr. Rogy, collector for the Sawyer-Massey Co., has been here a few days on business.
Mrs. Watson, of Dauphin, is the guest of Mrs. Fred Cooper for a few days on the Fork River.
A. Hunt, F.B. Lacey and D.F. Wilson returned from attending he Municipal convention and report not only a good time but a profitable one.
Mr. Rowe, of Harding, left with his third shipment of cattle and hogs. The cattle business has been very brisk at this point of late, there being more stock shipped than in any other previous year.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove has left for a few days visit among friends at Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Brewer, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Wm. Armstrong.
Mr. Parser, surveyor, and men have left for Winnipeg after spending a week adjusting lines east of Lake Dauphin.
Wm. Davis and T.N. Briggs returned on the Fork River local, having spent a few days in Dauphin on business.
Garnet Lacey has returned home, having spent the summer in the west. He is looking fine.
Most of the male members of this burgh are hiking for the bush to get their annual share of big game. We hope the boys will have good luck.

1913 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

Bennie Hechter returned from Winnipeg on Monday looking very jubilant.
Dugald McAulay dispatched a carload of cattle and pigs to Winnipeg on Wednesday, himself travelling by the same train.
Mr. and Mrs. Watson have departed for a well-earned holiday and the dancing folk will greatly miss them as they were the mainstay in the musical line.
Messrs. Hechter and Ford returned from Winnipeg on Wednesday, most important business having called them there. They report that the city is a bit quitter than even Winnipegosis.
“Professor” Sutton has been recuperating his health here for a few days and greatly admires the salubrity of the atmosphere to this winter sanatorium. He made no public appearance to the regret of everyone and consequently sold none of his well-known concoctions.
Archie McKerchar arranged a small dance in the Victoria Hall on Tuesday evening but your correspondent not having been invited, no details are to hand.
Mr. McGinnis of the Winnipegosis hotel (nearest the lake) is having an addition made to his livery barn which will accommodate six more teams, or is it to be a store house for the game he has gone out to shoot in company Doctor Medd and Mr. Whale.
The first consignment of fish, consisting of ten loads, arrived on Friday from up the lake, so things should new commence to be busy, although up to the present it is not apparent, there still being some individuals in the town waiting for a job.
It is observed with extreme satisfaction to most people in town that Mr. Frank Hechter is standing as councilor for Ward 4, Mossey River municipality, in the forthcoming election, in opposition to Mr. Billy Walmsley, caused by the retirement of Mr. Seiffert, whose tenure of the office has expired. It is time we had somebody with Mr. Hechter’s business acumen to look after the ward as according to all reports things have slightly got mixed up lately and the candidate being the head of a large trading concern in town, matters would no doubt straighten out at once. It is known to everyone the great interest Frank takes in the town and district generally, being the patron of every object tending to the welfare of same, his genial disposition, and is always approachable by anyone seeking aid or advice. It is up to all his adherents to get him right there on this occasion, thereby showing their appreciation of his worth.

1919 Dec 4 – Bicton Heath

It is a good thing we don’t feel the cold during these dips.
Fred. Wenger is holding an auction sale on the 12th inst. Dan Hamilton is the auctioneer.
Mr. Seal has purchased the Marantz farm in this district.
The basket social, which was held at the schoolhouse on Nov. 21st, for the purpose of raising funds to purchase an organ for the school, was a great success, $74.50 being realized. The ladies were out in force with many baskets, tastefully gotten up, which were auctioned off by Jack Haywood, who wielded the hammer with good results.
Fred Sharp is visiting friends at Fork River.
Mr. Pearson has removed to the old Snelgrove farm at Fork River.

1919 Dec 4 – Fork River

A meeting of farmers in Fork River on Monday resulted in the formation of a branch of the Grain Growers to be known as the Mossey River Grain Growers’ Association. President Marcroft, of the South Bay local, filled the chair, and gave a short but interesting address. The following officers were elected for 1920:
President – E.F. Hafenbrak
Vice – D.F. Wilson, Jr.
Sec.- treasurer – Fred J. Tilt
These officers, with M. Gealsky, J.D. Robertson, D. Briggs, Max King and A. Hunt form the board of directors. The meeting was not as large as hoped for on account of the severe weather, but a start has been made and we look for some development in the near future. The association is formed to benefit the district both socially and educationally. Every farmer, farmer’s wife and the young folks should join and help the movement. Membership fee $2 annually.

1919 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

The date for the Union Sunday school Christmas tree and entertainment has been changed from the 22nd to Friday the 19th December.
Seven carloads of fish have already been shipped. Fishing is reported good from all parts of the lake.
Archie McDonell’s snowplow and 20 teams left on Tuesday morning for the north end of the lake. They will be away about ten days.
The telephone system in the village is now in full working order. About fifty residents are connected. Hello, central! What’s the news?
H. Loire has sold his butcher business to J. Angus. Former customers of Mr. Loire will be welcomed with a broad grin at the one and only meat market.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 3 – 1914

1914 Dec 3 – Shot in Hand

A Galician named Lazar was brought to the hospital on Tuesday from the mountain with a bullet in his hand. The wound is not a dangerous one.

1914 Dec 3 – Boy Died

Sam, the 9-year-old son of S.J. Buchanan, of McCreary, was brought to the hospital on Monday, having been shot in the stomach and arm by a man who was hunting rabbits. The wound was a bad one and the boy died on Monday night. The remains were taken to McCreary on Tuesday for interment.

1914 Dec 3 – Soldiers Given Send Off

The departing soldiers on Monday morning were given a great send off at the station. The citizens turned out in large numbers and the town band was also present. Bunting and flags were displayed from all sides, and the military spirit was contagious. The special train the boys were to go odd on was over an hour late and this gave everyone an opportunity for a hand shake and chance to say good-bye. As the train steamed in with its long line of coaches the band struck up a popular air, and cheer followed cheer. The scene was one that will long be remembered.
During the short stay here the soldier boys from the west mingled with the crowd and the time was spent in a jolly way singing patriotic songs, waving flags and cheering.
As the train left the station the band played and the crowd simply went wild. Women shed tears, hats were thrown into the air flags and handkerchiefs were waved and cheer followed cheer.
It was a great send off the boys got and one not soon forgotten.

1914 Dec 3 – Sifton

We are glad to learn that miss Rowe, head nurse of the Presbyterian mission, is now on the way to recovery from a long illness.
Owing to bad roads there has been very little business done in the district of late.
The town will was completed last week and there is every indication of there being an abundance of water.
A party composed of our prominent business men paid a visit to Ethelbert last week with the view of inspecting the Kennedy Mercantile Co,’s new grist mill. They report the mill is running smoothly and doing excellent work.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz celebrated on Tuesday the engagement of their daughter, Miss Ida, to Prof. Matoff, which was witnessed by their many friends and relations of the various ???.
Mr. Joe Clarke, late Sawyer-Massey salesman, paid us a visit on Monday. He reports thing quiet at present but he says business will be humming in the near future. Hoe is sure no pessimist.
The teacher and children of the Wycliffe School gave a fine entertainment in the schoolhouse on Friday evening. The one entitled “War Scenes,” consisting of four parts, namely part I, soldiers fighting; 2nd, arrival of Red Cross nurses dressing the wounded on the battlefield; 3rd, hospital scene; 4th, soldiers and Red Cross nurses tenting on the battlefield, was certainly good. The other part of the programme included solos, readings and plays, consisting of “Henry VIII” and “Britannia.” Several patriotic songs were sung during the programme. A dance concluded the evening. The whole thing proved a great success.

1914 Dec 3 – Winnipegosis

California weather.
F. Hechter arrived home on Monday’s train from Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. and Miss McArthur left this week for Winnipeg, where they will reside for the winter.
Messrs. Thompson and St. John arrived last week from Portage for their annual big game shoot. J. McInnis and Walter Grenon accompanied them on the shoot.
Capt. Coffey spent the weekend at home at Dauphin returning on Monday.
Our train service is to be changed slightly. Instead of the train arriving on Saturday as heretofore, it will arrive on Friday, starting on the 4th inst., otherwise the schedule remains the same.
The fish are beginning to come in. The first loads arrived on the 25th, for the A.T.Co. From all reports the fishing is good.
Miss Emblem and miss Burrell spent the weekend at Snake Isle.
Doc. Medd, who has been attending the assizes at Portage, returned on Monday’s train.
Wm. Walmsley has been confined to the house through sickness. Better hurry, Bill, they’ve started curling.
Mr. Foley lost his residence through fire, last week, over heated stovepipes being the cause. Mr. Foley lost everything that was in the house, as the fire had gained too much head way before being discovered.
The entertainment and bazaar in the Methodist Church last Friday afternoon and evening was a grand success. The programme, though not a lengthy one, was of a classical nature and was fully appreciated by the large crowd present.
The municipal elections promise to cause some excitement, especially in Ward 5, where it is understood, “Old Reliable,” Tom Toye and J. Namarko will be the contestants.
The rink opened for skating and curling on Monday night. It is not every town of our size that has a curling and skating rinks open this winter. It should be fully appreciated and patronized by old and young, both skaters and curlers.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 25 – 1917

1917 Oct 25 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. Alfred Kelly, Dauphin, died. (Alfred Louis Kelly, 1881, 461093)
Pte. S.A. Keays, Dauphin, wounded. (Samuel Alfred Keays, 1893, 255859)
Pte. V. Rogers, of Ochre River, wounded. (John Vercor-Rogers, 1885, 216982)

1917 Oct 25 – Awarded Military Medals

The following Dauphin boys have been awarded military medals since the commencement of the war:
Flight Lieut. W.G. Barker. (William George Barker, 1894, 106074)
Gunner. Stewart Widmeyer. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Batchelor. (???)
Pte. Wm. McLean. (???)
Pte. Percy Lowes. (???)

1917 Oct 25 – Fork River

Fred Cooper arrived home from Dauphin in his new car the other day. Fred, looks imposing sitting at the wheel.
Mr. Timewell has returned from a trip south.
His Grace Archbishop Matheson paid Fork River a visit on Saturday last and held confirmation service.
The snowstorm of Saturday night found considerable grain out in the stook and some potatoes and roots in the ground.
There are three grain buyers on the market new exclusive of the elevator. This should prove satisfactory to all.
Carloads of fat stock are going out on every train. It seems a pity to see so many young heifers being sent out for beef.
The children’s Sunday school service was postponed from Oct. 21 till Oct. 28.
Cohen’s “cordial” is a thing of the past. As Bill Walmsley says “No use trying to establish an industry in this northern end of his country.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 24 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 24 – Typhoid Fever Outbreak

Typhoid fever has broken out among the school children at Winnipegosis and the school has been closed.

1912 Oct 24 – Fork River

J.H. Martinson, of Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, real estate agent, was here on business last week.
Alex. Cameron, of Mowat Centre, was a visitor to Dauphin on business a few days ago.
Mr. Sturdy, who has been all summer at the A.T. Co. store at Winnipegosis, is assisting Mr. Kennedy in the store here now.
Samuel Reid, returned home after a week’s holiday with friends at Brandon.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family spent a few days in Dauphin lately with friends.
J. Parker, of the Stark farm, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Captain Russell, of Sifton, was a visitor at D. Kennedy’s lately.
Miss Comber returned home after spending the summer at Selkirk.
Mr. Silverwood, of Dauphin, was in town for a short stay the guest of Wm. Williams, lumber merchant.
George Sumpton, of Dauphin, is here for a short stay with Mr. Snelgrove.
The railway traffic is getting so heavy on this line that it takes two locomotives to handle a train, especially when they take the side track for it.
The Press of October 17th refers to Macdonald election as a “Howling Farce” and has not got sand enough to print the exact majority.
F. Champion, of Cleveland, England, was here a few days ago in connection with a business transactions.
Harvest festival service at All Saints’ will be held in the church at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon, Oct. 27th.

1918 Oct 24 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Lloyd Winters, Ashville, killed in action. (Lloyd Levi Winters, 1896, 2129348)
Lieut. Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, killed. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Arthur Day, Dauphin, gassed and wounded. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
Pte. J.W. Lane, Dauphin, wounded. (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
Pte. Go.F. King, Dauphin, wounded. (George Francis King, 1891, 151775)
Pte. W.K. Goodman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Wilbert Karl Goodman, 1894, 294203)
Pte. W.J. Bothwell, Makinak, wounded. (Wilfred James Bothwell, 1899, 2184456)
Pte. L. Ward, Grandview, wounded. (Lewis Ward, 1896, 2129152)
Pte. J. Lahaie, Makinak, wounded. (Joseph Lahaie, 1889, 291727)
Lance Corp. D. Stewart, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. E.L. Abrey, Dauphin, wounded. (Ernest Lincoln Abrey, 1889, 865837)
Pte. C.A. Blackmon, Ochre River, wounded. (Charles Alexander Blackmon, 1897, 1001157)

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair was held on Oct. 10th. The weather was perfect but this militated against the attendance for threshing was going on. The attendance of children was good, still some of the schools were very poorly represented owing to the rush of work on the farms. The lack of teachers for some of the schools and the many changes in teachers in others, was a serious handicap to the welfare of the club during the past years.
Lawrence Rowe won the Bank of Commerce prize for the vest pair of pigs at either the Fork River or Winnipegosis fairs, with a very creditable pair of Yorkshires.
It is to be hoped that the club will receive greeter interest from the parents in the coming year and so encourage the children in this work.

PRIZE LIST.
The following is a list of prize winners at the fair:
Grain growing:
Wheat sheaf – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Wheat, 20 lbs – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Rye sheaf – Albert Janowski 1st.

Stock, Calves:
Dairy – Donald McEachern 1st, Arthur Jamieson 2nd, Dave Nowosad 3rd.

Calves:
Beef – Bob Williams 1st, Kate Williams 2nd, Steve Beyko 3rd, Bill Williams 4th.

Pigs:
Pair – Lawrie Rowe 1st, Alice Nowosad 2nd.

Poultry:
Pen of Barred Rocks (3) – Kate Williams 1st, Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Pen Buff Orpingtons – Dave Nowosad 1st, Stanley Lundy 2nd.
Pen White Leghorns – Stanley Benner.
Pen Black Minorcas – Mike Borowski 1st, Bob Williams 2nd.
Pen Brown Leghorns – Bill Williams 1st.
Pen White Rocks – Arthur Jamieson 1st.

Gardening: Half bushel potatoes – Rosie Sowenski 1st, Alex. Zaplitney 2nd, Nicola Poctylo 3rd, Annie Sowinski 4th.
Six carrots – Charlie Jager 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Lawrie Rowe 3rd.
Six turnips – Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Six beets – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Two cabbages – Annie Beyko 1st, Mike Borowski 2nd, Charlie Jager 3rd.
Pumpkins – Nellie Kolokicvk 1st.
Onions – Alice Nowosad 1st, Charlie Jager 2nd.

Cooker:
Loaf of bread – Viola Rower 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Buns – Viola Rowe 1st.

Sewing – Viola Rowe 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Patching – Viola Rowe 1st, Emily Strasdin 2nd.
Fancy work – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Canning – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Longest ??? thistle root – Peter Zaplitney 1st, Fred Jager 2nd.
Woodwork – Bob Williams 1st, Dave Nowosad 2nd, Belle Williams 3rd.
Ducks – Sophie Beyko 1st.
Butter – Rosie Sowskine 1st, Mary Mieke 2nd.
Knitting – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Scribblers – Yumtaska 1st, Annie Chornoboy 2nd, Nellie Karwstski 3rd.

Writing:
Grade I – Horace Thompson 1st, Clara Dewberry 2nd.
Grade II – Ivor Humphreys 1st, Alley Dewberry 2nd.
Grade III – Bernard Hunt 1st, Lulu Thompson 2nd, Golkie Schuchett 3rd.
Map of Manitoba – Dave Nowosad 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Arthur Jamieson 3rd.

Handwork:
Grade I – Mossey School.
Grade II – Mossey School.
Nature Book – Beatrice Rowe 1st.
Collection of butterflies – Irene Bailey 1st.

1918 Oct 24 – Winnipegosis Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Boys’ and Girls’ Cub Fair was held at Winnipegosis on Friday, Oct. 11th. This was the fist event of the kind ever held in this locality and thanks to the efforts of the public school teachers, was a decided success. Keen interest was displayed by the residents of South Bay, and a large number were on hand to view the fair.
The judges were Miss Speechley and Mr. Murray, of the Extension Department of the M.A.C.
The sewing exhibit, largely due to the efforts of Miss M. McMartin, was a credit to Winnipegosis schools. The chickens were good, as were also the display of vegetables. With a greater interest taken by the surrounding schools we hope to double or treble our entries another year.
The secretary and organizer was Mr. H.L. Williams, public school principal.

PRIZE LIST.
Class I: Pair of pigs – Harry Whale 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Single pig – Wallie Pouliet 1st, Evelyn Groff 2nd, Harry Whale 3rd, Gordon Rognvaldson 4th.
Class II, Chicken Raising: Pen of 3 Barred Rocks – Walter Keen, South Bay, 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd, Wilfred Moyer, South Bay, 3rd, Ignace Bobinsky, South Bay, 4th, Mike Samimski, South Bay, 5th, Anthony Bobinsky, South Bay, 6th.
Pen of 3, any other breed – Daisy Walmsley 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Class III, Gardening: One dozen potatoes – Beverly Schaldemose 1st, Elizabeth Moyer, South Bay, 2nd, Ruth Groff 3rd, Evelyn Groff 4th, Mike Verchaski 5th, Gladys Cartwright 6th.
Dozen large onions or 3 large turnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, Elizabeth Moyer 4th.
Dozen parsnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd.
Dozen carrots or beets – Mary Marchenski 1st, Mike Samimski 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, John Moodry 4th, Elizabeth Moyer 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Class IV, Cooking: Two loaves of bread – Lottie Moore 1st, Attie Hechter 2nd.
Dozen oatmeal cookies – Margaret McAuley 1st, Lottie Moore 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd, Alice Hechter 4th.
Dozen cornmeal muffins – Ruth Groff 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Lottie Moore 3rd.
Class V, Sewing: Work bag – Mary Magnuson 1st, Ester Hechter 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd.
Knitted article – Cecil Paddock 1st, Mary Marchinski 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Evolda Whale 4th.
Sewing apron – Mary Magnuson 1st, Verna Denby 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Esther Hechter 4th, Evolda Whale 5th, Charlotte Adam 6th.
Red Cross Collection – Evolda Whale 1st, Mary Magnuson 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Charlotte Adam 4th, Addie Ketcheson 5th.
Night gown or tea apron – Charlotte Adam 1st, Addie Ketcheson 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Amelia Adam 4th.
Table runner – Helen Macaulay 1st, Lenore Denby 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Dust cap and work apron – Lenore Denby 1st, Tina Marchenski 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Piece of crochet work – Attie Hechter 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Lenore Sehaldemose 4th, Mary Marchenski 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Two Red Cross articles – Lenore Sehaldemose 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Ruth Groff 4th.
Middy suit – Lottie Moore 1st, Lenore Sehaldemose 2nd.
Class VII, Weed Contest: Collection of seeds of 10 noxious weeds – Ignace Bobinsky 1st, Mary Fleming 2nd, Ella Martin 3rd, Arthur McLellan 4th.
Class VIII, Woodwork Contest – Stanley Miket 1st, John Wallace 2nd, Nieh Rudiak 3rd, Alec. Ogryzlo 4th.

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River

Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, spent the week-end with his parents.
There was a very good turnout to the Thanksgiving service on Sunday.
Mr. Fred Tilt is building a house next to the Orange Hall. He has retired from farming and will reside in town.
Dunc Kennedy and party from Ochre River passed through the town on Sunday on their way to Winnipegosis.
Pte. Venables, who has just returned from overseas, is visiting his brother, T.B. Venables.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ Church and the attendance was good. It is hopeful sign when interest is taken in our young people.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 21 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 21 – Sifton

The elections are now over and we are all glad we can now get down to business.
The threshing has been interrupted in this district by the frequent showers of rain.
The Misses Goforth and Reid, who spent their vacation in Saskatchewan, returned to town on Friday last. The ladies in question are well known as the nurses of the Presbyterian hospital here. The nurses are very popular here and on their return were tendered a reception at the Manse, which was decorated for the occasion. During the evening the ladies were presented with an address, which contained many complimentary terms, showing the esteem in which they are held and the appreciation of their work. The address was signed by J. Kennedy, J. Reid, Wm. Barry, W.J. Ashmore and C.A. Jones. At the conclusion of a very pleasant evening spent socially, refreshments were served by the ladies.

1911 Sep 21 – Winnipegosis

Wm. Sifton is spending a few days in town renewing acquaintances (before election).
Miss Sarah Hjalmerson is spending a few days at Snake Island the guest of Mrs. N. McAuley.
Miss M. Crawford left Thursday for Winnipeg, where she will attend business college.
Mr. and Mrs. Dennit and Miss Hansford are leaving town in October for England.
Miss Lily McAuley of South Bay, is visiting with Mrs. J.W. McAuley.
Mr. Paul Paplson and bride returned last week, after spending a two weeks’ honeymoon in Winnipeg.
Sunday, Sept. 24th, a confirmation service will be held in Victoria hall, conducted by Rev. B. Thorinson.
Misses Emma and Margaret Good, man of Red Deer Point, are the guests of Mrs. T. Schaldemose.
The Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.’s tug left Monday for Shoal River with Ted Cartwright in charge.
Ken McAuley, of Kamsack, is renewing acquaintances in town.
Wm. Walmsley in again managing the Lake View Hotel. His many friends are pleased to see his genial smile again at the hotel.

1916 Sep 21 – Maxwell King Wounded

Wm. King, postmaster at Fork River, received a cablegram this week from France stating that his son, Private Maxwell King, has been wounded.

1916 Sep 21 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on Wednesday, the 30th ult., all the members being present.
The minutes of the last meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner, re Fishing River Bridge, and from J.L. Bowman, re Cooper ditch.
McDonell – Reid – That the Basham Bridge be put in repair at once and that Coun. Reid be authorized to use any means to accomplish it that he may find necessary.
McDonell – Reid – That J.S. Seiffert be paid $25 for repairing the McAuley Bridge and that it have a further covering of two-inch tamarac plank eight feet long in the centre and that the clerk be authorized to issue orders for the plank and one leg of six-inch spikes.
McDonell – Reid – That the municipality make a grant of $50 to the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin; $25 to be paid now and $25 at the end of the year.
Reid – Namaka – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt – Campbell – That the accounts [1 line missing] in work be passed, $19.50.
McDonell – Reid – That the clerk notify Lawrence municipality that the council will pay 50 percent of any improvements made on the boundary line between the municipalities and that the construction of a ditch running into Lake Dauphin, which has been under consideration by the councilors of the adjourning wards be let by public auction by Reeve Lacey and Coun. Radcliff to arrange a date for such letting.
Hunt – Campbell – That Coun. McDonell, Reid and Namaka be a committee to inspect the Fork River-Winnipegosis road with a view to its improvement and report at the next meeting of the council.
Reid – McDonell – That the six pieces of timber purchased from W. Williams by the reeve be paid for.
Reid – Hunt – That as the plank ordered for the Fork River sidewalks has not been delivered for the purpose be purchased from W. Williams.
A by-law striking the rate for 1916 was passed. Municipal rate 12 ½ mills municipal commissioner’s rate, 4 mills, and general school rate, 5 ½ mills.
Hunt – Campbell – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

1916 Sep 21 – Fork River

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1915

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis Council

Meeting of the Council of the Village of Winnipegosis held in the Council chambers at 7 p.m. on the 6th inst. Mayor J.P. Grenon in the chair and Councillors Walmsley, Levons, Morris and Hjalmarson present.
Walmsley – Morris – That the minutes of previous meetings be adopted as read. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That Dunc Kennedy be appointed sec-treasurer at a salary of $30 per month from Sept. 1st till end of the fiscal year. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That Walter Clarkson be appointed constable for the Village of Winnipegosis at a salary of $40 per month. Carried.
Lyons – Morris – That the Mayor and Councillors walmsley and Lyons be a committee to secure a yard and feed for pound for Village of Winnipegosis. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That the Mayor, Coun. Walmsley and the Sec.-Tresurer meet the committee appointed by the municipality to go over the matter of the appointment between the village and the municipality. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council may for the transportation of Mr. [2 lines missing] such time as the Council are in a position to buy it our it is sold. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council adjourn to meet at the call of the Mayor. Carried.

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis

Miss Evelyn Barrell and Mr. Sidney Coffey were married in Winnipeg on the 30th August, and arrived in town on Saturday’s train. Their many friends wish them a long and happy wedded life.
G.O. Bellsmy, an old-timer, spent Sunday in town.
Geo. C. Nigh spent the week-end wit his wife and reports the crops in good shape at Grandview. He left on Monday’s train for Grandview.
Dr. Buttomley, accompanied by Tom Needham, arrived from Dauphin by auto Saturday, and left for Meadow Portage with Ern. Bickel to inspect the smallpox epidemic over there.
J.A. Ball, customs officer, spent Saturday in town.
T.F. Ganther arrived on Saturday’s train and is helping J.C. Adams with the completion of his residence.
Sergeant Jack Angus came up from Brandon on Saturday’s train and is looking well and reports the boys from here all well and happy and getting along splendidly. He left Joe Johnston in charge of his squad.
Jas. McInnes has purchased a gasoline launch and made a trip to Waterhen on Saturday with a survey party.
Hull Burrell took Mr. Loire and party to their ranch on Saturday, returning Saturday night.
The S.S. “Maniton” arrived from the north Sunday with a load of fish and report fishing quiet.
Donald Hattie returned from Snake Island and report fishing quiet.
W.H. Hunking left on Wednesday from Johnston, North Dakota, where he intends making his home. His family preceded him some time ago.
Harry and Walter Grenon returned on Saturday from an extended trip to Quebec and Eastern points and report a splendid vacation and a real good time.
Miss St. Vrain and Geo. Adams were married at the home of the latter’s parents last week and are receiving the congratulations of their many friends.
Mrs. Jne. Cain left on Wednesday’s train for her home in Rainy River, Ont.
The Mossey River Council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on the 31st August. The reeve and all councillors present.
E.R. Black and Scotty Howatson had an exciting trip going to Grave’s Point in a gasoline boat. They were lost and were eleven days making their destination. Why they made the point they had only a few matches left.
Sam McLean made a flying visit to town on Friday by automobile. We don’t see much of Sam nowadays.
Mrs. W. Morton and children returned on Wednesday from a two months’ visit to her parents at Wadena, Sask.
Capt. Russell received a nice bull terrier from Kelwood recently. Experts Dunc Kennedy and Billie Walmsley will tell you all about it. These two can sure spot a good dog with half an eye open.
Mr. and Mrs. Woiff and family motored up from Ochre River on Sunday to visit Mrs. Kennedy.
Joe Alex left for Winnipeg on business on Saturday.
Wm. Flett, Hudson’s Bay agent, returned from the far north and has been spending a week in town. He left for Winnipeg Saturday.
C.L. White left for Waterhen River Friday, taking a canoe in tow on account of the low water in the rivers.
The new principal for our school arrived in town Wednesday last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1910

1910 Aug 8 – Mossey River Council

A meeting of the council was held at Fork River on Thursday, July 14th, all the members present.
The minutes of two previous meetings were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Paddock – That the clerk write the superintendent of the C.N.R. and ask for an increased train service on the Winnipegosis branch.
Lacey-Fleming – That the clerk write to the superintendent of the C.N.R. and request that he appoint some responsible person to take charge of freight delivered at Fork River until it is called for by the person to whom it is consigned.
Hunt-Toye – That the clerk instruct Mr. Pruder re Road Commissioner’s certificate – that he must settle the matter with Mr. Walmsley.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Reeve and Coun. Paddock be a committee to investigate Mrs. McCleods claims.
Toye-Fleming – That Councillors Lacey, Nicholson and Hunt be a committee to see Messrs. Whale and Davis and secure a title to Fork River cemetery.
Lacey- Nicholson – That the Reeve, when in Winnipeg secure to lay out a road from Fork River to Winnipegosis.
Lacey-Toye – That all pathmasters notify the clerk or Road Commissioner of the ward when any serious obstruction or damage has occurred in their respective beats.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the clerk be instructed to write Thos. Shannon and notify him to repair the roadway damaged by him not later than July 18th.
Hunt-Paddock – That motions 5, 6, 7, and 8 of meeting March 13 and motions 15, 16, 17, and 18 of meeting May 21, be expunged.
Lacey-Toye – That S. Bailey be engaged as road commissioner on Main road between Fork River and Winnipegosis at $2.50 per day and that he be empowered to secure the necessary labour at lowest possible cost and to commence work as soon as possible.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the clerk notify M.W. Snelgrove that the Council is prepared to settle for the Shannon road as soon as advised to do so by its solicitor.
Lacey-Fleming – That Road Commissioner Toye’s account for letting and inspecting work amounting to $22.50 to be paid.

A by-law authorizing the loan of $1000 at Bank of Ottawa was passed.
Fleming-Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1910 Aug 8 – Fork River (too late for last issue)

D.F. Wilson returned from seeing the Winnipeg Exhibition last week.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Lockhart left here Monday to attend Brandon fair.
Mrs. S. Bailey returned from Winnipeg last Saturday.
The crops around this district are looking excellent and providing the ether last good a bumper harvest will be the result and the farmers are jubilant.
D. Shinks returned from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
The Church of England picnic which was held at Lake Dauphin last Tuesday was a great success, it was an ideal day and quite a number drove from Fork River. The sports were good and the boys and girls had a good time. The sack race was won by R. King, 1st; E.W. King, 2nd; three legged race, F. King and C. Wilson; married women’s race, Mrs. Kennis, 2nd; long jump E. King; horse race, D. Briggs; egg race, Mrs. G. Shannon, 1st; Mrs. T. Shannon, 2nd. S. Gower and the Rev. H.H. Scrase were busy all the afternoon looking after the sports etc., so as to give everybody a good time. Football between Mowat and Fork River was a hard fought game won by Fork River 1-0; baseball was also indulged in. Mr. F.B. Lacey and S. Gower got the booth and grounds ready and quite a number went on the lake in boats provided.

1910 Aug 8 – North Lake

Mr. and Mrs. F.B. Lacey paid a visit to North Lake last week.
Messrs. Weaver, and Shrog have been stranded on the shores of Lake Dauphin for a few days owning to their raft being unable to ride the waves. They hope to make Million Lighthouse some time this fall.
J. Spearing, who has been in Dauphin Hospital undergoing on operation is back with us again.
Any one wishing to see a good field of wheat should have a look at Tom Glendenning’s. It’s a dandy.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 12 – 1910

1910 May 12 – Burrows’ Mill Burned

Burrows’ Mill at Grandview was burned Wednesday evening. The lumber in the vicinity was saved after a hard fight. The loss is estimated at $50,000 with $25,000 insurance. Mr. Burrows will rebuild at once. The mill was to have commenced operations today on 12,000,000 feet of logs.

1910 May 12 – Died From Shock

Eunice, the three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Wells, died Saturday from pneumonia and the effects of a scalding shock. The little girl was playing on the floor of the home, when the bottom of a teapot Mrs. Wells was carrying dropped out, the contents going over the child about the face and neck, terribly scalding her. Everything possible was done to ease the little sufferer before she passed away. Rev. D. Flemming conducted funeral service on Tuesday.

1910 May 12 – Fork River

W. King and D.F. Wilson who have been to Gilbert Plains to attend the Conservative Convention returned last Monday.
Mr. Frame from Treherne came up last week and has been staying at Mr. Cameron’s for a few days.
Mrs. McLean and family from Selkirk came up last week and intend settling in this village.
A Methodist concert will be held on the 24th in the Orange Hall.
Dr. Medd, from Winnipegosis came down last week to inaugurate a Tag-day, but owning to the short notice given very few lapis turned out and the meeting was adjourned till a later date.
C. Bradley and Mr. Walmsley from Winnipegosis paid us a visit last week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 20 – 1913

1913 Mar 20 – Baran Now Praying

John Baran, condemned to be hanged for the murder of Constable Rooke, now spends his time in prayer.

1913 Mar 20 – Fork River

Geo. Esplen was a visitor with W. King on his return from Mafeking, where he spent the winter in charge of one of the fishing posts on the north end of the lake.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove left for Dauphin to visit among friends on her way to Dryden, Ontario.
Miss Pearl Wilson is taking a short vacation among friends at Sifton.
John Bykilo returned home after a two months rest for the good of his health at Portage.
Fred Storrar, of Mowat, has resumed his duties as assistant manager of the A.T. Co. Fred’s all right, a pleasant smile for everyone.
Miss Ena Fredrickson and Miss Kennedy returned from a visit to their folks at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that Professor Ike Robinson was scalded the other day while experimenting with a boiler, which exploded throwing the contents in his face. He is doing nicely. Ike says he don’t mind having solved the tea experiment.
The C.N.Ry. bridge gang is busy renewing the bridge on the creek north of town.
The vaudeville performance which the Laurier troupe has been putting on at the National Play house on Parliament Hill, is costly for the country. Ten thousand dollars a day or sixty thousand dollars for the week is the bill which the people of the Dominion will have to foot for the little game of politics which the Opposition has been staging for the first week in the opposition to the navy bill. That’s Liberal economy and loyalty everytime.
“Say, Mike, we overheard the Admiral trying to explain the need of that boundary bridge the other day and several took a hand in the debate.”
“Well, Pat, by what I see of the affair it is a fraud to take our taxes to build a bridge to accommodate one man and it on private property. He must have caught the rest of them napping to be able to carry such a measure.”
“Now, you’ve put your foot in it, Mike, sure. The Fork River Philosopher’s idea is to bridge the whole municipality and throw the dirt on top. Gee, what next.”
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese, held Communion and Baptismal service at All Saints’, Fork River, Winnipegosis and Sifton. There were large congregations at each service. The Rev. H.H. Scrase assisted.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

Charles Johnson, of Makinak, was a visitor to Rev. Father Derome last week. He was much interested in his visit and inspected the hatchery on Snake Island, where he enjoyed himself. His father is interested in the management of a hatchery in Norway, Europe.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

The ball in the Winnipegosis hotel on the 17th proves that the anniversary of St. Patrick is becoming very dear to the hearts of some, it being patronized by the elite, graced by those who love to trip the light fantastic, and enlivened by an appreciative crowd of onlookers. Many wore a souvenir badge supplied by willing workers of the W.A. and assistants. Fork River social element added materially to its success.
At the Christian League last Thursday Mr. Scott read a paper on “Commerce” touching on the German menace, that was worthy of a much larger crowd of understanding. He defined minutely the fundamental principles of commerce making it more interesting by apt illustrations, ably leading one’s interest up to appreciate the Empire’s present position. His reflections on England from Germany’s attitude served to illuminate her domain and in no way detracted from her greatness.
Mr. Mullens was the recipient of a handsome gift from his many friends in Winnipegosis last Wednesday evening as a token of their esteem and regret at his departure.
Mr. Hulme returns home for Easter holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson are rejoicing in the possession of a young son, which was privileged to be baptized by the Rev. Dr. Page, archdeacon and general missioner of the diocese. A baptismal service was also held in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walmsley on Sunday evening last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 19 – 1914

1914 Feb 19 – Fight with Mad Cat

Joshua Law was the proud owner of a large Russian cat last week. This week the cat is in the happy hunting grounds. The cat was the pet of the family and most affectionate. Three days ago it became suddenly mad and without warning whatever jumped on Norman, Mr. L’s 4 year old son, and commenced biting and scratching him. The screams of the child brought Mrs. Law to the rescue. She knocked the cat from the child with a chair. She had no sooner done this than the animal attacked Neta, the 14 year old daughter, and the fight was renewed with vigour. Finding the fight a little too hot with Mrs. Law battering the cat with a chair, the feline turned its attention to Mrs. Law, and Mr. Law, who was brought to the scene by the commotion at this time, says that it was the liveliest scrimmage that ever took place in Dauphin. Quickly grabbing a nearby axe Mr. Law, by a couple of well directed blows, dispatched the cat.
While the little boy is pretty badly bitten and scratched it is not thought any of the wounds are dangerous. Had Mrs. Law not been right at hand there is no doubt but the cat would have torn the child’s eyes out and likely killed him.

1914 Feb 19 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis on Thursday, Feb. 12th, 1914. All the members present.
Communications were read from the Children’s Aid Society, S. Hughes M.P.P., J.A. Gorby, clerk of Dauphin municipality; Reeve Collins of McCreary, Dominion Land office, Home for Incurables, the solicitors, department of Public Works, Manitoba Gypsum Co., Land Titles office and P. Robertson.
Hechter-Robertson – That the treasurer be authorized to pay the Lands Titles office $60.24, being the amount required to redeem the south of S.E. 28, 29, 20.
Richardson-Toye – That the Reeve and Councillor Hechter be a committee to inspect the roadway alongside sec. 365, 30, 19, and report as to the waterway being blocked.
Richardson-Robertson – The council of the municipality of Mossey River is of the opinion that the services of the bailiff in regards to seizure in the interests of the municipality was most unsatisfactory and that a copy of this resolution be sent to our solicitors.
Hechter-Hunt – That Mrs. Spence’s hospital account be not charged against the property.
Richardson-Bickle – That the assessment roll prepared by W.H. Hunking be accepted for 1914.
Hunt-Hechter – That Councillors Richardson and Robertson be committee to inspect the Fishing River Bridge and let the work for necessary repairs.
Bickle-Toye – That the account of P. Robertson be paid to the extent of $327.
Hechter-Hunt – That In amendment. That P. Robertson be paid in full for work on the bridge, $337, provided that the Public Works Committee see that the railing is completed.
Motion Carried.
Richardson-Bickle – That the reeve and councillors receive their fees after every meeting throughout the year.
Toye-Robertson – That the reeve be authorized to go to Winnipeg and interview the minister of public works with a view to obtaining a grant from the Provincial government for public works in the municipality.
By-laws were passed appointing Dr. Medd health officer at the usual salary; re-establishing the statute labour system; appointing weed inspectors and authorizing a loan from the Bank of Ottawa.

1914 Feb 19 – Fork River

Mr. J. Clawson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here visiting friends.
Mr. McAulay, collector for the Massey-Harris Implement Company, spent a few days here among the farmers.
Mrs. Beck has left for the south to visit.
Dr. Medd, health officer, paid his official visit and found scarlet fever prevalent. As a consequence quite a number are quarantined and the school closed for a time.
Mike says there is nothing like nipping things in the bud. We trust the fellow that carried the little medicine bag will not take offence.
Mr. J. Frost returned from the fish hauling up the lake and has accepted a position with the Williams’ Lumber Co. on Lake Dauphin.
Mrs. Wm. Davis has returned from short visit to Dauphin on business.
We believe it would be to the interest of the public if our health officer would visit the Mowat correspondent, as Mike says its coming on towards spring and he generally has them turns about that time. For instance, last week he made some very drastic statement about the P.O ??? We do not think he here came here and was unable to get attended ??? if he knew what he wanted. Another thing we don’t remember seeing him at the P.O. only once during the ??? As for the little peanut stand of ??? place, “two by twice” as he call it, we do not agree with him as it is one of the largest buildings in the place and is no more crowded on mail days than it was before the change, considering the mail is heavier than it ??? to be on account of the parcel post.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor at the home of her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
There was no Sunday school or ??? at All Saints’ on Sunday and the concert for the 20th has been postponed.
Nurse Tilt, of Dauphin, was a visitor her home on the Mossey River.

1914 Feb 19 – Winnipegosis

Here has certainly been something doing at the curling rink this past week, both sheets going every night and some very close and exciting games. In one night Walmsley and McNichol, Medd and Dennett had to play an extra end to break the tie, McNichol and Dennett won. The following night Watson and Medd had to play an extra end, Medd winning. The same night McDonald certainly put it all over McNichol, the latter not seeding the chalk until the last end Friday night. Walmsley showed Watson the road 13 to 3. The game of the season was played between McDonald and Dennett. As they were late in getting started they were only to play ten ends. At the ninth end the game stood 11-6 in favour of Dennett; but would you believe it? McDonald scored 6 on the last end, winning by one. How did you do it Mac? Monday night the Doc rink was up against Walmsley. The Doc. not being able to be there, his third man, John Black, a new curler, trimmed Walmsley in good style Watson beat McNichol. Tuesday night McDonald trimmed Walmsley and McNichol beat Dennett.
The boys are in good trim for the Dauphin bonspiel and are looking forward to showing the Dauphin boys where the game started.
Council meeting was held in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Thursday. Councillors all present; some of them arriving to do with that.
The Hotel Winnipegosis is certainly doing a great business now. So many fishermen are coming in it keeps them busy trying to furnish them with accommodation. Mine Host McInnis has added a few more rooms to the hotel and says, “Come on boys, there is always room for one more.”
Wm. Ford and wife left on Wednesday for Winnipeg. We were very sorry to see them go as they were well liked by everybody here.
Dr. Medd was called to Fork River last Friday. There is an outbreak of scarlet fever and a large number have been quarantined.
Wm. Christinson has bought John Seiffert’s residence and will be moving there in a short time.
C.L. White is remodelling the house he brought from John Spencer, of Brandon. When finished it will certainly be a fine place as Charley knows how to go about it.
Frank Hechter left on Monday for Winnipeg. Frank is a great sport and be ??? had to take in the ???
The snowplough arrived from up the lake with an outfit of fish and fishermen on Tuesday. It was a sight worth seeing, sleighs with seventy-five boxes of fish, a caboose on the top with a family living in it. They were six days on the trip. Now, that’s an outing for your life. That will be the last trip for the snowplough this ??? All the fish are in and the [missing section].

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 12 – 1914

1914 Feb 12 – Lake View Hotel Winnipegosis Destroyed By Fire

Early Sunday morning Winnipegosis was given a bad fire scare. With a high wind blowing it seemed that the greater part of the Main Street was doomed. A call was sent to the Dauphin Fire Brigade to be in readiness, in case the fire spread.
The fire started though the collapsing of the furnace about 9 a.m., in the basement of the Lake View Hotel, and in less than two hours the building was a complete wreck.
The fire gained such headway before a general alarm was given, that two of the female staff were compelled to jump from the second storey windows and received a severe shaking up.
The citizens of the town turned out in force and formed a bucket brigade. It is due to their strenuous efforts that the fire was confirmed to the one place. Several times adjacent property appeared to be doomed.
Hotel Winnipegosis, which is just across the street was given a bad scorching on the one side. All the window glass being broken by the heat.
The contents of Walmsley’s poolroom, Whale’s general store and Paddock’s butcher shop were cleared out.
Part of the contents of the hotel were saved, but the boarders and staff practically lost all their property.
The hotel was managed by Wm. Ford and owned by The Brewer’s Syndicate. The loss is partially covered by insurance.
The burned building was one of the first hotels in the district on the advent of the railway some fifteen years ago.

Fork River

The funeral service of the late W. Davis was conducted by Mr. Williams, lay reader of All Saints’ Anglican Church on Tuesday, February 3rd, at the house of the deceased. The remains were interned in the Fork River Cemetery followed by a very large crowd from the surrounding vicinity.
J. Robinson, of Mowat, has shipped over 60 boxes of fish caught in Lake Dauphin.
C.E. Bailey, Fred Cooper and W. King, C.M., returned from the annual meeting of the Country Orange Lodge in Dauphin. They report a good time.
Mrs. Gunness and two children have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Paswegan, Sask.
John Richardson had the misfortune to loose a valuable mare this week when he entered the stable in the morning the beast was found dead.
Mrs. Russell and children, of Kamsack, arrived and intend making their home with Captain Russell, teacher of the Beacon Heath School.
W. Hunkings, assessor, paid Clerk Wilson a visit on municipal business.
John Angus, of Winnipeg, pays frequent visits to this burgh. It’s all right John, Kitty’s busy these days catching owls.
W. King had a number of sheep killed by dogs ??? ??? making short work of any animal looking for mutton on his ??? in the future.
Don’t forge to [1 line missing] and fancy basket social under the auspices of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church. The ladies will furnish the baskets. There will be a short programme of songs, recitations, etc. [1 line missing] to come and have a good time. Admission 20 cents. On Friday night, Feb. 20th , at 9 o’clock sharp.

Winnipegosis

Fire completely destroyed the Lake View Hotel here Sunday morning. The fire originated in the basement, and gained such headway before being discovered that some of the guests had to escape through the upper story windows, not being able to save any of their personal effects. The citizens responded very quickly as soon as the alarm was given, and through hard work managed to confine the fire to the one building. Walmsley’s poolroom had a narrow escape. It being on fire several times but the bucket brigade never gave up, and the building only received a bad scorching. Hotel Winnipegosis looked at one time as if nothing could save it. The heat was so intense that all the windows were broken on the one side, but with a cost of paint and new windows the appearance of the fire will be gone. Had it burned, a number of us would be living in tents today.
Dr. Medd is certainly getting even with the boys now for what they did to him at the beginning of the curling season. He was a little unfortunate then, not having Ben Hechter and Jack Duhurst trained to get the broom instead of the fence. But now look out for the Doc. Why McDonald and his scouts only beat him by a very small margin Monday night. The Dr. and Watson had a good game Friday night only Watson had no use for the chalk. Dennett and Walmsley played a good game the same night, Dennett winning by 3 points. Watson’s rink won from Dennett Monday night 13-9. Jack Angus was the skip.
Mrs. Paddock left on Wednesday for Brandon, where she will remain a few days vising friends.
Sid Craighill, who has been confined to his bed through sickness, we are glad to report is around once more.
J.E. Morris arrived in town from his fishing camp last Thursday. He says the fishing is light.
It is rumoured there is likely to be a telephone line extended to South Bay this spring. It would be a grand thing for the farmers in that district. There will be a good number of phones put in here this spring.
Harvey Watson left on Monday for Dauphin on a business trip.
Wm. Christinson, wife and child arrived in town Monday from their fishing camp.
Willie McNichol and Gillis Johannesson got in on Saturday. It won’t be all down, then there will be something doing.
We are certainly getting a taste of cold weather now. The thermometer at the post office on Tuesday morning registered 32 below zero. One thermometer in town registered 54 below. Wednesday morning 53 below and still going down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 6 – 1913

1913 Feb 6 – Baran Fired Fatal Shot

Monday was the most fateful in the life of John Baran. It opened with the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke in morning and in the afternoon the coroner’s jury found Baran guilty of the shooting.
Coroner Harrington held an inquest in the afternoon, when the following composed the jury: Geo. King, foreman; H.F. Caldwell, John Cole, A.B. Buie, Nelson Taylor, Stewart Baird, Thos. Shaw, F.J. McDonald, R.G. Ferguson, Thos. Jordan, Frank Beely, and Arch. Esplen. Witnesses examined were Dr. Culbertson, as to immediate cause of death; John Tomaski, the man who drove the sleigh that carried Constable Rooke to Baran’s house where he was shot, and Marie Pelech, the woman who lived with Baran.
The jury, in order to receive the woman’s evidence, proceeded to the hospital and for an hour listened to a well connected and intelligent reciting of the incidents which led up to the shooting.
The woman testified that Baran fired two shots from a rifle through the door when Rooke attempted to force an entrance; that she knew that one of the bullets took effect for she examined the spot where Rooke fell exhausted in the snow, when the man who accompanied him left to secure assistance. She stated that she found a pool of blood. She also testified that Baran forced her to state that she fired two shot through the door. The whole affair was brought home to Baran in a most vivid manner.

THE JURY’S VERDICT

The following is the verdict of the jury:
“We, the jury empanelled to hear the evidence as to the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke, find that the said Charles Rooke on Sunday, Jan. 26, 1913, received a bullet in the breast from a rifle in the hands of John Baran and that the said Charles Rooke died on Monday, Feb. 3, 1913, from the effects of this shot.”
The death of Constable Rooke has cast a gloom over the community as he was a good citizen, as well a good officer, unassuming and kind to all.
Marie Pelech, who lived with Baran, is still in the hospital, but is doing as well as can be expected. If she recovers she will have to have her right arm amputated at the shoulder. Her brother, Michael, arrived from Winnipeg Monday morning and was overcome with grief to find his sister in such a pitiable condition. He says he has been looking for her for three years.
Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Munson on Monday on the charge of murder. He was remanded until Friday for trial.
Rooke was born at Redhill, Surrey, England. May 5, 1876, being the son of Inspector-General Rooke, of the Indian army, who was honorary physician to Queen Victoria, and was educated at Willington College. He came to Western Canada in 1895, and served five years with the Northwest Mounted Police. In 1905 the Manitoba government gave him the job of organizing the Manitoba mounted police, a body whose efforts were mainly directed to the suppression of lawlessness along the international boundary line. He made his name a terror to horse thieves, yeggmen and smugglers and soon made the frontier as safe as any other part of the province. Latterly, his headquarters have been here, where he had jurisdiction over much of the north country. In 1909 he married Elizabeth Surrey, who, with one son, survives him.
A brother, E.G. Rooke, news editor of the Nelson News, and former publisher of the Port Hope., Ont. Times, is here to attend the funeral as are also Mr. Geo. Surry, Victoria, B.C., Mrs. Rooke’s brother, and Miss Ellen Surrey, of Galt., Ont., sister of Mrs. Rooke.

1913 Feb 6 – Funeral Today

The funeral of the late Constable Charles Rooke is taking place this afternoon from the family residence 8th Ave., N.E. Vermillion Lodge No, 68, A.F. & A.M., of which deceased was a member having charge of the services. Rev. A.S. Wiley will conduct the service. Interment will be made at Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fraser Given Two Months

Wm. Fraser, who attempted suicide last week by cutting his throat, appeared before P.M. Munson on the 30th ult., and was sentenced to two months in jail. He was taken to Portage by Constable McLean.

1913 Feb 6 – Died From Bullet Wound

Fred Bichardson, a Barnardo boy who was working for Arthur Lee, a farmer at Togo, shot himself in the head Friday with a 22 rifle. He was brought to the hospital here on Saturday, but died shortly after his arrival. The remains were interred in Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fork River

Henry Benner, of Lloydminster, is visiting his parents up the Fork River. He is wanting a car of young cattle to take back with him. No objections to females being among them.
Howard Armstrong has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Dony, left for Bayhead, Nova Scotia, for a two months visit among relations and friends.
D. Kennedy’s high flyer got kicked the other day and is out of business for a short time, consequently Dunk had to fall back on the old reliables for a trip to Winnipegosis.
All the threshing outfits got cold feet early this fall except for Fred Cooper and he is on his last job. Fred’s a stayer and there should be no kick from the farmers as there’s no money in it for either this year as far as threshing goes.
We were out the other day looking for a stray heifer and didn’t find her, but came across someone looking for a pig. They did not mention whether it was a live pig, or dead pig or a blind pig and judging from their track a few hours after they must have run across a pig of some kind. Moral, don’t try to carry more pig than you can handle unless you cover up your tracks.
There is considerable kicking being done among the owners of gasoline engines re the poor gasoline sent up here from Dauphin. It not only wastes our time but puts the engines out of order.
We notice in the Press a long rigmarole about compulsory education also an ad for a teacher for Mowat School. We hear there has been several application received. It seems a pity this school should be closed since the summer holidays, it being in the centre of a settlement where there is a large number of children. The parents seem to be anything but delighted to have the kids miss all the nice weather we have had. We bet dollars to doughnuts that the head push has no children to send or we would have heard of it every week for the last five months.
Can anyone tell us what benefit the majority of the ratepayers receive for their taxes in the Municipality. Of course there are some who go on a pilgrimage to all the meetings looking for snaps and they get them, by gum. The clerk has had a rise of fifty. Oh well, I believe he published the minutes of one council meeting since last June. The municipal auditor was around so look out for the statement three inches by four. We received a copy of the Auditor’s report in book form of 47 pages from Ochre River Municipality. Its good reading and looks like business. A few dollars expended like this would be more appreciated by the ratepayers than paying two road commissioners in ward five, as there has been done the last three years to spend two or three hundred dollars.
The new Oak Brae postoffice as officially opened today. It is situated at Janowski schoolhouse and should prove a great boon to the people of that locality as it has been a deeply felt want. Geo. Basham is postmaster and we feel sure he will fill the bill to all satisfactorily. We hear Billy is sore, but we can’t help these things, so Billy, please remember the little saying “No use crying over spilt milk.” Such is life in the Wolly West.
The annual clearance sale started today 1st Feb. at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store and they are sure slaughtering the prices. This has been a poor year for the farmer so now is your chance to buy right.
Wanted, a boarding house right away for the travelling public.

1913 Feb 6 – Sifton

A ball was held in the Kennedy hall in aid of the English church; about forty couples were present, and a very enjoyable time was spent.
Elaborate arrangements were made for a wedding here on the 31st ult. A large number of guests had assembled and everything was in readiness for the ceremony when it was found that the would-be bride was missing. Consternation reigned for a time and great disappointment was felt, especially by the intended groom.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 4 – 1915

1915 Feb 4 – Remains Found

Some time last fall Paulo Jura, a one-armed young Ruthenian, disappeared at Ethelbert. An investigation was held but no trace of the young man could be found. He went out shooting with another young man named Timothy Nakonectiny, and at the time and considerable money on his person. Recently his remains were found in the Duck Mountain, but the flesh had just about all disappeared from the bones. His clothes, however, were identified. No trace of the money could be found.
Detectives are now again investigating the case.
Nakonectiny, Jura’s companion, has disappeared from the district.

1915 Feb 4 – Third Contingent Complete

The 110 men allotted to the Dauphin district to be raised for the Third Contingent has just about been enrolled, the number now reaching 106. Taken altogether the men are a fine lot and compare favourably with the first that enlisted here. The following is a summary of the nationality of the men:

Canadian 37
English 43
Scotch 20
Welsh 1
American 3
South Africa 1
Danish 1

CANADIAN.
J.D. Munson, single. (Jack Devereux Munson, 1895, 424039)
G. Prieur, single. (Gabriel Prieur, 1896, 425219)
A.A. Day, single. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
J.E. Welch, single. (John Edward Welch, 1891-1916, 74199)
C.W. Shaw, single. (Charles Wallace Shaw, 1875-1916, 424037 or A/24015)
W.C. Mitchell, single. (William Charles Mitchell, 1885, 74202)
I. Zufelt, single. (Isaac Zufelt, 1891, 425518)
H.W. Gardiner, single. (Hugh William Gardiner, 1894-1916, 424020)
J. Gallant, single. (Joseph Gallant, 1892-1916, 424019 or A/24019)
B.A. Whitmore, single. (Burton Alfred Whitmore, 1890, A/24250)
H.L. Pearson, single. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)
J. Payne, single. (John Payne, 1892, 424066)
F.W. Clark, single. (Francis William Clark, 1890, 424671)
C.J. Ivens, single. (Charles John, xxx-1917, 424952)
G. Wildfong, single. (Gordon Wildfong, 1892, 424079)
S. Day, single.
J. Hicks, single. (John Hicks, 1895, 154745)
A.E. Arnold, single. (Albert Edward Arnold, 1895-1916, 424002 or A/24002)
P.E. Chard, single. (Percy Edwin Chard, 1896, 424657)
J.A. Justice, single. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
H.W. Minish, single. (Herbert Whitfield Minish, 1893, 424061)
G. Stewart, single. (Garfield Stewart, 1895-1916, 425364)
H. Bidak, single.
C.C. Stacey, single. (Clarence Crozier Stacey, 1896-1916, 425349)
J.E. Wells, single. (Joseph Edward Wells, 1889, 424076)
J.E. May, married.
J.J. Troyer, single. (Joseph James Troyer, 1887, 425428)
J.A. McLean, single.
J.S. Willis, single.
Jas. E. Cain, single. (James Edward Cain, 1894, 154744)
John Ball, single. (John Ball, 1895, 424539)
Edward Gordon, single. (Edward Gordon, 1893, 425870)
J.M. Crossland, single. (John Marshall Crossland, 1887, 154737)
Victor Lavalle, single.
John R. Levins, married. (John Richard Levins, 1880, 424033)
L.A. Campbell, single. (Lorne Alexander Campbell, 1879-1916, 460743 or A/60743)
Henry C. Batty, single. (Henry Charles Batty, xxx-1916, 424320)

ENGLISH.
A. Grove, single.
W.F. Percy, single. (William Freeman Percy, 1886, 425202)
P.E. Millard, single. (Percy Edward Millard, 18781916, 74190)
A.H.G. Whittaker, married. (Albert Henry Guilym Whittaker, 1891-1916, 424077 or 424245)
A.G. Sanderson, married.
Wm. Coleman, single. (William Coleman, 1876, 424688)
R. Smith, single. (Richard Smith, 1889, 74196)
F. Clark, married. (Frank Clark, 1883, 424009)
J.S. Blundell, single. (James Stuart Blundell, 1893-1916, 74201)
A.J. Middleditch, married. (Albert John Middleditch, 1892, 425078)
J.W. Thompson, single. (John Walter Thompson, 1891, 424072)
Ivo Osman, single. (Ivo Isman, 1892, 74204)
T.L. Radway, single.
H. Marchant, single. (Harry Marchant, 1891, 424194)
G.J. Dickason, single. (George James Dickason, 1887, 424035)
P. Cowley, married. (Paul Cowley, 1886, 74186)
G. Burkett, married. (George Burkett, 1870, 154735)
J.A. Hurst, married. (J Arnold Hurst, xxx, 424339)
T.W. Swannell, single. (Frank Walton Swannell, 1893-1918, 425389)
C. Recknell, single. (Cuthbert Bradshaw Recknell, 1890, 425232)
F. Pexton, single. (Fred Pexton, 1887, 424067)
A. Wood, single. (Arthur Wood, 1897, 424375)
A.E. Weeks, single. (Arthur Edward Weeks, 1880-1917, 425472)
C.P. Webb, single. (Charles Peter Webb, 1895, 424374)
W. Weeds, single. (Walter Weeds, 1894, 424371)
A. Baldwin, single. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74184)
W.E. Ridley, single. (William Ernest Ridley, 1891, 74205)
R.E. Richards, single. (Robert Edmond Richards, xxx, 74207)
R.W. Watson, single. (Robert William Watson, 1891-1917, 424075 or 24229)
F. Pickup, single. (Frederick Pickup, 1893, 424068 or A/24068)
T. Pedley, married. (Thomas Pedley, 1878-1918, 425197)
A. Spence, married.
J. Gomme, single. (John Gomme, 1890, 424021)
C. Heather, single. (Charles Robert Heather, 1887, 424896)
B. Cheesmore, single. (Benjamin Cheesmore, 1887-1916, 424327)
W.J. Hill, single. (William James Hill, 1880, 74189)
P. Boam, single. (Percy Boam, 1883-1916, 74185)
T. Brown, single.
Herbert Townson, single. (Herbert Townson, 1896, 425426)
R.C. Crowe, single. (Roland Charles Crowe, 1897, 424012 or A/24066)
H.F.B. Percival, single.
Wm. J. Hickman, married. (William James, 1881, 424910)
F.L. Pearce, single.
Benj Dilworth, married. (Benjamin Dilworth, 1884-1916, 74187)

SCOTCH.
T.M. Ray, single. (T.M. Ray, xxx, 74206)
W.J. Wallace, single. (William John Wallace, 1895, 74200)
W. McDonald, single. (John Elliott McDonald, 1882, 424064)
Wm. Donaldson, married. (William Donaldson, 1885, 74188)
J. Nicol, married. (James Nicol, 1884, 74194)
J. Armstrong, married.
T. Latta, single. (Thomas Latta, xxx, 424031 or A/24136)
J.A. Craig, married.
A. Wilson, single. (Allan Wilson, 1895, 74198)
I. MacGlashan, single. (Isaac MacGlashan, 1885, 74193)
Wm. Miller, single. (William Miller, 1883-1916, 74191)
J. Alexander, single. (John Alexander, 1890, 425896)
R. Morrice, single. (Robert Morrice, 1892, 424343)
J.A. Whyte, single. (Joseph Alexander Whyte, 1893, 424078)
Wm. Lyon, single. (William Lyon, 1883, 424034)
R.L. Adams, single. (Robert Lawson Adams, 1896, 424001)
Wm. Munro, single. (William Munro, xxx, 74192)
Thos. Martin, single. (Thomas Martin, 1892, 424046)
N. McLeod, single.
T. Woodhouse, single. (Thomas Woodhouse, xxx, 425906)

WELSH.
E. Burnett, single. (Edwin Burnett, 1896, 424323)

U.S.A.
E. Engebretson, single. (Elmer Rudolph Engebretson, 1890-1918, 424015)
Wm. Madden, single. (William Madden, 1878, 424341)
C.B. Shales, single. (Chester Berdell Shales, 1896, 622436)

TRANSVAAL S. A.
H.E. Lys, married. (Hugh Ernest Lys, 1875-1876, Capt.)

DENMARK.
A. Peterson, single.

1915 Feb 4 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have returned from a two weeks’ trip to Rochester, Minn.
Mr. W. Walmsley was in town last week.
Archdeacon Green spent a few days in Dauphin on church business last week.
W. King county Orange master, is away on his annual tour among the various lodges and expects to return to Dauphin in time for the annual county meeting to arrange business for the coming term.
Wm. Northam, one of the standby subscribers of the Herald at Fork River, sends in the following verse when remitting his subscription. We take it that Mr. Northam intends the lines as a warning to delinquents:
He who doth the printer pay
Will go to Heaven sure some day;
But he who meanly cheats the printer
Will go where there is never winter.

1915 Feb 4 – Winnipegosis

Five men are working on the dredge fitting her out for the summer.
A large number of the fishermen are back in town again, and things are moving a little faster than usual.
J.W. McAulay was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday to attend the trainmen’s ball.
Dancing is one of the chief pastimes in this town. Lately, hardly a week goes by without one or two dances being held. A surprise dance was given at the home of Hos. Grenon on Friday last and another dance on Tuesday night in the Rex Hall.
Will Morton, station agent, whose life was despaired of, is getting better.
Mr. and Mrs. Ravelli, left on Wednesday for Portage la Prairie, where they will enter the employ of Hugh Armstrong.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Litwyn on the 28th ult., a son.
Mrs. (Dr.) Medd returned on Monday from a visit to Winnipeg.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 21 – 1915

1915 Jan 21 – 90 New Enlisted

There are 90 out of the 110 men required now enlisted. They are a fine lot of men taken as a whole. Sergeant instructors are Highfield and Fletcher. The men are now well advanced in drill.

1915 Jan 21 – Going to the Front

Nurse Margaret Cummings has been offered and accepted a position on nursing staff of the medical department of the army. She leaves for Ottawa to-night (Thursday). This is the second graduate nurse of the Dauphin General Hospital called, the other being Miss Hudson, who is now in England.
Dr. Jas. C. King, of Humboldt, has been appointed to the medical corps with the rank of first lieutenant. His commission dates from January 1st.
Captain Newcombe will go to Winnipeg on Feb. 1st to attend the military school of instruction.

1915 Jan 21 – Got Contract for Lighthouse

Mr. Frank Neely has been notified by the Dept. of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa, that he is the successful tenderer for the proposed lighthouse at Winnipegosis. Mr. Neely is now making arrangements for the material. A.J. Hunt has the contract for the painting.

1915 Jan 21 – Letter From Lewis Barnard

Mr. Thos. Barnard received a letter from his son Lewis, who is with the first contingent at Salisbury Plain this week. He states, in the letter, that he visited the Dauphin men at their camp recently and found them in bad quarters and quite a number sick. The sickness, he says, was nearly altogether confined to the older men. They were still occupying tents and the mud around the tents was fully a foot deep.
Mr. Barnard enlisted at Prince Albert and went to the front with the Saskatoon section.
Lewis has the distinction of being the second best shot in the regiment for rapid firing.

1915 Jan 21 – Mrs. Arnold Wins Case

Shortly after the death of Mr. Jas. Arnold, engineer, in the collision on the C.N.R. near Kamsack last summer. Mrs. Arnold applied through her solicitor, Mr. Bowman, for compensation. This was refused by the railway company and a suit was entered under “The Workman’s Compensation Act” of Saskatchewan, claiming a considerable amount of damages. When the case was ready to come to trial the officials of the company had evidently changed their minds for a cheque for the full amount claimed was forwarded to Mr. Bowman.

1915 Jan 21 – No Trace of Deserter Yet

Private John Alexander deserted on Saturday from the Dauphin contingent, and although the wires have been busy no trace of him has yet been ascertained. All that is known is the Alexander took the train south.

1915 Jan 21 – Fork River

Mr. Thos. Secord, of Dauphin, homestead inspector, spent a short time here lately.
Mr. W. Williams and gang of men left for his timber limits east of Lake Dauphin, where they will run his sawing outfit for the winter.
A large party of neighbours met at the home of Mr. A. Hunt on Wednesday evening the 13th, when a very pleasant evening was spent in dancing and social recreation.
Messrs. Walmsley, Hunking and Toye, of Winnipegosis, were visitors to this burgh on municipal matters lately.
The A.T. Co. have been very busy shipping cordwood lately.

1915 Jan 21 – Sifton

Mr. Robt. Brewer was in our midst last week and purchased a number of hogs. He states that business is still good with him and still has a pleasant smile for everyone.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt, the well drillers, left here last week and are now busy drilling wells around Ethelbert. Their outfit is a good one.
Since sleighing has commenced there is quite a lot of hardwood coming into town and our friend Fred Farion, seems to be the “Cordwood King.”
Joe Shand, of Dauphin, was a visitor here last week on his way from Ethelbert, where he had been on business.
The grist mill here has been running very steady this last week owing to the roads being good for sleighing and the people are now able to bring their grain to town.
We are all looking forward to business being a little brighter now that all the holidays are over.

1915 Jan 21 – Winnipegosis

A concert was held here on Friday evening in aid of the Red Cross society. Everybody turned out for the good cause, and a pleasant evening was spent. The sum of $30.00 has been forwarded direct to the society at Toronto, making in all a total of $70.00 sent from Winnipegosis, in addition to three shipments of bandages, pillows, etc.
It is understood the incorporation of the town will not take place until the return of the fishermen from the north. A considerable portion of our population is away at present.
Capt. Wm. Sifton, who is in charge of the Standard Lumber Co.’s camp at the north end of the lake, is visiting at Dauphin. The captain says the output of logs this winter will be limited.
We are all patiently waiting for the return of the fishermen. When they are away the town is like the play of “Hamlet” with “Hamlet” left out. And, you know, the nimble dollar of the fishermen is like the fish, it has the faculty of slipping from one to the other.
Like everything else, curling is expected to boom when the boys return from the north end of the lake. Up to the present it has been on the slow side.

Winnipegosis

1915 Jan 21 – Winnipegosis

Chas. White returned on Saturday night from his rounds as fish inspector, and reports the fishing good.
To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Christianson, a daughter, on Jan. 13th.
Jack Matthews is on the sick list, but is reported improving.
Mr. F. Neely, of Dauphin, has been awarded the contract for the new lighthouse.
The young ladies of the town are giving a dance and skating party on Wednesday evening, the 20th.