Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 8 – 1910

1915 Dec 8 – Shot for a Deer

What might have proved a fatal accident to a hunter occurred in the Riding Mountain south of Gilbert Plains on Friday last. William, the 18-year-old son of Jas. D. Sutherland was hunting in the mountain and was attired in white. He was coming through the scrub when the white of his legs was noticed by another hunter, by the name of Dimmick from Roblin, who at a distance of 2200 yards fired at him for a deer and hit him in the right leg, the ball breaking it. Sutherland immediately ell and yelled loudly which prevented Dimmick from again firing as he had the rifle to his shoulder a second time when he heard the yells. As the two men were a long distance away from any habitation, Dimmick had to carry the wounded man three miles to a farmer’s house when medical aid was procured and young Sutherland brought to the Dauphin Hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1915 Dec 8 – Fork River

Miss Lane, from Dauphin is spending a few days up here before proceeding to her home in Winnipeg.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of Mowat School was taken seriously ill last week and returned to Dauphin to be under the doctor’s hands. We all hope she will soon be herself again.
F. Storrar paid a visit Dauphin lately.
A Christmas tree and entertainment will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the English Church, on Friday evening, December 23rd, at eight o’clock. A good time is expected for the children. Admission all children free, but a charge for admission will be made to adults.
Mr. Letwin has been appointed as assistant to Mr. D. Kennedy in the Armstrong Store here.

1915 Dec 8 – Sifton

Bert Kennedy, of Canora, Sask., who was a patient in the Dauphin Hospital with typhoid, was a visitor to his brother John Kennedy for a few days before returning to his house at Canora.
Miss Scott, Neepawa, was a visitor at the Presbyterian mission house for a couple of days. Miss Scott is always welcomed at the mission house.
Rev. Johnston, of Gilbert Plains, held services here on Wednesday evening last. The sermon was well put and much appreciated.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held service on Thursday evening. Quite a large crowd congregated.
The moose shooting season is on again. Rudolph Spruhs is one of the number to leave for the haunts of the antlered monarch.
The Manitoba Government Telephones have a construction gang camped in the village doing construction work east of town.
On Tuesday Messrs. Buckwold & Levin shipped out three cars of cattle to Winnipeg.
The elevator of the British America Elevator Co. had to close down on Saturday for lack of cars to ship out. This is said to be the first experience of this kind since the elevator was erected. The opportune arrival of empty cars has now, however relieved the situation.
Rev. J.A. Sabourin is having a furnace and hot water heating system installed by M. Cardiff, of Dauphin, in his new building which is being rapidly completed. A new R.C. Church is expected to be erected next summer.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Melynik a few days ago a pair of twin girls. All three doing well.
With the late fall of snow the farmers are quickly taking advantage of the good sleighing and hustling their grain to market.

1915 Dec 8 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit of the Methodist Church, Winnipegosis, on Sunday next. Subject: The Call to Advance.
Teamsters here have been busy freighting fish from the various fishing grounds up the lake. They are impartment men and must needs be well catered for. Recognizing this fact the Misses Geekie and Black have opened a new restaurant at which good, solid, substantial meals are served at all hours. This is just what was needed in our busy little town. The fact that hot meals can be obtained at all hours, would see to be a guarantee of success. We wish them luck.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 21 – 1912

1912 Nov 21 – Ethelbert

Kenneth McLean has fully recovered and has now taken a trip to Vancouver for a change, and whilst there, will look into the prospects as to Coquitlam’s progress.
The British American elevator, is now taking its share of the wheat offering, but owing to the unfavourable and late season there is not much being offered.
A case came up before the P.M. for cruelty to a calf, and was decided in favour of the defendant. During the evidence it developed that there were a great number of barking and chasing dogs and in many cases even biting at teams and pedestrians, as they passed. Owners such of such dogs, were warned, that unless the dogs were kept under, they would be liable to be destroyed upon short notice.
Postmaster Scaife was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
The Pundy case was thrown out on technical grounds; had it not been so the results to all concerned might have been very serious. It is time that these petty exhibitions of spite and I’ll will should cease. The motto should be, live and let live and fair play for all, whether he be Jew or Greek, Barbarian or free, or as some might put it, everyone for himself, and the d—– take the hindmost.
Snow feel in considerable quantities on the 10th and the winter is now fairly inaugurated with us.
The danger of the arrangement of the switch, were nearly leaving bad results. A train backing up quietly, was not noticed and as the mail contractor was getting the mail from the car, he turned quickly across to reach the platform, and was within a few inches of a moving flat car before it was noticed, and he drew back. It behooves people to be careful, but all the same, the present system is full of danger, and some better provision as to lights and signals are needed, to protect the public, whilst going or coming in by train. It is now a long time, since the Ethelbert people, were promised by the company to make radical changes as to the switch and station. It seems as if nothing will be done, until someone is killed, or there is a bad fire.
J. McLean has now closed up his store business, and J. Marantz, another Jew, now carries on the business.
The Rev. Father Kraney is now stationed at Ethelbert, and conducts the services for the Greek-Roman religionists.
There are quite a number of marriages here at present, which incidentally, indicates hopeful prospects for the future.

1912 Nov 21 – FROM ANOTHER CORRESPONDENT

Mr. Marantz is right into business. He indeed deserves credit as a store manager as he is already doing a thriving business.
Miss Ethel Marantz, of Sifton, spent the week-end in Ethelbert.
Alex Katz, who is at present with Campbell & Simpson, at Dauphin, visited Ethelbert on a business trip Saturday. He reports the town looking as good as ever.
Threshing is going on at a good rate and will soon be finished.
Galicians of Ethelbert and the surrounding district had a concert on Saturday night following which was a dance.
At a recent meeting of the council the reeve and one of the councillors had a lively set-to, in which blows were exchanged.

1912 Nov 21 – Winnipegosis

J.P. Grenon, manager for the Armstrong Trading Co., who has been away the past three weeks on an extended trip to Lower Canada via the States, is expected home on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Steele, who have charge of the branch store at Mafeking, are making their semi-yearly sojourn hear at present.
Rev. H.H Scrase, anglican minister, is spending a couple of days in town visiting his parishioners.
Our senior teacher, Mr. Hulme, is suffering from a protracted cold. We are pleased to note that his interest in his pupils is extend to music; no doubt some of whom will benefit from free lessons on the organ in the school-room.
Dr. Medd is feeling the benefit of a recent vacation.
The Winnipegosis Christian League holds its weekly meetings Thursday evening at 8 o’clock in the Methodist Church, so far the interest has been well maintained and we trust that it will be beneficial.
Miss Isabelle McArthur, who has been visiting in Winnipeg for the past few weeks, is expected home early this week.
Mr. Scott, of the Standard Lumber Co., has returned from a trip to the city.
A Winnipegosis card circle is being formed by the enthusiasts which we trust will prove to be a large one.
Donald Hattie’s gasoline circular saw is in great demand at present, though the present weather is not consuming much of its product. We regret the open season is so unpropitious for the fishermen.
The Hudson’s Bay Co.’s business has been permanently closed.

1912 Nov 21 – Death of Ivor Humphreys

Ivor Humphreys, after several weeks’ illness, passed away on Sunday afternoon last at the comparatively early age of 42 years. Deceased came to the district from Brandon some eight or nine years ago and worked at Sifton for some time, afterwards removing to Dauphin. He filled the position of bookkeeper for the Steen-Copeland Co. for a considerable time and later entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, Fleming Wilson, under the firm name of Humphreys & Wilson, when they purchased the gents’ furnishing business of W.C. Turner. After continuing as a member of the firm for a couple of years, during which time his health was not good, he retired and accepted a position in the Dominion Lands office. This he filled until a few weeks ago when stricken down with his final illness.
The late Mr. Humphreys was of a retiring disposition but was held in esteem by all who enjoyed his acquaintance. He was a vocalist of conservable note and for several years was leader of the Presbyterian choir. He was a prominent Knight of Pythias and was one of the hardest works in No. 31, the first Pythian lodge organized here, and to his efforts much of its success is due. He was also one of the chief movers in instating the second Pythian lodge here, Empire No. 35.
The funeral took place on Monday and was held under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias, the members of both lodges attending in a body, as also the members of the uniform rank. The members of the Sons of England lodge were too in attendance. The service was held in the Presbyterian Church, which was crowded to the docs. Rev. D. Flemming conducted the service and in his remarks paid a warm tribute to the worth of the deceased.
The pallbearers were all past chancellors of Lodge No. 31 – S. Cohen, E. Mayo, J.W. Johnston, F.R. Copeland, G.A. Nicholson and J. Watson.
A widow and two small children are left to mourn the loss of a loving husband and father.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 13 – 1911

1911 Jul 13 – Four Fingers Taken Off

At the farm of D.E. Collison, Ochre River, on Monday, a young Galician lad had four fingers of his right hand taken off by a crushing machine. He was brought to town for medical treatment.

1911 Jul 13 – Fork River

Mrs. George Shannon was a visitor to Dauphin this week on business.
The annual meeting of the ratepayers of Mossey River School, 999, was held Tuesday the 4th, to elect a trustee, Mr. D.F. Wilson, retiring, Mr. A. Hunt was elected to fill the vacancy. The motion for moving the school house to Fork River was lost by the chairman giving the resting vote in favour of the present site; t is a pity as most of the scholars have 1 1/2 miles to walk to school.
Several famers here and Winnipegosis took a trip to Dauphin to hear R.L. Borden the great Conservative Leader speak. The Borden express passed through here on Friday morning with the ambulance car on behind in charge of Dr. Medd and a live Whale.
A large number of people from here took in the English Church Excursion from Gilbert Plains to Winnipegosis, among them the members of the Board of Trade who chartered a Winnipegosis liner for a sail and report the time of their lives.
In looking over the items published of the minutes of Mossey River Council it states they have taken over the Fork River Cemetery; and engaged Dr. Medd as health officer. As these two items are coupled together your correspondent would suggest our health officer get our cemetery committee together and confine them to their last resting place as the pigs and cattle are running over everything and half the summer gone and no fence to fit to keep stock out.
A heavy rain and hail storm passed through here on Friday evening, doing considerable damage.
Miss Finch and miss Hill ex-school teachers of the Mossey River School are spending their holidays at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
Miss Pearl Wilson returned from a visit to Mr. Humphreys of Dauphin.
Mr. A. Hodgson stayed over to help the boys out with the Orange Picnic on the 11th.
Miss Alice and Ethel Finch of Carman are visiting friends at Fork River.

1911 Jul 13 – Sifton

Mrs. Wm. Riler and family left on Tuesday week for Netherhill, Sask., where they are intending to reside.
Miss Scott, who was a visitor at the mission for a few days, returned to Neepawa on Thursday. Miss Scott intents leaving for eastern Ontario shortly where she will spend the balance of the summer visiting with friends.
An electric storm passed over the village on Friday. Mr. Felix Marantz lost three valuable horses having been struck by lightening and the fourth one received a severe shock.
The wild strawberry season has about closed for this year. The strawberries seem to have been in much demand, much more than could be procured to supply.
Mr. Wm. Barrie is leaving on a business trip to Victoria B.C. and other coast points.
Mr. D.R. Barlow, contract of building the R.C. Mission Church here.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 6 – 1911

1911 Jul 6 – Leg Amputated

T. Lee, a young farmer, who resides south of Gilbert Plains in the Glenlyon district met with a serious accident the early past of the week. He was endeavouring to stop a runaway team attached to a mower, when his left leg came in contact with the knives which badly cut it. He was brought to the hospital here on Tuesday, where upon examination it was found necessary to amputate it below the knee. The young man is doing as well as can be expected.

1911 Jul 6 – Fork River

Miss Burrell of Winnipegosis, was a guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy a few days last week.
Miss Pearl Wilson is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys at Dauphin.
Mrs. Snelgrove was a visitor to Dauphin Saturday to the home of her daughter, Mrs. F.F. Chase.
H. Chute of Dauphin, is busy with his gasoline engine and plows turning over the soil on Messrs. Chase and Lockhart’s farms.
H. Falconer, Government Weed Inspector, was here this week giving instructions to municipal inspectors Bailey and King.
The Orangemen of Fork River will hold their 10th annual bask picnic on July 11th. A program of sports is being arranged and they day’s fun will be wound up in the evening with a ball.
Coronation service was held in All Saints’ Church on the 24th ult. The members of L.O.L. No. 1765 attended in a body and the church was filled to the doors. Mr. G.M. Littler B.A., preached a very appropriate sermon which was much appreciated.
Wm. King, returned Saturday from attending the Orange Lodge convention in Winnipeg. He reports being entertained in royal manner and also getting a number of ideas which ought to stir the local brethren to greater enthusiasm.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy entertained at her home last Monday in honour of her sister, Miss Bertha Johnston, who is a nurse on the Dauphin Hospital staff. A very pleasant evening was enjoyed by all present. Miss Johnston visited several days in their neighbourhood.
Mrs. N. Little and daughters, while out driving last week met with an accident caused by the team running away. The ladies were thrown from the buggy, Mrs. Little receiving a serve shaking up and a number of cuts and viruses. A nurse was called and Mrs. Little was soon made comfortable. Miss Grace and Miss Lulu escaped unhurt.
The school will remain where it is at present, is the decision given by Chairman Hunt, who held the deciding ballot at the ratepayers meeting Monday. A meeting of the ratepayers was called from the purpose of taking a vote whether the school should be moved to town or remain where it is. The vote resulted in a tie and Chairman Hunt was called on to make the decision.

1911 Jul 6 – Sifton

Miss M. O’Donnell who has been teaching school here for the past year; left on Tuesday of last week for a visit to her home in Carleton Place, Ont.
Our local baseball team went to Ethelbert and played a friendly match on Saturday. The honours were about even.
Miss Eva Zlebita of Toulon, who has been attending school here for the past term, returned to her home in Toulon on Tuesday.
Miss Marion Flemming of Winnipeg, is spending her holidays at the Presbyterian mission the guest of Nurses Gofoth and Reid.
Miss Scott of Neepawa, is a visitor at Sifton.
Mr. Emanuel Michaliuk returned to Winnipeg on Saturday, after having completed a successful term as junior school (bilingual) teach here.
The Presbyterian Sunday School held their annual picnic on Dominion day, which was indeed a success. The Ethelbert football team came down and played off a return match. The Ethelbert boys proved a little too heavy for us however, winning the game one to nothing in the last half.
During this week to Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Jones at Sifton a daughter and to Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz at Dauphin a daughter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 4 – 1911

1911 May 4 – Fork River

Miss Gertie Cooper returned to Dauphin spending Easter with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Cooper.
A farmer here broke a piece on his plough and sent it to the States to the factory for the repairs which cost him 15 cents there, he then paid 35 cents expenses to straighten out the customs officer he had to put up another 53 cents duty making a total of $1.03 for a fifteen cent repair. There’s a nigger in the fence somewhere. A huge mis-or a rake off. Which?
Miss Clark spent Easter, visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
Mr. Cameron, C.N.R., claims agent, was here on business in connection with M. Little’s horse that was struck by an engine nearly a year ago and had to be shot. Putting in a claim and getting paid are two different things. A large number of cattle and horses have been injured by the railway here but we have never heard of anyone receiving settlement. They always wiggle out of it.
Farmers requiring repairs for Massey-Harris seeding implements are requested to have patience for a month or so as we are busy at present house cleaning.
The Government Dredge has commenced operations on the Mossey River, under the management of Capt. McLean and mate P. Ellis. The River mud’s all wool and a years wide.

1911 May 4 – Sifton

Dr. Scott of Wakaw, Sask., paid us a flying visit on Thursday on his return from Ontario, where he and Mrs. Scott have been visiting friends. Mrs. Scott still remains in the east.
His Grace, Archbishop Langevin, St. Boniface, made a business trip to Sifton last week in the interests of the R.C. mission here and returned by Saturday morning’s train.
At the section house another section man has arrived. An sought pound son to Mr. and Mrs. John Reid.
Easter is now over and the booze is done. The creeks are getting low and the suckers are gone. The community is now selling down to a steadier occupation to seeding.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 20 – 1913

1913 Mar 20 – Baran Now Praying

John Baran, condemned to be hanged for the murder of Constable Rooke, now spends his time in prayer.

1913 Mar 20 – Fork River

Geo. Esplen was a visitor with W. King on his return from Mafeking, where he spent the winter in charge of one of the fishing posts on the north end of the lake.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove left for Dauphin to visit among friends on her way to Dryden, Ontario.
Miss Pearl Wilson is taking a short vacation among friends at Sifton.
John Bykilo returned home after a two months rest for the good of his health at Portage.
Fred Storrar, of Mowat, has resumed his duties as assistant manager of the A.T. Co. Fred’s all right, a pleasant smile for everyone.
Miss Ena Fredrickson and Miss Kennedy returned from a visit to their folks at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that Professor Ike Robinson was scalded the other day while experimenting with a boiler, which exploded throwing the contents in his face. He is doing nicely. Ike says he don’t mind having solved the tea experiment.
The C.N.Ry. bridge gang is busy renewing the bridge on the creek north of town.
The vaudeville performance which the Laurier troupe has been putting on at the National Play house on Parliament Hill, is costly for the country. Ten thousand dollars a day or sixty thousand dollars for the week is the bill which the people of the Dominion will have to foot for the little game of politics which the Opposition has been staging for the first week in the opposition to the navy bill. That’s Liberal economy and loyalty everytime.
“Say, Mike, we overheard the Admiral trying to explain the need of that boundary bridge the other day and several took a hand in the debate.”
“Well, Pat, by what I see of the affair it is a fraud to take our taxes to build a bridge to accommodate one man and it on private property. He must have caught the rest of them napping to be able to carry such a measure.”
“Now, you’ve put your foot in it, Mike, sure. The Fork River Philosopher’s idea is to bridge the whole municipality and throw the dirt on top. Gee, what next.”
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese, held Communion and Baptismal service at All Saints’, Fork River, Winnipegosis and Sifton. There were large congregations at each service. The Rev. H.H. Scrase assisted.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

Charles Johnson, of Makinak, was a visitor to Rev. Father Derome last week. He was much interested in his visit and inspected the hatchery on Snake Island, where he enjoyed himself. His father is interested in the management of a hatchery in Norway, Europe.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

The ball in the Winnipegosis hotel on the 17th proves that the anniversary of St. Patrick is becoming very dear to the hearts of some, it being patronized by the elite, graced by those who love to trip the light fantastic, and enlivened by an appreciative crowd of onlookers. Many wore a souvenir badge supplied by willing workers of the W.A. and assistants. Fork River social element added materially to its success.
At the Christian League last Thursday Mr. Scott read a paper on “Commerce” touching on the German menace, that was worthy of a much larger crowd of understanding. He defined minutely the fundamental principles of commerce making it more interesting by apt illustrations, ably leading one’s interest up to appreciate the Empire’s present position. His reflections on England from Germany’s attitude served to illuminate her domain and in no way detracted from her greatness.
Mr. Mullens was the recipient of a handsome gift from his many friends in Winnipegosis last Wednesday evening as a token of their esteem and regret at his departure.
Mr. Hulme returns home for Easter holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson are rejoicing in the possession of a young son, which was privileged to be baptized by the Rev. Dr. Page, archdeacon and general missioner of the diocese. A baptismal service was also held in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walmsley on Sunday evening last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 13 – 1913

1913 Mar 13 – Baran to Hang

Joh Baran, the man who shot Constable Rooke, was found guilty of the crime at the assizes and sentenced to be hanged on May 20th.

1913 Mar 13 – Fork River

Mr. W. King, County Master, returned form Winnipeg, where he attended as delegate the provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Manitoba.
Rev. H.H. Scrase was elected deputy grand chaplain for Dauphin country L.O.L.
John Clements spent a few days in Dauphin last week.
Everyone is busy trying to get their hauling done before the snow leaves us.
Dr. Page will hold baptismal and Communion services in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, at 2:45 o’clock next Sunday, the 16th March.
Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove returned from a visit to friends in Dauphin.
Miss Pearl Cooper left for Dauphin on a visit to friends.
D.F. Wilson has returned from the Brandon fair and reports a good time.
Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak has returned after spending a few days in Dauphin on important business.
We notice the Fork River correspondent in the Press has coupled the named of some of our esteemed citizens to his untruthful items the last two weeks. He must be hard up for news. But then he reminds us of the man who kept his spirits by pouring spirits down because he got pinched for keeping a pig within the two limits against the law. Take a tumbler, friend, and don’t be so anxious to use other people’s names.
Professor J. Robinson, who has been up the lake fishing all winter, has returned from Mafeking and is taking charge of the Fork River Quadrille club.
Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of St. Paul’s Church, Dauphin, paid, Mr. H. Scrase a visit lately.

1913 Mar 13 – Winnipegosis

Rev. Dr. Page, of Winnipeg, is expected in town on the 16th to administer Holy Communion and baptismal services will also be held Sunday next, in the school house.
P. McArthur will be back shortly to town. Mrs. McArthur will probably remain in Winnipeg some time longer owing to having recently been suffering from a painful fall while south.
Mrs. Benoit, of Dauphin, who has been the guest of Mrs. Hall Burrell the past week, has returned home. Her visit was greatly enjoyed.
We’re glad to see Miss Evelyn Burrell looking well again, only minus roses. Get strong quick, Evelyn, there’s a good time coming.
Dr. Medd is rather a ? but confirms finally the fact that there are enigmatical people even here.
Mr. Scott says he would not have come to stay in this town but for its great attractions. Dear old, Winnipegosis! If we only had a daily train service.
St. Patrick’s anniversary will be celebrated by a ball in the Winnipegosis hotel.
The play, “when Greek meets Greek” is being practiced for the concert on the 28th promises to be exceptionally good.
A meeting of the W.A. will be held at the home of Mrs. Bradley on Friday evening.
Nearly all the families are down from the north end of the lake. Possibly about 20 people have yet to return. “Dad” Danby is as brisk as ever; a fine example of 70 years young.
The snow plough has made its best trip. It can transport 10 or 50 tons of fish on a single trip, and leaves the lake somewhat picturesque. A trip on a dog sled to Snake Island is fine and a visit to the hatchery most interesting.
Anyone keeping vigils now will have the dreamy canine cries as an accompaniment. ‘Tis a pity the dogs are not treated more as man’s true friends.