Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 9 – 1912

1912 May 9 – Girl Made Good Escape

A young Galician girl who has been employed in several Dauphin homes lately, seems to have a kleptomania habit of purloining articles which takes her fancy. From one home she carried off a suitcase, from another a couple of dresses and at her last place of employment a roll of bills. Her home is in the Valley River district and the police have been watching trains for her to come back. Tuesday morning night police Levins captured her, though not without considerable resistance as she got off the Prince Albert flyer. Steel cells are being innovated at the station and for the time being the firemen’s bathroom was used for the accommodation of the prisoner. About an hour after Levins and another young man had occasion to go to the proviso cell, only to find that the bird had vanished. It did not take long to find out her mode of escape. The young woman had broken a pane of glass out of the fanlight and crawled through the aperture. She evidently cut herself in doing so from evidence of blood left.
It has since been learned that she was met two miles from town and driven to her home at Valley River. A constable will be sent up to bring her back.

1912 May 9 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon one of out enterprising farmers is taking a trip west to Saskatchewan on business.
Nat Little is a busy man on train days shipping cream for a Winnipeg firm.
Wm. King is on a trip north posting registration posters. registration commences on May 21st at Winnipegosis.
Frank Merritt one of Winnipegosis old-timers, passed through here on his way west. He bid his numerous friends here good-bye. We are sorry to see Fran go as he was a good sport. We wish him and his family the best of luck in their new home.
John Seale, Dominion timber inspector, was here last week on business at the mill.
The new chairs arrived for the council chamber without cushions. Some one will get concussion of the brain if the sittings are anyway lengthy. Get cushions boys.
Roland King left for Togo, Sask., on a visit to his brother at that point. He intends having a look around this summer.
Rev. S. Wilkinson of the Methodist Church, Dauphin, held communion service in the church on Sunday. He was assisted by Mr. Malley of Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and Mrs. C. Clark, returned from a trip to the Lake Town Saturday.
Mrs. John Richardson and family of Winnipegosis, are visiting for a few days at her brothers, Mr. F.F. Hafenbrak.
Professor Robinson, a prominent leader of the town band, is contemplating a visit to his old home at Pittsburg, U.S.A.
The rainy weather last week seems to have put on the usual display of fireworks in the Press. The scribe is still doing business at the old stand.

1912 May 9 – Reply to Fork River Scribe

In reply to the scribe’s thrust in the Herald of May 2nd, the “Parrot” (unwisely so-called by the scribe) wishes to state that he now sees his mistake and regrets it, though no detriment was meant to the church. The leaders referred to should, as he says, be allowed to manage their own affairs also to fight their own battles.
To “Wellwisher” the Parrot has nothing whatsoever to say, for in him he recognizes one of the flock and is proud to own him as such. “Wellwisher” is to be complimented on his masterly representation of facts, and the “Management” (which in this instance has apparently developed itself to a membership of one) may justly feel proud in the possession of a bird of such excellent qualities and one that has so aptly learned the virtue of obedience.
THE PARROT.
Fork River, May 7th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 2 – 1912

1912 May 2 – Fork River

Archie McMillan and family left here with a carload of stock and settlers’ effects as he intends taking his homestead duties at Kindersley, Sask.
Mr. Briggs of Mowat, has moved into Fork River and his friend Mr. Culverhouse lately arrived from Yorkshire, England, is staying with him for a time.
Wm. Davis, one of our bonanza farmers, returned from a few days visit to Dauphin on business.
J. Robinson took a trip to Winnipegosis on business and we are informed that since a Board of Trade has been formed in that burg. the citizens have nothing to do but sit on the sidewalk and sun themselves waiting for the golden tide to roll in. Good luck Winnipegosis.
Captain McCartney returned from a trip to Dauphin, where he was give a magic lantern lecture of the Roll Call.
There was a very good turn out at the last ball of the season in the Orange Hall. The Honourables A. Hunt, T.N. Briggs, The King and Senator Kennedy and others were present and a good time was spent. Professor Robinson and other supplied the music and kept it up till the morning.
Mr. Chard was here in connection with his business.
The scribe is inclined to think the item in he Press of the 25th by a Fork River correspondent was out of place. Surely the leaders of the Episcopal elements as he calls them should be allowed to manage their own affairs without his interring through the Press. He must be hard up for news. If the students must have a parrot to voice their opine,. they should train it up in the way it would go before sending him out on a pilgrimage in the Press.
Captain McLean, foreman of the Government dredge and his gang are busy getting the dredge in shape for the summer’s work on the Mossey River.
Jack Clemence’s gang is up putting Frank Chase’s and Alf. Snelgrove’s places into shape for this year’s crop.

1912 May 2 – ANSWER TO FORK RIVER CORRESPONDENT IN DAUPHIN PRESS.

The Fork River correspondent for the Dauphin Press of the 25th April makes the following most unwarranted remarks regarding our Church of England Parsonage. “Some of our church leaders are agitating for a parsonage in connection with the Episcopal Element here. It seem an unwarranted expense.” now the writer of this cannot possible belong to that body or his remarks would never have been uttered and if he was at all cognizant of facts in connection with what he refers to he would have worded his phrases quite differently. The Church of England congregation and management are not agitating but are going to build a parsonage and should be glad of any help financially from the press correspondent. Perhaps our friend is one of the few who objected to our building a church a few years ago, yet the church is built and fully equipped and out of debt. Also under the same management a ten team stable is almost completed and also paid for as are the lots in connection with same. We should like to say the wardens and congregation should be proud of what they have done and as they know what they are doing and can overlook any disparaging remarks of an enterprising news correspondent who passes disparaging statements re the good work going on.
The management of All Saints’ Church have found through experience it is better to build than to pay from $60 to $100 a year for rent for an unsuitable house and by so building they will have something permanent. If the correspondent in the Press has anything to say in regard to the present or past management of this church I am sure they will gladly listen to him and receive any donation as there is nothing proud about this management. If the corespondent has nothing but wind to offer her should utilize this on a football field as we already had a sufficient supply of that commodity to the detriment of this church. It is good actions they want, not wind.

Wellwisher

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 30 – 1914

1914 Apr 30 – Attempted Suicide

Early Saturday evening Dr. Rogers was hastily summoned to Mr. F.O. Murphy’s farm, two miles south of town. When he reached the house it was found that Mrs. Murphy, in a fit of passion, had taken a dose of poison. The Dr. immediately put a stomach pump to work and most of the drug extracted, or sufficient to save the woman’s life.
Earlier is he evening Mrs. Murphy, who is of a jealous disposition, assaulted another woman, a Mrs. Clark, who she found in company with her husband. It was this which led up to the woman taking the poison. She had a narrow escape from death. She is recovering slowly but it will be some days yet before she is able to be around again.

TO SETRIEDON CHARGE OF ATTEMPTED SUICIDE.

Chief Bridle has laid a charge against Mrs. Murphy for attempted suicide. The case was to have been tried by P.M. Munson on Wednesday, but owning to her weak condition the trial was postponed until the 4th prox. The penalty for this offence is two years, if she is found guilty.
ASSAULT CHARGE ALSO.
Mrs. Clark has laid a charge against Mrs. Murphy for assault. The case is likely only to go to trial in the event Mrs. Murphy being freed on the first charge.

1914 Apr 30 – Fork River

Miss G. Shannon, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the homestead with her parents.
F. Cooper was a visitor to the Lake Town on business and reports everything very quiet.
John Robinson and Mr. Hunter left for the north for a couple of months to inspect some of the lakes with a view for next winter’s business.
John Clemens is busy loading cars at the Northern elevator.
Our friend Scotty is out on the warpath looking for ducks and geese. We expect to get a fowl supper soon.
Fishing for Jackfish and suckers is the order of the day. All the young fry are busy these days landing the fish with spears and forks.
A. McDonald, of Winnipegosis, has located on the company farm for he summer.
The W.A. of All Saints’ Church is having a concert in Orange hall on May 1st. Everybody welcome.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 16 – 1914

1914 Apr 16 – Chas. Best Hanged Himself

Charles Best, aged 47, and one of the first settlers on the Gilbert Plains, committed suicide on Friday by hanging himself to a brace in the granary. Deceased has been of unsound mind for the past two years, only having come home from the asylum about two weeks ago. He leaves a wife, six sons and three daughters, the eldest about 18 years old.
Deceased was well-known in Dauphin, having hauled grain to the market for several years in the early days.

1914 Apr 16 – Fork River

C. Clark of Paswegan, Sask., after spending a few days among his numerous friends at this point left for home. He was one of the old-timers, living here for ten years. He says he would rather live in Manitoba.
Professor Robinson is busy these days and intends trying farming for a little recreation as he states the bottom has fallen out of the fishing “biz”. The other fellow, he says, gets the wad. Try mushrooms, Jack.
J.G. Lockhart has returned from a trip to the east and intends investing heavily in real estate, etc.
Our Scotch friends seem to be taking alternate trips to the Lake Town. What will be the outcome we are not sure, as it’s neither sleighing or wheeling and there is too much wind for wings. Still, where there is a will there is always a way.
The Rev. Canon Jeffery, of Winnipeg, will hold Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, April 10th at 3 p.m.
Mrs. J.D. McAulay, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, arrived with his bride and is spending the Easter holidays with his parents on the Mossey. Frank is one of the boys we are always pleased to see and we with him much happiness and prosperity.
At a meeting of the Horse Breeders’ Association on the 7th it was decided to disband the majority being of the opinion it was cheaper to breed scrubs for another year. We don’t hesitate to say the farmers have made the mistake of their lives. It takes backbone and money, sure, but it has to be undertaken sooner or later. We will have to let the groomers set back if we ever intend raising saleable horses, or, for that matter, any other kind of good stock.
Mrs. J. Rice is off to Dauphin for a few days holidays.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending the Easter holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mrs. Humphreys has returned from a visit to Dauphin.

1914 Apr 16 – Winnipegosis

We are all turning our thought to spring when the lake will be open and the beats skinning the water.
The river is open.
R. Burrell has opened a restaurant in the Cohen block.
Dwellings are scarce and rooming quarters hard to get. This would indicate our little burgh is fording ahead.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley are spending a few days in Dauphin this week.
Sid Coffey, our moving picture man, visited Dauphin this week. Once Sid completes his new hall the moving picture business will become a permanent feature of the town.
Thorn Johnson has broken his arm again. This is the fourth fracture he has suffered.
John Rogelson is busy overhauling boats.
A number of mink have been added to the animal ranch here.
There was a large delegation from here on Monday to attend the Conservative convention at Gilbert Plains. Among the party were J.P. Grenon, C.I. White, J. Denby, J. Dewhurst, Ed. Morris, Thos. Toye, W. Hunkings, K. McAulay, W. Ketcheson, F.H. Hjaluarson, R. Harrison, Rod Burrell.
Four delegates were also along from Pine River: J. Klyne, W. Gobson, G. Pangman, and W. Campbell.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 13 – 1911

1911 Apr 13 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on the 20th alt. Coun. Paddock absent.
Communications were read from Algoma Steel Bridge Co., Chairman of the Telephone Commission, stating that a telephone line would be built through Fork River to Winnipegosis this coming season; from Supt. Fisher of C.N.R.; Western Municipal News, re vital statistic register; Salvation Army and Campbell, Simpson & Macneill.
Lacey – McAuley – That the secretary write the superintendent of C.N.R., the Minster of Railway and the Railway Commission, urging the necessity of a tri-weekly service on the Winnipegosis branch.
McAuley – Hunt – That the swamp on the road allowance, lying north of secs. 35 and 36, tp. 30, range 19, be corduroyed and that A.E. Groff be appointed foreman at $2 per day and that he be empowered to employ men at $1.50 per day, or man and team at $3 per day.
The following accounts were passed by the Finance committee: J. Nawasod, assisting surveyor, $3; W. Clark, $3; St. Boniface Hospital, $3; postage, $2; team with survey party, $7; F.B. Lacey, expenses to convention, $15.75.
Nicholson – Lacey – That the tender of he Algoma Steel Bridge Co. for the building of a combination steel and wood bridge across the Fork River between sections 21 and 28, tp. 29, range 19, for the sum of $230 be accepted.
A by-law appointing the officers for 1911, was passed; the noxious weed inspectors being T.B. Venables and W. King of Fork River, and W. Marcroft and I.K. Robinson of Winnipegosis.
McAuley – Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

1911 Apr 13 – Fork River

Geo. Nicholson had the misfortune to have his house and contents burnt last week. How the fire originated is a mystery. He had no insurance.
Mr. Homey, the horse dentist, is busy fixing up horses around Fork River. We have to do something with the hay as the railway seems unable to move it fast enough, and shippers are losing money on account of not being able to make prompt shipments.
A.H. Hodgson was a visitor to Fork River to spend the week-end.
A Press correspondent is shouting reciprocity because he can send to American firms and purchase barbwire and binder twine cheaper than he can get it at Fork River. We wonder if this is the individual that was giving us pointers on building a few weeks ago. We can’t all be R.C. and chairman of Boards of Public works committee. How about that municipal scheme for bringing settlers in? Rush it along, lots of room.
The people of Fork River spent an amusing evening in the Orange Hall listening to an entertainment given by Prof. Sas Koo Tam consisting of songs, recitations and vocals bits. Some of us will need remodelling before we can get into paradise. Its the first time we were aware we had Miltonia in Fork River.
W. Williams has moved his sawing outfit from Lake Dauphin here ready to saw the logs drawn by the settlers to Fork River. Billy’s a hustler in the sawdust line.
Our genial P.M., Mr. N. Little, has the greatest display of farm Implements ever seen in Fork River. If you want anything in that line give him a call. Say taw care those bandies don’t get stuck in those culvert pipes they might get damaged before they have time to experiment with them.
P. Ellis paid a flying visit to Dauphin. He believes in ascending and descending. Flying machines are all right if they run level. Call and get prices before buying. Blank forms on hand.
Wm. King has been under the weather the last two weeks. Its just a complaint he caught when the old McKenzie government was in power; times were hard then, soup kitchens were opened all over Canada. Billy says he had to consume so much free trade soup to get a little nourishment he never rightly recovered, in fact it stopped his growth. His one consolation is he’ll never have a show with the fellow who was to big to get into Paradise.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 26 – 1914

1914 Mar 26 – Fined $60

Nicola Brattiko, who accidentally shot Mike Kuzyk several weeks ago south of Winnipegosis, was fined $60 and costs a few days ago, for hunting out of season. W.H. Joyce, deputy provincial game guardian of Dauphin, was the prosecutor.

1914 Mar 26 – Fork River

Colin Inkster, of Dauphin, one of the old-timers, was a visitor here renewing acquaintances for a short time.
Sam Reid left for a week’s holiday in the south.
Coun. F. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, stayed over after the council meeting, the guest of Mr. Kennedy. Frank is contemplating using an aeroplane next time as the “automobilly” got stuck in the snow and he had to do a little sprinting to get here but he arrived smiling.
W. Bell returned from spending the winter with his friends at Russell. He is looking hale and hearty.
Reuben Coombers returned from a month’s visit at Selkirk and reports a pleasant time.
A. Shinks, who has been working all winter with the Williams Lumber Co. Ltd., arrived in town and has left for his homestead at Vonda, Sask.
Dr. Medd visited a family out west that was said to have the fever, which rumour upon investigation was found to be incorrect. This is too bad as the doctor had a long trip for nothing.
The Lake Dauphin fishermen’s ball proved a success, the hall being well filled. Several from Winnipegosis attended and all report a good time, although it was stormy.
Sid Coffey, of Winnipegosis, put on his moving picture show on Saturday. Judging from the crowd it had, there being hardly standing room, it was satisfactory to all when attended.
While it is a delicate subject we can’t help noticing the contrast of these turnouts in comparison with the congregations attending the two churches. Any excuse is made for not attending divine service. It is poor encouragement to young students who give their services to these [1 line missing] existence.
We notice our Mowat friend is still grinding out his imaginary P.O. troubles. He ought to take to the woods now.
James Gunness has received a 3 horse power gasoline engine for his track car. It certainly can go some when Jim and Conductor Sid get behind it.
Frank Hafenbrak has returned from Rochester, Minn., with his farther, I. Hafenbrak. We are sorry to hear he is not improving as fast as expected.
John Clements was in town for a short time Monday on business.
Nat Little is busy drawing stone for foundation for a new stable.

1914 Mar 26 – Fork River

J.T. Wiggins representative of the Steel Granary & Culvert Co., of St. Boniface, interviewed some members of the council regarding graders and road machines. Before leaving he appointed D. Kennedy, of the A.T. Co., their local agent.
Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat, returned from spending the winter months among friends in Eastern Ontario.
Nurse Tilt arrived fro Dauphin and intends spending some time on the farm.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is staying a short time with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Frank Hafenbrak received a telegram on Friday from his father’s doctor that he was wanted at once at Rochester, Minnesota, where Mr. Hafenbrak is receiving treatment. He left at once for the south.
The Shetland pony, Hamlet, was shipped to Cypress River by express, the little fellow being a trifle too heavy for parcel post. Romeo and Juliet are left behind. Mr. Little has plenty more to pick from.
Mrs. McWilliams has left for the south to recuperate after her illness. We trust she will be benefited by her trip.
Joseph Lockhart is off on a visit and will no doubt take in the Kerfanko trial as a variety during his absence. Joe likes to be up-to-date.
C.O. Allen, Dominion Land Survey or, is back in these parts in connection with water power or the town of Dauphin.
Don’t forget the Lake Dauphin Fishermen’s Ball in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, the 27th March, or you will miss a good time.
The weather is mild again and if this continues we will soon be on the land ploughing.
Mrs. D. Kennedy is visiting at Dauphin.

1914 Mar 26 – Winnipegosis

About one hundred couples attended the St. Patrick’s Ball, given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnis, in the Hotel Winnipegosis, and all had a very enjoyable time. The ballroom was beautifully decorated for the occasion and the guests tripped the light fantastic until the wee small hours of the morn. We haven’t space here to give a description of all the beautiful dressers worn by the ladies, so will just say they were the best dressed lot of ladies that ever graced a ball room in Winnipegosis. Mr. and Mrs. McInnis are ideal entertainers.
The fishermen’s ball was held Tuesday night, March 24th, in Victoria Hall.
It is reported another hotel will be built here this spring on the corner where the Lake View was burned.
There is talk of a bank being opened up here this spring and we hope he report is true. A bank is very much needed.
Frank Hechter has returned from Winnipeg. We understand he engaged a teacher for the third room that is to be opened up.
A party of surveyors arrived on arrived on Monday. They are leaving on Wednesday to inspect the work done by J.E. Jackson this winter.
A meeting of Conservative Association was held in Cohen’s hall on Monday might for the purpose of electing officers and appointing delegates to attend the convention at Gilbert Plains. A very large number were in attendance and the great interest taken in the meeting shows that the Conservatives are anxiously awaiting the coming election. J.P. Grenon was elected president.
Miss Phoebe Denby, who has been visiting friends in Winnipeg and Selkirk, returned last Monday. Her sister Ethel stopped in Winnipeg to attend college.
Coun. Hechter motored to Fork River on Tuesday morning to attend the council meeting
Mr. Finlayson, inspector of Dominion fish hatcheries paid our Sake Island hatchery a visit this week and reports everything in a very satisfactory condition.
Geo. Cunliffe has returned from spending a few days in Winnipeg.
Archie McDonnell has the gold fever and is going to the Pas to seek his fortune. If Archie makes good we will all get a piece of it.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 20 – 1913

1913 Mar 20 – Baran Now Praying

John Baran, condemned to be hanged for the murder of Constable Rooke, now spends his time in prayer.

1913 Mar 20 – Fork River

Geo. Esplen was a visitor with W. King on his return from Mafeking, where he spent the winter in charge of one of the fishing posts on the north end of the lake.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove left for Dauphin to visit among friends on her way to Dryden, Ontario.
Miss Pearl Wilson is taking a short vacation among friends at Sifton.
John Bykilo returned home after a two months rest for the good of his health at Portage.
Fred Storrar, of Mowat, has resumed his duties as assistant manager of the A.T. Co. Fred’s all right, a pleasant smile for everyone.
Miss Ena Fredrickson and Miss Kennedy returned from a visit to their folks at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that Professor Ike Robinson was scalded the other day while experimenting with a boiler, which exploded throwing the contents in his face. He is doing nicely. Ike says he don’t mind having solved the tea experiment.
The C.N.Ry. bridge gang is busy renewing the bridge on the creek north of town.
The vaudeville performance which the Laurier troupe has been putting on at the National Play house on Parliament Hill, is costly for the country. Ten thousand dollars a day or sixty thousand dollars for the week is the bill which the people of the Dominion will have to foot for the little game of politics which the Opposition has been staging for the first week in the opposition to the navy bill. That’s Liberal economy and loyalty everytime.
“Say, Mike, we overheard the Admiral trying to explain the need of that boundary bridge the other day and several took a hand in the debate.”
“Well, Pat, by what I see of the affair it is a fraud to take our taxes to build a bridge to accommodate one man and it on private property. He must have caught the rest of them napping to be able to carry such a measure.”
“Now, you’ve put your foot in it, Mike, sure. The Fork River Philosopher’s idea is to bridge the whole municipality and throw the dirt on top. Gee, what next.”
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese, held Communion and Baptismal service at All Saints’, Fork River, Winnipegosis and Sifton. There were large congregations at each service. The Rev. H.H. Scrase assisted.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

Charles Johnson, of Makinak, was a visitor to Rev. Father Derome last week. He was much interested in his visit and inspected the hatchery on Snake Island, where he enjoyed himself. His father is interested in the management of a hatchery in Norway, Europe.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

The ball in the Winnipegosis hotel on the 17th proves that the anniversary of St. Patrick is becoming very dear to the hearts of some, it being patronized by the elite, graced by those who love to trip the light fantastic, and enlivened by an appreciative crowd of onlookers. Many wore a souvenir badge supplied by willing workers of the W.A. and assistants. Fork River social element added materially to its success.
At the Christian League last Thursday Mr. Scott read a paper on “Commerce” touching on the German menace, that was worthy of a much larger crowd of understanding. He defined minutely the fundamental principles of commerce making it more interesting by apt illustrations, ably leading one’s interest up to appreciate the Empire’s present position. His reflections on England from Germany’s attitude served to illuminate her domain and in no way detracted from her greatness.
Mr. Mullens was the recipient of a handsome gift from his many friends in Winnipegosis last Wednesday evening as a token of their esteem and regret at his departure.
Mr. Hulme returns home for Easter holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson are rejoicing in the possession of a young son, which was privileged to be baptized by the Rev. Dr. Page, archdeacon and general missioner of the diocese. A baptismal service was also held in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walmsley on Sunday evening last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 13 – 1913

1913 Mar 13 – Baran to Hang

Joh Baran, the man who shot Constable Rooke, was found guilty of the crime at the assizes and sentenced to be hanged on May 20th.

1913 Mar 13 – Fork River

Mr. W. King, County Master, returned form Winnipeg, where he attended as delegate the provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Manitoba.
Rev. H.H. Scrase was elected deputy grand chaplain for Dauphin country L.O.L.
John Clements spent a few days in Dauphin last week.
Everyone is busy trying to get their hauling done before the snow leaves us.
Dr. Page will hold baptismal and Communion services in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, at 2:45 o’clock next Sunday, the 16th March.
Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove returned from a visit to friends in Dauphin.
Miss Pearl Cooper left for Dauphin on a visit to friends.
D.F. Wilson has returned from the Brandon fair and reports a good time.
Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak has returned after spending a few days in Dauphin on important business.
We notice the Fork River correspondent in the Press has coupled the named of some of our esteemed citizens to his untruthful items the last two weeks. He must be hard up for news. But then he reminds us of the man who kept his spirits by pouring spirits down because he got pinched for keeping a pig within the two limits against the law. Take a tumbler, friend, and don’t be so anxious to use other people’s names.
Professor J. Robinson, who has been up the lake fishing all winter, has returned from Mafeking and is taking charge of the Fork River Quadrille club.
Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of St. Paul’s Church, Dauphin, paid, Mr. H. Scrase a visit lately.

1913 Mar 13 – Winnipegosis

Rev. Dr. Page, of Winnipeg, is expected in town on the 16th to administer Holy Communion and baptismal services will also be held Sunday next, in the school house.
P. McArthur will be back shortly to town. Mrs. McArthur will probably remain in Winnipeg some time longer owing to having recently been suffering from a painful fall while south.
Mrs. Benoit, of Dauphin, who has been the guest of Mrs. Hall Burrell the past week, has returned home. Her visit was greatly enjoyed.
We’re glad to see Miss Evelyn Burrell looking well again, only minus roses. Get strong quick, Evelyn, there’s a good time coming.
Dr. Medd is rather a ? but confirms finally the fact that there are enigmatical people even here.
Mr. Scott says he would not have come to stay in this town but for its great attractions. Dear old, Winnipegosis! If we only had a daily train service.
St. Patrick’s anniversary will be celebrated by a ball in the Winnipegosis hotel.
The play, “when Greek meets Greek” is being practiced for the concert on the 28th promises to be exceptionally good.
A meeting of the W.A. will be held at the home of Mrs. Bradley on Friday evening.
Nearly all the families are down from the north end of the lake. Possibly about 20 people have yet to return. “Dad” Danby is as brisk as ever; a fine example of 70 years young.
The snow plough has made its best trip. It can transport 10 or 50 tons of fish on a single trip, and leaves the lake somewhat picturesque. A trip on a dog sled to Snake Island is fine and a visit to the hatchery most interesting.
Anyone keeping vigils now will have the dreamy canine cries as an accompaniment. ‘Tis a pity the dogs are not treated more as man’s true friends.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 26 – 1914

1914 Feb 26 – Arrested on Murder Charge

The following dispatch was received from Edmonton on Saturday and concerns two parties which are well known around Sifton and Dauphin, Charles Turcunuk and his wife, who is better known as Mrs. Lena Wilson.
About four years ago Turcunuk worked for the railway being engaged cleaning out cars. He afterwards went West to Edmonton, where he started a boarding house among the foreigners and has been doing well up to the time of the advent of his wife a weeks ago. Those who were acquainted with him while he was in Dauphin speak highly of him.
Mrs. Turcunuk, or Wilson, as she was known about town, only left here a few weeks ago for Edmonton. During the Rooke trial she acted as interpreter for the crown.
Charles Turcunuk, a boarding and lodging housekeeper, was arrested this morning on a charge of murdering his four-months-old child in Sifton.
Mrs. Wilson has made a statement that Turcunuk murdered their four-months-old child and afterwards made her promise not to tell the police, or anyone else. She heard the child crying, and all of a sudden it stopped. She ran upstairs to the bedroom and found the child dead on the bed; her husband was standing a few feet away and looking at the corpse. It was then that he grabbed a carving knife and holding it over her head while she knelt on the floor commanded that her mouth be sealed and her tongue be silent forever.

SHE TOLD SECRET

Convinced that her husband would carry out his terrible threat, Mrs. Wilson obeyed and promised to keep the secret, and this morning after seeing Turcunuk escorted to the prisoner’s dock to answer to a charge of non-support, she told the story to Deputy Chief Wright, and other police officials and in doing so submitted a written statement that will be used in evidence at the preliminary hearing next Tuesday morning.
The charge of non-support had just finished and the man fined $75 and costs, when Magistrate Massie commanded him to stand up to listen to a second charge.

1914 Feb 26 – Fork River

Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have left on a trip east on business.
W.J. Johnston, of Mowat, has returned from Mafeking where he spent the winter fishing.
W. King returned the latter end of last week from a business trip to Winnipeg, and states there are a large number there taking in the bonspiel and the Agricultural college course.
Prof. J. Robinson returned from fishing up north and there is little doubt but he will soon have the Fork River band in shape for any emergency.
We notice the minutes of the municipal meeting were published the following week after the meeting in the Herald. This is as it should be Promptness is what the people look for and appreciate.
Mr. T. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days in this burgh.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son, Donnie, are spending a week in Winnipeg.
“B and K” are not breaking any law of the country, Mowat friend. So try again. We have no doubt that the late Oak Brae mail carrier thought it an interesting event every Saturday and we are also sure though it a more interesting and wonderful stroke of luck when the cheques came along. It is not everyone gets paid for carrying their own mail. We don’t hold our meeting on Sunday friend. Get wise and shake yourself. Nuff for this time. Practice what you preach.

1914 Feb 26 – Winnipegosis

The bonspiel will open on Wednesday at one o’clock with sixteen rinks. Keen competition is looked for, as there is a large number of very valuable prizes. Some of the fellows that have been saying all winter what they would do if they wee only skips, will have a chance to try their hand now.
A very serious shooting accident took place about 25 miles south east of here on Monday. A Galician by the name of Kusyk, being shot through the back with a 44. Calibre rifle. The bullet passed through his abdomen. Dr. Medd was sent for and advised him to go to Dauphin Hospital to undergo operations. Since it is learned he has died.
Mrs. A.E. Groff, who has been on the sick list, we are glad to report is much better.
Frank Hechter arrived home from the Winnipeg bonspiel on Friday looking as hearty as ever.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Winnipeg and points east.
The W.A. are giving an alphabet party at the home of Mrs. Bradley on Tuesday evening.
Since the parcel post rates went into effect there is a large increase in parcels passing through the mail. The mail carrier is talking about getting a horse. But we see that Eaton’s still left Morten handle their catalogues.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 15 – 1912

1912 Feb 15 – Commissioner Wilson

D.F. Wilson, Board of Trade immigration commissioner expects to leave for England about March 6th. Besides endeavoring to interest the people over in the old land in the Dauphin district by meeting them personally he will deliver a number of addresses on various topics relating, of course, principally to farming and how it can be mad a success. Mr. Wilson expects to be away about two months.

1912 Feb 15 – Fork River

C.E. Bailey has just purchased a seven-horse power gasoline engine to run his saw and chopper.
Wm. King, Berkshire breeder, has sold to Geo. Teeyy, of Islay, Alberta, a Berkshire hog, and a crate of bared Plymouth Rock fowl.
The agent of the Ontario Windmill and Pump Co. was here on business lately.
C.E. Bailey, P. Ellis, W. King and F.F. Hafenbrak attended the annual meeting of the Dauphin County Loyal Orange Lodge on the 6th inst. and report a good time.
Mr. McArtney, Anglican lay reader of Kola district, has taken charge of the Fork River mission.
A St. Valentine’s ball was held in the Orange Hall on the 14th.
Charles Parks, one of our old-time merchants, has been spending a few days here on business.
John Robinson, of Winnipegosis, spent Sunday here renewing acquaintances.
To judge from the howl of the Fork River correspondent in the Press of the 8th he must have sat heavy on a tack. When he remarks that we are all sore because the poor country postmaster was “beat” out of his job, we beg to differ with him. We are not all sore on that part. How about the fellows who, during the election, were treated day after day to a tirade of profanity and abuse from “our friends.” We had to take our medicine and we advise “our friends” to do the same and rub a little cream on the sore spots. As for the other fellow he will manage filling in grade at five dollars a rod.

1912 Feb 15 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Johnston is visiting her son who is ill at Fort William.
The Armstrong Trading Co. has bought a lot from Capt. Coffey and it is rumoured will build a big block here in the spring.
Some of the fishermen have returned from the north end of the lake, where they were fishing during the winter. They report the catches light and a poor season generally. In fact, but few of them will do more than pay expenses.
Thos. Needham paid us a visit recently. Tom was one of the old-timers and we are always glad to have the town illuminated with his broad smile.
Winnipegosis possesses more dogs than any other town in the west. Just what good the majority of these dogs are would be hard to tell. There ought to be a cleaning up some of these days.
Things are going along quietly at the fish hatchery on the island. Whether there will be any fish brought forth time alone will reveal. Just what good this hatchery has been up to date it would be hard to tell. In the past the island proved a better place to raise sheep than young fish. How would it do for them to try to raise muskrats?
There is a rumour that the lake will be open to summer fishing again. This question of throwing the lake open for fishing in summer is worthy of much consideration. Don’t let us kill the goose that lays the golden egg.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 12 – 1914

1914 Feb 12 – Lake View Hotel Winnipegosis Destroyed By Fire

Early Sunday morning Winnipegosis was given a bad fire scare. With a high wind blowing it seemed that the greater part of the Main Street was doomed. A call was sent to the Dauphin Fire Brigade to be in readiness, in case the fire spread.
The fire started though the collapsing of the furnace about 9 a.m., in the basement of the Lake View Hotel, and in less than two hours the building was a complete wreck.
The fire gained such headway before a general alarm was given, that two of the female staff were compelled to jump from the second storey windows and received a severe shaking up.
The citizens of the town turned out in force and formed a bucket brigade. It is due to their strenuous efforts that the fire was confirmed to the one place. Several times adjacent property appeared to be doomed.
Hotel Winnipegosis, which is just across the street was given a bad scorching on the one side. All the window glass being broken by the heat.
The contents of Walmsley’s poolroom, Whale’s general store and Paddock’s butcher shop were cleared out.
Part of the contents of the hotel were saved, but the boarders and staff practically lost all their property.
The hotel was managed by Wm. Ford and owned by The Brewer’s Syndicate. The loss is partially covered by insurance.
The burned building was one of the first hotels in the district on the advent of the railway some fifteen years ago.

Fork River

The funeral service of the late W. Davis was conducted by Mr. Williams, lay reader of All Saints’ Anglican Church on Tuesday, February 3rd, at the house of the deceased. The remains were interned in the Fork River Cemetery followed by a very large crowd from the surrounding vicinity.
J. Robinson, of Mowat, has shipped over 60 boxes of fish caught in Lake Dauphin.
C.E. Bailey, Fred Cooper and W. King, C.M., returned from the annual meeting of the Country Orange Lodge in Dauphin. They report a good time.
Mrs. Gunness and two children have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Paswegan, Sask.
John Richardson had the misfortune to loose a valuable mare this week when he entered the stable in the morning the beast was found dead.
Mrs. Russell and children, of Kamsack, arrived and intend making their home with Captain Russell, teacher of the Beacon Heath School.
W. Hunkings, assessor, paid Clerk Wilson a visit on municipal business.
John Angus, of Winnipeg, pays frequent visits to this burgh. It’s all right John, Kitty’s busy these days catching owls.
W. King had a number of sheep killed by dogs ??? ??? making short work of any animal looking for mutton on his ??? in the future.
Don’t forge to [1 line missing] and fancy basket social under the auspices of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church. The ladies will furnish the baskets. There will be a short programme of songs, recitations, etc. [1 line missing] to come and have a good time. Admission 20 cents. On Friday night, Feb. 20th , at 9 o’clock sharp.

Winnipegosis

Fire completely destroyed the Lake View Hotel here Sunday morning. The fire originated in the basement, and gained such headway before being discovered that some of the guests had to escape through the upper story windows, not being able to save any of their personal effects. The citizens responded very quickly as soon as the alarm was given, and through hard work managed to confine the fire to the one building. Walmsley’s poolroom had a narrow escape. It being on fire several times but the bucket brigade never gave up, and the building only received a bad scorching. Hotel Winnipegosis looked at one time as if nothing could save it. The heat was so intense that all the windows were broken on the one side, but with a cost of paint and new windows the appearance of the fire will be gone. Had it burned, a number of us would be living in tents today.
Dr. Medd is certainly getting even with the boys now for what they did to him at the beginning of the curling season. He was a little unfortunate then, not having Ben Hechter and Jack Duhurst trained to get the broom instead of the fence. But now look out for the Doc. Why McDonald and his scouts only beat him by a very small margin Monday night. The Dr. and Watson had a good game Friday night only Watson had no use for the chalk. Dennett and Walmsley played a good game the same night, Dennett winning by 3 points. Watson’s rink won from Dennett Monday night 13-9. Jack Angus was the skip.
Mrs. Paddock left on Wednesday for Brandon, where she will remain a few days vising friends.
Sid Craighill, who has been confined to his bed through sickness, we are glad to report is around once more.
J.E. Morris arrived in town from his fishing camp last Thursday. He says the fishing is light.
It is rumoured there is likely to be a telephone line extended to South Bay this spring. It would be a grand thing for the farmers in that district. There will be a good number of phones put in here this spring.
Harvey Watson left on Monday for Dauphin on a business trip.
Wm. Christinson, wife and child arrived in town Monday from their fishing camp.
Willie McNichol and Gillis Johannesson got in on Saturday. It won’t be all down, then there will be something doing.
We are certainly getting a taste of cold weather now. The thermometer at the post office on Tuesday morning registered 32 below zero. One thermometer in town registered 54 below. Wednesday morning 53 below and still going down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 15 – 1914

1914 Jan 15 – Krafchenko Seen at Sifton

While the hunt for Krafchenko has centred principally in Winnipeg it is now known beyond a doubt he passed through Dauphin well disguised. That he is known and has friends in the Sifton district is also a fact. Several years ago, when arrested and taken to Prince Albert, he remained with a friend at the northern village for over a week. The people come from the same part of Europe as Krafchenko. A Winnipeg official is on the trial and developments may be expected.

1914 Jan 15 – Fork River

Mr. Elliott of Lloydminster, Sask., and Mr. Rowe, of Harding, Man., were here lately looking for cattle to ship out to their reach in Saskatchewan.
M. Mayir, government road inspector, was a visitor at W. King’s, afterwards leaving for Winnipeg.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Winnipegosis, returned home after having spent a few days with Mrs. T.N. Briggs on the Mossey.
Vivian Hafenbrak, Miss. G. Cooper and Miss Shannon have returned to Dauphin.
Miss Weatherhead, of Dauphin, is in charge of the Mossey River School for another term.
Mrs. Nat Little is on a short visit to Winnipeg.
Mr. Russell, of Sifton has returned from holidays and commenced his duties as teacher at Pine View School.
The new council for 1914 met at council chamber, Fork River, on January 6. Present, Reeve King, Councilors Hunt, Hector, Richardson, Robinson, Toye and Bickle. There was also present a large number of rate-payers and everything passed off satisfactory.
Peter Robinson, of Mowat and his gang are busy this nice weather repairing the Bailey Bridge.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 8 – 1913

1913 Jan 8 – Boy Fell from Balcony

Mrs. Jas. Gardiner and her three year old son of Kelwood, were calling at the Canadian Northern hotel late Sunday afternoon. They were upstairs and the boy finding the door leading to the front balcony open went out on it. Boy like, he started climbing on the railing to amuse himself. Once he got on top of it and losing his balance fell to the steps below, a distance of fifteen feet. Bystanders instantly picked the boy up and took him into the hotel. A physician was sent for and on examination it was found his leg was broken, but otherwise he appeared to have escaped injury. The child was removed to the hospital and the fracture limb set. He is doing splendidly and will soon be around again. It was a miraculous escape.

1913 Jan 8 – Fork River

S. Monington, who has been spending a few weeks with J. Robinson in the Mossey, returned home to Neepawa for the holidays.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, and Edwin King, of Prince Albert, spent the holidays at their respective homes.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School, returned to her duties on Monday.
On the night of the 23rd a Christmas tree and concert were given under the auspices of All Saints’ S.S. and W.A. The Hall was tastefully decorated with flags and bunting and was a credit to the committee in charge. There was a large turnout, the hall being crowded. W. King was chairman. The programme consisted of songs, drills and recitations and great credit is due the ladies of the W.A. and Miss Weatherhead for the way the children performed their various parts. E. Williams, minister in charge, distributed the prizes to the pupils. W. Davis substituted for Santa Claus and was kept busy with his assistants distributing presents to the little folks. At the close, Miss Eva Ellis and Joe Nowsede, on behalf of the teachers and pupils of the S.S., presented Mr. King, superintendent and Warden, with a valuable gold fountain pen, which came as a surprise and was very much appreciated by Mr. King who thanked them for their kindness. Bags of candies and fruit were then distributed among the kiddies and everyone claims they had the time of their life. We take this means of thanking all those who took part in helping us making it a success. After supper the young folk took charge of the hall and tripped the light fantastic till the wee sma’ hours.
Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson and family spent Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wood, at Sifton.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is spending the holidays with his family here.
We are sorry to hear that Mr. Isaac Hafenbrak is seriously ill in the Dauphin Hospital. The members of his family have the sympathy of this community and we trust he will soon be around again all right.
The annual ball of New Year’s night, under the auspices of the members of Purple Star, L.O.L., No. 1765, was a success. The music was supplied by Kitt Bros., of Sifton, Messrs. Mooney, of Valley River and Mr. Watson and Mrs. Paddock of Winnipegosis. J. Frost and A. Hunt were the floor managers. There was a large turnout. Sifton, East Bay, and Winnipegosis were well represented. County Master W. King and Bro. H.J. Woods, of Dublin Bay, gave short addresses after supper. Bro. Woods also gave us some good Irish songs. From the Grand March at 9 o’clock till the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at 6 o’clock in the morning the dance went with a swing. The members of 1765 appreciate very much the presence of many friends who came from a distance, to assist in having a good time.

1913 Jan 8 – Winnipegosis

Miss Molly Hechter has concluded a visit to her brothers, leaving for Winnipeg.
Four teams loaded with fish fell through the ice on the 28th, while the teams were negotiating a crack, but fortunately there were no causalities and everything was recovered the following morning.
Captain Jack Denby, late commodore of the Mossey River squadron, arrived from up the lake on Friday, looking very happy and prosperous, reporting great time among the fishermen.
Joe Alex, our peripatetic vendor of commodities to outlying districts, had a nasty experience on the lake six miles from home on Friday night, white it was snowing and very dark, his horses getting out of hand and bolting for home. He reckons, and so do other reasonable persons, that a beacon of some kind should be placed at the mouth of the river to give a line of direction on the town as in trying to strike the river on a dark night is like driving into a black wall. At any rate, it would help to advertise the place by letting people in the East know that there is a little rising town in the West that will come into its own some day.
Mr. King, the newly elected reeve, paid a visit to thank his adherents for their kind support and, of course, promised to do something.
George Cunliffe has been appointed magistrate in place of Mr. Parker, and his selection for the post appears to give general satisfaction.
John I. Matthews, from the old country, is spying out the land in this district and evidently wishes to put a few thousand into real estate and as he professes to have great knowledge regarding this question, no doubt he will make good.
Mr. Hulme, schoolmaster, and Miss Hayes, schoolmistress, returned from their vacation on the 5th.
Curling was in full swing on the night of the 5th, being the first game of the season. Mr. Barbour, a promising recruit, should, under the tutorship of Donald Hattie, come to the front in one of the ensuing Bon Spiels.
Mr. Hunkings, our indefatigable chief constable, has been busy lately collecting evidence and prisoners at the different reserves in connection with the illicit sale of liquor, and as a result Mr. Akbar and Paul Samaty, with two Indians, were dispatched to Winnipeg under the charge of Supernumerary Constable McKercher. Akbar was fined $200, or two months and Samaty, $100 or one month. The first named paid up and was pleased to use his return ticket, while Samaty will have a nice little holiday at the Government’s expense.
There are several more cases pending, the worthy magistrate having ordered a remand.