Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 15 – 1914

1914 Oct 15 – Gasoline Boat Burned

The gasoline boat, “Lake View,” owned by Mr. Frank Hechter, was burned at the north end of Lake Winnipegosis last week, together with supplies and fishing nets. The boat was in charge of Dan Martin. Mr. Hechter places his loss a near the $3000 mark. There was no insurance.

1914 Oct 15 – Doctors on Strike

It is said that since the declaration of war, the Swan River physicians have refused to threat German measles.

1914 Oct 15 – Fork River

Max King and Karl Erikson have left for the north end of the lake for he winter’s fishing.
Mr. W. Howitson has left for Winnipegosis and is working in the A.T. Co store. “Scotty” is always in great demand.
Mrs. Peter Ellis has returned from a trip to Ontario.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor with Mrs. D. Kennedy this week.
Miss M. Craighill and Mrs. W. Davis have returned from a short visit to Winnipegosis and report a pleasant time.
Mrs. Bert Cooper and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with Mr. W. Cooper, Sr., on the Mossey River.
Mr. D.F. Wilson has been confined to the house for a short time. It’s nothing “catching.” We trust he will recover.
Next Sunday, Oct. 10th, will be Children’s day. Special services will be held for the children. We trust there will be a good turn out to this service. All are welcome.
Mr. Mullens and friend here motored from Cypress River and are spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. A. Cameron, of Mowat Centre.
Mr. Eloftson, from Ontario, was up to W. King’s for the surveying teams and outfit which have been here all summer. He is moving them to Gimli ready for the winter’s work in that section.
Some one was enquiring of us last week if the A.T. Co. was still running the dredge at Winnipegosis.

1914 Oct 15 – Winnipegosis

Sid Coffey is going fishing and Harold Bradley will run the picture show while he is away.
Frank Hechter was a passenger Dauphin bound on Monday.
C.F. Stewart, insurance agent returned to Dauphin on Monday after a short business trip here.
Alex Bickel went to Dauphin on Monday.
Frank Hechter’s gasoline boat was burned at the north end of the lake last week. The loss is considerable as the boat was loaded with fishing apparatus and supplies for the winter. Dan Martin was in charge of the boat, and he says the origin of the fire is a mystery.
The Standard Lumber Co. is putting in a camp for the winter at Graves’ Point.
The steamer Manitou has already made several trips to the north end of the lake with supplies for the fishermen. Capt. McDonald is in charge of the boat.
It is expected that fully 150 men will be engaged in fishing this winter. The wages paid will be considerably lower than in the past two seasons.
Joe Johnston, from Fort William, is among the late arrivals. He reports times dull at the lake town. He will fish this winter.
Capt. Coffey’s new boat made her first trip to the north end of the lake last week. The boat has not been christened yet, but when the sparkling bottle of wine is broken the word “Mildred” will appear.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 10 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 10 – Fork River

Miss S. Lacey, of Oak Brae, returned from a short visit to Mrs. J. Spearing of Valley River.
Mrs. Wm. Ramsay, of Sifton, was a visitor with Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase at the vicarage.
Mrs. Wm. King returned home after a week’s say with her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, who is leaving for the north end of the lake for the winter.
J. Playford and Fleming Wilson were visitors here from Dauphin on business.
S. Biggs has given up the Mowat School and is leaving for Dauphin.
H.H. Benner, an old-timer, is travelling around for a few days in the educational chariot renewing acquaintances. We are all pleased to see Harcourt. He is now a regular walking encyclopaedia on real estate.
The C.N.R. bridge gang spent a few days here pile drying and fixing bridges.
Mr. Lampard, of Dauphin, is busy rounding up a car of fat cattle for shipment.
Duncan Briggs, Professor Robinson and Fred Storrar have left with T. Johnston for the winter’s fishing at Dawson’s Bay.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson, who has been spending a week with her daughter, Mrs. L. Humphreys, of Dauphin, returned home Saturday.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs arrived home from a month’s vacation spent with friends in Brandon.

1918 Oct 10 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Albert Jackson Weir, Valley River, wounded. (Albert Jackson Weir, 1888, 2193343)
Pte. Douglas Wells Bentley, Dauphin, wounded. (Douglas Wells Bentley, 1897, 469933)
Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, wounded. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Robert Stanley Colebeck, Dauphin, wounded. (Robert Stanley Colbeck, 1896, 1072198)
Pte. Charles Winstanley Skinner, Dauphin, was wounded and taken to the dressing station. While being conveyed from the dressing station to the hospital he was struck by a bomb and killed. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 9 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 9 – Accidently Shot

Robt. Charlier, a young man 23 years of age, was brought from Ochre River on Monday to the hospital here. He was pulling a shotgun out of a wagon when it was accidently discharged, the contents lodged in his groin. He is reported progressing satisfactorily.

1913 Oct 9 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy and daughters were visitors to the Lake Town with Mr. Theo. Johnston.
E. Williams returned from Dauphin after attending the rural deanery meeting at that point.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, was visiting friends at Fork River and returned home on the “All Saints” special.
The long distance telephone gang are busy here getting ready to put up the wire which will fill a long felt want.
The elevator is in full swing, with John Clements, in charge he having moved his family from Dauphin here for the winter.
Miss N. Millidge, organizer and managing secretary of the Church of England Women’s Auxiliary, gave an address in the church to the W.A. members, which was well attended
Miss Millidge is the guest of Mrs. W. King, president of the W.A. until Tuesday when they both drove to Winnipegosis to hold a meeting with the members of the W.A. at that point. A successful meeting was held.
Mr. Monnington, of Neepawa, arrived here for a few days chicken shooting and is the guest of his uncle, John Robinson on the Mossey.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. King and Mr. and Mrs. E.E. McKinstry and G.F. King paid our burg a visit in an automobile. They were after the fleet winged prairie chicken. The party were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dunc. Kennedy.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Winnipegosis, spent a short time with her aunt, Mrs. T.N. Briggs lately.
John Robinson and Mr. Monnington have returned from a pleasure trip to Winnipegosis. Both were delighted with that hustling town.
We hear that the government dredge Laurier, which was been under the water for three years, was resurrected. Why was the dredge not left where it was as it was less expense to the country under water, as the other dredge has been all summer poking around a little island that Pat and Mike would take away in a wheelbarrow in less time. The sooner there is a change in the present management the better the settlers will like it as we have competent men around here who are able to run this part of the bis.
Mr. Brandon & Sons, of Mowat, have purchased a large gasoline threshing outfit and are in the field for business. With the number of machines at work if the weather continues fine, the threshing will wind up in another week.

1919 Oct 9 – Fork River

Miss Millidge, organizer of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Anglican Church, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. W. King.
Mrs. Vinning and daughter, of Winnipeg, have returned home after spending a week with Mrs. J. Reid.
T.N. Briggs has invested in an oil pull tractor. This power will turn over the land more rapidly. It’s more speed that counts these times.
Bert Little has taken a trip to Chicago. Fred Tilt is in charge of the store during his absence.
The Cypress River paper, in a recent issue contains the following item:
“Mr. and Mrs. N. Little both old time residents of Cypress River and town this week. They left home in May for an overseas tour, and visited the battlefields of France and Belgium, securing many photos of great interest. They sailed to New York on a French boat and went from there to Toronto near which city Mr. Little purchased a new model 1920 McLaughlin 6 cylinder car and motored to Cypress. They are now on their way home. The same cherry Nat as of old looking as young as ever.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 7 – 1915

1915 Oct 7 – Fork River

Mr. Lorne Tilt has returned from the States and is visiting with his parents on the old homestead.
Mr. Ben Warshosky, horse and cattle buyer, left last week for Winnipeg with 2 carloads of fat cattle.
Fred Puluk, merchant of Oak Brae, was in town for a consignment of goods shipped here for his store.
Private F.J. Storrar is home from Sewell camp for a few days visiting his friends and looks quite spruce in his khaki.
Last winter the government officials advised the farmers to put in all the wheat they could and in many instances land was sown that should have been summer fallowed. Now the bad weather stops threshing and no plowing can be done. The government now comes out with the warning “Don’t thresh too soon.” Advice is cheap. It’s cheap money the farmer wants to be able to borrow. Interest at 8 to 12 percent, which is put up to us by the manufacturer when our crops are a failure by frost or otherwise are no good.
Mr. Shuchell, general merchant, is spending a few days at the Peg rustling bargains for his customers hereabouts.
Mr. John Chipley has returned from Hamiota, having spent a month harvesting.
Several men, who went out to harvest, are returning on account of the bad weather. Work is at a standstill lately.
Mr. Geo. Lyons, municipal tax collector, is busy these days. The job seems to agree with him.
W. King, J.P., received word that his appointment has been rescinded. “Billy” remarked with a smile, “that it knocked Doe Bryant’s yarn into a cocked hat when he (the doc) remarked that the Grits were always willing to wack up with a good Conversation.”
[1 line missing] Winnipegosis, was a visitor here inspecting the safe with the intention of moving it to Winnipegosis for the use in the clerk office.
Mr. A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned from a business trip to Dauphin at the week-end.

1915 Oct 7 – Sifton

Mr. Walters, of the Standard Lumber Co., joins the colours.
It was with regret that the young people of Sifton heard of the departure of Mr. Walters to join the colours. Mr. Walters has always identified himself with the best interests of the young people of the town, and has acted as scout master of the 1st Sifton patrol of Boy Scouts, which he was largely instrumental in forming. The patrol, in recognition of his kind work among them, met at his office in full dress uniform and presented him with a gold mounted cigarette holder. Mr. Bousfield, school principal, made the presentation and after a brief resume of the good work and happy reminiscences with the patrol, congratulated Mr. Walters and assured him of the party good [1 line missing] Sifton for his safe return among the heroes of a well-won fight.

1915 Oct 7 – Winnipegosis

The fishermen all arrived from their camps per the S.S. Manitou on Saturday morning, as the fall fishing is over. They will never get in shape for going up the lake for the winter.
We are glad to report Miss Pearl Paddock making rapid progress to recover.
Private Joe Johnston, Sid. King, Wm. Wright and Bert Arrowsmith are spending their leave of absence at their homes here. They are looking well and in uniform are a credit to the army.
Thomas Toye had a narrow escape from a serious accident Wednesday, when his horse took fright and bolted. A bunch of dogs got fighting under the horse and rig. These dogs want to be tied up before some one gets seriously hurt.
The council passed an early closing by-law at their last meeting; which comes into force on Oct. 8th.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. Whale was well attended and the proceeds amounted to $7.00.
Geo. Adams, of Waterhen, spent Sunday in town.
Mr. Derachers, of Pine Creek, is spending a few days in town.
A ten-cent tea will be held at the home of Mrs. White on Wednesday, Oct. 6th, in aid of a local family.
Frank Hechter spent a few days in Winnipeg on business last week, returning Monday.
We are getting three trains a week steady new and what is sill better news three mails also.
Mr. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is spending a few days in town at the home of her mother, Mrs. Theo. Johnston.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 6 – 1910

1910 Oct 6 – First Automobile Accident

The first automobile accident in town to write of happened Friday evening. Eric Nicholson driving his father’s (H.P. Nicholson) horse on Vermillion Street, collided with J.W. Johnston’s automobile just as it was coming over the crossing at his lane on the ave, N.W., Mr. Johnston immediately put on the emergency break but the machine struck the horse before it was stopped. On examination for casualties it was found that the animal had received a broken leg. The two veterinary, Dr. Bryant, was telephoned for to dispatch the animal.

1910 Oct 6 – Thresher Fatally Injured

Gilbert Plains, Man., Oct. 1 – Mike Genik, who was working on the threshing machine of Frank Morris, on the farm of Fred Manns, was run over by the front wheel of the engine last night, receiving internal injuries which, it is said, will prove fatal.

1910 Oct 6 – Fork River

A meeting of the Council was held here last week, when some important business was done.
Miss Hansford of Winnipegosis, paid us a visit was done.
Rev. H.H. and Scrase visited Mr. and Mrs. Lacey at Oak Brae last week.
Mowat School house was prettily decorated last Sunday on the occasion of their Harvest Festival. A nice congregation attended.
We are all wondering if the Fork River and Winnipegosis road will be ready for use this coming winter. Slow progress seemed to be made on account of scarcity of teams and men.
A spark from the engine was the cause of a load of wheat being burned up in the wagon owned by Mr. W. King was badly damaged.
Mrs. Tilt from Dauphin, came up last week.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very eloquent sermon to the congregation of All Saints Church which was greatly appreciated. His subject was “The Holy Eucharist Congress at Montreal” and replied to Father Vaughan, who said that Protestantism is a soulless religion and that Canadian public schools are Godless schools. Mr. Scrase handled the subject well.

1910 Oct 6 – To the Herald:

SIR – I notice in the press an article dated September 17th, from a Mowat correspondent, re Government Elevator, which he thinks is lost, strayed or stolen. If either of these three things have happened it, the people of this vicinity would not be surprised to hear of it dropping out of the Mowat mail bag some day as it is remarkable what that mail bag will consume – tacks, sugar and other things too numerous to mention.
I have never heard of such a thing happening an elevator but we have had an experience like that in post offices up here. Fishing River being mentioned in the Mowat article reminds me what happened a few years ago, the settlers of Fishing River petitioned the Ottawa Government for a post office. Did they get the post-office at Fishing River? Not your life! It was lost, strayed or stolen as a new post office was located shortly after, not a hundred miles from Fishing River. If our Oak Brae P.M. would put the same energy behind the mail cart as he uses on his pen, knocking at the Provincial Government, the Winnipegosis mail it carries would get here before the train leaves and not have to lay over and the people would appreciate it very much.

A Fork River Correspondent

1910 Oct 6 – North Lake

Councillor Lacey has let quite a few contracts for road work lately, which will help the Galicians to get around easier.
John Bolinski is erecting a dwelling and stable on his farm on the lake shore.
Rev. H.H. Scrase conducted harvest thanksgiving service at Mowat School house last week. His text was very appropriate. The school house was tastefully decorated by Misses Charlotte and Harriet Lacey.
If any person comes in contract with a threshing outfit looking for work, be so kind as to show them the way here in case they get lost.

1910 Oct 6 – Sifton

Fine weather continues. Threshing progressing very nicely.
Mr. Carruthers and gentlemen friend from Valley River, paid our village a visit on Tuesday evening. “Me thinks” a fair inducement.
The Rev. Sabourin is moving the R.C. Church to a property across the road from the present location.
The Rev. Archbishop of Lemburg, Galicia accompanied by Archbishop Langevin, St. Boniface, is expected at Sifton in the near future, in the interests of the Greek rite of the R.C. Church.
A number of our villagers went out to Lake Dauphin on Saturday for the day’s shooting.
The Sifton village mock council met on Wednesday of last week. After the minutes of the previous meeting were read and several very important communications were brought up and read before the council after which some heated discussions followed.
The matter of the excessive use of the Comfort Soap miniature wagons on the sidewalks of the village, was brought to the attention of the council, that the practice be immediately stopped, thus lessen the dangers to pedestrians exceeding the speed limit by law. After due discussion the motion was seconded by Alderman Dneufre, that the constable be ordered to put the by-law in force respecting this and in failure of that recommended that the family production be curtailed.
A complaint was also read from some residing in the farther wards east, of a nuisance of late in that locality. The west winds of late are heavily laden with the smell of carrion. The constable was ordered to investigate and see that all dead mosquitos, horses or horse flies, be buried at once by or at the expense of the parties responsible.
Alderman Pantoline thought that the nuisance ground was being moved too near the centre of the town anyway and wanted to know of the constable what was being done re the manure heaps which were called to his attention some time ago and demanded to know why he was not taking action. Alderman Dneufre thought the constable very dilatory in the performance of the duties of his position and said that he could produce a more competent party at less salary to take the place of the present policeman. Some charged graft repeatedly in the way of that officer’s position, others demanded investigation.
It was then moved by Alderman Dneufre and seconded by Pinkas that the matter of graft in the police commissioner’s office be investigated and reported to the council at the next meeting. Council then adjourned to again meet at the usual date.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 5 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 5 – Fork River

Mrs. C. Clark is visiting her son Harold, who is in the Dauphin Hospital with fever.
Mr. T. Shannon has purchased an up-to-date Sawyer & Massey separator.
Mr. J.G. Littler is visiting Sifton this week.
Mr. F. Wilson of Humphrey & Wilson, is up on a trip to his home.
Miss B Johnston who was visiting Mrs. D. Kennedy has returned to Dauphin to resume her duties at the hospital there.
We have not seen anything of our friend Joe, Liberal financier, since the 21st. We sincerely hope he is in good health.
The Liberal Conservative ball in the Orange Hall Friday night was a success. Dancing was kept up to about daylight. Premier Borden was ably assisted by Hon. Mr. and Mrs. Fielding, Hon. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Pugsley, Judge Wilson, Hon. T.N. Briggs, Senator Kennedy and other Honourables of all shades of politics and religion.
Harvest Festival in All Saints’ Anglican Church at three o’clock Sunday afternoon.

1916 Oct 5 – The Week’s Casualty List

Pte. S.F. Ferguson, of Melton, has been wounded. (Samuel Fremon Ferguson, 1894, 424783)
Lieut. Percy Willson is reported wounded. (Major Percy Willson, 1883)
Pte. Bert Blakely, Grandview, killed. (Albert Edward Blakely, 1897, 151543)
Pte. Wm. Gilbert, late of the Bank of Commerce staff, wounded. (William Alexander Gilbert, 1895, 150929)

1916 Oct 5 – Fork River

Mr. Shuckutt has returned after having spent the Jewish New Year in Dauphin with friends. Zack brothers merchants have removed their stock to the boarding house building on Main Street and are open for biz. Private Herman Godkin spent a few days visiting Mrs. Williams’ sister. His company expects to leave for overseas shortly. We wish him a safe return. W. King has received a letter from his son Private Maxwell King who is in the 14th general hospital with a shrapnel wound in the knee. He expects soon to be able to return to his company. The day before he went in the drive 5th September he had a talk with Lieutenant Worsey and Pete McCarty of Dauphin telephone man. Both had come through alright up to that time and wished to be remembered to all acquaintances at home.

1916 Oct 5 – Winnipegosis

We have been having a good deal of wind and there is snow in the air. The lake presents a very turbulent and unattractive aspect. Traveling by water just now is not very pleasant.
The “Manitou” is in and has brought down the summer fishermen with their boats and outfits. Preparations for winter fishing are rapidly going forward. If this weather continues we are likely to have and early closing of navigation. The 20th of October is considered as the safe limit.
The Red Cross Society held their regular monthly meeting on the evening of the 2nd. Mr. White finds it necessary to resign from the presidency but accepted the office of vice-president. Names were suggested for the office of the president and the matter of election is to be left in the hands of the executive committee. It is a marvel that so few come out to Red Cross business meetings. Every one claims to be interested in Red Cross work, and well they may be when over one hundred young men from this district have gone over to fight for us, while we sit securely at home beside a warm fire and a big lamp and read of their brass doings in Flanders and France. Come out to the monthly meetings on the first Monday of every month and then you will know what is being done and have a better chance to have a hand in it. The executive cannot get around and invite you personally and besides this is a public affair as much as the governing of your village, so come out and help; both men and women.
Miss Dolly Geekie has returned from Dauphin for a visit. Her many friends are pleased to see her.
Mrs. Frank Hechter had a cable that the 107th Battalion, in which her husband is an officer, had safely reached England.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 2 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 2 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River, on Wednesday, 17th inst. Councillors Richardson and Seiffert absent. The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Union of Manitoba Municipalities, Dauphin Hospital, Heaton’s Agency Co., N.R., the solicitor, Dominion Lands Office, the Minister of Interior, the Department of Education, Standard Lumber Co., T.A. Burrows Lumber Co. and land commissioner of Hudson Co.
Hunt – Bickle – That the clerk investigate the Dauphin Hospital accounts and pay all claims for which the municipality is liable.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk make the necessary entry with the Dominion government, paying the fees, for two acres of the S.E. 4-29-17 for cemetery purposes.
Hunt – Toye – That the reeve and clerk inspect ditch between sections 2 and 11, tp. 30, rge. 19, with a view to having it cleared out.
Bickle – Robertson – That the account for lumber of the Standard Lumber Co. amounting to $29.71 be paid and charged to ward 4.
Robertson – Toye – That the account authorized by Road Commissioner Bailey for deepening the Lockhart ditch and due J.W. Lockhart be paid.
Toye – Robertson – That the following resolution be forwarded to the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities to be brought before the annual Convention:
“That section 644, sub-section of the Municipal Act be amended by striking out the words “or any ward or any portion of a ward thereof” in the second and third lines thereof.”
Hunt – Bickle – That the following resolution be forwarded to Union of Manitoba Municipalities for consideration at the annual convention.
“That section 148 of the Municipal Assessment Act be amended by adding the words, “during the past two years” after the ‘taxes’ in the eighth line ??? ???.”
Toye – Robertson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye – Robertson – That the clerk put up notices that all arrears of taxes must be paid before the first day of November, 1913, or proceedings will be taken to collect.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk order one twenty-four inch corrugated culvert eighteen feet long for the Cooper crossing.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk be authorized to have the pile driver repaired as soon as possible.
A by-law authorizing the purchase of a roadway along the south side of the N.W. 26 and a portion of the N.E. 27-29-19 was passed; also a by-law striking the rate for 1913 as follows: municipal rate 10 mills, municipal commissioner’s rate ½ mill and general school rate 5 mills.
Toye – Bickle – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1913 Oct 2 – Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from Weyburn, where he has been for the summer months. He reports good crops there.
Geo. Tilt paid the Lake Town a visit on important business lately.
Willie Johnston returned from the summer fishing up the lake and reports a fair catch.
E. Williams, of Liverpool, England, has arrived to take up the work of the Anglican mission here.
F.B. Lacey returned from a trip south.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys.
Miss Pearl Wood has left for Winnipeg for a short stay with friends.
Mrs. O’Neill has arrived from Rainy River and is visiting her sister, Mrs. F.B. Lacey, of Mowat.
One of our Winnipegosis friends is of the opinion that the fishing at Fork River is ahead of Winnipegosis. We agree with him every time.
Mr. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, visited our burgh between trains.
Wm. Stonehouse left for Winnipegosis to follow his occupation as inspector for the A.T. Co.
Bert Cooper has returned from Winnipegosis, having spent the summer on the government dredge.
Mrs. Paul Pugon, of Lake Dauphin, while milking a cow was badly hurt, the cow having turned on her. Dr. Medd was sent for but could not go and by the time other assistance arrived it was too late, the woman died. She leaves a family of twelve children.
T.A. Worsey preached his farewell sermon on Sunday evening, the 28th, in All Saints’ Church. There was a good turnout. Mr. Worsey is leaving for St. John’s College to resume his studies. His many friends appreciate the good work he has done here this summer and all wish him prosperity.

1913 Oct 2 – Winnipegosis

The fishing season closes on Oct. 1st. The catch has been good. Fifty cars have been shipped out.
A monster jackfish, weighing 35 lbs., was caught in one of the hauls in Dawson Bay.
A Galician is in the lock-up having stabbed his wife in the arm with a knife. His mind is supposed to be unbalanced.
Ducks are numerous and the shooting is good.
Jos. Grenon is having the grounds around his fine new residence laid out by Mr. Sadler, of Dauphin. The grounds will be planted with hardy perennials this fall which will bloom early in the spring and summer.
Theo. Johnston returned on Wednesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1919 Oct 2 – Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

1919 Oct 2 – Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork Rive did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

1919 Oct 2 – Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Craighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 23 – 1915

1915 Sep 23 – Recruits for Sewell

The following recruits have enlisted in the 45th Batt. from Dauphin since Aug. 15th, and are now in training at Sewell camp: Bird McKinstry, A. Schoole, Cunningham, J. Brown, F. Storrar, W.H. Johnston, J. Cahill, J. Bartrup, J. Angus, W. Young, A.L. Cocking, W. Rindholm, E. Smith, B.F. Sparks, G. Spoueer, W. Mealing, and J. Hutson.
Sergt. Weeks will be in Dauphin and district until Oct. 15th and expects to get more recruits as the battalion is listed for England at an early date.

1915 Sep 23 – Winnipegosis

There was a most enjoyable dance in the Rex Hall on Thursday evening last in honour of Mr. Barbour and Mr. Burby who are joining the colours to do their bit for their country.
Sam McLean held a bailiff sale of furniture on Saturday, which was well attended and he had no trouble getting bidders, especially on the organ.
Frank and Ben Hechter attended the Jewish services in Dauphin Friday and Saturday.
The Ladies’ baseball team had a practice game on Wednesday when the Browns beat the Blues by 16 runs. Miss Geekie had the misfortune to get hit in the eye by the ball.
D.F. Wilson, of Fork River, passed through here on Friday for South Bay with notices of election for councillor [1 line missing] the army lately.
Quite a number are up north after the ducks. Mr. McInnes took a party across the lake in his gasoline launch Thursday.
Private Walter Munro arrived from Brandon on Saturday to spend a few days leave here with his friends. He reports the boys all well.
Mr. Rutlege, of the Pas, is spending a few days in town.
W.B. Sifton arrived from the north with is gang, having completed his lumber cut.
There was a children’s hour held in the Church of England on Friday evening, which was a great success thanks to Mrs. Bradley.
Constable Clarkson is busy these days rounding up dogs without tags, parties with dogs at large without tags had better keep their eye on the pound.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1912

1912 Sep 9 – Fork River

George Sumption, of Dauphin; is spending of short time with Mr. J. Clements on the Chase farm.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, who has been spending her holidays with her parents up the Fork, has returned to Dauphin.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs left for a two motions’ holiday with her friends at Brandon.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here lately taking in the sights.
Professor Gorden Weaver and N.H. Johnston returned from a trip to Winnipegosis on business and after the train run off the track. Misfortunes will happen to the best of regulated railways.
Frank Chase, of Dauphin, was here lately looking after his business interests.
The elevator builders have not arrived yet. We think it will be a mistake to build it on the site picked out. The building would be better if it were moved south on to the street next the cattle chute and
Mr. and Mrs. V.O. Weaver, of Vermont, are visiting their brother Gordon, of East Bay.
Wm. Geekie and son passed through here on their return trip from Strathclair to their home at Winnipegosis.
F. Lacey, of Oak Brae, has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Will Davis, who has invested heavily in real estate in Texas, strongly advocates the use of drain tiles. Will always was practical, especially on mail days when its raining.
Mrs. C. Bradley is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Several people from the Lake Town took in the dance in the Orange Hall on Thursday night past. Brother Robinson played the Fisherman’s Horn Pipe and a very pleasant time was spent.
Wm. Williams and Mr. Venables spent the week-end at Dauphin on business.
A meeting of the council will be held at Fork River on Monday, the 23rd inst.

1912 Sep 9 – Sifton

The wet season now appears to be over and all except to get on with the harvest at once.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Good progress is being made with the Kennedy-Barrie store. Once these gentlemen open they are sure of doing a good business.
Frequent shipments of cattle are being made from here. There’s nothing like mixed farming to bring in the cash between seasons.
Geo. Lampard, wholesale butcher, Dauphin, and W.A. Davis were in town on Monday. These gentlemen brought a number of cattle while here.
This end of the district is open to come under the Drainage Act. It pays at any time to make improvements whether they are drains or building better roads.
Paul Wood’s family are going to reside in Dauphin during the winter so that an opportunity will be afforded the children to go to school.
Now that the Herald is giving interesting personal sketches of prominent men who have resided in the district a long time, I hope the prosperous village of Sifton will not be overlooked. We have several pioneers here who had ouch to do with its development and are will known, viz., Paul Wood, John Kennedy, Coun. Peter Ogrislo, Postmaster Thos. Ramsay, Wm. Ashmore and quite a few others that could be named.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1915

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis Council

Meeting of the Council of the Village of Winnipegosis held in the Council chambers at 7 p.m. on the 6th inst. Mayor J.P. Grenon in the chair and Councillors Walmsley, Levons, Morris and Hjalmarson present.
Walmsley – Morris – That the minutes of previous meetings be adopted as read. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That Dunc Kennedy be appointed sec-treasurer at a salary of $30 per month from Sept. 1st till end of the fiscal year. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That Walter Clarkson be appointed constable for the Village of Winnipegosis at a salary of $40 per month. Carried.
Lyons – Morris – That the Mayor and Councillors walmsley and Lyons be a committee to secure a yard and feed for pound for Village of Winnipegosis. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That the Mayor, Coun. Walmsley and the Sec.-Tresurer meet the committee appointed by the municipality to go over the matter of the appointment between the village and the municipality. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council may for the transportation of Mr. [2 lines missing] such time as the Council are in a position to buy it our it is sold. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council adjourn to meet at the call of the Mayor. Carried.

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis

Miss Evelyn Barrell and Mr. Sidney Coffey were married in Winnipeg on the 30th August, and arrived in town on Saturday’s train. Their many friends wish them a long and happy wedded life.
G.O. Bellsmy, an old-timer, spent Sunday in town.
Geo. C. Nigh spent the week-end wit his wife and reports the crops in good shape at Grandview. He left on Monday’s train for Grandview.
Dr. Buttomley, accompanied by Tom Needham, arrived from Dauphin by auto Saturday, and left for Meadow Portage with Ern. Bickel to inspect the smallpox epidemic over there.
J.A. Ball, customs officer, spent Saturday in town.
T.F. Ganther arrived on Saturday’s train and is helping J.C. Adams with the completion of his residence.
Sergeant Jack Angus came up from Brandon on Saturday’s train and is looking well and reports the boys from here all well and happy and getting along splendidly. He left Joe Johnston in charge of his squad.
Jas. McInnes has purchased a gasoline launch and made a trip to Waterhen on Saturday with a survey party.
Hull Burrell took Mr. Loire and party to their ranch on Saturday, returning Saturday night.
The S.S. “Maniton” arrived from the north Sunday with a load of fish and report fishing quiet.
Donald Hattie returned from Snake Island and report fishing quiet.
W.H. Hunking left on Wednesday from Johnston, North Dakota, where he intends making his home. His family preceded him some time ago.
Harry and Walter Grenon returned on Saturday from an extended trip to Quebec and Eastern points and report a splendid vacation and a real good time.
Miss St. Vrain and Geo. Adams were married at the home of the latter’s parents last week and are receiving the congratulations of their many friends.
Mrs. Jne. Cain left on Wednesday’s train for her home in Rainy River, Ont.
The Mossey River Council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on the 31st August. The reeve and all councillors present.
E.R. Black and Scotty Howatson had an exciting trip going to Grave’s Point in a gasoline boat. They were lost and were eleven days making their destination. Why they made the point they had only a few matches left.
Sam McLean made a flying visit to town on Friday by automobile. We don’t see much of Sam nowadays.
Mrs. W. Morton and children returned on Wednesday from a two months’ visit to her parents at Wadena, Sask.
Capt. Russell received a nice bull terrier from Kelwood recently. Experts Dunc Kennedy and Billie Walmsley will tell you all about it. These two can sure spot a good dog with half an eye open.
Mr. and Mrs. Woiff and family motored up from Ochre River on Sunday to visit Mrs. Kennedy.
Joe Alex left for Winnipeg on business on Saturday.
Wm. Flett, Hudson’s Bay agent, returned from the far north and has been spending a week in town. He left for Winnipeg Saturday.
C.L. White left for Waterhen River Friday, taking a canoe in tow on account of the low water in the rivers.
The new principal for our school arrived in town Wednesday last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 5 – 1912

1912 Sep 5 – Heavy Rain

A heavy rain set in early this (Thursday) morning and canted for several hours. The rain has put a stop to harvesting operations for this week at least. Indications now point to better weather.

1912 Sep 5 – A Note of Warning

There has been issued, by direction of the Minister of Agriculture at Ottawa, a conspicuous poster calling the attention of potato growers to the importance of examining their crop to ascertain whether or not is infected with potato canker. The hanger shows in natural colours a potato plant the whole yield of which is affected by the ideas. It also shows the appearance of individual tubers in which the canker has started to work. Growers who discover suspicious symptoms of the ideas in their crop are requested to send affected specimens to the Dauphin Botanist, Experimental Farm, Ottawa. The poster is issued as farmers’ circular No. 3 of the Division of Botany and is being distributed by the Publications Branch of the Department of Agricultural.

1912 Sep 5 – Fork River

The crops around this district are now looking excellent and the binders are now busily at work. If only we have good weather from now on we shall have a good average. If this district had a good ditch made to let off the water from the west, the farmers would not have to complain of so much water on their land. Perhaps something will be done one of these days.
Miss Alderton, teacher of Mossey River School, spent a few days in Dauphin last week.
Nat Little and his daughter, Gracie, are taking a little holiday in the States. We all hope they will have a pleasant time.
Wm. King is busy these days finishing off that new stable he has been building. It looks fine.
Mr. H.H. Scrase spent a few days visiting friends in Dauphin. He looks well.
Miss Fredrickson, of Winnipegosis, is now helping at the Armstrong Trading Co. in place of Miss Pearl Wilson resigned.
Mrs. F. Hafenbrak gave birth to a little son last week.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, came to Fork River, last Sunday and visited Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase.
We are glad to see the ??? ??? the elevator and hope to see ??? this fall.
Mrs. S. Bailey, who spent a month with friends in Ontario, has returned reports having a pleasant time there.
John Stacey, of Snowflake, Man., is visiting at S. Bailey’s and renewing old acquaintances.
S.E. Briggs, who had the misfortune to lose his horse with fever, has purchased another driver.
Hugh Armstrong spent a few days at the Company’s store on his return from the Pas.
Sydney Gower, electrical engineer, was renewing old acquaintances for a few days.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family returned home after a visit to her home at Brandon.
Theodore Johnston has returned from the south and is staying a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Professor John Robinson has returned and is looking well. We expect to see the band out in full force in future.
[1 line is rubbed out] the position of municipal critic. Not at all; we just noted a few remarks that were brought to our notice ??? friend don’t seem to relish ???. Before he ??? into the council ??? [9-10 lines are rubbed out] and all is forgotten ??? ??? ??? then they strike ??? ???. “Anything else Tommy.” “Yes, dad says the taxes amount to a rent and there ain’t no ex-rays powerful enough to discover where they go.” “That will do Tommy, dear; you must have meant beaver instead of municipality, as the beaver’s head looks wise and his tail is to carry the mud. The M.C. goes on to say we should suggest something. What’s the use. Several grants were got for the south road and the M.C. sent a three page letter to the man in charge and stopped the work as laid out by the Government engineer because he was not in the council he was held up and yet the M.C. whines about not getting assistance to overcome these difficulties. Rats, keep quiet M.C. and things will be all right later on and we’ll meet you on the south road with the band.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 2 – 1915

1915 Sep 2 – More Recruits for Sewell

Recuriting-Sergant Weeks has enlisted 12 more men during the week. Among the new men are A. Schoole and J.P. Cunningham, Ochre River; F.J. Storrar and Wm. Johnston, Fork River; John Cahill, East Bay, and James Brown, Dauphin. Besides these several Ontario men have also enlisted. These men left for Sewell this (Thursday) morning.

1915 Sep 2 – Fork River

The bridge gang of the C.N.R. are here putting our new station house that arrived on a flat car the other day in the place of the old one which is to be transferred to Fishing River siding. There is something remarkable about the size of our new station house which has fooled several already. Mike had several hen coops made out of packing cases and one went astray and Pat told him he might find it at the siding. On Mike’s arrival there he came to the conclusion and the only difference between the station and his stray hen coop was there had been some paintspot on the state some time ago. He suggested [1 line missing] track train day to keep the trains from passing the station without knowing it.
Another carload of horses arrived from Mr. Levins, of Winnipeg, for Mr. Masshosky, horse dealer.
“Say, Mike, is it true that company men pay so much a month for doctor?” “I believe so Pst. It is done from a humane point of view as by the time three or found pounds of crab apples have been sampled out of a case besides plums, peaches and oranges the doctor has to be called in. They are sick and so is the merchant who pays freight and express and loses his profits.”
Mr. Shouldice, of Valley River, is a visitor here for a few days on business.
Messrs. Glendenning and Hunter have received a New Daisy Separator, which is larger, and more up-to-date than the old one. It will be ready for business as soon as grain is ready to thresh.
Dr. Evans, of Brandon, was the guest of Mr. Nat Little for a short stead.
Nurse Tilt has returned and is spending a few weeks at the homestead.
Everything has been pretty dead around this burg since election, but things brightened up for a short time on Wednesday. One of the company’s team of horses [1 line missing] while standing in front of the express office and hiked for the bush, taking up trees by the roots for some distance. The whole town rushed out to gather fragments. Strange to say the ??? ??? though without a scratch. Archie says that’s where educated horses come in.
Mr. Nat Little has been appointed payee for the Northern elevator at this point.

1915 Sep 2 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Coffey is spending a few days, the guest of her daughter, Mrs. J.W. Macaulay.
The tugs Iona and Isabelle arrived Saturday with a raft of lumber from the mill at Grave’s Point.
The tug Odenae left Sunday for the north with Mr. Plunkett’s survey parties.
Sid. Coffey motored to Dauphin Sunday.
Mrs. Hall Burrell and Miss Evelyn left for Winnipeg on Wednesday. Miss Evelyn is undergoing an operation.
Charles Macrothur, of Winnipeg, is a visitor in town for a few days.
New settlers still keep flocking in here and we are glad to welcome them. They all seem greatly satisfied with our country here and intend staying and locating.
Mr. Rosenbaum, cattle buyer of Winnipeg, is in town looking up another car of fat stock.
The school is now in full swing under an efficient staff of teachers.
Wm. Campbell, of Camperville, spent Monday in town.
Mr. Max Resnuik, of Winnipeg, arrived in town Friday to take a position with Mr. Frank Hechter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 24 – 1911

1911 Aug 24 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy left for Winnipeg with her sister, Nurse Johnston who is on the sick list. We hope she will soon be all right again and able to attend her good work attending the sick.
Mrs. D. McLean returned home again from a visit to her parents at Selkirk.
The Government dredge is passing through Bailey’s bridge and doing some fast work.
While the hay making the grain is well and promises to be a good crop. The binders are starting and every train brings in binders and twine.
The land is good here and there are several sections of good land within two or three miles waiting for good settlers.
A meeting of Fork River Conservatives to elect officers for the campaign was held on Saturday evening the 12th. The meeting was well attended and very enthusiastic all through. The farmers here cannot see how Reciprocity is going to help them and are in favour of R.L. Borden’s policy. The hollowing officers were elected and a good committee:
President – Wm. King, (re-elected).
Vice – A. Hunt.
Treasurer – D.F. Wilson, (re-elected).
What’s the matter without he C.N.R., it seems to be on the bum lately. A car of stuff shipped prepaid left Dauphin on Aug. 8th, did not get here until the 17th. Who is going to pay the farmers for their lost time? Why it’s rotten.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 13 – 1914

1914 Aug 13 – Assembling Volunteers

Major Walker, of “C” Squadron, 32nd Manitoba Horse, has received the following telegram from the Adjutant General, Ottawa.
OTTAWA, August 13.
In view of non-completion of medical examination in many places volunteering need not be closed until orders for mobilization at Valcartier are issued. Commanding officers will assemble all volunteers for overseas expeditionary force at local corps headquarters for instructional purposes from this date. Pay and substenance allowance will be allowed under authorized militia rates. Issue necessary instructions.
ADJUTANT GENERAL.

1914 Aug 13 – Latest War News

London, Aug. 13.
Great excitement prevails over report of fighting in North Sea.
German cruisers, Goeben and Brealan captured in Mediterranean. The cruisers surrendered without a shot.
Great Britain is now at war with Austria.
Bombardment of Liege forts has recommenced. Belgians are putting up strong fight.
French will force fighting with Germans. Big battle expected hourly.

1914 Aug 13 – Ready to Go to Front

The following local men have been passed by Dr. Bottomly, medical examiner, and have made application to go to the front. They are likely to be called upon at once:
Huber Izon, Garth Johnston, Neville Munson, C. Curtis, Eric Clausen, H. Pollard, F.W. Bunstead, H.H. Moore, A.J. Pudifin, E.C. Herrick, Neil A. Briss, J. Osman, H.A. Bray.

1914 Aug 13 – Fork River

Several farmers from this point took in the Dauphin fair. Another year we hope to see more go.
Mr. Fair, of Dauphin, is around peddling medicine for a medicine company. Some are of the opinion they got some bargains.
Miss Bessie Wilson was a visitor to friends at Sifton and Dauphin.
Professor Fred Storrar, of Werdon academy, is spending his holidays among friends here and is very uneasy about the war. He will no doubt tender his services as leader of a company of fullbacks and move to the front in a short order.
F.B. Lacey was a recent visitor to Winnipegosis.
The annual meeting of Mossey River School was held on Saturday night. W. King was chairman and C.E. Bailey, secretary. The annual report was passed. W. Williams and Sam Reid were appointed trustees to fill the vacancy of C.E. Bailey and J.W. Lockhart retiring.
The trustees are spending a large amount of money repairing the school which was condemned. The majority of ratepayers are of the opinion it would have been more in the interest of the community at large to build a school in the village where the majority of the scholars come from. The ratepayers who were conspicuous by their absence will have another year to chew the rag over school affairs.
A dance was held in the hall as a farewell to the Misses Briggs and Miss Gertrude Cooper, who are leaving.
John Reid and family, of Sifton, visited at the home of W. King for the weekend.
Mrs. Paul Wood and family, of Sifton, are visiting at the home of Mrs. D.F. Wilson on the Mossey River.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 10 – 1911

1911 Aug 10 – Fork River

Mrs. James Munro and family of Dauphin are visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. N. Johnston at Mowat.
Some few nights ago persons broke into the pound and cut the rope and turned lose an animal impounded. We trust the guilty parties may be found out and given the full penalty of the law. As there are too many of such animal running at large contrary to the law, what’s the Council going to do about it? Will it be the same old song we admire the man while others have to shut their animals up.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey and family are spending a week visiting friends in Dauphin.
Mrs. H.H. Scrase who is still in hospital.

DAUPHIN FAIR.
Little D.F. went to town
To judge the hens and chicken,
The Shangi rooster gave a squeal
And D.F. started sprinting.

Nat Little went along
To show his Shetland ponies,
Tilt and Cameron sang the song
We are four old cronies.

F.B. he took his grip along
To tend the Independent Grit Convention,
Say boys, we don’t work it right
Tad swears he’ll stop our Pension
HAYSEED.

Lost, strayed or stolen, a bunch of Massey-Harris repairs since the 3rd of June. A general travelling agent or any one who will kindly forward the repairs will receive the everlasting thanks of the farmers of this community.

To judge by the kicking and plunging of the ass in the Press the Fork River Scribe must have put a thistle under his tail. Say next time if you know enough, leif your tail and it will not prick your conscience so much, as we judge you hate to hear the truth. We will give you a rest for a while.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1912

1912 Aug 8 – Thos. Spence Drowned

Thos. Spence, a half-breed, fell out of a boat he was crossing the Mossey River in at Winnipegosis a few days ago and was drowned. His body was recovered shortly after the accident.
Spence was formerly a resident of Dauphin and was about 35 years of age. He leaves a wife and several children.

1912 Aug 8 – Ethelbert

James Miles and family have gone to Stenan, Sask., to live. He is going into business there.
Kenneth McLean is seriously ill at the home of his brother, L.M. McLean. He is very sick and fears are entertained for his recovery. He expressed a wish to see his beloved niece, Cassie, who is at Arran and she came done on Sunday evening.
The new bridge entering the town is finished, and is a fair specimen of local work.
Police Magistrate R. Skaife had several cases before him on Saturday afternoon. Vonella Kuzzett, for threatening his brother-in-law, John Malyszyk, was bound over to keep the peace and he of good behaviour for twelve months. Also Vonella Kuzsyk was fined ten dollars and costs for shooting prairie chickens out of season, or in defaulting month. Nikola Kulchyski was also fined ten dollars and costs for an unprovoked assault on Audrian Skelkuoski, of Fork River, or in default one month.

1912 Aug 8 – Fork River

Professor J. Spearing, of Valley River, spent some time here renewing old acquaintances.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, inspected the work done by the dredge and we have been informed that A. Munro has been appointed dredge master for the present and his work so far is satisfactory.
Miss Joyce Sergant returned home after spending a week’s stay with Mrs. W. Coultas in Fork River.
Gorden Weaver has accepted a position of master mechanic at the Armstrong Trading Co. store.
Miss Grant arrived and will wield the rod of correction at the Pine View School for the coming term.
Miss Cameron who was been spending her holidays at her uncle’s, A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned to Neepawa.
We were pleased to see the Rev. H.H. Scrase walking around town with W. King, warden, the other day and hope that he will be able to take up his work this fall.
Mr. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are having a week’s vacation with Noah Johnston, at Mowat Centre.
H. Armstrong has branched out in the contracting and building line and is building an addition to Mr. Nowsade’s residence.
The ratepayers are of the opine that it is time that an itemized statement of accounts of all ward appropriations and general expenditures, as demanded by the status, be got out in pamphlet form.
Mr. Tubath and family are enjoying their vacation at S. Reid’s on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Chapman and daughter are visiting with W. Coultas.
A very pleasant evening was spent in Orange Hall on Friday. Dancing was indulged till daylight.
The Misses Tindall, of Rathwell, are having a pleasant time at their uncle’s, Me. T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey.
The stores are doing a rushing business these days in raspberries and blueberries.
The postponed picnic at Lake Dauphin was held on the 30th. It was a fine day. Although there was not as large a turnout as usual a very pleasant time was spent in sports and boating.

1912 Aug 8 – Mowat Picnic

Those who chanced their luck at the Mowat picnic, which took place at Dauphin Lake on Mr. T. Briggs’ land, by his kind permission on Tuesday, July 30th were not sorry they put in an appearance. The rain, which came the previous Tuesday no doubt dampened the spirits of some, otherwise we should have had a much larger turnout; despite the fact that one or two of our Fork River worthies would have liked it to be a failure. Dame nature smiled upon us and we had a roaring good time. Nat Little’s oranges and candies were in good demand. Fortunately everyone’s ice cream freezers are not so easily broken and Mrs. C. Clark’s came in fine and handy. Even the lemons were made to “spin out,” no doubt much to the annoyance of some individuals. Hard lines, some of the folks had to leave early and therefor missed most of the sport. The Fairville boys enjoyed themselves immensely to say nothing of the ladies. We tender our hearty thanks to them for their cooperation and sympathy. They came off well in the sports, except in the football match. Keep smiling, better luck in this line next time. Our best thanks are extended to all who tried to make it a success, especially to the Lacey family, Briggs family and Sandy and Mrs. Cameron. Need I add some of the boys did not forget to look sheep’s eyes at the girls. It’s a habit handed down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 27 – 1911

1911 Jul 27 – Fork River

Sam Bailey and Mr. and Mrs. N. Johnston were visitors to the Winnipeg exhibition last week.
A social evening was spent at Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Bailey’s in honour of Miss Finch, a former school teacher of this district, who is visiting here. An interesting programme of songs and recitations was given by Mrs. Duncan Kennedy, Miss Finch, Miss Hill and Mr. Malley. A very enjoyable evening was spent by all present.
What’s the matter with the Press. We look over it week after week for news and all it contains in some “caw” from a demented “Jackass”, otherwise known as a “Jackdaw”. Column after column of abuse about Glen Campbell and J.G. Harvey, the members who the people have chosen to represent them. It is disgusting.
D.F. Wilson, our local Galloway breeder, was a visitor to the Winnipeg fair. He was there for the purpose of getting a Galloway bull brought from Ontario, and shown at the fair.
N. Little and daughter, Grace, have returned from the Winnipeg exhibition and report a pleasant time. Chief among the other attractions they saw was the flying machine.
Mr. Cameron and niece of Neepawa, were visiting at the home of A. Cameron of Mowat, last week.
Messrs. Corbet and McKee are busy putting a bridge over the Fork River at Mr. Coultas, which, when completed will fill a long felt want.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 23 – 1914

1914 Jul 23 – Successful Ethelbert Students

The following students from Ethelbert School were successful in passing:
Entrance – Honours – Ben Brackman and Nessie McNullan
Grade IX – Maggie Hagar and William Mastiuck
Grade X – Waldmar Mastiuck

1914 Jul 23 – Fork River

The Orangemen of Fork River held their 12th annual basket picnic on July 13. The weather was fine for the occasion and there was a large turnout many coming from Winnipegosis, Mowat, Sifton and Melton. There was a parade after dinner. Speeches were made by the Rev. E. Williams and Rev. Brother Clixby, and the chairman Brother William King country master. The sports commenced with a football match between Fork River and Mowat which resulted in two goals to nothing in favour of Fork River. Foot racing and other sports were also indulged in till supper. After supper a football match was played off between Winnipegosis and Fork River teams which ended in favour of Fork River, one goal to nothing. The Winnipegosis automobile was busy all night carrying passengers. There was a good dance at night. Thanks due our Winnipegosis friends for furnishing the music, which was much appreciated.
S, Nowosad and family are away for a short time visiting at Vonda, Sask., where John, the son resides.
Edwin King has returned to Saskatchewan after a week’s visit at his home here.
Milton Cooper has returned from a trip to the Winnipeg exhibition.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, spent last week with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. Brewer, of Ashville, spent a few days here and took a carload of stock south. The man who is raising stock is the one who is making money these days.
Road building is the order of the day.
W. Lockhart, from Ontario, is spending a few days here on business.
Coun. Robertson, of Ward 6, has resigned as he is leaving for the north for a year. Here will be an election to select his successor.
Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Venables both lost valuable clots last week.
There was considerable discussion at the last council meeting by the ratepayers regarding stock running at large and it was decided to enforce the by-law passed. Owners of stock must take care of them during the night or get into trouble.
On Sunday parties driving along Main Street to church had to pass between young men paying baseball, which is dangerous to horse and driver. We would kindly draw the players attention to the last part of clause 3 in by-law No. 5.

1914 Jul 23 – Mr. King replies.

To Editor of the Herald.
Sir – On Friday my attention was drawn to an article in the Press reporting Dr. Shortreed’s meeting at Fork River, said to be written by F.B. Lacey, who presided at that meeting. Personally I have nothing but pity for a man who will write such an untruthful report and makes such uncharitable statements. The meeting was held out on Main Street in front of Mr. Nat Little’s store. Dr. Shortreed was given a good hearing. The doctor quoted some figures he could not prove and Mr. Grenon politely took off his hat to the doctor and asked that a Conservative be allowed to speak. The request was flatly refused. Mr. Little shouted, “Go back to Winnipegosis. What in h-ll did you come here for?” This is the language our friend used in front of his own doorstep to persons who were quietly listening to Dr. Shortreed. When later the doctor repeatedly stated that the Roblin government was kept in power by the rattle his statement was objected to. There was no one there under the influence of liquor unless our Liberal friends. To judge from their pugilistic attitude at times it would lead people to believe they were under the influence of something. Perhaps it was fright, as the 10th was close at hand. At the close of the meeting, the Conservatives offered to pay for the hall and invited Dr. Shortreed and his friends to go there and discuss the matter as long as they liked. The offer was declined. If there was any rowdyism it was not the Conservatives who indulged in it. There were several other misstatements in the article worthy of the man who wrote them. But they are not worthy noticing. We have the greatest respect for a great number of our Liberal friends in Fork River and their opinions are always treated with the consideration they merit and we are sure they do not endorse such tactics.

W. King, President of Conservative Association of Fork River.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 10 – 1913

1913 Jul 10 – Greek Church Burned

The Greek Catholic Church at Fishing River, near Fork River, was struck by lightning during an electric storm sat week and was burned to the ground. There was no insurance on the building.

1913 Jul 10 – Ethelbert

K.F. Slipetz, sec.-treasurer is visiting Winnipeg this week and taking in the exhibition.
Fine rains of late and crops looking good.
Road work is progressing throughout the municipality. We all want good roads.
Wild strawberries are coming in small quantities. The crop will be a light one this season, although the late rains have improved the berries some.
Ethelbert is preparing for a big celebration on the 18th inst. There will be races and other sports and we invite all our neighbours to come and have a good time.

1913 Jul 10 – Fork River

R. Bell is taking a vacation with his friends at Dauphin.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending her holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mr. Noble, Methodist stunt who has had charge of the circuit during the last 12 months, left to take up his summer’s work at Mafeking mission.
Miss C. Grant, teacher of Pine View School, is spending her holidays at Foxwarren.
Mr. Comber was a visitor to the Lake Town on business last week.
Miss. M. Nixon is spending her summer holidays with her sister, Mrs. A. Rowe.
Mrs. D. McLean and Mrs. A.J. Snelgrove are taking a month’s holiday’s visiting friends at Regina.
Mrs. J. Rice, of North Lake district, was in town on important business lately.
James Johnston and family, who have been spending the winter at the government hatchery on Snake Island, have returned to the farm for a time.
July 1st was warm and bright, just the day for a holiday and quite a number took advantage of it. Where were all those teams loaded with old-timers and their wives going? Why, to help Mrs. Wm. Northam to celebrate her 62nd birthday to be sure. On arriving at her beautiful place on the banks of the Fork River our hostess conducted us to a pretty grove beside the house, where tables were laid for dinner. The tables were decorated with flowers and were well loaded with turkey, chicken and other good things to temp the inner man. Dinner over, the afternoon was spent in talking over old times and other pleasant themes. Mrs. Northam was the recipient of many ??? ??? ??? ??? the good wishes of all conveyed to her. After supper all left for home having had a very pleasant time. We trust this will only be one of such pleasant gatherings.
A severe electric storm passed over this district last week. The Greek Catholic Church at Fishing Rive was destroyed by lightning and the brick chimney on the Armstrong Trading Co.’s store here was badly shaken up and it will have to be rebuilt. The water is higher than it has been for years.
James Campbell and W. Foley, of Winnipegosis, are starting to summer fallow the Snelgrove farm lately purby F.P. Grenon, of the A.T. Co.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 6 – 1911

1911 Jul 6 – Leg Amputated

T. Lee, a young farmer, who resides south of Gilbert Plains in the Glenlyon district met with a serious accident the early past of the week. He was endeavouring to stop a runaway team attached to a mower, when his left leg came in contact with the knives which badly cut it. He was brought to the hospital here on Tuesday, where upon examination it was found necessary to amputate it below the knee. The young man is doing as well as can be expected.

1911 Jul 6 – Fork River

Miss Burrell of Winnipegosis, was a guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy a few days last week.
Miss Pearl Wilson is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys at Dauphin.
Mrs. Snelgrove was a visitor to Dauphin Saturday to the home of her daughter, Mrs. F.F. Chase.
H. Chute of Dauphin, is busy with his gasoline engine and plows turning over the soil on Messrs. Chase and Lockhart’s farms.
H. Falconer, Government Weed Inspector, was here this week giving instructions to municipal inspectors Bailey and King.
The Orangemen of Fork River will hold their 10th annual bask picnic on July 11th. A program of sports is being arranged and they day’s fun will be wound up in the evening with a ball.
Coronation service was held in All Saints’ Church on the 24th ult. The members of L.O.L. No. 1765 attended in a body and the church was filled to the doors. Mr. G.M. Littler B.A., preached a very appropriate sermon which was much appreciated.
Wm. King, returned Saturday from attending the Orange Lodge convention in Winnipeg. He reports being entertained in royal manner and also getting a number of ideas which ought to stir the local brethren to greater enthusiasm.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy entertained at her home last Monday in honour of her sister, Miss Bertha Johnston, who is a nurse on the Dauphin Hospital staff. A very pleasant evening was enjoyed by all present. Miss Johnston visited several days in their neighbourhood.
Mrs. N. Little and daughters, while out driving last week met with an accident caused by the team running away. The ladies were thrown from the buggy, Mrs. Little receiving a serve shaking up and a number of cuts and viruses. A nurse was called and Mrs. Little was soon made comfortable. Miss Grace and Miss Lulu escaped unhurt.
The school will remain where it is at present, is the decision given by Chairman Hunt, who held the deciding ballot at the ratepayers meeting Monday. A meeting of the ratepayers was called from the purpose of taking a vote whether the school should be moved to town or remain where it is. The vote resulted in a tie and Chairman Hunt was called on to make the decision.

1911 Jul 6 – Sifton

Miss M. O’Donnell who has been teaching school here for the past year; left on Tuesday of last week for a visit to her home in Carleton Place, Ont.
Our local baseball team went to Ethelbert and played a friendly match on Saturday. The honours were about even.
Miss Eva Zlebita of Toulon, who has been attending school here for the past term, returned to her home in Toulon on Tuesday.
Miss Marion Flemming of Winnipeg, is spending her holidays at the Presbyterian mission the guest of Nurses Gofoth and Reid.
Miss Scott of Neepawa, is a visitor at Sifton.
Mr. Emanuel Michaliuk returned to Winnipeg on Saturday, after having completed a successful term as junior school (bilingual) teach here.
The Presbyterian Sunday School held their annual picnic on Dominion day, which was indeed a success. The Ethelbert football team came down and played off a return match. The Ethelbert boys proved a little too heavy for us however, winning the game one to nothing in the last half.
During this week to Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Jones at Sifton a daughter and to Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz at Dauphin a daughter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 4 – 1912

1912 Jul 4 – Fork River

Mrs. Richardson, of Ontario, is visiting at the home of her sister, Mrs. Sam Bailey, on the Mossey River.
Miss Pearl Cooper returned home from a visit to her numerous friends in Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Wood are visitors with Mr. and Mrs. Bert Cooper on the Fork River for a few days.
Mrs. C. Clark returned ohm from Dauphin, where she has been attending her daughter. We are pleased to hear that Miss Olive is improving and will soon return home.
S.W. Swannerton was a visitor with Mr. Kennedy, manager of the Armstrong Trading Co., in connection with business for the Rapid City Flour Milling Co.
Miss A. Snelgrove is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
Mrs. Kennedy and Mrs. Williams are taking a trip to the Lake Town.
Mrs. Paul Wood and family, who have been visiting at Mrs. D.F. Wilson’s, having returned to Sifton.
Fred B. Lacey of Oak Brae, and D.F. Wilson, are visitors to Winnipegosis, the summer resort, on business.
Take care Bay Centre as we respect the one mentioned and he can kick both ends and unless you know the ropes you might get hurt. No offence meant.
The Government Agricultural special train was here on the 27th. There was a large turnout. The ladies
car was full and great interest was taken in the lectures on home culture given by the ladies in charge. A great number of famers turned out and listened to the able addresses delivered on cattle, horses and grain and weeds. As the train was late arriving the time was short to deal with so many subjects properly. We hope o see them back again at an early date and that our council will go in for roads instead of rabbit paths after hearing the road lecture given on good roads. The professors took two epecimros spector, which were returned safely and as soon as classified will be reported on and that’s the long and the short of it.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, expect for the Sawyer & Massey Co., is spending a few days with is parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bailey. We are alway pleased to meet Frank.
Several took in the Oddfellow’s excursion to Winnipegosis and and brought back a good dose of mosquitoes as souvenirs.
Nurse Johnston, of Dauphin Hospital, and Mrs Johnston are visitors at Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Whew, but its not. Just a sheet of paper between here and the place we hear on Sunday. Looking for a cool place is the order of the day. The river is well patronized.
W. King shipped two Berkshire sows to Robert McGregor, from this herd. There is a bargain for some on in “McNair,” the head of this herd, who is for sale.
A meeting of the Mossey River council will be held at Fork River on Tuesday, July 9.

1912 Jul 4 – Winnipegosis

E.R. Black was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.
The first excursion of the season, was by the Oddfellows of Grandview on Friday. The train brought a large crowd and all spent a pleasant day in boating and other amusements. A notable piece of enterprise on this occasion was the business acumen shown by a number of the ladies of the town by the erecting of booths, and selling of ice cream and refreshments. We are glad to say the young ladies did a good business and realized a nice profit.
Boating is the popular pastime with our citizens just now. At anytime on the river and law the small craft may be seen dodging and darting about.
Mrs. Coffey and her son Ted, returned to Dauphin Saturday, after a short visit with her daughter, Mrs. J.N. McAuley.
Capt. Coffey is here this week making repairs to his boat.
It is rumoured about that the Masonic and Oddfellows lodges of Dauphin will shortly hold an excursion to this place. We hope the report is true and promise the visitors an enjoyable outing.
Nurse Johnston of the Dauphin Hospital staff spent a few days visiting at the home of her mother last week. She returned to Dauphin on Saturday’s train.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 26 – 1913

1913 Jun 26 – Soldiers Leave For Sewell

There was a lively scene about the station on Sunday evening when the Manitoba 32nd Light Horse embarked by special train for Sewell. The train brought in 100 troopers and horses from Roblin and they were joined here by the numbers of the Dauphin troop, numbering 74. Col. H.I. Stevenson is in command. The other officers are Major G.C.J. Walker and Capt. H.K. Newcombe. The train was made up of twenty cars including men, horses, supplies, etc. The soldiers were given an ovation by the crowd as the train moved out of the station.

1913 Jun 26 – Fork River

Charles Clark, section foreman here for a number of years, left for Paswegan, Sask., to take on a section there and to arrange for moving his family to that point.
Mrs. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are spending their summer vacation with N. Johnston at Mowat Centre.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, spent a short time in town last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, the latter was formerly Miss Olive Clark, took in Fork River, on their honeymoon trip visiting Mrs. Clark. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston will make their home at Edmonton. We wish them a life of happiness and prosperity.
The herd law will come into force in August in a portion of wards on and three. This has become necessary on account of stock of all kinds being let run and not looked after by the owners as they should be.
At a meeting of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, it was decided to hold their 12th annual picnic at Fork River July 12. A special meeting is called for Saturday night, June 28th, to arrange for the picnic and other business. All members are requested to attend.
Mr. Gunness, of Robin, has arrived here to take over the section left vacant by C. Clark.
Mrs. Capt. Coffey, of Dauphin, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
George says those weeds will have to go or he will know the reason why. Some person with an inquisitive turn of mind is anxious to know if it was necessary to drive around delivering notices before the weeds were up, when a one cent stamp would suffice as heretofore and the travelling around come later on.
Now seeding is over, road making is being talked of. Can our intelligent municipal Daddy and his assistant tell us where to find the tools or have they gone off in the bush browsing as usual. Information on this matter will be thankfully received by a large number of ratepayers.
Sam Hughes, M.P.P., spent a few hours between rains, listening to the wants and troubles of this part of his constituency. No doubt his visit will be beneficial to our neighbourhood.
The Government Agricultural train was here, but owing to general train coming in, it delayed the starting of business, which made the time short. A large number turned out and the ladies had a good time. The addresses though they had to be cut short, were very instructive. The horses and stock were very good and an improvement on last year and credit is due to those in charge. The train left for Winnipegosis at 5.30 in charge of the Prof. of Minnokin Experimental weed farm and Prof. O’Malley, of the Agricultural College.
Prof. G. Weaver, of Millions was renewing acquaintances here for a short time lately.
Saturday was a red letter day here in the departing of two wedding parties, our M.P.P. and this agricultural train. It was a bright day suitable for such occasions and everything passed off quietly.
The football match between the married and single teams has been postponed.
Wm. King returned from court of revision at Gilbert Plains and states that everything passed off quietly.