Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 30, 1919

Can a Doctor Sell Liquor?

Dr. Wilmot, of Roblin, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday, on several charges preferred by the inspector for selling liquor contrary to the provisions of the act. One charge was dismissed and decision reserved in the others.

Chief Little Issues Warning

Young men and boys would be well advised to take warning as regards their conduct on Hallowe’en. Annually there has been a wanton destruction of the citizens’ property by the gangs of organized rowdies. This year steps have been taken by Chief Little and staff to put an end to this class of amusement. All damage done will have to be paid for, as well as the appearance of the parties in court.

Daughters of Empire Rally

The rally of the Daughters of the Empire here on Tuesday, the 28th inst., was largely attended, every Chapter being represented, which included the Pas, Grandview and Gilbert Plains. The meeting was held in the town hall and was presided over by the Rev. J.A. Cormie.
Mrs. Aldridge was the first speaker and she spoke in the interest of the establishment of a hospital for the people of Servia. She related in a pathetic and impressive manner the great sufferings of these people and the heroic way in which they had faced and overcome every difficulty. Mrs. Aldridge spent much time in Servia during the war and incidents she related were from personal experience.

Details of War Memorial

In explaining the war memorial, Mrs. G.H. Smith, National Educational secretary of the order, told the meeting that in detail the plan of the I.O.D.E. is to establish ideals of patriotism and give the children in the schools a truly British education by acquainting them with the ideals, the traditions and the institutions of Britain. Illustrated lectures on the history and geography of the Empire will be given in schools. All non-English will be supplied with one of I.O.D.E. British historical libraries within the next few years. A lecture fund for the teaching and study of British history will be established and some eminent lecturer brought to Canada at least once a year. Pictures of Canada’s part in the war will be given to 1000 schools, 100 schools in Manitoba to be among the number. Travelling scholarships to the extent of $1200 to university graduates in history will be awarded to each province. A second scholarship of greater value may then be established for these nine scholarship winners. An endowment fund of $500,000 is being collected for this purpose.
On rising to speak, Ms. Colin H. Campbell, provincial president, was warmly greeted. After expressing her great pleasure at having the privilege of again speaking to a Dauphin audience, se made a strong appeal on behalf of the Victory Loan. She pointed out that it was the duty of everyone to the best of their ability to assist the country at this time by subscribing what they could. Mrs. Campbell also spoke for a few minutes on the war memorial.
During the evening Mrs. Rogers sang a solo and miss Pear M. Tucker and Miss Irma Struthers contributed instrumentals.
At the conclusion of the meeting the visitors and the members of the chapter repaired to the rest room, where refreshments were served, and a couple of hours spent in social intercourse.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 27.
Mrs. Sharp has left for Winnipeg and will shortly cross the ocean to visit London.
Mr. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has returned from Brandon, and will conduct meetings at different points in our district. Some of the methods of the Army may be open to criticism but there is much to commend them. They hit out straight from the shoulder every time.
The rally meeting of the Grain Growers, recently held at the house of Thos. Toye, was well attended. Mr. Dixon, barrister, of Winnipegosis, was the sparker. The farmers’ platform and other issues were clearly explained.
The Ontario elections have given the farmers a big boost. The west is awaiting its opportunity.
Mr. Frank Sharp and bride arrived home from Winnipeg a few days ago. We wish the bride and groom every happiness and when their troubles come, may they be nothing worse than “little Sharps.”
Tom Toye grew a potato this season which weighted 4 lbs. The late Capt. Coffey brought the seed of these potatoes to Canada from the United States. There has bot been anything in the potato line to equal them for heavy yielding or excellent flavor.
An October cold dip is not common, but during the last few days the thermometer has been hovering round the zero mark.

Fork River

J. Shuchitt has opened a pool room and barber shop on Main Street.
Misses L. and K. Briggs are attending the wedding of one of their sisters at Hartney. Mr. Russell is teaching the Fork River School during their absence.
Don’t forget the returned soldiers’ banquet in the Orange Hall, Friday night, Oct. 31st. Supper will be served at 6.30. Tickets, $1.00.
Jim Parker returned from a two weeks’ trip to Saskatchewan points.
It begins to look as if winter has come to stay.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 12 – 1914

1914 Nov 12 – Men for Second Contingent

The following have successfully passed the preliminary medical examination here this week conducted by Dr. Bottomley. The men are now drilling at the barracks under Sergeant-Major. Goodall and Sergeant Highfield. There are 50 men wanted from district No. 10., which territory is almost all in the Dauphin district, for the Second Contingent.
A.G. Cockrill, Dauphin. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
T. Boakes, Swan River. (Thomas Boakes, 1892, 81084)
A. Kerr, Swan River.
F. Conley, Benito.
S.J. Ellis, Dauphin.
W.J. Falconer, Dauphin. (William John Falconer, 1894, 106218 SGT)
J.L. Younghusband, Dauphin.
J.W. Cleaver, Dauphin. (John Wesley Cleaver, 1890, 106138)
Andrew Andrew, Dauphin. (Andrew Andrew, 1883, 81019 CSM)
J.W. Meek, Dauphin. (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578 QMS)
Glen H. Pettis, Dauphin. (Glen Haslome Pettis, 1893, 81704 SGT)
H. Knight, Dauphin.
A. Richmond, Swan River.
W.H.G. Cattermole, Grandview. (William Harry Gage Cattermole, 1879, 81140)
H. Wade, Dauphin.
D. Leigh, Ashville. (Duncan Blake Leigh, 1893, 106356)
A. Towns, Grandview. (Alfred Towns, 1893, 81894 LCP)
Jas. Walkey, Dauphin.

1914 Nov 12 – Fork River

Mr. R.M. Bell has left for a short vacation to Brandon and Russell.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown, of Alexandria, Ont., are visiting their daughter, Mrs. A. Snelgrove.
Mrs. Joe Hunter left for home at Severn Bridge, Ont., after spending a few weeks with her sons, Sam and Harry.
The school was closed on Wednesday. The kids enjoy a holiday in the middle of the week or at any other time.
Mr. T.B. Venables has left for a vacation trip to Boissevain. Major Humphries is in charge of the farm during his absence.
Mr. Sam Hunter has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mr. Sydney Howlet, of Million, paid his friends of this burgh a visit, while passing through from Winnipegosis.
The Orangemen’s patriotic ball on November the 5th was admitted by all to be the best event of the kind ever held in this little burgh. There were fifty couple present, Dauphin, Dublin Bay, Sifton and Winnipegosis represented. The music was furnished by the Russell family and several others. From the opening at nine o’clock with the grand march till the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at 4:30, everything moved along pleasantly and most enjoyably. The ladies furnished a good supper. Speeches and songs were given during that interval. The song, “It’s a Long, Long, Way to Tipperary” by the three Russell children was well received. Ice cream was served by the ladies of the Women’s Auxiliary and a nice sum realized for the fund. The Orangemen wish to thank the public for the assistance given towards making it a success.

1914 Nov 12 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Bradley is fast recovering from the effects of the burning she received on Hallowe’en night.
Mr. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Monday.
Dr. Medd took Mrs. R.C. Birrell to Dauphin on Monday for treatment. Mrs. B. has been in unsatisfactory health for some time past.
Capt. Coffey arrived on Wednesday’s train.
We see that Charlie White has been appointed fishery overseer for the province. We hope that this does not mean that our old friend may have to pull up stakes and locate elsewhere.
What Winnipegosis would be without a curling club it is hard to say. It is truly our chief winter sport. A meeting was held recently to organize and the feeling prevails that the game will be as popular as ever this season. Dr. Medd is president and Fred McDonald secretary-treasurer. The curlers have taken over the rink from Mr. Whale, and will manage it themselves this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 13 – 1910

1910 Oct 13 – Fined $60

Thos. Shannon, of Fork River, administered a severe beating to a neighbouring farmer, Morley Snelgrove, and was arraigned before Geo. O. Bellamy, P.M., of Winnipegosis, and fined $40 and costs for the assault and $10 and costs for trespass. The beating given to Snelgrove was a terrible one.

1910 Oct 13 – Killed by Fall From Wagon

A sad accident occurred last Tuesday evening about seven o’clock some sixteen miles from Roblin, by which James Blakely, eldest son of Mr. Robert Blakely, of Grandview, met an almost instantaneous death. He had been for a long time employed as a freighter for the Hanbury camps, and in company with a young Englishman named Joe pulled out of Roblin with two loads immediately after dinner on Tuesday, and they had got about sixteen miles on their journey when it began to rain. Blakely evidently had reached back on his load to get his coat and standing up was in the act of putting it on when the wheel dropped into a rut, throwing the unfortunate man to the ground between the horses. He struck on the side of his head, dislocating the neck. He died just as the driver of the rig following reached him and pulled him from under the horses. – Grandview Exponent.

1910 Oct 13 – Fork River

Mrs. Dallas and Mrs. G. Shannon paid Dauphin a visit last week.
Hugh Harley, of Swan River, was here doing business last week.
D.F. Wilson returned from Dauphin last week.
G. Tilt was a visitor to Dauphin last week.
Miss Nixon left last week on a visit to friends in Winnipeg.
Mr. Salter, of the Winnipeg Portrait Oil Co. has been here doing business.
Mrs. C. Clark paid a flying visit to Winnipegosis a day or two ago.
Mr. and Mrs. Sims, North Dakota, have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. J. Lockhart of this district.
Next Sunday special service at the English Church, Children’s Day. Sermons appropriate for the day will be preached by the missionary in charge.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 12 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 12 – Badly Injured

Nat Douse, a young man in the employ of the Burrows Mill at Grandview, met with a bad accident last Thursday. While at work in the mill he slipped and fell against the slash saws and sustained injuries to his right shoulder, the muscle and flesh being torn very badly. After he had his wounds dressed at Grandview he was brought to the hospital here. A few days later it was found necessary to amputate his arm at the shoulder. Douse is now making as good progress as can be expected towards recovery.

1911 Oct 12 – Planing Mill Burned

The planning mill belonging to T.A. Burrows at Birch River was destroyed by fire on Monday afternoon. Besides the mill a half dozen cars of lumber were also burned. The loss is covered by insurance.

1911 Oct 12 – Fork River

The heavy rains have tied up the threshing machines and stopped the ploughing. With the present fine weather work will commence again.
Constable G. Weaver has returned from a business trip to Dauphin and reports everything quiet.
W. King, Sam Bailey and D. Wilson paid a visit to Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The fishermen are busy preparing to go up to the lake for the winter’s fishing. It is remarkable how many Conservatives one meets there since the Borden Government was elected.
Mr. Littler is attending the Rural Deanery meeting in Dauphin.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, was up inspecting the government dredge working in the Mossey River.
In the Press, Sept. 28, page 1, is composed of items of Cruise’s big Majority and the Markets is said to be correct. Take the price of barley, No. 3, 60 to 62, No. 4, 60 to 64, first time we ever knew No. 4 to bring more than 3. On another page under the heading of Charvari it is stated barely looks like thirty cents and that the Press will be doing business at the same old stand. Would advise them to take a rest and not contradict themselves so often. On another page is a large rigmarole about T.A. Burrows the gentleman who it has been claimed used his office to feather his nest and was never heard on the floor of the house only to try and protect himself regarding the timber steal. Of course he should have a senatorship. Rats! As yet they have the audacity to talk about Jimmy Harvey and Glen Campbell.
Mr. F.B. Lacey, postmaster general of Oak Brae, is attending Council meeting at Winnipegosis.

1916 Oct 12 – The Week’s Casualty List

Sergt. Frank Burt, killed on Sept. 24th. Burt enlisted at Dauphin with the first contingent two years ago. (Frank Burt, 1876, 46965)
Pte. Anderson Reed Walker, killed. (Anderson Reid Walker, 1895, 2056)
Sergt. Fred. Clark-Hughfield, wounded. (???)
Pte. Hugh Dunston, wounded on shoulder. (Hugh Leo Dunstan, 1896, 150887)
Pte. Jas. A. Justice, wounded. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
Lieut. Percy Willson, died from wounds. (Major Percy Willson, 1883)

1916 Oct 12 – Winnipegosis

Miss Edna Grenon was among the arrivals on Saturday’s train to spend Sunday and Thanksgiving Day at home.
Mrs. P. McArthur has returned from a short visit to Minneapolis.
The “Manitou” has two more trips to make taking fishermen’s supplies up. We trust the present good weather holds so that she may get in safely before freeze-up.
There has been a good deal of liquor in town of late. There is something taking in the liquor law when these boozers can have it shipped up here to them from Ontario and deal it out to other boozers more benighted than themselves. Now that men are scare it would prove a very potent method of wheeling a man over far more effective than money.
Mrs. J.E. McArthur was a passenger on Tuesday’s train going to Winnipeg.
It is reported that Jimmie Taylor, who went to the front with the 79th, has been wounded.
The Red Cross evening at Victoria Hall on Thursday night under the management of Mrs. Hall Burrell and Miss Jarvett, was a great success socially and financially. Over $10 was taken at the door.
Mr. Lacey, of Fork River, was here on Saturday in connection with the business of building the Meadow Land and Don schools.
Miss Leith McMartin spent the week-end at Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 10 – 1910

1910 Sep 10 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 10 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 10 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 10 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 15 – 1911

1911 Jun 15 – Died From Injuries

Anthony Lefia, a Galician, had both his legs taken off by a box car passing over them in the railway yards here on Sunday morning last. How the accident happened will remain a mystery as the unfortunate man could not speak the English language and was unable to make any explanation. It is suppose that he was attempting to steal a ride when he fell under the moving wheels.

He was taken to the hospital immediately after the accident and everything possible was done for him but Dr. Harrington, who had charge of the case, held out little hope for recovery and as anticipated he passed away early Wednesday morning.

Lefia had been out from Austria but a few months and leaves a wife and family in that country.

1911 Jun 15 – Struck by Lightning

Jas. Bedard, who had been employed on the Burrows’ lumber drive at Grandview, was returning from driving a number of men to the camp on Wednesday last, when he was caught in a thunderstorm and struck by lightning. The electric fluid struck him on the back of the head and ran down his back and side, severely burning him. When discovered Bedrad was unconscious and was immediately taken to Grandview and afterwards brought to the hospital here, where he received treatment and is now on a fair way to recovery.

Bedard is well-known in Dauphin, having been connected with Clark Bros. livery stable the greater part of last year.

1911 Jun 15 – Fork River

Miss M. Nixon; teacher of Pine View School is taking a trip to Winnipeg on business.
It has been raining everyday for about a week and the roads are bad, yet Mr. A. Hunt is smiling, twin girls.
Mr. C. Clark is visiting Dauphin this week.
W. Williams is busy making the sawdust fly. The mill is in full swing under the management of Pat Powers, of Missouri.
The Rural Dean, Rev. S. Wiley, of St. Paul’s Church, Dauphin, will hold a service in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, on Sunday, June 18th, at 3 o’clock and at Winnipegosis in the evening at 7:30.
A. Hodgeson is visiting among his numerous friends at the Fork. He says mosquitoes are a nuisance.
E.H. Walker, school inspector of Dauphin, is here visiting the schools.
Mr. McLeod of Winnipeg is busy buying fat cattle for shipment.
The ladies of All Saints W.A. held a meeting at the rectory recently, considerable business was arranged for the coming years work.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 12 – 1910

1910 May 12 – Burrows’ Mill Burned

Burrows’ Mill at Grandview was burned Wednesday evening. The lumber in the vicinity was saved after a hard fight. The loss is estimated at $50,000 with $25,000 insurance. Mr. Burrows will rebuild at once. The mill was to have commenced operations today on 12,000,000 feet of logs.

1910 May 12 – Died From Shock

Eunice, the three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Wells, died Saturday from pneumonia and the effects of a scalding shock. The little girl was playing on the floor of the home, when the bottom of a teapot Mrs. Wells was carrying dropped out, the contents going over the child about the face and neck, terribly scalding her. Everything possible was done to ease the little sufferer before she passed away. Rev. D. Flemming conducted funeral service on Tuesday.

1910 May 12 – Fork River

W. King and D.F. Wilson who have been to Gilbert Plains to attend the Conservative Convention returned last Monday.
Mr. Frame from Treherne came up last week and has been staying at Mr. Cameron’s for a few days.
Mrs. McLean and family from Selkirk came up last week and intend settling in this village.
A Methodist concert will be held on the 24th in the Orange Hall.
Dr. Medd, from Winnipegosis came down last week to inaugurate a Tag-day, but owning to the short notice given very few lapis turned out and the meeting was adjourned till a later date.
C. Bradley and Mr. Walmsley from Winnipegosis paid us a visit last week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 20 – 1910

1910 Jan 20 – Jammed to Death

Thos. Michael a teamster at one of Barrows lumber camps at Grandview, was jammed Tuesday between two sleigh loads of logs on a runway and crushed so badly that he died shortly after the accident. Dr. Shortreed brought him to the hospital here Wednesday morning and he expired shortly after arriving. He is an American and his home is in Wisconsin.

1910 Jan 20 – Fork River

The Rev. H.H. and Mrs. Scrase and Mrs. King visited Mowat and Oak Brae district last week.
Services are held at Mowat schoolhouse fortnightly by the Rev. H.H. Scrase regularly at 11 o’clock. The missioner welcomes everybody in the district to these services.
The Englishman’s rest at Fishing River is now opened with Mr. A.B. Hodgson in charge.
We are sorry to hear that Mr. W. Benner is down with typhoid fever. We hope to hear that he will soon be around again.
Some of our ratepayers would like to ask our Mossey River Council if the December meeting has been published or was it of so little importance being the wind up of the year we have not seen it yet.
Another matter under the old Reeve and council a yearly report was published and distributed to the ratepayers showing the amount awarded to each ward and how it was spent, the amount of salary and mileage to each councillor and the amount paid to each road commissioner for letting work and mileage in each ward. If such a report of 1909 were published it would prove interesting reading for the ratepayers. The auditors report printed on a piece of paper four inches square is not enough for the amount of taxes raised. E should have a fuller report gotten out by the Sec.-Treas. at the end of each year.

1910 Jan 20 – To the Editor of the Herald

SIR: – We notice in last week’s press our genial friend the Mowat correspondent, is on the war-path again after a couple of months rest. It is the ministers this time. He must be short of material when he says he seldom sees a minister now days. Where does the fault lie when a man attends divine worship only once or twice a year at most?
The English church ministers stationed here have held fortnightly services for ears at the Mowat schoolhouse, about two miles from our Mowat friend, except when roads were impassable to walk or drive. The majority of the people have been visited three or more times a year considering he has to walk unless come friend drives him occasionally. I consider our minister has done his duty well and if there is any kick coming it is from the ministers for the indifference a great many people show regarding church matters and as to the way they are carried on and how the ministers of bot denominations get around to the different stations they are expected to preach and visit in fair or stormy weather, in a large field like ours, comprising Fork River, Mowat, Winnipegosis and Sifton. Let us put ourselves in these men’s places. Would we put up with the same hardship on the small salary we dole out to them? I say no, we would not. Then let us help them instead of grousing. The great secret of help is encouragement.

Wm. King.
Minister’s Warden and Fin. Sec.