Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 20 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 20 – Fork River

A number of farmers met at the municipal office on Saturday event, the 15th, to discuss the horse question. Q. King was appointed chairman and T.B. Venables secretary. The chairman stated the reason for calling the meeting, after which those present voted that we form an association to be known as the Fork River Horse Breeders’ Association and the flowing officers were elected: President, Thos. B. Venables; Vice, Wm. King; Sec.-Treas., D.F. Wilson. Directors: Ab. Hunt, Nat Little, A. Rowe and Geo. H. Tilt. The meeting adjourned to meet on Saturday night, Nov. 29, at 8 o’clock sharp to decide the most suitable breed to apply for a government pure bred stallion and to transact other business. Anyone can become a member of the association on the payment of one dollar membership fee. We wish the farmers every success in this worthy undertaking and it should have the hearty support of all in the district.
Dan McLean returned home for the winter months after spending the summer in charge of the government dredge at Regina.
Capt. Russell, of Cork Cliff, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Mrs. F.B. Lacey of Mowat, returned from the wedding of Mr. Cain and Mrs. O’Neil at Dauphin. We wish them all kinds of happiness.
George Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He still wears that genial smile.
Harcourt Benner is visiting at the home of his uncle, D.F. Wilson, on the Mossey.
Bert Steele passed through here on his way to take up his winter quarters at Mafeking for the A.T. Co. Bert is looking the picture of health and prosperity.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, in company with the president and secretary of the Booth Fishing Co., paid the A.T. Co. store a visit last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid a visit to the home of his parents and Miss Bessie Wilson returned with him for a short visit among friends in Dauphin.
Mr. Almack, of Gilbert Plains, left for the west with two cars of cows and young stock for the ranch.
The ladies of the Union Church, of Fork River, will hold a fowl supper in the Orange Hall, on Friday, Nov. 28th. Admission, adults 35c, children 15c. Short programme, everybody welcome.

1913 Nov 20 – Sifton

The fine weather and good roads are making numbers of people visit our village and shopping and milling are the order of the day.
Mrs. J. Kiteley, of Toronto, Ont., who has been visiting her sons in Brandon, Moose Jaw and Calgary, was the guest of Miss Reid at the Presbyterian mission house for a week.
A much felt need is being met now by an enterprising shoemaker, who has opened a repair shop on Front Street. He should do well. A bank should be our next addition and would be a convenience to many.
A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, when a nine year old son of Anton Sturcko lost his life. The child was taking a loaded gun down from the wall, where it was left, when the weapon discharged, shattering the boy’s left leg and the loss of blood was so great that when he was taken to the village about two hours later, he was in a state of partial collapse and died before he could be taken to a doctor.
The gross neglect of parents in allowing children the use of firearms is a matter of grave import, and some steps to set on foot a law imposing a heavy fine on such should be a good thing, and the means of saving other young and bright lives.
A band of boy scouts is being inaugurated and is a fine thing for the boys. Scout laws are just the kind needed here. Our best wishes for their success under the leadership of our esteemed neighbour, Mr. Paul Wood.
The quiet of the night is sometimes broken in upon the chug, chug, of our worthy section foreman’s gasoline hand car on patrol, up to the switch. Also several of our villagers have enjoyed a fast trip to Fork River or Winnipegosis.

1913 Nov 20 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Frank Hechter returned on Monday after a considerable stay in Winnipeg.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon arrived here on Wednesday, having spent a pleasant vacation studying mink farming at Quebec. Winnipegosis will soon be able to boast of its Zoological Gardens at the rate it is going on. We only want a few live bears, but no mosquitoes, as we have plenty of them to spare, in season.
Capt. Dan. McDonald accompanied by his brother, arrived from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Paul Paulson and family returned on Monday, having recovered from his attack of typhoid fever which he contracted while staying in Winnipeg. He proceeded to his fishing camp on Thursday.
Archie Stewart, proprietor of the well known livery stable, met with an accident by falling off his wagon.
A meeting of the Curling Club took place in Walmsley’s pool room on Monday evening, when it was resolved that practice would take place an soon as the skating rink was got into working order and on receipt of first instalment of subscriptions. The club would then be open to engage all comers, bar none.
The young ladies of this place are having great times of an evening, skating on river and lake, the latter being practically frozen over. Charley Langlois having skated over from is camp on Weasel Island on Tuesday, Mr. Johnston also walking in from Snake Island the previous day.
Charley reports that the fishermen up the lake have suffered a great loss, which is probably irreparable at this time of the year.
Howard Armstrong of Fork River, appeared before Mr. Parker, magistrate, on Friday morning to answer a charge of stealing various articles, too trivial to mention, and after Miles Morris had given evidence, his worship came to the conclusion that at present there was not sufficient incriminating evidence to connect the prisoner with the charge and adjourned the case till Monday morning, the accused being allowed out on his own recognizances. During the proceedings Capt. Dan McDonald made a minute inspector of the only and only cell and evidently admired the accommodation, although he passed no comment.
Frank Hechter has a fine display of furs in his store, which would make suitable presents to the “Old Country” and prospective buyers are warned that the supply being limited, they had better hurry up so as to secure specimens at most reasonable prices.
Mr. Bennie Hechter made a trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday for the purpose of supervising his house property in that city.
A progressive whist part was held on Thursday evening at Mr. Martin’s (station agent) home and after light refreshments and an enjoyable evening, the lucky participants returned to their respective homes in the early hours of the morn.
Mrs. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Friday, having spent a few days here with the jovial Captain.
Dick Harrison went to Winnipeg on Friday for purpose of disposing of surplus funds, which is a great loss to this rising watering resort, and as it is evidently entering a new era of prosperity, can do with every little help to give it a leg up.
Mr. Sturdy, Jr., from Fort Frances, Ont., is paying a week’s visit to his father, one of our most prominent citizens.
Tom Toye, our energetic Councillor, has brought in news of a big bear having killed a Galician round his part of the country, the animal having disembowelled the man. As a gallant Welshman why does not Tom uphold the traditions of his race and kill the brute, bringing the hide back as evidence. Tom Sanderson would act as guide and track the beast to his winter lair.

1919 Nov 20 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. John Dobson and family, of Winnipeg, are visiting at the home of Reeve Venables.
D.F. Wilson, sec. treasurer is attending the Union of Municipalities convention at Winnipeg this week.
Milton Cooper, who has been in the Dauphin Hospital, is improving.
F.F. Haffenbrak is on a visit to Ninette, Man.
With the milder weather the attendance at Sunday school has increased. 42 were in attendance last Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 12 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 12 – Badly Injured

Nat Douse, a young man in the employ of the Burrows Mill at Grandview, met with a bad accident last Thursday. While at work in the mill he slipped and fell against the slash saws and sustained injuries to his right shoulder, the muscle and flesh being torn very badly. After he had his wounds dressed at Grandview he was brought to the hospital here. A few days later it was found necessary to amputate his arm at the shoulder. Douse is now making as good progress as can be expected towards recovery.

1911 Oct 12 – Planing Mill Burned

The planning mill belonging to T.A. Burrows at Birch River was destroyed by fire on Monday afternoon. Besides the mill a half dozen cars of lumber were also burned. The loss is covered by insurance.

1911 Oct 12 – Fork River

The heavy rains have tied up the threshing machines and stopped the ploughing. With the present fine weather work will commence again.
Constable G. Weaver has returned from a business trip to Dauphin and reports everything quiet.
W. King, Sam Bailey and D. Wilson paid a visit to Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The fishermen are busy preparing to go up to the lake for the winter’s fishing. It is remarkable how many Conservatives one meets there since the Borden Government was elected.
Mr. Littler is attending the Rural Deanery meeting in Dauphin.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, was up inspecting the government dredge working in the Mossey River.
In the Press, Sept. 28, page 1, is composed of items of Cruise’s big Majority and the Markets is said to be correct. Take the price of barley, No. 3, 60 to 62, No. 4, 60 to 64, first time we ever knew No. 4 to bring more than 3. On another page under the heading of Charvari it is stated barely looks like thirty cents and that the Press will be doing business at the same old stand. Would advise them to take a rest and not contradict themselves so often. On another page is a large rigmarole about T.A. Burrows the gentleman who it has been claimed used his office to feather his nest and was never heard on the floor of the house only to try and protect himself regarding the timber steal. Of course he should have a senatorship. Rats! As yet they have the audacity to talk about Jimmy Harvey and Glen Campbell.
Mr. F.B. Lacey, postmaster general of Oak Brae, is attending Council meeting at Winnipegosis.

1916 Oct 12 – The Week’s Casualty List

Sergt. Frank Burt, killed on Sept. 24th. Burt enlisted at Dauphin with the first contingent two years ago. (Frank Burt, 1876, 46965)
Pte. Anderson Reed Walker, killed. (Anderson Reid Walker, 1895, 2056)
Sergt. Fred. Clark-Hughfield, wounded. (???)
Pte. Hugh Dunston, wounded on shoulder. (Hugh Leo Dunstan, 1896, 150887)
Pte. Jas. A. Justice, wounded. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
Lieut. Percy Willson, died from wounds. (Major Percy Willson, 1883)

1916 Oct 12 – Winnipegosis

Miss Edna Grenon was among the arrivals on Saturday’s train to spend Sunday and Thanksgiving Day at home.
Mrs. P. McArthur has returned from a short visit to Minneapolis.
The “Manitou” has two more trips to make taking fishermen’s supplies up. We trust the present good weather holds so that she may get in safely before freeze-up.
There has been a good deal of liquor in town of late. There is something taking in the liquor law when these boozers can have it shipped up here to them from Ontario and deal it out to other boozers more benighted than themselves. Now that men are scare it would prove a very potent method of wheeling a man over far more effective than money.
Mrs. J.E. McArthur was a passenger on Tuesday’s train going to Winnipeg.
It is reported that Jimmie Taylor, who went to the front with the 79th, has been wounded.
The Red Cross evening at Victoria Hall on Thursday night under the management of Mrs. Hall Burrell and Miss Jarvett, was a great success socially and financially. Over $10 was taken at the door.
Mr. Lacey, of Fork River, was here on Saturday in connection with the business of building the Meadow Land and Don schools.
Miss Leith McMartin spent the week-end at Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1912

1912 Aug 8 – Thos. Spence Drowned

Thos. Spence, a half-breed, fell out of a boat he was crossing the Mossey River in at Winnipegosis a few days ago and was drowned. His body was recovered shortly after the accident.
Spence was formerly a resident of Dauphin and was about 35 years of age. He leaves a wife and several children.

1912 Aug 8 – Ethelbert

James Miles and family have gone to Stenan, Sask., to live. He is going into business there.
Kenneth McLean is seriously ill at the home of his brother, L.M. McLean. He is very sick and fears are entertained for his recovery. He expressed a wish to see his beloved niece, Cassie, who is at Arran and she came done on Sunday evening.
The new bridge entering the town is finished, and is a fair specimen of local work.
Police Magistrate R. Skaife had several cases before him on Saturday afternoon. Vonella Kuzzett, for threatening his brother-in-law, John Malyszyk, was bound over to keep the peace and he of good behaviour for twelve months. Also Vonella Kuzsyk was fined ten dollars and costs for shooting prairie chickens out of season, or in defaulting month. Nikola Kulchyski was also fined ten dollars and costs for an unprovoked assault on Audrian Skelkuoski, of Fork River, or in default one month.

1912 Aug 8 – Fork River

Professor J. Spearing, of Valley River, spent some time here renewing old acquaintances.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, inspected the work done by the dredge and we have been informed that A. Munro has been appointed dredge master for the present and his work so far is satisfactory.
Miss Joyce Sergant returned home after spending a week’s stay with Mrs. W. Coultas in Fork River.
Gorden Weaver has accepted a position of master mechanic at the Armstrong Trading Co. store.
Miss Grant arrived and will wield the rod of correction at the Pine View School for the coming term.
Miss Cameron who was been spending her holidays at her uncle’s, A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned to Neepawa.
We were pleased to see the Rev. H.H. Scrase walking around town with W. King, warden, the other day and hope that he will be able to take up his work this fall.
Mr. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are having a week’s vacation with Noah Johnston, at Mowat Centre.
H. Armstrong has branched out in the contracting and building line and is building an addition to Mr. Nowsade’s residence.
The ratepayers are of the opine that it is time that an itemized statement of accounts of all ward appropriations and general expenditures, as demanded by the status, be got out in pamphlet form.
Mr. Tubath and family are enjoying their vacation at S. Reid’s on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Chapman and daughter are visiting with W. Coultas.
A very pleasant evening was spent in Orange Hall on Friday. Dancing was indulged till daylight.
The Misses Tindall, of Rathwell, are having a pleasant time at their uncle’s, Me. T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey.
The stores are doing a rushing business these days in raspberries and blueberries.
The postponed picnic at Lake Dauphin was held on the 30th. It was a fine day. Although there was not as large a turnout as usual a very pleasant time was spent in sports and boating.

1912 Aug 8 – Mowat Picnic

Those who chanced their luck at the Mowat picnic, which took place at Dauphin Lake on Mr. T. Briggs’ land, by his kind permission on Tuesday, July 30th were not sorry they put in an appearance. The rain, which came the previous Tuesday no doubt dampened the spirits of some, otherwise we should have had a much larger turnout; despite the fact that one or two of our Fork River worthies would have liked it to be a failure. Dame nature smiled upon us and we had a roaring good time. Nat Little’s oranges and candies were in good demand. Fortunately everyone’s ice cream freezers are not so easily broken and Mrs. C. Clark’s came in fine and handy. Even the lemons were made to “spin out,” no doubt much to the annoyance of some individuals. Hard lines, some of the folks had to leave early and therefor missed most of the sport. The Fairville boys enjoyed themselves immensely to say nothing of the ladies. We tender our hearty thanks to them for their cooperation and sympathy. They came off well in the sports, except in the football match. Keep smiling, better luck in this line next time. Our best thanks are extended to all who tried to make it a success, especially to the Lacey family, Briggs family and Sandy and Mrs. Cameron. Need I add some of the boys did not forget to look sheep’s eyes at the girls. It’s a habit handed down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 4 – 1911

1911 May 4 – Fork River

Miss Gertie Cooper returned to Dauphin spending Easter with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Cooper.
A farmer here broke a piece on his plough and sent it to the States to the factory for the repairs which cost him 15 cents there, he then paid 35 cents expenses to straighten out the customs officer he had to put up another 53 cents duty making a total of $1.03 for a fifteen cent repair. There’s a nigger in the fence somewhere. A huge mis-or a rake off. Which?
Miss Clark spent Easter, visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
Mr. Cameron, C.N.R., claims agent, was here on business in connection with M. Little’s horse that was struck by an engine nearly a year ago and had to be shot. Putting in a claim and getting paid are two different things. A large number of cattle and horses have been injured by the railway here but we have never heard of anyone receiving settlement. They always wiggle out of it.
Farmers requiring repairs for Massey-Harris seeding implements are requested to have patience for a month or so as we are busy at present house cleaning.
The Government Dredge has commenced operations on the Mossey River, under the management of Capt. McLean and mate P. Ellis. The River mud’s all wool and a years wide.

1911 May 4 – Sifton

Dr. Scott of Wakaw, Sask., paid us a flying visit on Thursday on his return from Ontario, where he and Mrs. Scott have been visiting friends. Mrs. Scott still remains in the east.
His Grace, Archbishop Langevin, St. Boniface, made a business trip to Sifton last week in the interests of the R.C. mission here and returned by Saturday morning’s train.
At the section house another section man has arrived. An sought pound son to Mr. and Mrs. John Reid.
Easter is now over and the booze is done. The creeks are getting low and the suckers are gone. The community is now selling down to a steadier occupation to seeding.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 2 – 1912

1912 May 2 – Fork River

Archie McMillan and family left here with a carload of stock and settlers’ effects as he intends taking his homestead duties at Kindersley, Sask.
Mr. Briggs of Mowat, has moved into Fork River and his friend Mr. Culverhouse lately arrived from Yorkshire, England, is staying with him for a time.
Wm. Davis, one of our bonanza farmers, returned from a few days visit to Dauphin on business.
J. Robinson took a trip to Winnipegosis on business and we are informed that since a Board of Trade has been formed in that burg. the citizens have nothing to do but sit on the sidewalk and sun themselves waiting for the golden tide to roll in. Good luck Winnipegosis.
Captain McCartney returned from a trip to Dauphin, where he was give a magic lantern lecture of the Roll Call.
There was a very good turn out at the last ball of the season in the Orange Hall. The Honourables A. Hunt, T.N. Briggs, The King and Senator Kennedy and others were present and a good time was spent. Professor Robinson and other supplied the music and kept it up till the morning.
Mr. Chard was here in connection with his business.
The scribe is inclined to think the item in he Press of the 25th by a Fork River correspondent was out of place. Surely the leaders of the Episcopal elements as he calls them should be allowed to manage their own affairs without his interring through the Press. He must be hard up for news. If the students must have a parrot to voice their opine,. they should train it up in the way it would go before sending him out on a pilgrimage in the Press.
Captain McLean, foreman of the Government dredge and his gang are busy getting the dredge in shape for the summer’s work on the Mossey River.
Jack Clemence’s gang is up putting Frank Chase’s and Alf. Snelgrove’s places into shape for this year’s crop.

1912 May 2 – ANSWER TO FORK RIVER CORRESPONDENT IN DAUPHIN PRESS.

The Fork River correspondent for the Dauphin Press of the 25th April makes the following most unwarranted remarks regarding our Church of England Parsonage. “Some of our church leaders are agitating for a parsonage in connection with the Episcopal Element here. It seem an unwarranted expense.” now the writer of this cannot possible belong to that body or his remarks would never have been uttered and if he was at all cognizant of facts in connection with what he refers to he would have worded his phrases quite differently. The Church of England congregation and management are not agitating but are going to build a parsonage and should be glad of any help financially from the press correspondent. Perhaps our friend is one of the few who objected to our building a church a few years ago, yet the church is built and fully equipped and out of debt. Also under the same management a ten team stable is almost completed and also paid for as are the lots in connection with same. We should like to say the wardens and congregation should be proud of what they have done and as they know what they are doing and can overlook any disparaging remarks of an enterprising news correspondent who passes disparaging statements re the good work going on.
The management of All Saints’ Church have found through experience it is better to build than to pay from $60 to $100 a year for rent for an unsuitable house and by so building they will have something permanent. If the correspondent in the Press has anything to say in regard to the present or past management of this church I am sure they will gladly listen to him and receive any donation as there is nothing proud about this management. If the corespondent has nothing but wind to offer her should utilize this on a football field as we already had a sufficient supply of that commodity to the detriment of this church. It is good actions they want, not wind.

Wellwisher

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 28 – 1910

1910 Apr 28 – Found Dead Near Sable

George Frame, a homesteader of the Fork River district, was found dead Friday morning near his stable by a neighbouring farmer, Mr. G. Shannon.
Authorities and his brother Robt. Of Kelso, Sask., were at once notified and Coroner Harrington went up on Monday’s train, but did not deem an inquest necessary.
Mr. Frame was subject to epileptic fits. He was 60 years of age and unmarried.

1910 Apr 28 – Fork River

Mr. Clawson paid Dauphin a visit last week.
George Frame, who had been farming in this district for some years, was found dead near the stable. The body was found by a neighboring farmer, G. Shannon, last Tuesday. He at once gave information and the coroner, Dr. Harrington of Dauphin, was notified, also R. Frame at Kelso. Mr. Frame came by the first train on receipt of the sad news, and on getting to Dauphin saw Dr. Harrington and told him that George Frame was subject to epileptic fits. On the strength of this the coroner did not think a post mortum examination necessary. The body must have laid over a week before found. Mr. Frame was born in Hamilton, Scotland about sixty years ago. He was a bachelor.

1910 Apr 28 – Winnipegosis

A very successful social was held in the Methodist Church on Thursday, April 21st. The church was crowded and a good programme consisting of songs, recitations and dialogues was gone through. The chair was taken by the Rev. W.E. Rowan and a very pleasant evening was spent. The net proceeds realized the magnificent sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, truly a noble effort.
Mrs. Malo, of Vancouver, B.C., is visiting her sister, Mrs. Derochers, here for a few weeks.
George Frame, who has lived on a homestead here for some time, was found dead Friday morning in his stable. The cause of death is unknown other than he was subject to fits. He had been dead some days before being found, as he lived alone on the homestead.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was in town a few days in connection with his fish business and other matters.
The Government are now installing a new and improved dredge here to operate at the mouth of the Mossey River.
The ice on Lake Winnipegosis has not yet broken up, but it is expected it will be clear in a week or ten days.
A case of assault and rape is reported at South Bay, near here. The victim was unable to identify the assailant. The attorney-general has been communicated with and has been asked to send a detective. Local authorities are now working on the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 24 – 1913

1913 Apr 24 – Ethelbert

Mr. and Mrs. L.W. Saunders and children left last week for Herbert, Sask., where Mr. Saunders will operate a steam plough during the summer. The family have been residents of this district since the settlement was opened and carry the best wishes of many friends to their new home.
Geo. P. Metz, another of our old-timers, has also left for Saskatchewan.

1913 Apr 24 – Fork River

Alfred Snelgrove has left for Regina to work on the government dredge at that point for the summer.
Wm. David has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Archie McMillan returned to his home at Kindersley on Saturday.
Howard Armstrong and nephew, have arrived from Dauphin and intend farming on a larger scale this summer.
Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, is busy taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co., store.
D. Kennedy’s little boy was taken suddenly ill with convulsions and had to get Dr. Harrington, of Dauphin to meet him at Sifton. We are pleased to hear the lad is recovering.
W. Williams, lumber merchant, was a visitor to the Lake Town recently on important business.
C. Clark is spending the weekend at Dauphin attending the railway mens’ meeting at that point.
We are sorry to hear friend George’s new bridge went down stream.
Charles White, fish inspector of Winnipegosis, is a visitor at D. Kennedy’s.
Mrs. T. Johnson is visiting with her friends in town for a few days.
If you want a horse call at Kennedy’s new emporium. He has all sorts and sizes. You pay your money and get your choice. A bargain every time.
“Say, Mike, they had quite a picnic at Monday’s council meeting. I am told the boundary bridge was laid over for the present.”
“Well, Pat, the doc gets a bonus of $600 for the coming year. That’s equal to three miles of graded road and the fun of it is in many cases we have to send to Dauphin for a doctor on account of not being able to get him when wanted.”
“Well, Mike, Winnipegosis, was represented by the Mayor and Alderman and they claim the doc will be around at all ball games. That’s something we are thankful to know. Then there’s our genial friend, the town orator; he gets the price of another 4 miles of graded road to sit on the sidewalk and sun himself while we flaunter through the mud.”
“Well, Pat, it does look as if things were shure going to the divel, but there’s a good time coming by and by.”