Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 4 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 4 – Fork River

The fowl supper and concert held in the Orange Hall on Friday night last, by the Methodist Church was a success. There was a large turnout and the ladies are to be congratulated on the way they handled the supper. A number came from Winnipegosis. After the concert the young folks hired the hall and a good time was spent the remainder of the night, all leaving for home in the wee small hours of the morning.
There was a fair turnout to the horse breeders meeting on Saturday night last. Much business was done. The choice of the horse went to the Shire breed, the choice being closely contested by admirers of the Punch Everything passed off in a very pleasant manner, after which the meeting adjourned to be called later on by the president. Those who wish to join should call on Secretary Wilson as soon convenient and help on the horse breeding industry of this district, as only members of the association are eligible for use of the horse. Fee for membership is one dollar per annum. Anyone can become a member.
Freddie Storrar is home after spending the summer in the west. He reports a very good time.
Mrs. George Tilt left for Dauphin, having spent a month among her relatives on the Mossey.
Mr. Rogy, collector for the Sawyer-Massey Co., has been here a few days on business.
Mrs. Watson, of Dauphin, is the guest of Mrs. Fred Cooper for a few days on the Fork River.
A. Hunt, F.B. Lacey and D.F. Wilson returned from attending he Municipal convention and report not only a good time but a profitable one.
Mr. Rowe, of Harding, left with his third shipment of cattle and hogs. The cattle business has been very brisk at this point of late, there being more stock shipped than in any other previous year.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove has left for a few days visit among friends at Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Brewer, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Wm. Armstrong.
Mr. Parser, surveyor, and men have left for Winnipeg after spending a week adjusting lines east of Lake Dauphin.
Wm. Davis and T.N. Briggs returned on the Fork River local, having spent a few days in Dauphin on business.
Garnet Lacey has returned home, having spent the summer in the west. He is looking fine.
Most of the male members of this burgh are hiking for the bush to get their annual share of big game. We hope the boys will have good luck.

1913 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

Bennie Hechter returned from Winnipeg on Monday looking very jubilant.
Dugald McAulay dispatched a carload of cattle and pigs to Winnipeg on Wednesday, himself travelling by the same train.
Mr. and Mrs. Watson have departed for a well-earned holiday and the dancing folk will greatly miss them as they were the mainstay in the musical line.
Messrs. Hechter and Ford returned from Winnipeg on Wednesday, most important business having called them there. They report that the city is a bit quitter than even Winnipegosis.
“Professor” Sutton has been recuperating his health here for a few days and greatly admires the salubrity of the atmosphere to this winter sanatorium. He made no public appearance to the regret of everyone and consequently sold none of his well-known concoctions.
Archie McKerchar arranged a small dance in the Victoria Hall on Tuesday evening but your correspondent not having been invited, no details are to hand.
Mr. McGinnis of the Winnipegosis hotel (nearest the lake) is having an addition made to his livery barn which will accommodate six more teams, or is it to be a store house for the game he has gone out to shoot in company Doctor Medd and Mr. Whale.
The first consignment of fish, consisting of ten loads, arrived on Friday from up the lake, so things should new commence to be busy, although up to the present it is not apparent, there still being some individuals in the town waiting for a job.
It is observed with extreme satisfaction to most people in town that Mr. Frank Hechter is standing as councilor for Ward 4, Mossey River municipality, in the forthcoming election, in opposition to Mr. Billy Walmsley, caused by the retirement of Mr. Seiffert, whose tenure of the office has expired. It is time we had somebody with Mr. Hechter’s business acumen to look after the ward as according to all reports things have slightly got mixed up lately and the candidate being the head of a large trading concern in town, matters would no doubt straighten out at once. It is known to everyone the great interest Frank takes in the town and district generally, being the patron of every object tending to the welfare of same, his genial disposition, and is always approachable by anyone seeking aid or advice. It is up to all his adherents to get him right there on this occasion, thereby showing their appreciation of his worth.

1919 Dec 4 – Bicton Heath

It is a good thing we don’t feel the cold during these dips.
Fred. Wenger is holding an auction sale on the 12th inst. Dan Hamilton is the auctioneer.
Mr. Seal has purchased the Marantz farm in this district.
The basket social, which was held at the schoolhouse on Nov. 21st, for the purpose of raising funds to purchase an organ for the school, was a great success, $74.50 being realized. The ladies were out in force with many baskets, tastefully gotten up, which were auctioned off by Jack Haywood, who wielded the hammer with good results.
Fred Sharp is visiting friends at Fork River.
Mr. Pearson has removed to the old Snelgrove farm at Fork River.

1919 Dec 4 – Fork River

A meeting of farmers in Fork River on Monday resulted in the formation of a branch of the Grain Growers to be known as the Mossey River Grain Growers’ Association. President Marcroft, of the South Bay local, filled the chair, and gave a short but interesting address. The following officers were elected for 1920:
President – E.F. Hafenbrak
Vice – D.F. Wilson, Jr.
Sec.- treasurer – Fred J. Tilt
These officers, with M. Gealsky, J.D. Robertson, D. Briggs, Max King and A. Hunt form the board of directors. The meeting was not as large as hoped for on account of the severe weather, but a start has been made and we look for some development in the near future. The association is formed to benefit the district both socially and educationally. Every farmer, farmer’s wife and the young folks should join and help the movement. Membership fee $2 annually.

1919 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

The date for the Union Sunday school Christmas tree and entertainment has been changed from the 22nd to Friday the 19th December.
Seven carloads of fish have already been shipped. Fishing is reported good from all parts of the lake.
Archie McDonell’s snowplow and 20 teams left on Tuesday morning for the north end of the lake. They will be away about ten days.
The telephone system in the village is now in full working order. About fifty residents are connected. Hello, central! What’s the news?
H. Loire has sold his butcher business to J. Angus. Former customers of Mr. Loire will be welcomed with a broad grin at the one and only meat market.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 29 – 1914

1914 Oct 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Davis has sold off all her stock and rented her farm and left with her mother for her old home in Illinois.
Mrs. W.D. King and daughter, of Dauphin, were visitors at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. Stevenson, Dominion government engineer, of Winnipeg, was here in connection with finishing the dredging work of Fork River and Mossey River. Wm. King and Sandy Munro went over the proposed work with Mr. Stevenson, who later left for Winnipeg to report.
Sam Hunter has rented the Davis farm. Sam’s a hustler.
Mrs. Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have left for a trip east.
James Parker has rented the Company from Mr. Grenon.
The pupils of All Saints’ Sunday school, spent the afternoon on Saturday at the farm of W. King, superintendent. Games of ball, running and other sports were indulged in until supper time. Mrs. King, Mrs. McEachern and Mrs. C.E. Bailey, attended to their “inner wants” at the supper table, after which a tired, but happy bunch of kiddies left for their several homes.
Nat Little has completed his new livery farm. It looks well with a coat of red paint.
Mrs. J. Robinson, of Mowat, has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
The Orangemen of Fork River are advertising a patriotic ball is to be held in the Orange Hall on the right of November the 5th. The proceeds are to be donated to the Patriotic Fund. Everyone is cordially invited to come and help in making this a successful ball. God Save the King.

1914 Oct 29 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. C.L. White were passengers to Winnipeg on Monday. Mrs. W. is to have her eyes treated in the city.
Constable W.H. Hunking was a Dauphin visitor this week.
A number from here will take in the Patriotic Ball at Fork River on Nov. 5th, Guy Fawkes anniversary.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston is visiting at Dauphin this week.
The lake is several feet lower than in past years, in fact, it is said to be lower than in the recollection of the oldest inhabitants.
The winter fishing season opens on Nov. 15th, and most of the fishermen and supplies have gone north. The indications are that there will be a good winter’s fishing.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 22 – 1914

1914 Oct 22 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughter, are spending a few days in Winnipeg with friends.
Miss Gertrude Cooper spent the week-end with her parents and returned to Dauphin on Monday.
Mrs. I. Humphreys has left for a few days visit to Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin. They were accompanied by Mrs. W. Johnston, of Fork William.
Mrs. W. Davis’ sale on Thursday, was a very successful one. Dan Hamilton, of Dauphin, wielded he hammer and good prices were realized on everything put up, particularly his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Joe Johnston, of Fort William, is spending a few days here visiting his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end here with Miss Gertrude Bradley, teacher of Mossey River School.
The mayor and alderman of Winnipegosis, were visitors to this burgh one day last week.
Mr. Simpson, of Winnipeg, was here lately paying the money for work done in this municipality. The Armstrong Trading Co.’s store was used as a paying office.
The first dance of the season came off in the Orange Hall on Friday last. It was well attended and all had an enjoyable time.
Alex. Cameron returned on Wednesday from a business trip to Dauphin.

1914 Oct 22 – Winnipegosis

Our town is again assuming the even tenor of its way now that many of the fishermen are at the north end of the lake.
Mrs. P. McArthur has gone to the Pas to visit her daughter.
Inspector James made an inspection of the post office here last week. He stated that Postmaster Ketcheson had everything in good order.
J.W. McAuley took a carload of cattle to Winnipeg a few days ago.
Coun. F. Hechter was a Dauphin visitor in the early part of the week.
It is learned that there is every prospect of the township of swamp lads on the west of the town being thrown open for homesteading. Should the Dept. of the Interior consent to do this it will do much to help the development of the town. The land is good and with thrifty settlers on it would yield prolifle crops.
Mrs. W. Johnston has returned from Dauphin.
The sensation of late was the arrest of the man who had charge of the dredge here during the summer. He pleaded guilty and was let off on suspended sentence by the police magistrate at Winnipeg. It is learned that when the total of the goods taken was summed up to amounted to a large sum. The question now comes up, who was it that squealed, and did the squealer participate in the spoils. Yes, there is going to be further developments and one sensation is likely to follow another.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 15 – 1914

1914 Oct 15 – Gasoline Boat Burned

The gasoline boat, “Lake View,” owned by Mr. Frank Hechter, was burned at the north end of Lake Winnipegosis last week, together with supplies and fishing nets. The boat was in charge of Dan Martin. Mr. Hechter places his loss a near the $3000 mark. There was no insurance.

1914 Oct 15 – Doctors on Strike

It is said that since the declaration of war, the Swan River physicians have refused to threat German measles.

1914 Oct 15 – Fork River

Max King and Karl Erikson have left for the north end of the lake for he winter’s fishing.
Mr. W. Howitson has left for Winnipegosis and is working in the A.T. Co store. “Scotty” is always in great demand.
Mrs. Peter Ellis has returned from a trip to Ontario.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor with Mrs. D. Kennedy this week.
Miss M. Craighill and Mrs. W. Davis have returned from a short visit to Winnipegosis and report a pleasant time.
Mrs. Bert Cooper and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with Mr. W. Cooper, Sr., on the Mossey River.
Mr. D.F. Wilson has been confined to the house for a short time. It’s nothing “catching.” We trust he will recover.
Next Sunday, Oct. 10th, will be Children’s day. Special services will be held for the children. We trust there will be a good turn out to this service. All are welcome.
Mr. Mullens and friend here motored from Cypress River and are spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. A. Cameron, of Mowat Centre.
Mr. Eloftson, from Ontario, was up to W. King’s for the surveying teams and outfit which have been here all summer. He is moving them to Gimli ready for the winter’s work in that section.
Some one was enquiring of us last week if the A.T. Co. was still running the dredge at Winnipegosis.

1914 Oct 15 – Winnipegosis

Sid Coffey is going fishing and Harold Bradley will run the picture show while he is away.
Frank Hechter was a passenger Dauphin bound on Monday.
C.F. Stewart, insurance agent returned to Dauphin on Monday after a short business trip here.
Alex Bickel went to Dauphin on Monday.
Frank Hechter’s gasoline boat was burned at the north end of the lake last week. The loss is considerable as the boat was loaded with fishing apparatus and supplies for the winter. Dan Martin was in charge of the boat, and he says the origin of the fire is a mystery.
The Standard Lumber Co. is putting in a camp for the winter at Graves’ Point.
The steamer Manitou has already made several trips to the north end of the lake with supplies for the fishermen. Capt. McDonald is in charge of the boat.
It is expected that fully 150 men will be engaged in fishing this winter. The wages paid will be considerably lower than in the past two seasons.
Joe Johnston, from Fort William, is among the late arrivals. He reports times dull at the lake town. He will fish this winter.
Capt. Coffey’s new boat made her first trip to the north end of the lake last week. The boat has not been christened yet, but when the sparkling bottle of wine is broken the word “Mildred” will appear.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 8 – 1914

1914 Oct 8 – Boy Found

The four-year-old son of Joseph Lareche, of McCreary, who was lost for four days, was found on Saturday alive, but nearly exhausted. He has since recovered entirely.
Twenty-five of the boy scouts from here, under direction of Scoutmaster D.S. Woods, participated in the hunt.

1914 Oct 8 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Davis and Mrs Grenon have returned from a short visit to Dauphin.
Professor Robinson and several young folks took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Friday night. They report a good time.
All will be pleased to hear that Andy Rowe is getting around again after his two weeks’ illness.
Mr. Bradley, of Saskatchewan, has disposed of a car load of horses while here and is returning with a car of stock.
School has commenced again and the “pimple scare” is about over. What will we have next? We seem to be catching something all the time since the telephone arrived.
Miss Eva Storrar has returned from Rainy River, Ont., and intends living on the homestead for the present.
Children’s day will be on Sunday, Oct., 18th. There will be a special children’s service and singing in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock. All are invited to come and help to make this a rally day for the children to remember.
The rain of Sunday was the means of putting out the running fires.

1914 Oct 8 – Winnipegosis

The finishing touches are being put on the school by the painter this week. Contractor Neely finished his work and left on Saturday for Dauphin. The school is a credit to the town.
Our new police magistrate, Mr. J. Seiffert, has tried several cases of late and his decisions go to show he has good judgement. It is a good idea to mix common sense with judicial decisions sometimes. Some of the cases brought before the P.M. would test the ability of the historic “Philadelphia lawyer.”
The fishermen have commenced to prepare for the winter camp. The steamer Manitou went north with a cargo of supplies this week.
The P.M. has laid a charge against a local official and Wm. King, J.P., of Fork River, will try the case.
Mr. Wallace Dudley and Miss Phoebe Denby were married on Monday, the 5th, by the Rev. D. Flemming, of Dauphin. The young people are popular and their many friends wish them every happiness.
Mrs. John Denby is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Mrs. Kenneth McAuley is visiting at Dauphin.
Fred. McDonald has returned to spend the winter months with us. The great question the boys now ask is, will Freddy repeat his curling stunts this winter.
Rev. B. Thorensson, of Winnipeg, united Miss Toby Oddsson and Mr. John Goodman in the holy bonds of matrimony on the 7th inst.
Watch the Herald for more marriage notices. We have more coming, but “mum’s the word just now.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1912

1912 Sep 9 – Fork River

George Sumption, of Dauphin; is spending of short time with Mr. J. Clements on the Chase farm.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, who has been spending her holidays with her parents up the Fork, has returned to Dauphin.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs left for a two motions’ holiday with her friends at Brandon.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here lately taking in the sights.
Professor Gorden Weaver and N.H. Johnston returned from a trip to Winnipegosis on business and after the train run off the track. Misfortunes will happen to the best of regulated railways.
Frank Chase, of Dauphin, was here lately looking after his business interests.
The elevator builders have not arrived yet. We think it will be a mistake to build it on the site picked out. The building would be better if it were moved south on to the street next the cattle chute and
Mr. and Mrs. V.O. Weaver, of Vermont, are visiting their brother Gordon, of East Bay.
Wm. Geekie and son passed through here on their return trip from Strathclair to their home at Winnipegosis.
F. Lacey, of Oak Brae, has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Will Davis, who has invested heavily in real estate in Texas, strongly advocates the use of drain tiles. Will always was practical, especially on mail days when its raining.
Mrs. C. Bradley is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Several people from the Lake Town took in the dance in the Orange Hall on Thursday night past. Brother Robinson played the Fisherman’s Horn Pipe and a very pleasant time was spent.
Wm. Williams and Mr. Venables spent the week-end at Dauphin on business.
A meeting of the council will be held at Fork River on Monday, the 23rd inst.

1912 Sep 9 – Sifton

The wet season now appears to be over and all except to get on with the harvest at once.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Good progress is being made with the Kennedy-Barrie store. Once these gentlemen open they are sure of doing a good business.
Frequent shipments of cattle are being made from here. There’s nothing like mixed farming to bring in the cash between seasons.
Geo. Lampard, wholesale butcher, Dauphin, and W.A. Davis were in town on Monday. These gentlemen brought a number of cattle while here.
This end of the district is open to come under the Drainage Act. It pays at any time to make improvements whether they are drains or building better roads.
Paul Wood’s family are going to reside in Dauphin during the winter so that an opportunity will be afforded the children to go to school.
Now that the Herald is giving interesting personal sketches of prominent men who have resided in the district a long time, I hope the prosperous village of Sifton will not be overlooked. We have several pioneers here who had ouch to do with its development and are will known, viz., Paul Wood, John Kennedy, Coun. Peter Ogrislo, Postmaster Thos. Ramsay, Wm. Ashmore and quite a few others that could be named.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 29 – 1912

1912 Aug 29 – Ethelbert

Miss Ada Willey, has come to take up her duties as teacher at the senior school.
The British American Elevator Co. is putting in a foundation for a 50 thousand bushel elevator.
Considerable rain has fallen here of late.
K. McLean is getting better day by day, which his friends will be glad to learn.

1912 Aug 29 – Fork River

Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, accountant for the Armstrong Trading Co., spent a couple of days with D. Kennedy.
Edwin King left for Minnedosa for a short time on business.
We are informed one of our farmers is putting up hay with a sky pilot. That accounts for the showery weather no doubt.
Miss Annie Briggs and Miss Mabel Tindale returned from a visit to the Lake Town last week.
Mr. Combes, of the Fork, took a short vacation to Dauphin on business.
Mrs. Chapman and her daughter, who spent the last month with her brother, Wm. Coultas, has left for her home in Winnipeg.
Sam Hunter who spent the last two months in Ontario, has returned. He states Manitoba is good enough for him.
Courtney Wilson and E. Briggs are paying Dauphin a visit on business.
N. Little has cut his fall wheat and several others cut their wild oats some time ago. Don’t sow your wild oats in future.
Give Will Davis a call and he will put you in to something good in Texas farm lands for sale on easy terms.
Same Bailey paid Winnipegosis a flying visit on business, as also Herman Godkin, real estate agent.
We are sorry to hear our alderman had a lapse of memory for a short period lately and we trust it will return shortly, as Sammy Veller says its very convenient sometimes.
Can anyone explain how it costs forty cents to ship an article to Winnipegosis by express and a week after the same article came back by express costing only thirty cents. We give it up. No offence meant.
Looking over the Winnipegosis news in the Press of August 22nd it appears as if the correspondent wants this scribe’s scalp to add to his belt. We are amused at the statement. We of F.R. are not satisfied with the medical officer’s choice of residence. Does his conscience prick him. Ba! Read the article over again friends and you will not find any mention of residence. We stated nothing but plain facts and by the way he seems to dodge the issue. They are too plain for some one’s liking. If the matter had been attended to as was promised nothing further would have been said. Bluff won’t work any more and so get down ti biz. What the people want is the manure and rubbish taken further away and it’s the health officer’s place to see it done when it’s mentioned to him whoever he is and we advise the Winnipegosis correspondent to be careful of himself as he might see snakes next time and be under the hands of the M.D. Keep to facts in future if you have anything to say, “M.O.H.” whatever it means, we do not know, it might be member of hades or some other place. We’ll let it go at that. Ta, ta for the present.
The writer of the Mowat picnic seems to have bitten off more than he could chew and the more he tries to explain the further he gets in the mire. In our opinion he always had cold feet.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 22 – 1912

1912 Aug 22 – Ethelbert

P.G. Keays, assistant to the chief games guardian, was in Ethelbert for a couple of days lately to see the P.M. anent a recent case of shooting chickens out of season and went away satisfied that the party convicted had got off easy.
Kenneth McLean, we are glad to say, is improving in health, but slowly. The Dr. thinks he may be allowed to get up this week, all being favourable.
Mrs. A. Willy and Mrs. McViears are visiting at the home of the stations operator here. Mrs. Willy left for home the early part of the week.
Mr. Finnen is here trying to interest the people in the insurance business.
M. Troy, of the Massey-Harris Co., has been here for some days conferring with the agent.

1912 Aug 22 – Fork River

James McDonald, of Minitonas, is staying with his old friend, Nat Little.
Mr. Wade, of East Bay, was staying with W. Davis a few days and took several photographs of this part of the district, we are informed.
Wm. Stonehouse has been appointed constable by the council. They are to be contended for getting a wiggle on in this one case anyway.
Wm. Northam has taken a trip as far west as Weyburn, Sask., and intends stating their a short time.
Harold Shannon, returned from a short stay at Winnipeg.
We notice Joseph Grenon, Sr., has been given the management of the fish hatchery at Snake Island.
Rev. H.H. Scrase returned after a few days spent at Dauphin and Sifton on business.
Professor Millard, ventriloquist was here for a few days. A large crowd turned out to see his moving pictures in the Orange Hall. The show was well worth the money.
The young folks of this part enjoyed a very pleasant evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.N. Briggs, where they celebrated the coming of age of their son, Duncan.
Several carloads of timber are being unloaded for the elevator.
Mrs. J. McAuley, of Winnipegosis, returned home after a week spent with Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1910

1910 Aug 8 – Mossey River Council

A meeting of the council was held at Fork River on Thursday, July 14th, all the members present.
The minutes of two previous meetings were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Paddock – That the clerk write the superintendent of the C.N.R. and ask for an increased train service on the Winnipegosis branch.
Lacey-Fleming – That the clerk write to the superintendent of the C.N.R. and request that he appoint some responsible person to take charge of freight delivered at Fork River until it is called for by the person to whom it is consigned.
Hunt-Toye – That the clerk instruct Mr. Pruder re Road Commissioner’s certificate – that he must settle the matter with Mr. Walmsley.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Reeve and Coun. Paddock be a committee to investigate Mrs. McCleods claims.
Toye-Fleming – That Councillors Lacey, Nicholson and Hunt be a committee to see Messrs. Whale and Davis and secure a title to Fork River cemetery.
Lacey- Nicholson – That the Reeve, when in Winnipeg secure to lay out a road from Fork River to Winnipegosis.
Lacey-Toye – That all pathmasters notify the clerk or Road Commissioner of the ward when any serious obstruction or damage has occurred in their respective beats.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the clerk be instructed to write Thos. Shannon and notify him to repair the roadway damaged by him not later than July 18th.
Hunt-Paddock – That motions 5, 6, 7, and 8 of meeting March 13 and motions 15, 16, 17, and 18 of meeting May 21, be expunged.
Lacey-Toye – That S. Bailey be engaged as road commissioner on Main road between Fork River and Winnipegosis at $2.50 per day and that he be empowered to secure the necessary labour at lowest possible cost and to commence work as soon as possible.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the clerk notify M.W. Snelgrove that the Council is prepared to settle for the Shannon road as soon as advised to do so by its solicitor.
Lacey-Fleming – That Road Commissioner Toye’s account for letting and inspecting work amounting to $22.50 to be paid.

A by-law authorizing the loan of $1000 at Bank of Ottawa was passed.
Fleming-Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1910 Aug 8 – Fork River (too late for last issue)

D.F. Wilson returned from seeing the Winnipeg Exhibition last week.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Lockhart left here Monday to attend Brandon fair.
Mrs. S. Bailey returned from Winnipeg last Saturday.
The crops around this district are looking excellent and providing the ether last good a bumper harvest will be the result and the farmers are jubilant.
D. Shinks returned from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
The Church of England picnic which was held at Lake Dauphin last Tuesday was a great success, it was an ideal day and quite a number drove from Fork River. The sports were good and the boys and girls had a good time. The sack race was won by R. King, 1st; E.W. King, 2nd; three legged race, F. King and C. Wilson; married women’s race, Mrs. Kennis, 2nd; long jump E. King; horse race, D. Briggs; egg race, Mrs. G. Shannon, 1st; Mrs. T. Shannon, 2nd. S. Gower and the Rev. H.H. Scrase were busy all the afternoon looking after the sports etc., so as to give everybody a good time. Football between Mowat and Fork River was a hard fought game won by Fork River 1-0; baseball was also indulged in. Mr. F.B. Lacey and S. Gower got the booth and grounds ready and quite a number went on the lake in boats provided.

1910 Aug 8 – North Lake

Mr. and Mrs. F.B. Lacey paid a visit to North Lake last week.
Messrs. Weaver, and Shrog have been stranded on the shores of Lake Dauphin for a few days owning to their raft being unable to ride the waves. They hope to make Million Lighthouse some time this fall.
J. Spearing, who has been in Dauphin Hospital undergoing on operation is back with us again.
Any one wishing to see a good field of wheat should have a look at Tom Glendenning’s. It’s a dandy.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 13 – 1912

1912 Jun 13 – Fork River

Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove left for a visit to her friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Adams and son of Big Stone, are here loading cordwood for the Armstrong Trading Co., when there are cars.
Mr. McAuley, travelling agent for the Massey Co., spent a few days with D. Kennedy. Travelling agents are all right in their place. What the farmers here want is a better supply of repairs.
The King’s birthday passed off quietly. The Lake Town team failed to appear for the return match. A good dance was held in the Orange Hall by the football team and friends.
Saturday, registration day here, passed off quietly. Several names were added to the list.
Gordon Weaver, of Million, spent a few days with his friends. Gordon scored one goal at football.
There was a ghost around the hall two nights last week and the fair sex did not seem to mind at all.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove returned from Dauphin after spending a few days.
The Fork River football team killed the fatted calf and invited the Winnipegosis team for the return match from the home team and the rustlers. Latest, the Winnipegosis team has the whooping cough and the dropsy caught on the 24th. We trust the doctor will get them in line for the July picnic.
It is rumoured that we are to have an elevator. We hope the rumour is correct as we needs it bad.
K.T. Biggs, the only delegate appointed to represent the Fork River mission, is attending the Synod in Winnipeg this week.
Captain McCartney left for Winnipeg on business.
A very much concert, arranged by Mr. Biggs in aid of the W.A., was held on June 7th in the Orange Hall. The proceeds were given to swell the parsonage fund. The covert was opened by the Mossey River School children singing “Flag of Britain,” which was well rendered, and which gave their teacher, Miss Alserton, much credit. “The Diver” by Mr. McCartney, was well sung and encored. A duet by Ray and Elva Ellis, entitled, “A Boy Called Taps,” was well sung. The next song “Flanagan,” sung by Mr. Culverhouse, was splendid and he was heartily cheered and encored, and a recitation by W. Davis, entitled the “Englishman” was highly appreciated. A quartette by Miss Pearl and Bessie Wilson, Mr. Biggs and Mr. Culverhouse was well rendered. After an interval of a few minutes the Mossey River School children started again and with a chorus, “Summer, Gladsome Summer,” which was well sung, and then another song by Mr. McCartney entitled, “Sleep in the Deep,” and then a song by Mr. Culverhouse “Sang Mackie” and then another recitation by H.H. Benner entitled, “A Minister’s Grievances,” was very laughable and enjoyed by all. This was encored and he came on again and gave another, the last song was “Sweet Genevieve,” by Mr. Culverhouse, Miss Pearl Wilson, Mr. Biggs and Miss Bessie Wilson. The accompanist was Miss Comber, who played well. The chair was taken by W. King and after the sale of ice cream a vote of tanks was given to the chairman and to all who had so very kindly helped. God save the King was sung.
In talking with a farmer about the weather he informed us the moon had a good deal to do with it. To get posted on the matter we looked for the almanac and could now find it, so we turned to the Dauphin Press to see if there was anything from our Mowat friend. Sure there was, we know at a glance how the moon was as at a certain stage of every month it affects his capacious meddle. He seems to be weary of posting as the Mowat Jackass and wants to turn over his troubles to the Fork River scribe. Thanks; we are sure we could not do the same justice as a representative of that animal as our Mowat friend has had long experience in that line. It’s kind of him to compliment us writing funny things to interest the kids, which goes to show he must be in his dotage. The old saying has come true in his case “first a child, then a man,” etc. Our Mowat friend needs something to cheer him up judging from his appearance on his return from the summer resort.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 2 – 1912

1912 May 2 – Fork River

Archie McMillan and family left here with a carload of stock and settlers’ effects as he intends taking his homestead duties at Kindersley, Sask.
Mr. Briggs of Mowat, has moved into Fork River and his friend Mr. Culverhouse lately arrived from Yorkshire, England, is staying with him for a time.
Wm. Davis, one of our bonanza farmers, returned from a few days visit to Dauphin on business.
J. Robinson took a trip to Winnipegosis on business and we are informed that since a Board of Trade has been formed in that burg. the citizens have nothing to do but sit on the sidewalk and sun themselves waiting for the golden tide to roll in. Good luck Winnipegosis.
Captain McCartney returned from a trip to Dauphin, where he was give a magic lantern lecture of the Roll Call.
There was a very good turn out at the last ball of the season in the Orange Hall. The Honourables A. Hunt, T.N. Briggs, The King and Senator Kennedy and others were present and a good time was spent. Professor Robinson and other supplied the music and kept it up till the morning.
Mr. Chard was here in connection with his business.
The scribe is inclined to think the item in he Press of the 25th by a Fork River correspondent was out of place. Surely the leaders of the Episcopal elements as he calls them should be allowed to manage their own affairs without his interring through the Press. He must be hard up for news. If the students must have a parrot to voice their opine,. they should train it up in the way it would go before sending him out on a pilgrimage in the Press.
Captain McLean, foreman of the Government dredge and his gang are busy getting the dredge in shape for the summer’s work on the Mossey River.
Jack Clemence’s gang is up putting Frank Chase’s and Alf. Snelgrove’s places into shape for this year’s crop.

1912 May 2 – ANSWER TO FORK RIVER CORRESPONDENT IN DAUPHIN PRESS.

The Fork River correspondent for the Dauphin Press of the 25th April makes the following most unwarranted remarks regarding our Church of England Parsonage. “Some of our church leaders are agitating for a parsonage in connection with the Episcopal Element here. It seem an unwarranted expense.” now the writer of this cannot possible belong to that body or his remarks would never have been uttered and if he was at all cognizant of facts in connection with what he refers to he would have worded his phrases quite differently. The Church of England congregation and management are not agitating but are going to build a parsonage and should be glad of any help financially from the press correspondent. Perhaps our friend is one of the few who objected to our building a church a few years ago, yet the church is built and fully equipped and out of debt. Also under the same management a ten team stable is almost completed and also paid for as are the lots in connection with same. We should like to say the wardens and congregation should be proud of what they have done and as they know what they are doing and can overlook any disparaging remarks of an enterprising news correspondent who passes disparaging statements re the good work going on.
The management of All Saints’ Church have found through experience it is better to build than to pay from $60 to $100 a year for rent for an unsuitable house and by so building they will have something permanent. If the correspondent in the Press has anything to say in regard to the present or past management of this church I am sure they will gladly listen to him and receive any donation as there is nothing proud about this management. If the corespondent has nothing but wind to offer her should utilize this on a football field as we already had a sufficient supply of that commodity to the detriment of this church. It is good actions they want, not wind.

Wellwisher

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 10 – 1913

1913 Apr 10 – Titanic Disaster Just a Year Ago

The sinking of the Steamship Titanic occurred on the Atlantic Ocean on April 15th, 1912. It will be a year next Tuesday, April 18th, since the disaster occurred, which resulted in the greatest loss of like in the history of marine travel.

1913 Apr 10 – Fork River

Bert Steele passed through from Mafeking on his way to Winnipegosis.
Dave Shinks has left for his homestead at Vonda, for the summer.
Several left here the other evening chaperoned by Captain Storrar, to take in the dance given by the ladies of Winnipegosis. They returned in the wee sma’ hours of the morning singing “the girls we left behind us.” We are not sure whether it’s the ones here or at Winnipegosis. They ought to know.
Wm. Davis and J.W. Lockhart have returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
The council has given us the auditors report in book form at last and they are to be commended for a step in the right direction. We trust that they will go farther and state what the money is paid out for. The report states Jack Smith got $20 and we don’t know whether it’s for cutting lamb’s tails or scrub or rubbing down a large pair of calves to take the selling down or what. Let’s know what the money is paid for in future, please.
Rev. S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, was here on church business between trains.
Harold Clark, of Dauphin, spent the weekend with his parents.
Pat Powers returned from his winter’s work with the Williams Lumber Co. at Lake Dauphin. Sid. Gower, engineer of that Co. is also taking a vacation and renewing acquaintances around town.
The annual vestry meeting of All Saints’ Church was held on April 3rd in the church. The chair was taken by the Rural Dean, the Rev. A.S. Wiley, M.A. The minutes of the last meetings were read out by the sec.-treasurer also the treasurer’s report, which was accepted and found satisfactory. The Rev. H.H. Scrase acted as vestry clerk and the officers elected for the coming year were Mr. W. King, minister’s warden; C. Baily, people’s warden; Wm. King, sec.-treasurer; Delegate to synod, Wm. King.
The snow is leaving us fast and there is water everywhere and yet the “philosopher” is heard to remark this is getting to be a “darned dry hole” to live in. We don’t know exactly what he means, but still this is a great country for guessing, and we are wondering if our municipal fathers are in possession of the deed of land they intend building that boundary bridge on? Or is it to be the same old chestnut like the north ditch, just ask for it or whistle for it after. We are informed there is a largely signed petition against the building of the bridge. Its time to call a halt of this bridge building and repair, for safety, what we have and give us good roads to them before we go bust entirely. We have a good country and good settlers and all we need is a little common sense and judgement by those at the head of affairs and we will be all right and leave those brainy problems alone.
A vote of thank was passed to Mr. Wm. King for his work as warden for the past 10 years. The Sunday School has been kept open all winter and there has been a very fair attendance. A vote of thanks was passed to the rural dean for coming up and acting as chairman also to Mr. and Mrs. Scrase for their work in the mission.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 27 – 1913

1913 Feb 27 – Fork River

Wm. Paddock spent several days here among the farmers buying and dressing beef and pork for his meat emporium at Winnipegosis.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from Sifton, where he held divine service. He states that he has good congregations at that point.
The Fork River correspondent in the Press states one of our citizens changed his office from the Armstrong T. Co., which is not so, as he is quite at home at the A.T. Co. Don’t get annoyed friend because he didn’t move right over your way. Come in and warm yourself, we don’t mind it if you don’t want to talk.
Mrs. T. Johnson, who has been spending two weeks with friends, returned home to Winnipegosis last week.
“Say, Mike, did you hear the latest? A customer from the country went into one of our department stores and “Buttons” stepped up and asked him if he would take the elevator. He accepted; “elevate it. I’ll take it without any water” and it was elevated. “Buttons” is there anything else we can do for you. We have some fresh case goods and we take in minors and flats, where we can.”
Several of the councillors took the train to attend the municipal meeting at Winnipegosis. “Admiral Turnover” accompanied them and they returned on a special.
Fred. and Max King took a business trip to Winnipegosis this week.
Wm. Davis and Sid Craighill are home from the fish haul. Too much snow to fish now.
We wish to say to the Mowat correspondent that his scurrilous remarks are not true. We wish to remind him before he was a member of the council he was the one that set the ball rolling by his weekly tirade against the council because he could not get what he wanted. Any remarks we have made are mild compared to opinions we hear from other ratepayers regarding the blunders and unbusinesslike transactions that have been done and we are sorry to say we have to admit what they say is true in most cases. As you have told us before you don’t wish to hurt people’s feelings, but just do it to remind us, so its up to you to take it in the same spirit. You say, “hands off.” Don’t get alarmed M.C. as we are never anxious to touch pitch as it sticks. Kind regards M.C. and we trust you will be all right after the change of the moon.
F.B. Lacey went south on the train and intends combining pleasure with business while absent. A pleasant time, Fred.
The Lenten services are held in All Saints’ Church Tuesday nights at 8 o’clock. Everyone welcome. Service at 3 o’clock Sunday, March 2nd.
The weekly dance party came off at the home of Mr. and Mrs. S. Reid over the Mossey River and a pleasant time was spent and that tired feeling chased away for the time being.
“Say, Mike, a stranger wanted to know what those pipes were for on the river bank and what they were worth to the people as a money maker.” “Can’t say Pat, what they are worth but the “Admiral” ordered them we believe to do duck shooting with.”
Miss M. Shannon, of Winnipegosis, paid a visit to her parents on the Mossey on Friday.

1913 Feb 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishermen are arriving down the lake each day. At present Mr. and Mrs. Christianson, Mr. and Mrs. Arrowsmith, Mr. and Mrs. Holly Burrell, Mr. and Mrs. Schaldermouse and family, Leo Hjalmarson, and Jack Angus have arrived.
H. Burrell has opened a pool room at the north end of the town.
R. McLean, an old timer freighter, is back in town on business.
Mrs. J. McAuley, of Dauphin, is the guest of Mrs. Whale since the 22nd.
Mr. Lloyd Younghusband, of Dauphin, is a guest of Mrs. Bradley.
Miss Irma Bradley, of Bowsman, is making a few weeks visit with Miss. C. Bradley.
Some of the young folk are greatly enjoying snowshoe tramps.
J. McArthur recently spent a few weeks in Winnipeg and saw his parents off on a southern trip from which we hope they will return greatly befitted.
Mr. Mullens, station agent, is leaving us for a more lucrative position in Minitonas. His departure is to be regretted.
Mrs. Grenon, Sr. is enjoying the visit of her brother from Montreal.
Last week the Christian League’s monthly social meeting was held in the Methodist Church, where a large number gathered to hear a debate on Woman’s Suffrage. It is to be hoped the parties wishing to espouse the movement (which might better be ignored as one of our prominent young men thinks) are not greatly in earnest. Mr. Grenon, Mr. Hechter and Mrs. Dempsey acted as judges, giving honors to the negative side.
Being the Lenten season it is regretted that an arrangement has not been made for weekly services here; we know Rev. Mr. Scrase does his best.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 19 – 1914

1914 Feb 19 – Fight with Mad Cat

Joshua Law was the proud owner of a large Russian cat last week. This week the cat is in the happy hunting grounds. The cat was the pet of the family and most affectionate. Three days ago it became suddenly mad and without warning whatever jumped on Norman, Mr. L’s 4 year old son, and commenced biting and scratching him. The screams of the child brought Mrs. Law to the rescue. She knocked the cat from the child with a chair. She had no sooner done this than the animal attacked Neta, the 14 year old daughter, and the fight was renewed with vigour. Finding the fight a little too hot with Mrs. Law battering the cat with a chair, the feline turned its attention to Mrs. Law, and Mr. Law, who was brought to the scene by the commotion at this time, says that it was the liveliest scrimmage that ever took place in Dauphin. Quickly grabbing a nearby axe Mr. Law, by a couple of well directed blows, dispatched the cat.
While the little boy is pretty badly bitten and scratched it is not thought any of the wounds are dangerous. Had Mrs. Law not been right at hand there is no doubt but the cat would have torn the child’s eyes out and likely killed him.

1914 Feb 19 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis on Thursday, Feb. 12th, 1914. All the members present.
Communications were read from the Children’s Aid Society, S. Hughes M.P.P., J.A. Gorby, clerk of Dauphin municipality; Reeve Collins of McCreary, Dominion Land office, Home for Incurables, the solicitors, department of Public Works, Manitoba Gypsum Co., Land Titles office and P. Robertson.
Hechter-Robertson – That the treasurer be authorized to pay the Lands Titles office $60.24, being the amount required to redeem the south of S.E. 28, 29, 20.
Richardson-Toye – That the Reeve and Councillor Hechter be a committee to inspect the roadway alongside sec. 365, 30, 19, and report as to the waterway being blocked.
Richardson-Robertson – The council of the municipality of Mossey River is of the opinion that the services of the bailiff in regards to seizure in the interests of the municipality was most unsatisfactory and that a copy of this resolution be sent to our solicitors.
Hechter-Hunt – That Mrs. Spence’s hospital account be not charged against the property.
Richardson-Bickle – That the assessment roll prepared by W.H. Hunking be accepted for 1914.
Hunt-Hechter – That Councillors Richardson and Robertson be committee to inspect the Fishing River Bridge and let the work for necessary repairs.
Bickle-Toye – That the account of P. Robertson be paid to the extent of $327.
Hechter-Hunt – That In amendment. That P. Robertson be paid in full for work on the bridge, $337, provided that the Public Works Committee see that the railing is completed.
Motion Carried.
Richardson-Bickle – That the reeve and councillors receive their fees after every meeting throughout the year.
Toye-Robertson – That the reeve be authorized to go to Winnipeg and interview the minister of public works with a view to obtaining a grant from the Provincial government for public works in the municipality.
By-laws were passed appointing Dr. Medd health officer at the usual salary; re-establishing the statute labour system; appointing weed inspectors and authorizing a loan from the Bank of Ottawa.

1914 Feb 19 – Fork River

Mr. J. Clawson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here visiting friends.
Mr. McAulay, collector for the Massey-Harris Implement Company, spent a few days here among the farmers.
Mrs. Beck has left for the south to visit.
Dr. Medd, health officer, paid his official visit and found scarlet fever prevalent. As a consequence quite a number are quarantined and the school closed for a time.
Mike says there is nothing like nipping things in the bud. We trust the fellow that carried the little medicine bag will not take offence.
Mr. J. Frost returned from the fish hauling up the lake and has accepted a position with the Williams’ Lumber Co. on Lake Dauphin.
Mrs. Wm. Davis has returned from short visit to Dauphin on business.
We believe it would be to the interest of the public if our health officer would visit the Mowat correspondent, as Mike says its coming on towards spring and he generally has them turns about that time. For instance, last week he made some very drastic statement about the P.O ??? We do not think he here came here and was unable to get attended ??? if he knew what he wanted. Another thing we don’t remember seeing him at the P.O. only once during the ??? As for the little peanut stand of ??? place, “two by twice” as he call it, we do not agree with him as it is one of the largest buildings in the place and is no more crowded on mail days than it was before the change, considering the mail is heavier than it ??? to be on account of the parcel post.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor at the home of her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
There was no Sunday school or ??? at All Saints’ on Sunday and the concert for the 20th has been postponed.
Nurse Tilt, of Dauphin, was a visitor her home on the Mossey River.

1914 Feb 19 – Winnipegosis

Here has certainly been something doing at the curling rink this past week, both sheets going every night and some very close and exciting games. In one night Walmsley and McNichol, Medd and Dennett had to play an extra end to break the tie, McNichol and Dennett won. The following night Watson and Medd had to play an extra end, Medd winning. The same night McDonald certainly put it all over McNichol, the latter not seeding the chalk until the last end Friday night. Walmsley showed Watson the road 13 to 3. The game of the season was played between McDonald and Dennett. As they were late in getting started they were only to play ten ends. At the ninth end the game stood 11-6 in favour of Dennett; but would you believe it? McDonald scored 6 on the last end, winning by one. How did you do it Mac? Monday night the Doc rink was up against Walmsley. The Doc. not being able to be there, his third man, John Black, a new curler, trimmed Walmsley in good style Watson beat McNichol. Tuesday night McDonald trimmed Walmsley and McNichol beat Dennett.
The boys are in good trim for the Dauphin bonspiel and are looking forward to showing the Dauphin boys where the game started.
Council meeting was held in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Thursday. Councillors all present; some of them arriving to do with that.
The Hotel Winnipegosis is certainly doing a great business now. So many fishermen are coming in it keeps them busy trying to furnish them with accommodation. Mine Host McInnis has added a few more rooms to the hotel and says, “Come on boys, there is always room for one more.”
Wm. Ford and wife left on Wednesday for Winnipeg. We were very sorry to see them go as they were well liked by everybody here.
Dr. Medd was called to Fork River last Friday. There is an outbreak of scarlet fever and a large number have been quarantined.
Wm. Christinson has bought John Seiffert’s residence and will be moving there in a short time.
C.L. White is remodelling the house he brought from John Spencer, of Brandon. When finished it will certainly be a fine place as Charley knows how to go about it.
Frank Hechter left on Monday for Winnipeg. Frank is a great sport and be ??? had to take in the ???
The snowplough arrived from up the lake with an outfit of fish and fishermen on Tuesday. It was a sight worth seeing, sleighs with seventy-five boxes of fish, a caboose on the top with a family living in it. They were six days on the trip. Now, that’s an outing for your life. That will be the last trip for the snowplough this ??? All the fish are in and the [missing section].

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 12 – 1914

1914 Feb 12 – Lake View Hotel Winnipegosis Destroyed By Fire

Early Sunday morning Winnipegosis was given a bad fire scare. With a high wind blowing it seemed that the greater part of the Main Street was doomed. A call was sent to the Dauphin Fire Brigade to be in readiness, in case the fire spread.
The fire started though the collapsing of the furnace about 9 a.m., in the basement of the Lake View Hotel, and in less than two hours the building was a complete wreck.
The fire gained such headway before a general alarm was given, that two of the female staff were compelled to jump from the second storey windows and received a severe shaking up.
The citizens of the town turned out in force and formed a bucket brigade. It is due to their strenuous efforts that the fire was confirmed to the one place. Several times adjacent property appeared to be doomed.
Hotel Winnipegosis, which is just across the street was given a bad scorching on the one side. All the window glass being broken by the heat.
The contents of Walmsley’s poolroom, Whale’s general store and Paddock’s butcher shop were cleared out.
Part of the contents of the hotel were saved, but the boarders and staff practically lost all their property.
The hotel was managed by Wm. Ford and owned by The Brewer’s Syndicate. The loss is partially covered by insurance.
The burned building was one of the first hotels in the district on the advent of the railway some fifteen years ago.

Fork River

The funeral service of the late W. Davis was conducted by Mr. Williams, lay reader of All Saints’ Anglican Church on Tuesday, February 3rd, at the house of the deceased. The remains were interned in the Fork River Cemetery followed by a very large crowd from the surrounding vicinity.
J. Robinson, of Mowat, has shipped over 60 boxes of fish caught in Lake Dauphin.
C.E. Bailey, Fred Cooper and W. King, C.M., returned from the annual meeting of the Country Orange Lodge in Dauphin. They report a good time.
Mrs. Gunness and two children have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Paswegan, Sask.
John Richardson had the misfortune to loose a valuable mare this week when he entered the stable in the morning the beast was found dead.
Mrs. Russell and children, of Kamsack, arrived and intend making their home with Captain Russell, teacher of the Beacon Heath School.
W. Hunkings, assessor, paid Clerk Wilson a visit on municipal business.
John Angus, of Winnipeg, pays frequent visits to this burgh. It’s all right John, Kitty’s busy these days catching owls.
W. King had a number of sheep killed by dogs ??? ??? making short work of any animal looking for mutton on his ??? in the future.
Don’t forge to [1 line missing] and fancy basket social under the auspices of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church. The ladies will furnish the baskets. There will be a short programme of songs, recitations, etc. [1 line missing] to come and have a good time. Admission 20 cents. On Friday night, Feb. 20th , at 9 o’clock sharp.

Winnipegosis

Fire completely destroyed the Lake View Hotel here Sunday morning. The fire originated in the basement, and gained such headway before being discovered that some of the guests had to escape through the upper story windows, not being able to save any of their personal effects. The citizens responded very quickly as soon as the alarm was given, and through hard work managed to confine the fire to the one building. Walmsley’s poolroom had a narrow escape. It being on fire several times but the bucket brigade never gave up, and the building only received a bad scorching. Hotel Winnipegosis looked at one time as if nothing could save it. The heat was so intense that all the windows were broken on the one side, but with a cost of paint and new windows the appearance of the fire will be gone. Had it burned, a number of us would be living in tents today.
Dr. Medd is certainly getting even with the boys now for what they did to him at the beginning of the curling season. He was a little unfortunate then, not having Ben Hechter and Jack Duhurst trained to get the broom instead of the fence. But now look out for the Doc. Why McDonald and his scouts only beat him by a very small margin Monday night. The Dr. and Watson had a good game Friday night only Watson had no use for the chalk. Dennett and Walmsley played a good game the same night, Dennett winning by 3 points. Watson’s rink won from Dennett Monday night 13-9. Jack Angus was the skip.
Mrs. Paddock left on Wednesday for Brandon, where she will remain a few days vising friends.
Sid Craighill, who has been confined to his bed through sickness, we are glad to report is around once more.
J.E. Morris arrived in town from his fishing camp last Thursday. He says the fishing is light.
It is rumoured there is likely to be a telephone line extended to South Bay this spring. It would be a grand thing for the farmers in that district. There will be a good number of phones put in here this spring.
Harvey Watson left on Monday for Dauphin on a business trip.
Wm. Christinson, wife and child arrived in town Monday from their fishing camp.
Willie McNichol and Gillis Johannesson got in on Saturday. It won’t be all down, then there will be something doing.
We are certainly getting a taste of cold weather now. The thermometer at the post office on Tuesday morning registered 32 below zero. One thermometer in town registered 54 below. Wednesday morning 53 below and still going down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 5 – 1914

1914 Feb 5 – Fork River

Miss Pearl Cooper returned home from a month’s visit among her numerous friends in Dauphin.
Rev. Ernest Williams returned from a visit to his parishioners at Winnipegosis.
William Northam is a visitor to the lake town on important business.
The first heavy snowstorm of the season reached here on Wednesday last and there is enough of the beautiful snow to satisfy those who have much teaming to do.
John Clemens paid a visit to Dauphin in connection with the elevator here.
Wm. Davis, of Fork River, was taken seriously ill at Winnipegosis on his return from a trip up the lake for fish with his teams and he never rallied but passed away on Sunday morning. Our heart felt sympathy hoes to Mrs. Davis in this her greatest bereavement.
The Mossey River Council will meet at Winnipegosis on Thursday, Feb 12.
Those K’s referred to make a great team; hard to beat; even the Irish wit is left dumbfounded. A few more Scotch emigrants and Whitechapel cockneys would be good thing for this community. They are noted for their straight talk not like the L’s [1 line missing] follow up the K’s as for alphabet regulations, but ??? buck anything the K’s are interested in, for what reason is best known to themselves. The K’s are not looking for trouble but are not sleeping friends. Nuff said.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 16 – 1913

1913 Jan 16 – Building for 1913

Dauphin undoubtedly enjoyed the greatest building boom during this year which has occurred in the history of the town. Already plans are being prepared for a dozen modern residences. The business blocks which will be built during the year include the Bennett block, McDonald-Voight block and one or two others which are under contemplation.

1913 Jan 16 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. J. Cameron, of Neepawa, are spending a few weeks with Alex Cameron, of Mowat Centre.
Wm. Davis returned from fish haul of a few days and reports fishing good this year.
John Nowsed, who was teaching school at Aberdeen, Sask., is spending his vacation with his parents.
R.C. Sparling, of Dauphin, is here on business for the companies he represents.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Cooper returned from a visit to the Lake Town.
Miss M. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, will wield the rod of correction over her scholars of Mossey River School, having the position of teach for 1913.
Messrs. Bawden and Simpson of Dauphin, interviewed Mr. D.F. Wilson at his office on business.
Max and Fred. King are busy among the farmers sawing their wood and crushing their grain with their gasoline outfit.
Miss Pearl Wilson returned from a week’s visit among her friends at Sifton.
Mr. Sturdy is back from his trip to the city and is looking good and as sturdy as ever.
Threshing is making slow progress these cold days. We are told W.R. had so many men he had to turn them out for want of room.
Wm. King, county master, is away on his annual trip visiting the Orange Lodges in Dauphin county.
The Press keeps ringing the changes on what Sir Wilfy did and what he did not do. If they only publish what he didn’t do when he had the chance, they would have the biggest paper in Canada.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 8 – 1913

1913 Jan 8 – Boy Fell from Balcony

Mrs. Jas. Gardiner and her three year old son of Kelwood, were calling at the Canadian Northern hotel late Sunday afternoon. They were upstairs and the boy finding the door leading to the front balcony open went out on it. Boy like, he started climbing on the railing to amuse himself. Once he got on top of it and losing his balance fell to the steps below, a distance of fifteen feet. Bystanders instantly picked the boy up and took him into the hotel. A physician was sent for and on examination it was found his leg was broken, but otherwise he appeared to have escaped injury. The child was removed to the hospital and the fracture limb set. He is doing splendidly and will soon be around again. It was a miraculous escape.

1913 Jan 8 – Fork River

S. Monington, who has been spending a few weeks with J. Robinson in the Mossey, returned home to Neepawa for the holidays.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, and Edwin King, of Prince Albert, spent the holidays at their respective homes.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School, returned to her duties on Monday.
On the night of the 23rd a Christmas tree and concert were given under the auspices of All Saints’ S.S. and W.A. The Hall was tastefully decorated with flags and bunting and was a credit to the committee in charge. There was a large turnout, the hall being crowded. W. King was chairman. The programme consisted of songs, drills and recitations and great credit is due the ladies of the W.A. and Miss Weatherhead for the way the children performed their various parts. E. Williams, minister in charge, distributed the prizes to the pupils. W. Davis substituted for Santa Claus and was kept busy with his assistants distributing presents to the little folks. At the close, Miss Eva Ellis and Joe Nowsede, on behalf of the teachers and pupils of the S.S., presented Mr. King, superintendent and Warden, with a valuable gold fountain pen, which came as a surprise and was very much appreciated by Mr. King who thanked them for their kindness. Bags of candies and fruit were then distributed among the kiddies and everyone claims they had the time of their life. We take this means of thanking all those who took part in helping us making it a success. After supper the young folk took charge of the hall and tripped the light fantastic till the wee sma’ hours.
Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson and family spent Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wood, at Sifton.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is spending the holidays with his family here.
We are sorry to hear that Mr. Isaac Hafenbrak is seriously ill in the Dauphin Hospital. The members of his family have the sympathy of this community and we trust he will soon be around again all right.
The annual ball of New Year’s night, under the auspices of the members of Purple Star, L.O.L., No. 1765, was a success. The music was supplied by Kitt Bros., of Sifton, Messrs. Mooney, of Valley River and Mr. Watson and Mrs. Paddock of Winnipegosis. J. Frost and A. Hunt were the floor managers. There was a large turnout. Sifton, East Bay, and Winnipegosis were well represented. County Master W. King and Bro. H.J. Woods, of Dublin Bay, gave short addresses after supper. Bro. Woods also gave us some good Irish songs. From the Grand March at 9 o’clock till the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at 6 o’clock in the morning the dance went with a swing. The members of 1765 appreciate very much the presence of many friends who came from a distance, to assist in having a good time.

1913 Jan 8 – Winnipegosis

Miss Molly Hechter has concluded a visit to her brothers, leaving for Winnipeg.
Four teams loaded with fish fell through the ice on the 28th, while the teams were negotiating a crack, but fortunately there were no causalities and everything was recovered the following morning.
Captain Jack Denby, late commodore of the Mossey River squadron, arrived from up the lake on Friday, looking very happy and prosperous, reporting great time among the fishermen.
Joe Alex, our peripatetic vendor of commodities to outlying districts, had a nasty experience on the lake six miles from home on Friday night, white it was snowing and very dark, his horses getting out of hand and bolting for home. He reckons, and so do other reasonable persons, that a beacon of some kind should be placed at the mouth of the river to give a line of direction on the town as in trying to strike the river on a dark night is like driving into a black wall. At any rate, it would help to advertise the place by letting people in the East know that there is a little rising town in the West that will come into its own some day.
Mr. King, the newly elected reeve, paid a visit to thank his adherents for their kind support and, of course, promised to do something.
George Cunliffe has been appointed magistrate in place of Mr. Parker, and his selection for the post appears to give general satisfaction.
John I. Matthews, from the old country, is spying out the land in this district and evidently wishes to put a few thousand into real estate and as he professes to have great knowledge regarding this question, no doubt he will make good.
Mr. Hulme, schoolmaster, and Miss Hayes, schoolmistress, returned from their vacation on the 5th.
Curling was in full swing on the night of the 5th, being the first game of the season. Mr. Barbour, a promising recruit, should, under the tutorship of Donald Hattie, come to the front in one of the ensuing Bon Spiels.
Mr. Hunkings, our indefatigable chief constable, has been busy lately collecting evidence and prisoners at the different reserves in connection with the illicit sale of liquor, and as a result Mr. Akbar and Paul Samaty, with two Indians, were dispatched to Winnipeg under the charge of Supernumerary Constable McKercher. Akbar was fined $200, or two months and Samaty, $100 or one month. The first named paid up and was pleased to use his return ticket, while Samaty will have a nice little holiday at the Government’s expense.
There are several more cases pending, the worthy magistrate having ordered a remand.