Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 12 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 12 – Fork River

Miss E. French, of Grandview, is staying with Mrs. John Clemens.
Mrs. I. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor of Mr. Duncan Kennedy’s.
Some persons have been kind enough to visit the storehouse of one of our citizens and help themselves to meat, and he takes this means of advising them that he has laid in a stock of ammunition and is ready for target practice.
S. Reid returned from a short visit to Dauphin on business.
Mrs. D. Kennedy is spending a week among her numerous friends in Dauphin.
A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the home of Mrs. Nat Little on Dec. 4th. A few braved the snow storm and after business was done an enjoyable time was spent. It was arranged that the next meeting be held at the home of the vice-president, Mrs. Lacey, of Oak Brae, in January at the call of the president, Mrs. W. King.
Jack Richardson has been elected by acclamation councillor for Ward 1 and we believe he will be all right. No doubt we will miss the usual display of fireworks when we ask for anything. We’ll get used to it in time I guess. Say, it’s nice to be able to bind and stack your crop in good time, while others have to flounder around in mud and snow and yet we are all expected to cash up. What for? “Keep Smiling.”
Dear “Freddy” asked for another term to finish what he didn’t do last year? He reminds us of “Sir Wilfy” and the Hudson Bay Railway. It’s the same old chestnut at election time. Nuff said.
The annual public Xmas tree under auspices of the W.A. and All Saints; Sunday School will be held in the Orange Hall Xmas eve. A programme provided. Everybody come, bring the kiddies and have some fun.

1912 Dec 12 – Winnipegosis

The Women’s Auxiliary held a meeting last week at Mrs. Kitcheson’s that was very encouraging to its members, who, without any graves to tend can say “we are seven,” though they have the problem to solve of the “how” and “why” they are to raise funds to build a church. The proceeds to be realized from the concert to be held on the 20th will be allocated to the mission debt contacted last summer. Regret is felt that we have not a residing minister here. We know Mr. King deserves credit for the faithful way he succeeds in bring us a Sunday supply. Mr. Noble is constant to his duties and taking circumstances into consideration we do not fare so badly.
The Roman Catholics held mass last Sunday morning, Father Derome officiating.
The C. League last week entertained a fair number (not withstanding the storm) at their months social evening.
The Card Circle the last two evening was of indifferent issue, the prizes being won by draw. In future admission is free.
Mrs. Cunliffe has suffered from a fall down the step of her home. We trust she has not sustained any serious injury.
Miss Parker, of Valley River, came in on Saturday to visit her sister, Mrs. Hippisley.
The late storm, which was of the blizzard kind, has greatly subsided though drifts are forming. The hunters will be delighting in the advantage it affords them.
Mr. Thompson, of Portage la Prairie succeeded in securing a moose on Saturday last. Messrs. Starling and Lunn arrived on Saturday from Portage to join his party. Dr. Medd is recalled from his outing to attend Miss Whale, who is ill from the effects of a bad cold.
Mr. Newell’s moving pictures were of an edifying character as well as amusing. He has left town for Fork River.
Mr. McNichol is very low at present.
The late H.B. Stand has the appearance, from a new coat of paint, of possibly being an attractive centre of business.

1918 Dec 12 – Fork River

Two cars of horses were brought in to the district lately. Horses equally as good as can be bought locally, but strange to say the farmers prefer over their hard earned ducats for animals that are backed up, not with a pedigree, but with a plausible story.
How is it that the minutes of the council have not been published lately? He only opportunity the ratepayers have of knowing what is going on is what they read in the columns of the Herald. Let us have light.
A cablegram received from Lorne Lacey states that he has arrived safely in England. Lorne has been a prisoner of war in Germany for a considerable time, and it is a great relief to his friends to know that he is safe on British soil once more.
Sid Frost left last week in the best of health to spend the winter with his parents in Rathwell. He stopped over in Winnipeg, where he took sick and died. Decreased was of a quiet disposition and was liked by all who knew him. He was a member of L.O.L. No. 1765.
Corporal Stanley King is spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. King. He will resume his duties as section foreman at Togo. Mr. and Mrs. King contributed four sons to the defence of the Empire, which is a record to be proud of.
The contest for the reeveship is proving interesting. All three candidates appear to be confident of election. The counting of the ballots on Tuesday night will solve the mystery.

1918 Dec 12 – Winnipegosis

The first carload of fish this season was shipped out on Tuesday by the Armstrong Independent Fisheries, Limited.
J.G. Hamilton has arrived in town to take over the departmental management of the Armstrong Trading Co.’s store.
Mr. Bradley has raised a porker which tips the scale at 490lbs.
H. Johnson, who was fishing on Lake Winnipegosis for the Armstrong Trading Co., lost his life early this week by falling through the ice. The deceased was returning home to his camp and trod on thin ice which broke and threw him into the water. He was carried away by a strong current before help could arrive. The deceased leaves a wife to mourn his loss.
The collectors’ report shows over $300 collected for the Sailor’s fund from the town alone.
Last Saturday there was a lively scene at the C.N. railway station to welcome home two returned soldiers – Neily McCaulay and Alex Chartrand. Flags were in abundance and the whole town turned out to welcome the heroes home. The soldiers were heartily cheered and the school children led the singing of patriotic songs. Both men were escorted in an auto driven by Mayor Whale to their homes. The school children and townspeople formed a procession on either side of the auto and enlivened the way singing, cheering and waving flags. The reception of the soldiers was conducted under the superintendence of the Returned Soldiers’ League.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 11 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 11 – Fork River

Mr. Mornington, of Neepawa, is spending the hunting season with John Robinson, of Mowat.
Several cars are being loaded with bailed hay at this point. The hay is of good quality.
David Briggs, of Brandon, and Ed. Briggs, of Souris, are visiting their brother, T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey during the hunting seasons.
John Tidsberry of Dauphin, spent a few days here on business lately.
John Clemens was lucky enough to get a noose and is now busy shipping grain from the elevator as farmers are busy drawing in grain this nice weather.
The municipal election is in full blast and the candidates are busy as bees.
Fred Cooper and W. Williams have returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The mayor, aldermen and several others of Winnipegosis, attended the nomination at Fork River. Everything passed off quietly.
Wm. Foley and Mr. Elliot were visitors here on Sunday last.
Nat Little and son are buying up another shipment of cattle.
Fork River has a blacksmith now. Once as been wanted for some time badly. Another new industry is a laundry.
The annual school meeting for Mossey River S.D. was held in the municipal office on Dec. 1st. A. Hunt the retiring trustee, was returned for another term. A school in the village is needed very much as the majority of the scholars have to travel a mile and a half from the village and often farther.
Wm. Northam has returned from a visit to Weyburn, Sask.

1919 Dec 11 – Two Fatal Accidents

Two accidents occurred at the weekend which resulted fatally. Oliver Trann, who was employed by Evans & McEwen at their sawmill in the Riding Mountain, was killed on Friday by a falling tree. He was a resident of Crystal City, Man., and 28 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children.
Peter Terresdale, aged 22 years, received he contents of a shotgun in the left hand and abdomen at McPherson’s camp on Saturday afternoon. He was removing a shotgun from a sleigh when it accidentally discharged. He was taken to the hospital and died there on Sunday afternoon. Deceased’s home in in Indiana.

1919 Dec 11 – Fork River

The Christmas tree arranged for to be held in Orange Hall on Christmas eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ Church, has been cancelled. The S.S. will have their Xmas tree in the church on Xmas eve, and the staff hopes to have a pleasant time with the scholars.
Rev. Mr. Roberts held service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, 7th inst.
At the annual meeting of Purple Star L.O.L. No. 1765, the brethren decided to hold a ball on New Year’s Eve. Good music and supper. Admission, gents, $1.
The following officers of Purple Star, L.O.L., were elected: Bro. Fred. King, W.M.; H. Hunter, D.M.; M. Cooper, chaplain; W. King, R.S., reelected; A. Hunt, F.S. C.E. Bailey. Treas.; Edwin King, D of C.; F.F. Hafenbrak, lecturer; S. Reid, D.L.; F. Cooper, 1st com.; W. Russell, Fred. Armstrong, J. Bickel, committeemen.
A very interesting debate took place in All Saints’ Church on the evening of Dec. 3rd, under the auspices of the Sunday school. Subject of debate was, “Resolved, that a city boy has greater advantages than a country boy.” The captain for the affirmative was Mrs. A.J. Little; negative, Mr. Jarvis. Very interesting points where given on both sides although the negative won by five points. Chairman for the evening was W. King; critic, D.F. Wilson, Sr.; judges, Miss Hess, Mrs. E.V. Lockwood and D.F. Wilson, Jr. These regular Wednesday evening meetings are for the advancement of the Sunday school and any one interested in the work are invited. Meeting for Dec. 10th will be in the form of a parlor field meet and is in the hands of The Daniel’s Band, Mr. Lockwood’s class of boys.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 7 – 1912

1912 Nov 7 – Fork River

George King, of Dauphin, was here renewing old acquaintances between trains.
Miss Grant of Pine View was visiting her friends at Valley River during the weeks end.
Thos. Ramsay, P.M. of Sifton, was here on business with D. Kennedy.
Walter Clark has returned staying for a short time at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
Rev. H.H. Scrase, who has been visiting his brother at Swan River and attending the mission at Dauphin, returned on Saturday’s train.
S. Briggs, who was here renewing acquaintances for a short time, has returned to Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy and family have returned after visiting friends at Ochre River and Dauphin.
Miss Olive Clark and miss Comber have returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Hallowe’en has passed, and to judge from the looks of the town next morning, those who too part in the the tricks, should be pleased with themselves if they call it fun. Even the church was made to pay toll, which is going the limit.
The elevator gang has left. The elevator is now open for business with Jack Clemens in charge.
What’s the matter with the Bay Centre correspondent of the Press. We must have touched him on a sore spot by the remarks he makes of the Fork River scribe. We would advise him to give up his Hooligan tactics of sandbagging people and to roost with the owls till it freezes up.
One of our enterprising citizens has surrounded his lot on Main Street with an ornamental fence.

1912 Nov 7 – The Fork River Settlement

Pretty much all the history of the Dauphin district dates from the advent of the C.N.R. The actual settlement of the northern part of the country, which includes Fork River and Winnipegosis, commenced in 1897, when the railway entered. It is true there were parties who squatted here and there, but the first settlement amounted to nothing when estimated in figures. It was not until three or four years later that the municipality of Mossey River, which comprises the territory described, was organized. Your correspondent spent a few house at Fork River the other day, and what is more important, spent them pleasantly. It is some fourteen years since the writer first visited the new thriving village of Fork River, and some of those he formed an acquaintance with then, were there to greet him last week. The village of Fork River is located on the Fork and Mossey Rivers, and within a mile or two of its centre, a considerable number of people reside. The land along the Mossey and Fork Rivers is as good as there is to be found anywhere on the American continent, which is saying much. It was but natural then that those who came in first selected the best farms, those along the rivers. The country about was at one time covered with a growth of timber, which included tamarack, spruce and poplar. The latter kind was the most frequently met with. Much of it, of course, has since disappeared before the axe of the lumberman and the wood chopper. Another destructive elements has been fire. In the early days wood had little value and no effort was made to preserve timber. Much timber was needlessly destroyed which would be of considerable value today. But most of us are like the German, if our foresight was as good as our hindsight, we would soon get rich. There is, however, much consolation in the fact that good land will soon produce enough grain to find money to purchase fuel. Like other new districts the Fork River settlement has been up against manta drawbacks, notably wet seasons and poor roads. But somebody remarks, are these not the condition which develop strong men? Yes, truly, but, at times, even the heart of the pioneer sinks. Take the present year as an example. Conditions were such as to try the metal most of us are made of. Even more, the loss of crop is bad enough, but add to this financial obligations incurred and can’t be met, and the burden seems too heavy to bear.
But enough of lamenting. Let us turn to the people themselves. We don’t know where one will find a finer band of pioneers than at Fork River. There is Tom Glendenning, who was there many a day before the railroad. A splendid specimen of the pioneer; good-hearted and a true friend.
Tom Briggs, another who was in the settlement before, we were going say, the war, but we mean before the railroad. The Briggs Bros., Dave and Tom, went though the worst of it, and still wear pleasant faces. Incidentally, it manta be mentioned that Dave is no longer following, like Cincinnatus, the low.
There’s Sam Bailey, who, while not in before the iron horse, has been there long enough to establish his sterling qualities. He’s a good fellow and one can’t meet too often.
Wm. King, pioneer farmer and stock breeder. Has faced difficulties, met them and overcame them. Besides farming on an extensive scale he is bending his energies to improve his own and other people’s stock. Truly a valuable man in any community.
D.F. Wilson – there’s no mistaking him; besides quality he’s got size, both important factors in a new country. He has farmed, is a breeder of stock and fills the important office of municipal clerk. Has also done his share to develop the district.
Nat Little, pioneer merchant. Has been there a long time, and, what’s better, has succeeded. A good fellow with a weakness for the Shetland pony.
Coun. Geo. Nicholson, too, has had the usual ups and downs, seen the rough and the smooth and is still staying with the job.
Reeve Lacey, not such an old-timer as some of the others, but has, in the time he’s been there established his worth and taken a willing hand in the work of development. For several years he has been in the council and is now its head.
W.T. Snelgrove can look quite a ways back. He has seen more than a little of the life of the pioneer. As a hunter he has quite a record in the deer line and can relate some interesting experiences. Some day, when we have time at our disposal and more space we may relate some of W.R.’s exploits.
While speaking of the Snelgroves its opportune to mention morally and Alf. There some pioneers, too.
Alex. Cameron is not exactly one of the prime old-timers, but has been in the distinct quite a few years. There is just this difference between Alex. and most of the other settlers, he had the “dough” and they didn’t. It don’t take long to tell this, but oh, what a world of meaning there is in it. Money is highly important to us all, but when we haven’t got any and need it, words fail to impress its importance on us. May every man who has a healthy pocketbook know how to use its contents as judiciously and generously as Alexander Cameron.
There are many others worthy of a word in this article, but space forbids. They have done their part and performed it well. What more can be said? There’s the Rowe brothers, A. Hunt, Geo. Tilt, W. Northam, C. Clark, F. Cooper, and Frank and Vivan Hafenbrak.
Then, what about the women? Are they, too, not pioneers in the true sense. Yes, indeed; they are worthy of a special article and even then justice could not be done them. They have taken their part, a part which carried its own burden. A burden, no matter how heavy, always cheerfully carried when the interest of their families and their homes was at stake.
Municipal organization should come in for a chapter. Its work is important in our advancement. The reeves and councillors help materially to make history. If they have done their part well and faithfully their names should be writ in large letters.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 28 – 1913

1913 Aug 28 – Broke His Leg

John Coleen, of Red Deer Point, Lake Winnipegosis, broke his leg on Tuesday by falling out of a wagon. He was brought to the hospital here on Wednesday by Dr. Medd.

1913 Aug 28 – Ethelbert

Peter Pundy was arraigned before Magistrate Skaife last week charged by George Marantz with plastering manure over he windows of his store. He was found guilty and the fine and costs amounted to $31. There is talk of Pundy appealing the case.
Wheat cutting is going ahead with all possible speed. The bulk of the crop will be cut by Saturday night.
The Ruthenians have organized a Conservative association with a good membership. The following are the officers elected: Sam Hughes, M.P.P., Honorary President; N.A. Hryhorczuk, President; P. Kuzyk, Vice; K.F. Slipetz, sec.-treasurer and organizer.

1913 Aug 28 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens of Dauphin, spent a short time renewing old acquaintances last week.
Mr. Morrison, of the Canadian Oil Co. of Winnipeg, was busy here taking orders for gasoline and oil.
Our weed inspector is busy these days. One of our farmers was mulcted to the tune of twenty-five dollars and costs. We are informed another man at Winnipegosis was put to the trouble of having a gang of men cutting down a common weed for sow thistle. This weed business seems a complicated proposition and needs handling very carefully. The enforcing of the act has become a necessity here.
We are informed that a new fruit store is in operation. Opposition is the life of trade we are told.
Fred. Storrar returned from Winnipegosis, where he had charge of a booth during the picnic and reports a swell time.
Mrs. McEacheron and son, Donny, are spending, a few days with her sister, Mrs. E. Morris, at Winnipegosis.
In the absence of the constable last week we hear the lady suffragettes held a successful meeting and everything passed off quietly till they meet again.
Mrs. Kennedy and family and Miss A. Godkin returned from Winnipegosis, after spending a week at that point among their numerous friends.
Quite a number took in the trainmen’s picnic to Winnipegosis and report having a good time there.
James McDonald returned from a two weeks’ visit among friends in the south and is looking hearty and has resumed charge of the express automobile.
Picture to yourself Main Street east in our little burgh where night after night a band of from twenty to forty head of cattle laying around till there is not room to pass between them and the dwelling houses with a team and the aroma that arises with a hot sun beating down on it every day. Again, a benighted traveller crossing over in the dark and landing in one of those pyramids dedicated to the memory of cowology. A voice calling to be helped out and a pillar of brimstone and fire arises blazoned with it, to the downfall of those who put the herd law out of existence. Is it not a disgrace to a civilized community to put up with such a state of affairs.
Mrs. W. King returned from a short stay at Winnipegosis with her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, during the illness of her little son who died last week.
The Rev. Mr. Roberts held service in the Methodist Church on the 24th.
The Rev. Mr. Wosney will hold service in All Saints’ English Church every Sunday at three in the afternoon till further notice.
The first car of fish of the season passed through here from Lake Winnipegosis last week.
A large assortment of vegetables is shipped from this point which is sampled by the stock running at large to the discomfort of the shipper.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 19 – 1913

1913 Jun 19 – Fork River

George Tilt, noxious weeds inspector, is very busy serving notices on the farmer at their homes.
Wm. Stonehouse, builder and contractor, has left for Winnipegosis to help build a mansion for J.P. Grenon.
Mrs. Ivor Humphreys has opened an up-to-date boarding house, which will fill a long felt want in this burgh. We wish her success in the undertaking.
Frank Chase and John Clemens, of the Northern Elevator Co., Dauphin, were here on business lately.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy has returned from a few days’ visit with friends at Dauphin.
Wm. Northam left for Weyburn, Sask., to spend the summer months with friends and intends combining business with pleasure.
F.B. Lacey, of Mowat Centre, has returned from a short visit to the Lake Town on business.
Pat Powers was here renewing acquaintances. He still wears that genial smile, by the Powers.
The seeding is over and everyone is looking for a bumper crop as the weather is ideal and everything is looking O.K. Butter and cream are coming so fast that it keeps that white apron in a continual whirl.
Dr. Leadbeater, veterinary surgeon, paid us a visit lately.
We are sorry to hear Charles Clark, one of our most respected old-timers, is leaving us for Saskatchewan.
R.C. Sparling, real estate agent, of Dauphin, spent a couple of days here lately on business. He left for Sifton on the Fork River special.
T.B. Venables has purchased an Evinreede motor engine for his new boat from Max. King, agent for the Scott Motor Co.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 8 – 1913

1913 May 8 – Fork River

Seeding is the order of the day. The land is getting in good order and everyone is as busy as bees and expects to put in a large crop if the fine weather continues.
John Clemens, of Dauphin, was up inspecting his farm and intends putting in a crop.
“Say, Mike, did yees notice the state of the crossing in front of the express office? It looks like Paddy’s pants, “more holy than righteous.” Some one will get hurt there yet.”
“Well, Pat, I am told it is caused by the heavy mail passing over it to the municipal office. Shure they are mistaken as I notice all the crossings in Winnipegosis are about busted up, too. They have only been down one year.”
“Well, Mike, its either those heavy draft horses of Josies that’s playing the divel with them crossings or their not built right. We’ll have to see the reeve about it. Fancy building crossings on Main Street with two inch spruce plank.”
We notice in last week’s issue a paragraph about early hatching of eggs in Manitoba given as the 11th April and we would like to inform our readers that Dunc Kennedy had chicks out on the 1st of March and are now well grown. What about Fork River for poultry raising. There were raised by the hen.
Mrs. A. Cameron and Mrs. G. Shannon of Mowat Centre were visitors to the Lake Town this week.
R.C. Sparling, real estate agent of Dauphin, paid us a short visit on business.
Mrs. Wm. King returned from a two weeks’ visit to her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, at Winnipegosis.
W. Williams, lumber merchant, returned from Dauphin and states Mrs. William is improving in health.
Miss Ena Fredrickson has been transferred to the Armstrong Trading Co. store at Winnipegosis. She will be missed her and her numerous friends wish her a pleasant time in her new position.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has received word from the Synod that he and his family are to be transferred to Kinisota on Lake Manitoba as soon as arrangements are completed.
We are pleased to see Sam Baily around town again after being confined to the house for some time.
Wm. King, having been appointed registration clerk for this district, is busy posting up the bills and starts registration at Winnipegosis, on May 27th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 7 – 1914

1914 May 7 – Escaped in Male Attire

Woman at station on Tuesday Night Dressed in a Man’s Suit – Who was the Woman?
When court was called on Wednesday morning there was a surprise when Chief Bridle gave out that Mrs. Murphy had left town and would not appear to answer the charge of attempting to commit suicide.
How the woman managed to get away is now what is puzzling the police as she was supposed to be in bed at home sick and the trains were being closely watched.
But there is a possible explanation of how the escape was effected. On Tuesday night a woman dressed in a man’s suit was observed on the station platform by several who were there. So sure was the conductor of the train that the supposed man was a woman that he offered to be the cigars with an acquaintance that such was the case. The disguise was very good but the woman, whoever she was, evidently forgot one essential in her make-up, which was a source of much amusement to the bystanders.

MRS. MURPHY HEARD FROM.

This (Thursdays) morning the Herald received a little from Mrs. Murphy, the postmark being Winnipeg, May 6th. In this letter she says that “she has to thank the liars of Dauphin for the trouble they have caused her.” She further remarks that after it is too late she has had her eyes opened and warms other women to beware and not believe liars as she did until it is too late to mend the damage done.

1914 May 7 – Met Instant Death

Maurice Frobisher and his brother arrived a short time ago from St. Norbert, Man., and took up homesteads at Asham Point, in the Ste. Rose district. On Saturday last the two brothers were going by ox team to Ste. Rose. Maurice was sitting in the back end of the wagon holding a rifle, when it accidently discharged, the bullet entering his arm, passing to his jaw and came out at the back of his head. Death was instantaneous.
Dr. Harrington was telephoned for and went to Ste. Rose. After learning the circumstances be decided that an inquest was not necessary.
Deceased was 40 years of age and unmarried.

1914 May 7 – Prairie Fire Does Damage

Prairie fires were running southwest of the town in the Mayflower and Spruce Bluff districts on Friday and Saturday. A dwelling on the farm of Arthur Bule, near the Mayflower School, was burned. A. Maynard lost a quantity of hay and other settlers suffered minor losses.

1914 May 7 – Ethelbert

Seeding has been going ahead actively and much of the wheat has been ???. The recent rain held things up for sure.
Very little wood is now being shipped out, still there are always a few cars moving.
Business is a little on the quiet side of late. Our burgh is becoming quite an egg expecting centre, many cases being shipped out weekly.
Wm. Morray, truancy officer, is visiting schools in our municipality. He is very busy going from one farmer to another making them send their children to school. On account of his visit the school trustees of Ethelbert S.D. have to provide more accommodation for the children that are of school age and who must attend. The people are satisfied with the action of the government in this move and will assist the officer in every way in enforcing the law.

1914 May 7 – Fork River

R. Corbett and his assistant returned to Winnipeg after taking the levels for draining a township and a half and laying out the road to Winnipegosis.
The English Church concert held in the Orange Hall, May 1st, was a very successful one. Our critic here admits it the best. A large number came from Sifton and put on a dialogue, which, to say the least was a laugh maker from start to finish. It pleased everyone. Our Winnipegosis friends were out in force and helped materially and that with the help of Fork River contingent a good evening’s entertainment was enjoyed. An excellent super was provided by the ladies. After supper several hired the hall for a dance and splendid music was supplied by Mr. Russell and sons.
Contractor Briggs is busy these days trying to make Main Street passable. Next thing we know Councilor Richardson will be putting down the balance of the sidewalk and all will be rosy.
John Clemens and family have left for McCreary, where they will reside in the future.
W. King has been appointed registration clerk for the northern portion of Gilbert Plains constituency. He starts in on the 12th of May at Winnipegosis.
Richard Harrison and E. Bickle, of South Bay, were visitors here at the council meeting during court of revision.
The dwelling house of J. McDonald caught fire last week. Captain Wilson and the fire brigade were soon on the ground. There was very little damage done.
Mr. McMillian, of Cyprus River, is a visitor at the home of A. Cameron of Mowat.
Our Mowat friend states they have put a bell and tower on the Mowat School house and yet they forgot to put a foundation under it. Of course, our friend usually does things different from others, which accounts for his being in a kicking frame of mind. He goes on to state the folks he sends to take his mail out, take all the way from one day to a week and the sometimes longer before he gets his mail back. What a shame. We trust he got the paper which contained the write up of how his pet government let the contractors mulet the people out of forty million dollars in building the Transcontinental Railway. Say, F.B. don’t get sore over our convention at Gilbert Plains. Have you forgotten the fuss you made with your friends here and up north because they wanted a share of the swag when you carried the chequebook and had to take a holiday for a few weeks in Winnipeg. You were not missed a bit. Have the common decency to keep in your own backyard, as we believe the glass in our house is of better material than yours and as in the past you can’t afford to indulge in stone throwing.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 30 – 1914

1914 Apr 30 – Attempted Suicide

Early Saturday evening Dr. Rogers was hastily summoned to Mr. F.O. Murphy’s farm, two miles south of town. When he reached the house it was found that Mrs. Murphy, in a fit of passion, had taken a dose of poison. The Dr. immediately put a stomach pump to work and most of the drug extracted, or sufficient to save the woman’s life.
Earlier is he evening Mrs. Murphy, who is of a jealous disposition, assaulted another woman, a Mrs. Clark, who she found in company with her husband. It was this which led up to the woman taking the poison. She had a narrow escape from death. She is recovering slowly but it will be some days yet before she is able to be around again.

TO SETRIEDON CHARGE OF ATTEMPTED SUICIDE.

Chief Bridle has laid a charge against Mrs. Murphy for attempted suicide. The case was to have been tried by P.M. Munson on Wednesday, but owning to her weak condition the trial was postponed until the 4th prox. The penalty for this offence is two years, if she is found guilty.
ASSAULT CHARGE ALSO.
Mrs. Clark has laid a charge against Mrs. Murphy for assault. The case is likely only to go to trial in the event Mrs. Murphy being freed on the first charge.

1914 Apr 30 – Fork River

Miss G. Shannon, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the homestead with her parents.
F. Cooper was a visitor to the Lake Town on business and reports everything very quiet.
John Robinson and Mr. Hunter left for the north for a couple of months to inspect some of the lakes with a view for next winter’s business.
John Clemens is busy loading cars at the Northern elevator.
Our friend Scotty is out on the warpath looking for ducks and geese. We expect to get a fowl supper soon.
Fishing for Jackfish and suckers is the order of the day. All the young fry are busy these days landing the fish with spears and forks.
A. McDonald, of Winnipegosis, has located on the company farm for he summer.
The W.A. of All Saints’ Church is having a concert in Orange hall on May 1st. Everybody welcome.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 3 – 1913

1913 Apr 3 – Nellie McClung Recitals

Mrs. Nellie L. McClung, the popular Manitoba novelist, favoured Dauphin with her first visit this week. She came under the auspices of the Presbyterian Ladies’ Aid, and gave two recitals in the town hall on Monday and Tuesday evenings, respectively. Mrs. McClung gave all her numbers from her own books, “Sowing Seeds in Danny,” The Second Chance,” “The Black Creek Stopping House.” The selections contained variety of wholesome humour and pathos. The splendid character of the author is reflected in her works. Each reading had many lessons to teach. One might go as far as to say some of them were sugar coated sermons. The entertainer was assisted by some of our best local talent including Miss Harvely, the ladies’ quartette, Misses Johnston, Gunne, Coutts, and Cadman; the male quartette, Messrs. Park, Argue, Johnston and Stelck; Mrs. Jewsbury, Miss Astley and Mr. Main. On Tuesday evening the McMurray orchestra was in attendance.

1913 Apr 3 – Ethelbert

Mr. Finch, of Minitonas, took the services at the Methodist Church on Easter Sunday, to full congregation. He gave two very instructive sermons, and was very much appreciated.
We had a novel and spirited debate at the church on Friday night, when six debaters dealt with the subject of “Should women be allowed to vote?” Mr. McPhedran, Mrs. Munro and H. Brackman took the affirmative and Mr. Brown, teacher, Cyril Skaife and N. Booth took the negative.
Two men were arrested on Friday night for a savage attack upon one of the councillors named Mandryk. A preliminary trial was held and upon taking the evidence a fresh summon was taken out and the case will be dealt with Thursday, the 3rd inst.
The council intend putting two cells into the lock up of a substantial and safe character like those at Dauphin. We need a good man as constable.

1913 Apr 3 – Fork River

C. Bradley and family, were visitors from the Lake tow at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mrs. McQuigge and family, of Dauphin, returned home from visiting with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper on the Fork.
Miss Alice Godkin and Katie Williams have returned from a short visit to Dauphin.
A car load of young stock were shipped from here by a farmer for his ranch at Lloydminster, Sask.
The elevator has closed down for the season and John Clemens and family left for Dauphin, where they will reside.
Dave Shinks, general manager for the Williams Lumber Co., east of Lake Dauphin, is renewing acquaintances around town this week.
Mrs. Scrase and Mrs. Kennedy and family spent the weekend at Winnipegosis with friends.
Harcourt Benner returned to his duties at Dauphin and his many friends are pleased to hear his vacation here has been beneficial to him. Come again Harcourt.
Mrs. R. McEacheron and son, Donny, returned from a two months visit to friends in Nova Scotia.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held their annual meeting in the church on Wednesday, March 26th. Quite a number were present. The secretary’s and treasurer’s report were received, showing a good year’s work with a cash balance on hand. The officers elected for the coming year are president, Mrs. W. King; vice. Mrs. Lacey, Mowat; secretary, Mrs. H. Scrase; treasurer, Wm. King.
F.B. Lacey, of Oak Brae, who has been under the weather for some time, is getting around again.
Mr. Gordon and family, of Mowat, have left for North Dakota for a change of climate.
Dunk Kennedy paid the lake town a visit on Sunday.
“Say, Mike, some one’s wife got sick, I am told, and they phoned for a doctor and by the time he arrived the baby had grown bald headed and was crying with the toothache.”
“Well, Pat, that shows we are not paying $600 a year for speed. If we are it got miscarried that time.”
“Now, Mike, don’t put your foot into it again. You know that unless you can yell like “Hell-o” they don’t catch on. It’s the fellow at the other end. Wow.”
“Say, Mike, did yees catch on to the way the members of parliament from the different provinces voted on the proposal of the government to build three Dreadnoughts, to be added to the British fleet, pending the formation of Canada’s permanent naval policy? It’s instructive.”
Our readers should note whence came the opposition. The vote against the government’s proposal as the division recorded in Hansard, was made up thus:

Against
Quebec (with 65 members) 44
Prince Edward Island (with 4 members) 2
Nova Scotia (with 18 members) 9
New Brunswick (with 13 members) 5
Saskatchewan (with 10 members) 6
Alberta (with 7 members) 6
Manitoba (with 10 members) 2
British Columbia (with 7 members) 0
Ontario (with 66 members) 11
Total opposition 85

It is not significant that 75 out of 85 members from the province of the United Empire Loyalist (Ontario) supported the measure, while 44 out of 65 from Quebec opposed it? Besides the 44 members from Quebec, at least 9 members from other provinces who voted against the proposal represented French ridings, making a total of 53, so that at the very outside figure only 32 coming from English speaking ridings, out of a total 221 members, tried to force the government to the country. If time were taken to go further into details it could be shown that one-half of these 32 members represented ridings in which there was a considerable sprinkling of French-Canadian and foreigners. So there is every reason for the assertion that the British people of Canada are well content with Borden’s naval.

1913 Apr 3 – Winnipegosis

The Armstrong Trading Co. has purchased and received a car load of horses from Winnipeg which they have deposited on their farm. A chance is open for any one wishing to purchase a good team. The company is preparing to build an addition to their store, also a house on the farm.
Mr. McArthur and daughters are again residents of their home here. We hope Mr. McArthur will soon join hem, fully recovered.
Mr. Scrase and Master Archer visited in town last week, and were the guests of Mrs. Bradley.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and children, of Fork River, are visiting her mother for the week past. Mr. Kennedy joined her on Sunday to avail themselves of a trip to Snake Island with Inspector and Mrs. White.
Mrs. Langlois and sons have gone on a trip to Le Pas to visit friends there.
The Anglican Church entertainment had to be postponed owing to the interest taken in the moving pictures exhibited here the past week and contined this one, which will make it difficult to satisfactorily produce the playette, “When Greek meets Greek” on the 4th as intended. An interesting competition is being held to raise extra church funds. The cigarette quilt won by Mr. Bradley at a raffle recently being the reward.
Messrs. Coffey, Whale, Ketcheson, White and others are attending a meeting of the masonic order this week in Dauphin.
The spring, though tardy, is likely to prove a delightful one at the Lake.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 5 – 1914

1914 Feb 5 – Fork River

Miss Pearl Cooper returned home from a month’s visit among her numerous friends in Dauphin.
Rev. Ernest Williams returned from a visit to his parishioners at Winnipegosis.
William Northam is a visitor to the lake town on important business.
The first heavy snowstorm of the season reached here on Wednesday last and there is enough of the beautiful snow to satisfy those who have much teaming to do.
John Clemens paid a visit to Dauphin in connection with the elevator here.
Wm. Davis, of Fork River, was taken seriously ill at Winnipegosis on his return from a trip up the lake for fish with his teams and he never rallied but passed away on Sunday morning. Our heart felt sympathy hoes to Mrs. Davis in this her greatest bereavement.
The Mossey River Council will meet at Winnipegosis on Thursday, Feb 12.
Those K’s referred to make a great team; hard to beat; even the Irish wit is left dumbfounded. A few more Scotch emigrants and Whitechapel cockneys would be good thing for this community. They are noted for their straight talk not like the L’s [1 line missing] follow up the K’s as for alphabet regulations, but ??? buck anything the K’s are interested in, for what reason is best known to themselves. The K’s are not looking for trouble but are not sleeping friends. Nuff said.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 9 – 1913

1913 Jan 9 – Engineer Wm. Bowman Killed

Engineer Wm. Bowman, who was running for Engineer Wm. Graham on No. 4 train was killed in the Winnipeg yard on Saturday afternoon last. The train reached Winnipeg safely from Dauphin and Mr. Bowman was running to the roundhouse light when another engine ran into the tender, smashing it and driving the tender into the cab with such force that the boiler was injured in such a way that the steam escaped and scalded Bowman so badly that he expired on the spot.
Jack Cobb, the fireman, escaped through the cab window without suffering any injury.
Engineer Bowman was well-known in Dauphin and sympathy is felt for the family in their great sorrow.

1913 Jan 9 – Frozen to Death

Tuesday was Christmas according to the Galician custom and there was the usual festivities on that day and the following two days. John Kuruk, a Galician about 45 years of age, imbibed freely on Tuesday and Wednesday and on the later day he lay down at the C.N.R. tool house near the bridge and (Thursday) morning was found there frozen to death.
Deceased came from Austria about three years ago and has been working on the railway as a section man. He leaves a wife and two grown-up sons.

1913 Jan 9 – Suffered Bad Cut

Mrs. E.H. Walker was carrying a crock in her hands on Tuesday at the farm three miles south of the town when she slipped and fell. The crock broke and one of the pieces cut a bad gash on her left wrist. An artery was severed and she bled freely for quite a time. A phone message hurriedly brought Dr. Culbertson to the scene when the wound was dressed and Mrs. Walker brought to the hospital. It is expected she will be out in the course of a day or two.

1913 Jan 9 – Fork River

Mr. French, of Grandview, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens.
W. Williams has taken his outfit out to his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Frank Bailey left for Winnipeg after spending his New Year’s holidays with his parents on the Mossey.
Miss M. Nixon left for Findlay, having accepted the position of teacher in that district.
Miss Bessie and Miss Pearl Wilson left on a visit to friends at Sifton.
Professor S. Biggs returned to Dauphin after spending Xmas week among friends.
M. Sturdy, assistant manager of the A.T.Co. store, left on a short vacation. We wish him a good time.
Edwin King, who if with the C.N.R., was a visitor at the home of his parents lately.
Mrs. Willis Miller, of Mowat, who has been under the doctor’s care at Winnipegosis, has returned home.
The C.N.R. surveyor paid a visit and took the measurement of the elevator here.
Mr. Howatson, from Winnipegosis, is relieving Mr. Sturdy at the Armstrong Trading Co. for a few days while Mr. Sturdy is on holiday.
The annual meeting of Purple Star, 1775 was held on Tuesday, Dec 31st. The auditors’ report was most satisfactory, showing a balance in hand, after meeting all expenses for 1912.
The following officers were elected for 1913.
W.M. – Bro F.F. Hafenbrak
D.M. – Bro. W.J. King
Chaplain – Bro. H.H. Scarse, re-elected
Recording Secretary – Bro. W. King, re-elected
Financial Secretary – Bro. C.E. Bailey, re-elected
Treasurer – Bro. C. Bailey, re-elected
D. of C. – Bro. F. Cooper, re-elected
Lecturer – Bro. A Hunt
Dept. Lecturer – S.B. Reid
1st Committeemen – Edwin King, re-elected; C. Clark
Committeemen – J. Frost, Joe Bickle, J.E. Morriss, S.B. Munro, J.C. Bickle
Installation of officers at next regular meeting.

1913 Jan 9 – Winnipegosis

The Standard Lumber Co.’s mill is closed for the season.
The Armstrong Trading Co. has started their snow-plow with ten teams on its first trip up the lake to haul down fish.
Alex McArthur’s steam engine invention is also on a trip for the same purpose.
J.P. Grenon made a trip to Winnipeg on Saturday on business.
There was no Anglican Church service last Sunday owing to the recent storms impeding velocipede transition.
The Christian League held their social evening at the home of Mrs. J.J. Burrell last week. A very enjoyable time is reported.
Mr. Noble has returned to Dauphin to continue his studies after spending a week here visiting his adherents.
Mr. Malley returned on Saturday to Winnipeg.
The school was opened on Friday by Miss Hayes on account of Mr. Hulme not returning till Saturday.
Inspector Charles White has been away to Waterhen.
Miss Bradley has returned to Winnipeg to pursue her studies at St. Mary’s Academy.
Mrs. Bradley last Saturday received a letter from a Greek lady of Athens giving an account of the war raging in the Balkans. The letter was dated Dec 12th.