Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 10 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 10 – Fork River

Miss S. Lacey, of Oak Brae, returned from a short visit to Mrs. J. Spearing of Valley River.
Mrs. Wm. Ramsay, of Sifton, was a visitor with Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase at the vicarage.
Mrs. Wm. King returned home after a week’s say with her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, who is leaving for the north end of the lake for the winter.
J. Playford and Fleming Wilson were visitors here from Dauphin on business.
S. Biggs has given up the Mowat School and is leaving for Dauphin.
H.H. Benner, an old-timer, is travelling around for a few days in the educational chariot renewing acquaintances. We are all pleased to see Harcourt. He is now a regular walking encyclopaedia on real estate.
The C.N.R. bridge gang spent a few days here pile drying and fixing bridges.
Mr. Lampard, of Dauphin, is busy rounding up a car of fat cattle for shipment.
Duncan Briggs, Professor Robinson and Fred Storrar have left with T. Johnston for the winter’s fishing at Dawson’s Bay.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson, who has been spending a week with her daughter, Mrs. L. Humphreys, of Dauphin, returned home Saturday.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs arrived home from a month’s vacation spent with friends in Brandon.

1918 Oct 10 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Albert Jackson Weir, Valley River, wounded. (Albert Jackson Weir, 1888, 2193343)
Pte. Douglas Wells Bentley, Dauphin, wounded. (Douglas Wells Bentley, 1897, 469933)
Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, wounded. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Robert Stanley Colebeck, Dauphin, wounded. (Robert Stanley Colbeck, 1896, 1072198)
Pte. Charles Winstanley Skinner, Dauphin, was wounded and taken to the dressing station. While being conveyed from the dressing station to the hospital he was struck by a bomb and killed. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 15 – 1912

1912 Aug 15 – Appointed Manager of Fish Hatchery

Joseph Grenon, one of the oldest fishermen on Lake Winnipegosis, has been appointed manager of the fish hatchery, which is located on Snake Island. Mr. Grenon’s appointment dates from August first.

1912 Aug 15 – Damage at Gilbert Plains

A hail storm passed over Gilbert Plains on Sunday night and did much damage in the vicinity of the town and covered about two miles in width by eight in length.

1912 Aug 15 – Gypsies For Dauphin

A dispatch from Gretna, Man., states that a large party of Syrian gypsies crossed the international boundary at that point from the United States Saturday, and continued their journey northward at noon. They were heading for the Dauphin district. There were seven caravans, 25 people, and a large number of horses. The gypsies had no difficulty in passing the immigration officials, as they were plentifully supplied with money and goods.
From what can be learned the party will locate on the east side of the lake where they will take up homesteads. They are expected to reach town by the latter end of the week.

1912 Aug 15 – Fork River

Miss Alice and Herman Godkin left the early part of the week on a trip to Saskatchewan.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Williams were visitors to the Dauphin fair.
S. Bailey, F. Cooper, and W.R. Bell returned Saturday from attending the Dauphin exhibition.
Bishop McCartney of All Saints’, and Prof. T. Biggs of Mowat Academy, took a trip south on business.
Mrs. N. Little and daughter Grace, are taking a short vacation.
Mr. Maxim of Winnipeg, spent a week looking over the district. He is well pleased with this part and intends returning shortly with his family. There is plenty of good land within a short distance of the village waiting for settlers.
John O’Neil and family, of Rainy River, returned home after spending a week with Postmaster Lacey of Oak Brae.
Mrs. Peter Robinson spent a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Robinson on the Mossey River.
Mr. McAuley, traveller for the Massey Co., was here a few days on business.
A remark was overheard the other day that our Municipality was run rather loose. On July 5th, our health officer’s attention was drawn to the rubbish dumped a few yards from the Orange Hall. We were promised it would be attended to at once, but we are sorry to say nothing has been done as yet. Ten days after a ratepayer notified the council and they instructed the clerk to notify the health officer. A month has passed and nothing has been done. At the same meeting a by-law was passed presenting the said gentleman with $600 a year. We don’t object doing a fair thing, but in the name of justice let’s have something for it and not be told gone to Winnipeg, Duck Bay or Hong Kong. There is also a by-law against bulls running at large all summer. On numerous occasions complaints have been made. The head beadle remarked that they will have to erect a stable, but at the present rate of going probably nothing will be done. Great Caeasar this is comforting to men who look after their animals. Not long ago Government engineers were up here to lay out roads and make profiles which cost the Municipality a handsome sum of money. Our commissioners instead of following engineers’ instructions make roads so narrow that a man with a wheelbarrow had to wait at cross roads to let a buggy by coming in the opposite direction. Say they dog by-laws are peaches. Have one for every month in the year. What’s the matter Winnipegosis?

Re. the writeup of the Mowat picnic in last week’s Herald and Press. The remarks re certain individuals in Fork River wishing the picnic to be a failure were certainly very uncharitable whoever the writer was as for there being a shortage of lemons that was up to the general manager. Concerning freezers they could have been had as usual for the asking. This is supposed to be a free country and surely people can suit themselves about going to such places without being called to account by some evil thinking person like the writer of the Mowat article.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 13 – 1912

1912 Jun 13 – Fork River

Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove left for a visit to her friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Adams and son of Big Stone, are here loading cordwood for the Armstrong Trading Co., when there are cars.
Mr. McAuley, travelling agent for the Massey Co., spent a few days with D. Kennedy. Travelling agents are all right in their place. What the farmers here want is a better supply of repairs.
The King’s birthday passed off quietly. The Lake Town team failed to appear for the return match. A good dance was held in the Orange Hall by the football team and friends.
Saturday, registration day here, passed off quietly. Several names were added to the list.
Gordon Weaver, of Million, spent a few days with his friends. Gordon scored one goal at football.
There was a ghost around the hall two nights last week and the fair sex did not seem to mind at all.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove returned from Dauphin after spending a few days.
The Fork River football team killed the fatted calf and invited the Winnipegosis team for the return match from the home team and the rustlers. Latest, the Winnipegosis team has the whooping cough and the dropsy caught on the 24th. We trust the doctor will get them in line for the July picnic.
It is rumoured that we are to have an elevator. We hope the rumour is correct as we needs it bad.
K.T. Biggs, the only delegate appointed to represent the Fork River mission, is attending the Synod in Winnipeg this week.
Captain McCartney left for Winnipeg on business.
A very much concert, arranged by Mr. Biggs in aid of the W.A., was held on June 7th in the Orange Hall. The proceeds were given to swell the parsonage fund. The covert was opened by the Mossey River School children singing “Flag of Britain,” which was well rendered, and which gave their teacher, Miss Alserton, much credit. “The Diver” by Mr. McCartney, was well sung and encored. A duet by Ray and Elva Ellis, entitled, “A Boy Called Taps,” was well sung. The next song “Flanagan,” sung by Mr. Culverhouse, was splendid and he was heartily cheered and encored, and a recitation by W. Davis, entitled the “Englishman” was highly appreciated. A quartette by Miss Pearl and Bessie Wilson, Mr. Biggs and Mr. Culverhouse was well rendered. After an interval of a few minutes the Mossey River School children started again and with a chorus, “Summer, Gladsome Summer,” which was well sung, and then another song by Mr. McCartney entitled, “Sleep in the Deep,” and then a song by Mr. Culverhouse “Sang Mackie” and then another recitation by H.H. Benner entitled, “A Minister’s Grievances,” was very laughable and enjoyed by all. This was encored and he came on again and gave another, the last song was “Sweet Genevieve,” by Mr. Culverhouse, Miss Pearl Wilson, Mr. Biggs and Miss Bessie Wilson. The accompanist was Miss Comber, who played well. The chair was taken by W. King and after the sale of ice cream a vote of tanks was given to the chairman and to all who had so very kindly helped. God save the King was sung.
In talking with a farmer about the weather he informed us the moon had a good deal to do with it. To get posted on the matter we looked for the almanac and could now find it, so we turned to the Dauphin Press to see if there was anything from our Mowat friend. Sure there was, we know at a glance how the moon was as at a certain stage of every month it affects his capacious meddle. He seems to be weary of posting as the Mowat Jackass and wants to turn over his troubles to the Fork River scribe. Thanks; we are sure we could not do the same justice as a representative of that animal as our Mowat friend has had long experience in that line. It’s kind of him to compliment us writing funny things to interest the kids, which goes to show he must be in his dotage. The old saying has come true in his case “first a child, then a man,” etc. Our Mowat friend needs something to cheer him up judging from his appearance on his return from the summer resort.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 23 – 1912

1912 May 23 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 23 – Mail Robbery
Mail Bag Disappears Between Fork River and Sifton
Contains Much Money

A few days ago the postmaster at Fork River, D. Kennedy, gave the mail bag from that point to one of the C.N.R. brakeman on the train on that particular day. This man acknowledges receipt of the bag and states that he placed it in the car in the usual way. It may be stated that there is no mail clerk on the Dauphin-Winnipegosis trains and the mail pouches along the line are taken in charge by the railway employees. This necessarily involves much risk to the bags as the employees are engaged at each station for a considerable time in switching and performing other duties.
The bag in question was not missed until Dauphin was reached and a search made for it when it was found to have disappeared. The postoffice authorities at Winnipeg were at once apprised of the matter and Inspector Hicks sent to investigate. He was here on Tuesday and looked into the matter without being able to solve it. Later, however, two special service men were put on the case and developments are expected.
The theory advanced is that the bad disappeared at Sifton.
The registered mail was particularly heavy on this day and besides cheques and money orders there were several hundred dollars in cash.

1912 May 23 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 23 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 23 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 16 – 1912

1912 May 16 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 16 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 16 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 16 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 18 – 1912

1912 Apr 18 – Fork River

Rev. A. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, visited Messrs. H.H. Scrase and Wm. King, warden, on church business.
R. Rowe and bride, returned from their wedding trip and were greeted at the station with the usual rice fusillade. We wish them good luck. Next.
Mr. B. Tate returned to Dauphin, having spent her Easter holidays with Mr. and Mrs. T. Bailey and renewing old acquaintances. Her numerous friends are always pleased to meet their old friend and teacher.
Pat Powers returned from a visit to Winnipegosis and intends starting business shortly in the Albert Edward block.
The C.N.R. will have to put on a watchman to keep those ponies from devouring the ties and rails as they have things about cleaned up, barring the wire for the cemetery, which comes next to culvert pipes.
Nat Little is busy unloading a car of Cockshutt implements of all kinds.
A concert was held in the Orange Hall on Thursday the 11th. A good programme was furnished and there was a very good crowd present. We appreciate the assistance given by people from Winnipegosis and others in helping to make the program a success financially. Mrs. D. Kennedy and Miss Pearl Wilson of the committee instructed Mr. W. King, chairman, to present the proceeds to Mr. Scrase, on their behalf. After supper a good time was spent tripping the light fantastic until morning.
Mr. Biggs, teacher of Pine View School, returned from a trip to Winnipeg.
Miss Gertie Cooper returned to Dauphin after spending Easter holidays with her parents.

1912 Apr 18 – Winnipegosis

Business Men Organize Board of Trade 40 Members Enrolled $1000 Subscribed
A meeting of the business men of Winnipegosis was held on Monday evening to consider the advisability of forming a Board of Trade. There was a large attendance and everyone present were unanimously in favour of this and determined that an aggressive policy of publicity and advertising be put in hand at once. Over 40 members were enrolled at the termination of the meeting and nearly $500 subscribed; it is anticipated that over $1000 will be received in membership fees by the time the new Board of Trade is constituted.
The growth of business at this point has been rapid during the past two years the fish catch which produces a revenues of over $150 000 each winter will soon be overshadowed by farming and other industries that ill utilize the natural resources of the country adjoining the lake. The surrounding district is vert fertile and with a very low expenditure on draining the land can be made the best in Canada; frost is practically unknown of the prairie farmer are unknown. Farmers here have been shipping wheat out west for seed this spring, and for the rancher and dairy man hay can be had in unlimited quantities and an up-to-date creamery has already made a success and is now paying the highest prices.
The new railway that is being built along the West shores of Lake Manitoba will soon be here, opening up a splendid country that will be quickly settled. The dredging of the river to Lake Dauphin will be copulated this summer by the Government dredges and Winnipegosis will become the natural shipping port for the produce form an already prosperous and tickle settled district.
Any advice and assistance from the Dauphin Board of Trade will be greatly appreciated, or, better still, come and spend a week end at Winnipegosis; there is to be another meeting on Monday next, April 22, the business men here will sure give you a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 11 – 1915

1915 Mar 11 – Found Dead in Bed

S.C. Powley, traveller for the firm of James Robertson & Son, of Winnipeg, was found dead in bed at the Kings Hotel on Saturday morning. Coroner Harrington was notified, and after making an examination, decided that an inquest was not necessary. Heart failure was stated to be the cause of death. Deceased was 20 years of age and single. The remains were sent east to Orillia, Ont. on Monday for interment.

1915 Mar 11 – Dauphin Soldier Dead

J.J. Bloomer (John James Bloomer, 1887, 136), private of the C.M.R. who enlisted at Dauphin, died of pneumonia at Brandon on Monday.

1915 Mar 11 – Fork River

Mr. Biggs, of Dauphin, was a visitor for a few days at the home of Mr. F. Wilson on the Mossey River.
F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, is a visitor to Winnipeg to interview the government re a generous grant to the municipality for 1915, which would be very acceptable.
Mr. D.F. Wilson is a visitor to the ‘Peg and will no doubt have a pleasant time.
Mr. Dan McLean is off for a trip south on important business.
Mr. Wiggins, travelling agent for the Winnipeg Steel Granary and Culvert Co., was here lately and appointed W. King agent for this district for 1915.
Mr. McCaulay, travelling agent for the Massey-Harris Co., appointed W. Stonehouse as their agent for Fork River. We should be able to sell him a tin hat on the head of this.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred. Cooper, who have been visiting with friends in Ontario during the last two months, returned home on Friday and are looking hale and hearty. Mr. c. states they had a pleasant time and were pleased to get back to Manitoba.
The roads are getting bare and everyone is buy hauling before the break up.
We hear it is rumoured that we are only to have trains Tuesdays and Fridays. This is Hell after giving them the railroad and paying them to run it. Three times a week is little enough.
In looking over the Mowat correspondence we notice the correspondent takes a Sifton writer to task re sickness. If the professor’s word is worth anything there has been considerable sickness and several deaths in the Wieden district. Then to be fair, why try to cover up these serious matters. It is only the way to keep a clean sheet of health in the community by calling a spade a spade. We do doubt the authorities are doing what they can.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 8 – 1912

1912 Feb 8 – Girl’s Clothes Caught Fire
In a Moment She was Aflame
Father to Rescue Both Burn

What might have been a fatal burning accident occurred at the home of Robt. Fair, whose farm is located about 10 miles south east of Dauphin the later end of last week. His daughter Hattie, who is 22 yeas of age, was suffering from a pain in her face, and her mother advised her to soak a rag in coal oil, heat it and apply. The young woman took the oil can near to the stove and kept pouring the oil on the rag and then placing it on the stove to warm. In doing this some of the oil dripped over her clothes. The last time she applied the rag to the stove it suddenly ignited and in a twinkling her clothes were a mass of flame. She screamed and her father, who had just gone to bed, rushed to her rescue ad with the assistance of a sheet endeavoured to smother the flames. Before the fire was extinguished the fire was burned considerably about the legs, hands and face.
Mr. Fair also had his hands badly burnt. It was a miraculous escape. Had Mr. Fair not been right at hand his daughter would have been burned to death in less than two minutes as the coal oil on her clothes added greatly to the rapidity with which the flames spread over her body.

1912 Feb 8 – Fork River

Mr. Biggs has returned after a month’s stay at Bethans and has accepted the position of teacher of the Mowat School for another term, which is satisfactory to the ratepayers.
We are pleased to hear Rev. H.H. Scrase is making good progress at home.
The Leap Year ball in the Orange Hall on Friday, Jan. 26th, under the management of the ladies of Fork River, was a big success. “Wall flowers” were conspicuous by their absence. Most of the evening the ladies attended to that part of the programme and deserve great credit as the hall was well filled with people from Winnipegosis, Mowat, East Bay and all parts and every one seems to have enjoyed themselves. The break-up came at six o’clock in the morning to the strains of the “Home sweet home waltz”: and a frosty drive.
Mrs. Wm. King and son Roland, returned home after a three months’ stay at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Morris, of Mosse Island, Winnipegosis.
A. Rowe’s little girl was unfortunate enough to have her arm broke in two places while playing. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, was sent for and the patient id progressing nicely.
Mr. Powers, provincial government auditor, spent a few days at the municipal office going over the books of the municipality. Which means getting out another financial report three inches by four. It should be larger and more comprehensive.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy and little son returned from Dauphin after a two weeks’ visit.
Fred Cooper, with Peter Ellis, paid a flying visit to Dauphin on business; also D.F. Wilson in connection with his immigration trip. Not knowing the time of the trains arrival the Fork River band was not in attendance. Still we gave them a hearty welcome.

1912 Feb 8 – Winnipegosis

If the man from Roblin, who skinned out about the middle of January would be kind enough to come back and settle for his board bill and also for the hay and oats he took from the freighters the people of Winnipegosis would be very grateful.
It would be far better for the fish companies to let the people here freight the fish than send out for freighters.
Born on Jan. 8th, 1912, to Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Morris, a son.
Some of the fishermen are complaining of the timber wolves breaking open their boxes and eating the fish.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 9 – 1913

1913 Jan 9 – Engineer Wm. Bowman Killed

Engineer Wm. Bowman, who was running for Engineer Wm. Graham on No. 4 train was killed in the Winnipeg yard on Saturday afternoon last. The train reached Winnipeg safely from Dauphin and Mr. Bowman was running to the roundhouse light when another engine ran into the tender, smashing it and driving the tender into the cab with such force that the boiler was injured in such a way that the steam escaped and scalded Bowman so badly that he expired on the spot.
Jack Cobb, the fireman, escaped through the cab window without suffering any injury.
Engineer Bowman was well-known in Dauphin and sympathy is felt for the family in their great sorrow.

1913 Jan 9 – Frozen to Death

Tuesday was Christmas according to the Galician custom and there was the usual festivities on that day and the following two days. John Kuruk, a Galician about 45 years of age, imbibed freely on Tuesday and Wednesday and on the later day he lay down at the C.N.R. tool house near the bridge and (Thursday) morning was found there frozen to death.
Deceased came from Austria about three years ago and has been working on the railway as a section man. He leaves a wife and two grown-up sons.

1913 Jan 9 – Suffered Bad Cut

Mrs. E.H. Walker was carrying a crock in her hands on Tuesday at the farm three miles south of the town when she slipped and fell. The crock broke and one of the pieces cut a bad gash on her left wrist. An artery was severed and she bled freely for quite a time. A phone message hurriedly brought Dr. Culbertson to the scene when the wound was dressed and Mrs. Walker brought to the hospital. It is expected she will be out in the course of a day or two.

1913 Jan 9 – Fork River

Mr. French, of Grandview, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens.
W. Williams has taken his outfit out to his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Frank Bailey left for Winnipeg after spending his New Year’s holidays with his parents on the Mossey.
Miss M. Nixon left for Findlay, having accepted the position of teacher in that district.
Miss Bessie and Miss Pearl Wilson left on a visit to friends at Sifton.
Professor S. Biggs returned to Dauphin after spending Xmas week among friends.
M. Sturdy, assistant manager of the A.T.Co. store, left on a short vacation. We wish him a good time.
Edwin King, who if with the C.N.R., was a visitor at the home of his parents lately.
Mrs. Willis Miller, of Mowat, who has been under the doctor’s care at Winnipegosis, has returned home.
The C.N.R. surveyor paid a visit and took the measurement of the elevator here.
Mr. Howatson, from Winnipegosis, is relieving Mr. Sturdy at the Armstrong Trading Co. for a few days while Mr. Sturdy is on holiday.
The annual meeting of Purple Star, 1775 was held on Tuesday, Dec 31st. The auditors’ report was most satisfactory, showing a balance in hand, after meeting all expenses for 1912.
The following officers were elected for 1913.
W.M. – Bro F.F. Hafenbrak
D.M. – Bro. W.J. King
Chaplain – Bro. H.H. Scarse, re-elected
Recording Secretary – Bro. W. King, re-elected
Financial Secretary – Bro. C.E. Bailey, re-elected
Treasurer – Bro. C. Bailey, re-elected
D. of C. – Bro. F. Cooper, re-elected
Lecturer – Bro. A Hunt
Dept. Lecturer – S.B. Reid
1st Committeemen – Edwin King, re-elected; C. Clark
Committeemen – J. Frost, Joe Bickle, J.E. Morriss, S.B. Munro, J.C. Bickle
Installation of officers at next regular meeting.

1913 Jan 9 – Winnipegosis

The Standard Lumber Co.’s mill is closed for the season.
The Armstrong Trading Co. has started their snow-plow with ten teams on its first trip up the lake to haul down fish.
Alex McArthur’s steam engine invention is also on a trip for the same purpose.
J.P. Grenon made a trip to Winnipeg on Saturday on business.
There was no Anglican Church service last Sunday owing to the recent storms impeding velocipede transition.
The Christian League held their social evening at the home of Mrs. J.J. Burrell last week. A very enjoyable time is reported.
Mr. Noble has returned to Dauphin to continue his studies after spending a week here visiting his adherents.
Mr. Malley returned on Saturday to Winnipeg.
The school was opened on Friday by Miss Hayes on account of Mr. Hulme not returning till Saturday.
Inspector Charles White has been away to Waterhen.
Miss Bradley has returned to Winnipeg to pursue her studies at St. Mary’s Academy.
Mrs. Bradley last Saturday received a letter from a Greek lady of Athens giving an account of the war raging in the Balkans. The letter was dated Dec 12th.