Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 4 – 1917

1917 Oct 4 – Week’s Causalities

Pte. Geo. H. Winters, Dauphin, wounded. (George Henry Winters, 1897, 1000224)

1917 Oct 4 – Fork River

D.F. Wilson has purchased Mr. Williams’ threshing outfit.
Rural Dean Price of Swan River will hold baptismal and holy communion service at Mowat at 11 o’clock in the morning, and in All Saints’, Fork River, at 3 in the afternoon, and Winnipegosis at 7.30 in the evening.
W. King has sold his shorthorn stock bull to T.A. Rothwell, of Melton.
W. Williams has received a new separator.
Several cars of fat cattle go out of here every train. While grain growing is staple with us, there is no doubt but the basis of our advancement will be from stock raising.
The Winnipegosis liquor cases on Tuesday created quite a stir here. The “boys”, we hear, won out.
Rev. A.S. Russell is a visitor to the Peg on church business. He intends taking in charge of this mission for the winter.
Archbishop Matheson intends visiting Fork River and holding confirmation services in All Saints’ sometime this month.

1917 Oct 4 – Winnipegosis

In loving memory of Eva, dearly beloved child of Quarter-Master Sergeant Frank Hechter, now of France, and Minnie Hechter, who died Sept. 1st, 1917:
We miss the gentle child
More than words can ever tell,
But you are happy there above
Where loving angels dwell.

Your tender arms no longer
Embrace us with your love,
But they are now encircling,
God’s eternal dove.

We love thee, darling Eva,
As only God knows how,
But He loved you better
As He has shown us now.

That Divine and Holy Father,
Looked upon this world so grim,
And thought are the world would defile your spirit
He would take you back to Him.

But, oh, how can we forget,
Your face so pure and sweet,
And your eyes that never opened,
But for to love and greet.

We still look up and whisper,
Sweet Eva come back to me,
But you only smile and answer,
“I wait up here for thee”
Inserted by her aunt, Mrs. B.P.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 2 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 2 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River, on Wednesday, 17th inst. Councillors Richardson and Seiffert absent. The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Union of Manitoba Municipalities, Dauphin Hospital, Heaton’s Agency Co., N.R., the solicitor, Dominion Lands Office, the Minister of Interior, the Department of Education, Standard Lumber Co., T.A. Burrows Lumber Co. and land commissioner of Hudson Co.
Hunt – Bickle – That the clerk investigate the Dauphin Hospital accounts and pay all claims for which the municipality is liable.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk make the necessary entry with the Dominion government, paying the fees, for two acres of the S.E. 4-29-17 for cemetery purposes.
Hunt – Toye – That the reeve and clerk inspect ditch between sections 2 and 11, tp. 30, rge. 19, with a view to having it cleared out.
Bickle – Robertson – That the account for lumber of the Standard Lumber Co. amounting to $29.71 be paid and charged to ward 4.
Robertson – Toye – That the account authorized by Road Commissioner Bailey for deepening the Lockhart ditch and due J.W. Lockhart be paid.
Toye – Robertson – That the following resolution be forwarded to the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities to be brought before the annual Convention:
“That section 644, sub-section of the Municipal Act be amended by striking out the words “or any ward or any portion of a ward thereof” in the second and third lines thereof.”
Hunt – Bickle – That the following resolution be forwarded to Union of Manitoba Municipalities for consideration at the annual convention.
“That section 148 of the Municipal Assessment Act be amended by adding the words, “during the past two years” after the ‘taxes’ in the eighth line ??? ???.”
Toye – Robertson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye – Robertson – That the clerk put up notices that all arrears of taxes must be paid before the first day of November, 1913, or proceedings will be taken to collect.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk order one twenty-four inch corrugated culvert eighteen feet long for the Cooper crossing.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk be authorized to have the pile driver repaired as soon as possible.
A by-law authorizing the purchase of a roadway along the south side of the N.W. 26 and a portion of the N.E. 27-29-19 was passed; also a by-law striking the rate for 1913 as follows: municipal rate 10 mills, municipal commissioner’s rate ½ mill and general school rate 5 mills.
Toye – Bickle – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1913 Oct 2 – Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from Weyburn, where he has been for the summer months. He reports good crops there.
Geo. Tilt paid the Lake Town a visit on important business lately.
Willie Johnston returned from the summer fishing up the lake and reports a fair catch.
E. Williams, of Liverpool, England, has arrived to take up the work of the Anglican mission here.
F.B. Lacey returned from a trip south.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys.
Miss Pearl Wood has left for Winnipeg for a short stay with friends.
Mrs. O’Neill has arrived from Rainy River and is visiting her sister, Mrs. F.B. Lacey, of Mowat.
One of our Winnipegosis friends is of the opinion that the fishing at Fork River is ahead of Winnipegosis. We agree with him every time.
Mr. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, visited our burgh between trains.
Wm. Stonehouse left for Winnipegosis to follow his occupation as inspector for the A.T. Co.
Bert Cooper has returned from Winnipegosis, having spent the summer on the government dredge.
Mrs. Paul Pugon, of Lake Dauphin, while milking a cow was badly hurt, the cow having turned on her. Dr. Medd was sent for but could not go and by the time other assistance arrived it was too late, the woman died. She leaves a family of twelve children.
T.A. Worsey preached his farewell sermon on Sunday evening, the 28th, in All Saints’ Church. There was a good turnout. Mr. Worsey is leaving for St. John’s College to resume his studies. His many friends appreciate the good work he has done here this summer and all wish him prosperity.

1913 Oct 2 – Winnipegosis

The fishing season closes on Oct. 1st. The catch has been good. Fifty cars have been shipped out.
A monster jackfish, weighing 35 lbs., was caught in one of the hauls in Dawson Bay.
A Galician is in the lock-up having stabbed his wife in the arm with a knife. His mind is supposed to be unbalanced.
Ducks are numerous and the shooting is good.
Jos. Grenon is having the grounds around his fine new residence laid out by Mr. Sadler, of Dauphin. The grounds will be planted with hardy perennials this fall which will bloom early in the spring and summer.
Theo. Johnston returned on Wednesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1919 Oct 2 – Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

1919 Oct 2 – Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork Rive did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

1919 Oct 2 – Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Craighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 25 – 1913

1913 Sep 25 – Fork River

John Robinson spent a few days here among his friends after returning from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Weaver left for Winnipegosis, where Mr. W. intends residing having taken a position in the A.T. Co.
Mrs. F.F. Hafenbrak and family returned from a week’s visit to her sister, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis.
Miss Buie and Miss Weatherhead, of Dauphin, spent the week-end here the guests of Miss Weatherhead, teacher.
Miss M. Millidge, ravelling organizer of the Woman’s Auxiliary for the English church, will address the members of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on Monday, September 29th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon in the church.
W. Williams has received another separator, which makes four threshing outfits working within a radius of two miles and all are busy these days, the trouble is to get men to run the machines to their full capacity.
John Richardson is going around with a broad smile. It’s a bouncing boy.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Coomber of Selkirk, are visiting R. Coomber, on the Fork River for a few days.
The Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on the 21st. The church was very tastefully decorated with grain, leaves, fruit and flowers by the ladies and the congregation was the largest on such an occasion. T.A. Worsey, of St. John’s College, preached a very appropriate sermon. There was a good offertory to the Home Mission Fund.
Miss Ena Fredrickson, of Winnipegosis, has taken a position at the A.T. Co. store here.
The C.N.R. telegraph gang are repairing old poles and putting up new ones between here and Winnipegosis.
The members of All Saints’ W.A. are holding an ice cream social in the Orange Hall on Friday night, September 26th. Everybody welcome.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 20 – 1917

1917 Sep 20 – Week’s Casualties

Sergt. Weeks, Makinak, killed. The sergeant was one of the first to enlist at Dauphin three years ago. Two years age he recruited in town during the winter.
Pte. Leslie Lintick, Dauphin, wounded.
Pte. W.R. Lawson, Swan River, killed.
Pte. Wilford Lee, Dauphin, missing.
Pte. L. Trotignon, Ste. Rose, missing.

1917 Sep 20 – Fork River

Mr. Timewell has received word from his son who was wounded that he is recovering in a hospital in England.
Adolf Rudiwick has purchased a Case threshing outfit and intends to make his “pile” this fall.
W.S. Spillett, post office inspector, paid postmaster King a visit and found everything in good shape.
Tony Boyko has purchased Fred. Cooper’s threshing outfit and intends working in the western section.
Miss Grace Beach returned from Dauphin and Mowat School opened on Monday.
Mr. Timewell has purchased the A. Snelgrove residence in town, and W. Williams’ tractor it up north to Mr. T’s farm.
Postmaster King received word from his son, Pte. Aubrey King, who was gassed and is in hospital that he is better and expects to be back in service in two or three months.
The train service is providing unsatisfactory of late. Trains are late frequently.
Owners of stock should remember that there is a herd law in operation and it is the intention of residents to impound the animals.
Rev. A.S. Russell is attending the rural deanery meeting at Swan River this week.
It is learned that the Winnipegosis council has made overtures to our council to bonus a doctor to settle in the district. The move is one that will be supported by all. It is crying shame that an epidemic like the one at Winnipegosis should be allowed to exist in any civilized community.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1912

1912 Sep 9 – Fork River

George Sumption, of Dauphin; is spending of short time with Mr. J. Clements on the Chase farm.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, who has been spending her holidays with her parents up the Fork, has returned to Dauphin.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs left for a two motions’ holiday with her friends at Brandon.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here lately taking in the sights.
Professor Gorden Weaver and N.H. Johnston returned from a trip to Winnipegosis on business and after the train run off the track. Misfortunes will happen to the best of regulated railways.
Frank Chase, of Dauphin, was here lately looking after his business interests.
The elevator builders have not arrived yet. We think it will be a mistake to build it on the site picked out. The building would be better if it were moved south on to the street next the cattle chute and
Mr. and Mrs. V.O. Weaver, of Vermont, are visiting their brother Gordon, of East Bay.
Wm. Geekie and son passed through here on their return trip from Strathclair to their home at Winnipegosis.
F. Lacey, of Oak Brae, has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Will Davis, who has invested heavily in real estate in Texas, strongly advocates the use of drain tiles. Will always was practical, especially on mail days when its raining.
Mrs. C. Bradley is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Several people from the Lake Town took in the dance in the Orange Hall on Thursday night past. Brother Robinson played the Fisherman’s Horn Pipe and a very pleasant time was spent.
Wm. Williams and Mr. Venables spent the week-end at Dauphin on business.
A meeting of the council will be held at Fork River on Monday, the 23rd inst.

1912 Sep 9 – Sifton

The wet season now appears to be over and all except to get on with the harvest at once.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Good progress is being made with the Kennedy-Barrie store. Once these gentlemen open they are sure of doing a good business.
Frequent shipments of cattle are being made from here. There’s nothing like mixed farming to bring in the cash between seasons.
Geo. Lampard, wholesale butcher, Dauphin, and W.A. Davis were in town on Monday. These gentlemen brought a number of cattle while here.
This end of the district is open to come under the Drainage Act. It pays at any time to make improvements whether they are drains or building better roads.
Paul Wood’s family are going to reside in Dauphin during the winter so that an opportunity will be afforded the children to go to school.
Now that the Herald is giving interesting personal sketches of prominent men who have resided in the district a long time, I hope the prosperous village of Sifton will not be overlooked. We have several pioneers here who had ouch to do with its development and are will known, viz., Paul Wood, John Kennedy, Coun. Peter Ogrislo, Postmaster Thos. Ramsay, Wm. Ashmore and quite a few others that could be named.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 18 – 1913

1913 Sep 18 – Dynamite Will be Used

Although the lake at the point where young Romeo Fleury was drowned last week has been thoroughly dragged and tramped no trace of the body has been found. Dynamite will now be used to bring the body to the surface.

1913 Sep 18 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Williams and family left for Winnipegosis’ summer resort for a few days.
Mrs. Tarbath and family left for their home in Winnipeg after spending a few weeks wit her sister, Mrs. S. Reid.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and daughter returned from a visit among friends at Dauphin.
The Mowat correspondent has woke up again after being dormant several months, and remarks that the energetic Herald’s correspondent’s criticism on road making, scrapers, etc., is about right, but goes on to state I never refer to mail matte which are going on around our P.O. For the benefit of our Mowat friend I beg to state that I do not know of anything to say against the management of our P.O. here. The P.O. inspector was here a short time ago and found everything in order. There has been no friction here since the Oak Brae P.O. was changed to fresh quarters. This act did not seem to agree with the Mowat correspondent. This reminds us of the Bailey Bridge here. It was condemned by our council over a year ago and notices put up and nothing has been done to it up o date. The people have to go over it safe. A child was thrown out of a rig at this spot and barely escaped with her life. Again the Tilt Bridge has been in use for years and never was properly finished. The Cameron Bridge stringers are so rotten you can pick some of them to pieces. Despite this our council has left its tenders for another bridge; this in the face of a largely signed petition from the ratepayers opposing it.
The ratepayers invited the reeve and council to meet them in the Orange Hall last Saturday night to hear their views on the bridge question and other matters. Only one councillor had backbone enough to face the music. Under the circumstances those present decided there was only one thing to do and that was have a general housecleaning in December. The majority of those present left to serenade Professor Weaver and his bride, who arrived home from their wedding trip. We wish Gordon and his wife long life and happiness.
James Campbell and wife passed through here on their way to spend the winter at the north end of the lake. Jimmy is well-known here and one of the right sort and we wish them both happiness and prosperity.
A very pleasant afternoon was spent recently at the home of Mrs. S. and Mrs. C. Bailey on the Mossey River by their lady friends. Amusements were indulged in and our old friend Sam was quite at home as umpire. If our friends get as efficient with the baseball bat as Ma is with the rolling pin, there’s nothing left but to give them the franchise with as good grace as we can and save our pates.
The harvest festival will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church next Sunday, Sept. 21st at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.
Don’t forget the clearing sale at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store. Now you have your chance. The prices you can’t beat.

POST OFFICE STAFF REPLY.
To the Editor of the Herald:
SIR: – We notice in last week’s issue of the Press some remarks from Mowat regarding our correspondent for the Herald in connection with municipal matters, which we have no particular interest in, but we wish to draw the attention of our readers to the items regarding mail matter trouble at Fork River P.O., which are very much out of place at best as coming from a gentleman and one who holds a position in our midst from whom we expect better things, from whom we should be taking example. We would like to say that personally we are not aware of any trouble in mail matters at this office and if our friend has any complaint he has up to now not made any mention of same to any of our staff here. If there is any trouble we should like to hear it straight and we shall certainly remedy it. If it is a case of soreness or petty personal spite, we shall ignore it. Some of us have made mistakes and are only too willing to admit it but we like to hear our faults to our faces. We are sorry to have taken up so much of your valuable space and thank you for same.

POST OFFICE STAFF.
Fork River.

1913 Sep 18 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Coben is in Dauphin to visit her husband who is in the hospital. Friends here were sorry to hear he had to have his foot taken off.
Mrs. White is visiting with friends at Dauphin.
The fishing has been extra good and large quantities are being brought down from the north end of the lake. Some of the fishermen have returned to town.
On Friday evening the 12th inst. A few of Miss Mabel Shannon’s friends gave her a very pleasant surprise by assembling at the house without invitation and suspending the amusements of the evening to read the following memorial: –
“We the undersigned, express our regret that miss Mabel Shannon is leaving Winnipegosis, but we feel that the business training she is the undergo will enlarge her sphere of usefulness and we wish to show our estimation of her high moral character and our appreciation of her services in post office, church and society by the accompanying token of remembrance from her friends at Winnnipegosis.”
The Rev. R. Turnbull made a very humourous and appropriate speech, and Miss Hayes presented the gift, gloves and bank cheque. Mr. Hulme made a few closing remarks.
The young people enjoyed themselves until time was forgotten. The moon seem especially kind to them as it was light as day, excusing to some extent the lateness of the hour. The entertainment closed with best wishes for Miss Shannon’s success in her business course.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 10 – 1914

1914 Sep 10 – Fork River

W.R. Snelgrove had the misfortune to loose his dwelling house with all its contents by fire last week. No insurance.
Miss Wood, of Sifton, is a visitor here with friends.
Nat Little has shipped by express his Shetland stallion, Romeo, to a gentleman in Kamsack.
Nurse Tilt, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the homestead.
The ice cream social held at the home of Mrs. C.E. Bailey, on the Mossey, in aid of All Saints’ Church fund, was a success and a pleasant evening was passed considering the bus time.
W. King, accompanied by Mr. Taylor and Mr. Sweeny, of the Dominion Public Works Deportment, Winnipeg, returned to Dauphin after visiting the government dredge at Winnipegosis.
E. Williams, lay reader of this mission, received word that he would be returning to St. John’s College, Winnipeg, on September 22nd.
The annual harvest festival will be conducted by Mr. E. Williams in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon. September 20th, at 3 p.m. all are invited to take part in this service of thanksgiving.

1914 Sep 10 – Winnipegosis

The first coat of plaster has been put on the school by Mr. Justice.
Mr. Grenon’s two daughters have gone to Winnipeg to attend the convent.
Mr. Neely, the contractor, states that he will shortly have the new school in readiness for opening. The building is a fine one and a credit to the town. The sale of bonds may fail but when it comes to the pinch our local capitalists just go down in their jeans and produce the wherewithal.
Ducks are reported numerous around the marshes and in the lake. The birds should now be in fine condition for the table. Several parties from outside points are expected to come here for the shooting season.
Mr. Grenon has added a number of silver foxes to his ranch here of late. The animals were brought from Norway House on Lake Winnipeg.
The fishing continues good.
The water in the lake has risen since the recent rains. The water his season was at a lower level than the old-timers remember it for many years past.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 8 – 1910

1910 Sep 8 – Fork River

Mr. Hunt from Ottawa is visiting his son, Absolam, here for a short time.
F. Wilson, from Dauphin, paid us a visit this week.
W. Williams will be running the Wilson threshing outfit here.
Cutting will be all done in a few days and good yields are expected.
Lots of hay has been cut up in this district and people from a long distance are coming in to buy. Prices evidently will be high.
F. Cooper will be running a thrashing outfit this year, having bought one from W. Williams.
Nat Little nearly lost one of his horses last week. The train from Winnipegosis happened to catch one of its hind legs, which was found to be very badly cut. Mr. Little had the animal attended to at once and it will recover from the accident.

1910 Sep 8 – North Lake

Rudolph Sprubs of Sifton, visited Jacob Strasdin last week.
Wheat cutting is finished now, and we hope soon to hear the toot! Toot! of Glendenning and Hunter’s threshing machine.
John Strasdin, who has been away on his farm breaking this summer, spent a few days with his parents last week.
Nat Little, of Fork River, has been around here setting up binders. He rather likes this part of the country.
The teachers of North Lake and Janowski schools have commenced duties again.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 7 – Fork River

Pathmaster Briggs and his gang are busy laying a sidewalk from the post office to the station and stores, which is quite an improvement this muddy weather.
Mrs. H.H. Scrase and son returned from Dauphin after a two weeks’ visit.
The C.N. Ry. is building a stock yard here. We sincerely hope they will provide a raft to float them over the ditch to the shoot.
Mr. McLeod is busy buying cattle and shipping a car a week.
Mr. J.M. Littler returned from Gilbert Plains on Wednesday.
Mr. Glen Campbell, M.P., will hold a meeting in the Orange Hall on Friday night, September 8th.

1916 Sep 7 – Fork River

Mr. Ducker, engineer, was here for a few days inspecting roads and bridges.
Mrs. Dobson, of Winnipeg, returned home after a two weeks’ visit with Mrs. Cameron on the Mossey River.
Mr. E. Hunter, of Severn Bridge, Ont., is visiting his brothers, Harry and Tom Hunter at Lake Dauphin.
Mr. Joe McMillian, of Lac du Bonnett, returned home after a few days’ visit to his mother at Mrs. C. Bailey’s.
Mr. Hawkins, P.M. of Dauphin, and Mr. McCaul, of the Bank of Commerce, spent a short time touring the district in a motor lately.
Mr. W. Williams started thrashing on the farm of John Mushoski.
The heavy rain on Saturday night has stopped the harvesting and thrashing a couple of days.
Rev. Mr. Price, of Swan River, and rural dean of Dauphin, held Holy Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon, which was well attended. He left in the evening for Winnipegosis.
The annual Harvest Festival service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock on September 10th. This will be Mr. Butler’s farewell sermon as he leaves for Wychiffe College, Toronto, on Monday. A cordial invitation to all to come and take part in this service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 4 – 1913

1913 Sep 4 – Ethelbert

An extraordinary general meeting of the shareholders of the Ruthenian Trading Company, Limited, was held at two o’clock at Ethelbert, on the 28th day of August. The president, Mr. M. Pacholok was in the chair. The president explained that the meeting had been called for the purpose of considering the question of increasing the capital stock of the company from ten thousand dollars to twenty-five thousand dollars by the creation and issue of six hundred new shares of the par value of twenty-five each. The matter was then left to the meeting for discussion. After a long discussion a by-law of the directors passed the 26th day of July, authorizing the increase of capital of the company from ten thousand dollars to twenty-five thousand dollars was sanctioned and confirmed by special resolution of the shareholders.
The Ruthenian Literary Society, under the leadership of K.F. Slipetz, its president, arranged a programme of giving lectures to the farmers. The subjects that are taken up are: organization, economy and mixed farming. We shall be very glad to get particulars and, if possible, regulations of farmers’ societies. This need is very necessary for us. We, as farmers, don’t want to be left behind the other farmers but must struggle or the survival of the fittest for existence.
Mr. Hill, an Ethelbert pioneer, is renewing acquaintance here. We are always gad to see old friends.
Some of the prominent Ruthenian farmers at Garland are forming a company with the idea of buying up the other business there.
The construction of a Greek Catholic Church at Garland has been postponed on account of some members objecting to the transfer of the said church under the name of Bishop Budka.

1913 Sep 4 – Fork River

Mrs. Avid Briggs, of Brandon, is visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.N. Briggs on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Potts, of Neepawa, returned home after a week’s vacation with Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat.
Miss Gilanders and brother, of Brandon, returned home after spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. Joe Lockhart.
John Mathews and Fred Storrar are assisting Mr. T.N. Briggs, the bonanza farmer, with his harvest.
We are pleased to hear the town orator has recovered from his recent illness. Some of the fair sex remarked he was becoming thin as its hard on the constitution sitting on the sidewalk without a sunshade.
Mrs. Fred Cooper and Miss Alice Godkin are visiting with friends at Dauphin.
Alfred Snelgrove, who has been on the dredge at Regina all summer, returned home and is of the opinion there are worse places than Fork River.
We notice the hum of Tom Shannon’s and King Bros.’ machinery threshing a few loads of grain. Fred Cooper and Billy Williams have their outfits ready to start as soon as the grain is fit.
Dr. Ross and W.H. Morison, of Dauphin, passed through here with their automobile on Tuesday. The roads north of here were so soft that they had to return and take the train from Fork River to Winnipegosis. The appropriation money for the north road must have miscarried.
Jack Angers, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end in town renewing acquaintances.
W. Howitson, of Winnipegosis, is clerking in A.T. Co. sore at this point for a time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 15 – 1912

1912 Aug 15 – Appointed Manager of Fish Hatchery

Joseph Grenon, one of the oldest fishermen on Lake Winnipegosis, has been appointed manager of the fish hatchery, which is located on Snake Island. Mr. Grenon’s appointment dates from August first.

1912 Aug 15 – Damage at Gilbert Plains

A hail storm passed over Gilbert Plains on Sunday night and did much damage in the vicinity of the town and covered about two miles in width by eight in length.

1912 Aug 15 – Gypsies For Dauphin

A dispatch from Gretna, Man., states that a large party of Syrian gypsies crossed the international boundary at that point from the United States Saturday, and continued their journey northward at noon. They were heading for the Dauphin district. There were seven caravans, 25 people, and a large number of horses. The gypsies had no difficulty in passing the immigration officials, as they were plentifully supplied with money and goods.
From what can be learned the party will locate on the east side of the lake where they will take up homesteads. They are expected to reach town by the latter end of the week.

1912 Aug 15 – Fork River

Miss Alice and Herman Godkin left the early part of the week on a trip to Saskatchewan.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Williams were visitors to the Dauphin fair.
S. Bailey, F. Cooper, and W.R. Bell returned Saturday from attending the Dauphin exhibition.
Bishop McCartney of All Saints’, and Prof. T. Biggs of Mowat Academy, took a trip south on business.
Mrs. N. Little and daughter Grace, are taking a short vacation.
Mr. Maxim of Winnipeg, spent a week looking over the district. He is well pleased with this part and intends returning shortly with his family. There is plenty of good land within a short distance of the village waiting for settlers.
John O’Neil and family, of Rainy River, returned home after spending a week with Postmaster Lacey of Oak Brae.
Mrs. Peter Robinson spent a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Robinson on the Mossey River.
Mr. McAuley, traveller for the Massey Co., was here a few days on business.
A remark was overheard the other day that our Municipality was run rather loose. On July 5th, our health officer’s attention was drawn to the rubbish dumped a few yards from the Orange Hall. We were promised it would be attended to at once, but we are sorry to say nothing has been done as yet. Ten days after a ratepayer notified the council and they instructed the clerk to notify the health officer. A month has passed and nothing has been done. At the same meeting a by-law was passed presenting the said gentleman with $600 a year. We don’t object doing a fair thing, but in the name of justice let’s have something for it and not be told gone to Winnipeg, Duck Bay or Hong Kong. There is also a by-law against bulls running at large all summer. On numerous occasions complaints have been made. The head beadle remarked that they will have to erect a stable, but at the present rate of going probably nothing will be done. Great Caeasar this is comforting to men who look after their animals. Not long ago Government engineers were up here to lay out roads and make profiles which cost the Municipality a handsome sum of money. Our commissioners instead of following engineers’ instructions make roads so narrow that a man with a wheelbarrow had to wait at cross roads to let a buggy by coming in the opposite direction. Say they dog by-laws are peaches. Have one for every month in the year. What’s the matter Winnipegosis?

Re. the writeup of the Mowat picnic in last week’s Herald and Press. The remarks re certain individuals in Fork River wishing the picnic to be a failure were certainly very uncharitable whoever the writer was as for there being a shortage of lemons that was up to the general manager. Concerning freezers they could have been had as usual for the asking. This is supposed to be a free country and surely people can suit themselves about going to such places without being called to account by some evil thinking person like the writer of the Mowat article.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 14 – 1913

1913 Aug 14 – Ethelbert

Captain (Mrs.) Tutte, of the Salivation Army, is visiting her mother, Mrs. A. Willey, for a few days.
Mrs. McVicar, formerly of Garland, now of Brandon, is renewing old acquaintances at Ethelbert, and is stating at the station agent’s home.
Mrs. McDonald of Fort William, youngest sister of J. McLean, is visiting old scenes hereabout.
Mrs. Rod Campbell, the oldest sister of Mrs. McPhedrian, is visiting relatives in this neighbourhood.
H. Brachman has been gazetted as J.P.
There is a fear amongst the famers that the copious rain may injure the crop prospects.
Great quantities of berries are being shipped east and west; more than 100 pails a day.
This is a great country for fruit, wheat, hay, eggs, and last but not the least in mosquitoes. They come and go in millions.

1913 Aug 14 – Fork River

Mrs. Walter Cooper, Sr., left for a two weeks’ vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Sam Bailey left for a week’s visit to his son Frank at Winnipeg.
James McDonald, assistance express agent, left for a well-earned vacation at Winnipeg.
Miss Pearl Wilson has left for Dauphin for a short visit.
Mrs. W. Williams returned from a week’s rest in the south.
J. Stewart, of North Lake, was in town lately and reports the roads out that way very bad.
Postmaster Kennedy and wife are off to Winnipeg to take in the stampede in company with the Mayor of Winnipegosis and several others from this point.
Miss Alice Godkin is spending a week with Mrs. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, with the Misses Kennedy.
Miss M. Nixon left for Winnipeg, after a month’s vacation here with friends.
St. John Butler, of Winnipegosis, has charge of the A.T. Co. store, during manager Kennedy’s absence.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, who has been visiting with her grandmother, Mrs. R. Snelgrove for some time, has returned home.
Although the council passed a by-law to the effect that all stock was to be on the owners property during sunset and sunrise and not allowed to run at large, we find cattle and ponies running at all hours of the night, and in places it is unsafe to drive along the roads dark nights for fear of tumbling over them.
The heavy rains of this week have stopped the haying and road making for a short time.
Councillor Hunt let several contracts for roads to Contractor Briggs and others. We trust there will be an open fall so this work can be done.
John Mathews, electrician for the A.T. Co., is intending to go into the pork raising business as a side issue. We wish him all kinds of success as Jack’s a pretty good fellow.
Our esteemed friends, Fred. Storrar, has charge of the cream department and is giving good satisfaction.
Much interest is being taken in the baseball match between the married and single ladies which is to come off on the 13th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 13 – 1914

1914 Aug 13 – Assembling Volunteers

Major Walker, of “C” Squadron, 32nd Manitoba Horse, has received the following telegram from the Adjutant General, Ottawa.
OTTAWA, August 13.
In view of non-completion of medical examination in many places volunteering need not be closed until orders for mobilization at Valcartier are issued. Commanding officers will assemble all volunteers for overseas expeditionary force at local corps headquarters for instructional purposes from this date. Pay and substenance allowance will be allowed under authorized militia rates. Issue necessary instructions.
ADJUTANT GENERAL.

1914 Aug 13 – Latest War News

London, Aug. 13.
Great excitement prevails over report of fighting in North Sea.
German cruisers, Goeben and Brealan captured in Mediterranean. The cruisers surrendered without a shot.
Great Britain is now at war with Austria.
Bombardment of Liege forts has recommenced. Belgians are putting up strong fight.
French will force fighting with Germans. Big battle expected hourly.

1914 Aug 13 – Ready to Go to Front

The following local men have been passed by Dr. Bottomly, medical examiner, and have made application to go to the front. They are likely to be called upon at once:
Huber Izon, Garth Johnston, Neville Munson, C. Curtis, Eric Clausen, H. Pollard, F.W. Bunstead, H.H. Moore, A.J. Pudifin, E.C. Herrick, Neil A. Briss, J. Osman, H.A. Bray.

1914 Aug 13 – Fork River

Several farmers from this point took in the Dauphin fair. Another year we hope to see more go.
Mr. Fair, of Dauphin, is around peddling medicine for a medicine company. Some are of the opinion they got some bargains.
Miss Bessie Wilson was a visitor to friends at Sifton and Dauphin.
Professor Fred Storrar, of Werdon academy, is spending his holidays among friends here and is very uneasy about the war. He will no doubt tender his services as leader of a company of fullbacks and move to the front in a short order.
F.B. Lacey was a recent visitor to Winnipegosis.
The annual meeting of Mossey River School was held on Saturday night. W. King was chairman and C.E. Bailey, secretary. The annual report was passed. W. Williams and Sam Reid were appointed trustees to fill the vacancy of C.E. Bailey and J.W. Lockhart retiring.
The trustees are spending a large amount of money repairing the school which was condemned. The majority of ratepayers are of the opinion it would have been more in the interest of the community at large to build a school in the village where the majority of the scholars come from. The ratepayers who were conspicuous by their absence will have another year to chew the rag over school affairs.
A dance was held in the hall as a farewell to the Misses Briggs and Miss Gertrude Cooper, who are leaving.
John Reid and family, of Sifton, visited at the home of W. King for the weekend.
Mrs. Paul Wood and family, of Sifton, are visiting at the home of Mrs. D.F. Wilson on the Mossey River.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 6 – 1914

1914 Aug 6 – C.N.R. Excursion to Winnipegosis

The 2nd annual picnic of the Dauphin employees of the Canadian Northern Railway will be held on Tuesday, August 18th, at Winnipegosis. An excellent programme of events has been arranged, consisting of foot races, boat races, swimming races, lake trips, dancing, tug-of-war, and a baseball match, mechanical dept. vs. traffic dept. Band in attendance. Train will leave Dauphin at 8:30 a.m. and returning will leave Winnipegosis at 8 p.m.

1914 Aug 6 – Dauphin Officers 32nd Horse

The 32nd Manitoba Horse will undoubtedly be pressed into service. “C” men. The following are the officers:
Major G.C.J. Walker.
Captain. H.K. Newcombe.
Lieutenants P. Wilson, E. Manby, L. Shand, E.P. Milward.
Sergeant-Major Fletcher; Sergts. T. Coghian, G. Fraser, Alguire.

1914 Aug 6 – From the Seat of War

London, Aug. 6.
The war situation is extremely critical at present. All Europe is little better than a vast powder magazine.
The British fleet is concentrated in the North Sea and it is quite probable that important engagements have already taken place. All cables are being used almost exclusively for war purposes.
The cutting of the German telegraph and telephone connections and the severance of the German trans-Atlantic cable virtually cut Germany from communication with other countries. Reports from France, Belgium, Holland and Russia showed that Germany’s armies were steadily moving east and west, and that her advance posts were in contact with the opposing Russian and French armies.

1914 Aug 6 – Glen Campbell to Raise Scout Troop

The Militia department at Ottawa has received an offer from Glen Campbell offering to raise and command a troop of scouts.
Several Dauphin men have been offered positions in the troop and some, it is understood, will accept.

1914 Aug 6 – Fork River

Gerald Stuart, of Winnipeg, is spending his holidays with his aunt, Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, and is putting in a good time at the lake.
Mr. Earie, engineer, and his assistant are putting in an apparatus for taking the levels of the Mossey River at Wilson’s.
E. Williams, lay reader, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. J. Reid of North Lake, and has a very enjoyable time.
J.R. Roblin, Government engineer, paid Reeve King a visit in connection with the roadwork being doe in the municipality.
Several ratepayers turned out to the annual school meeting on Saturday night. No “biz” was done as the books were not audited. It’s strange how the heat affects even our school officers.
Mrs. King had tomatoes ripe in the last week of July in her garden and also corn.
A good rain is needed to cook things off.
W.W. Cooper and family, who have been absent from this burgh over a year, returned and are staying with their people, Walter Cooper, Sr., on the Mossey River.
We hear F.B. Lacey is to be the councillor for ward 6, as unfortunately Sam Reid’s papers did not arrive till twenty minutes past two, and the returning officer refused to take them then and stated it was law. Yes, that is the law. What a difference; a week ago a farmer wanted redress for stock destroying his crop and every obstacle was put in the way to prevent him securing justice.
Pat says give a calf rope enough and it will hang itself in time. True, and if public opinion is anything to bank on there will be no one to cut the calf down.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey has returned from Winnipeg and reports a present holiday.
We notice in the Winnipegosis news that the Fork River dredge has been sent to Pine Creek, while the Winnipegosis lays rotting on the river. More will be heard of this unfair deal to Fork River later on.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 3 – 1911

1911 Aug 3 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. T.N. Briggs were visitors tot he Brandon fair last week.
Arthur Hodgson has been transferred to the Hudson Bay post at Lesser Slave Lake. We wish him success.
Geo. Williams and family of Dauphin have taken the Stacey farm.
The Armstrong Trading Co. are brightening up their buildings here with a coat of paint. This is quite an improvement and adds greatly to the appearance of the town.
Wm. Williams is busy these days rafting lumber from his limits across the lake to his planer at Fork. There will soon be plenty of lumber for building purposes.
Mr. R. Roe and Mr. Venable are building dwelling houses and F. Cooper’s barn is about completed.
D.F. Wilson has imported a fine register Galloway bull to head his herd. The animal was purchased from the McCrae herd of Guelph, Ont., and carried off second prize at the Winnipeg exhibition.
The social recently held at the home of W. King, was a very pleasant affair. The evening was spent enjoyably in songs, recitations and games. The event of the evening was the presenting of the poets with twins and the christening of Jehoshaphat. After supper dancing was indulged in until the see small hours of the morning.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 23 – 1914

1914 Jul 23 – Successful Ethelbert Students

The following students from Ethelbert School were successful in passing:
Entrance – Honours – Ben Brackman and Nessie McNullan
Grade IX – Maggie Hagar and William Mastiuck
Grade X – Waldmar Mastiuck

1914 Jul 23 – Fork River

The Orangemen of Fork River held their 12th annual basket picnic on July 13. The weather was fine for the occasion and there was a large turnout many coming from Winnipegosis, Mowat, Sifton and Melton. There was a parade after dinner. Speeches were made by the Rev. E. Williams and Rev. Brother Clixby, and the chairman Brother William King country master. The sports commenced with a football match between Fork River and Mowat which resulted in two goals to nothing in favour of Fork River. Foot racing and other sports were also indulged in till supper. After supper a football match was played off between Winnipegosis and Fork River teams which ended in favour of Fork River, one goal to nothing. The Winnipegosis automobile was busy all night carrying passengers. There was a good dance at night. Thanks due our Winnipegosis friends for furnishing the music, which was much appreciated.
S, Nowosad and family are away for a short time visiting at Vonda, Sask., where John, the son resides.
Edwin King has returned to Saskatchewan after a week’s visit at his home here.
Milton Cooper has returned from a trip to the Winnipeg exhibition.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, spent last week with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. Brewer, of Ashville, spent a few days here and took a carload of stock south. The man who is raising stock is the one who is making money these days.
Road building is the order of the day.
W. Lockhart, from Ontario, is spending a few days here on business.
Coun. Robertson, of Ward 6, has resigned as he is leaving for the north for a year. Here will be an election to select his successor.
Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Venables both lost valuable clots last week.
There was considerable discussion at the last council meeting by the ratepayers regarding stock running at large and it was decided to enforce the by-law passed. Owners of stock must take care of them during the night or get into trouble.
On Sunday parties driving along Main Street to church had to pass between young men paying baseball, which is dangerous to horse and driver. We would kindly draw the players attention to the last part of clause 3 in by-law No. 5.

1914 Jul 23 – Mr. King replies.

To Editor of the Herald.
Sir – On Friday my attention was drawn to an article in the Press reporting Dr. Shortreed’s meeting at Fork River, said to be written by F.B. Lacey, who presided at that meeting. Personally I have nothing but pity for a man who will write such an untruthful report and makes such uncharitable statements. The meeting was held out on Main Street in front of Mr. Nat Little’s store. Dr. Shortreed was given a good hearing. The doctor quoted some figures he could not prove and Mr. Grenon politely took off his hat to the doctor and asked that a Conservative be allowed to speak. The request was flatly refused. Mr. Little shouted, “Go back to Winnipegosis. What in h-ll did you come here for?” This is the language our friend used in front of his own doorstep to persons who were quietly listening to Dr. Shortreed. When later the doctor repeatedly stated that the Roblin government was kept in power by the rattle his statement was objected to. There was no one there under the influence of liquor unless our Liberal friends. To judge from their pugilistic attitude at times it would lead people to believe they were under the influence of something. Perhaps it was fright, as the 10th was close at hand. At the close of the meeting, the Conservatives offered to pay for the hall and invited Dr. Shortreed and his friends to go there and discuss the matter as long as they liked. The offer was declined. If there was any rowdyism it was not the Conservatives who indulged in it. There were several other misstatements in the article worthy of the man who wrote them. But they are not worthy noticing. We have the greatest respect for a great number of our Liberal friends in Fork River and their opinions are always treated with the consideration they merit and we are sure they do not endorse such tactics.

W. King, President of Conservative Association of Fork River.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 11 – 1912

1912 Jul 11 – Sent Down for Six Months

Wm. Wright, better known as “Nigger Bill”, appeared before P.M. Munson on Wednesday, charged with disturbing the peace and using threating language towards Mrs. F. Crowder. He was found guilty and fined $50 and sentenced to six months imprisonment, and in default of payment of fine “Bill” is to serve another six months. According to evidence the defendant was shown to have attempted to stab Mr. Chowder. This is not the first time Wright has been up before the magistrate and he appears to be an undesirable citizen.

1912 Jul 11 – Fork River

Mr. Noble, Methodist student who has taken charge of this mission in Mr. Malley’s place, who has moved to Brandon, is spending a few days at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
A. Cameron, of Mowat Centre, returned home after a weeks visit to Neepawa and Cypress.
Miss Oliver Clark has returned home from Dauphin.
The Orangemen of Fork River, who intend celebrating in Dauphin on the 12th, held their 10th annual picnic here on the 5th. There was a fair turnout considering it was raining. About 100 were in the grounds. At five o’clock it cleared up and the Fork River Coons and the Winnipegosis Bunters lined up for a game of football, which was a hard fought match from beginning to finish and some good playing was done. Fork River made 1 goal the first half and Winnipegosis 1 the second half. As it commenced to rain later the game was declared a draw. One prominent Orangeman remarked if the Orange goat was ever put out of business he would get the M.D. as he would fill the bill to perfection. It being too wet for further sports a dance was held in the hall and a pleasant time was spent till 3:30 next morning.
Professor H. Armstrong is busy building a sidewalk from the Municipal hall to somewhere.
Mrs. J.E. Morris and family returned to Winnipegosis after spending a few days at the home of Wm. King.
Mrs. William Coultas and wee daughter have returned from Dauphin.
The Orangemen attended divine service at All Saints’ Church on Sunday.
Fred Storrar has retired as walking boss from the A.T. Co., having made his pal. Good for you Fred. He had better put it into municipal roads.
Miss Nellie Williams is visiting her friends in Dauphin for a week.
Mr. Lusher returned to the farm – ????

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 4 – 1912

1912 Jul 4 – Fork River

Mrs. Richardson, of Ontario, is visiting at the home of her sister, Mrs. Sam Bailey, on the Mossey River.
Miss Pearl Cooper returned home from a visit to her numerous friends in Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Wood are visitors with Mr. and Mrs. Bert Cooper on the Fork River for a few days.
Mrs. C. Clark returned ohm from Dauphin, where she has been attending her daughter. We are pleased to hear that Miss Olive is improving and will soon return home.
S.W. Swannerton was a visitor with Mr. Kennedy, manager of the Armstrong Trading Co., in connection with business for the Rapid City Flour Milling Co.
Miss A. Snelgrove is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
Mrs. Kennedy and Mrs. Williams are taking a trip to the Lake Town.
Mrs. Paul Wood and family, who have been visiting at Mrs. D.F. Wilson’s, having returned to Sifton.
Fred B. Lacey of Oak Brae, and D.F. Wilson, are visitors to Winnipegosis, the summer resort, on business.
Take care Bay Centre as we respect the one mentioned and he can kick both ends and unless you know the ropes you might get hurt. No offence meant.
The Government Agricultural special train was here on the 27th. There was a large turnout. The ladies
car was full and great interest was taken in the lectures on home culture given by the ladies in charge. A great number of famers turned out and listened to the able addresses delivered on cattle, horses and grain and weeds. As the train was late arriving the time was short to deal with so many subjects properly. We hope o see them back again at an early date and that our council will go in for roads instead of rabbit paths after hearing the road lecture given on good roads. The professors took two epecimros spector, which were returned safely and as soon as classified will be reported on and that’s the long and the short of it.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, expect for the Sawyer & Massey Co., is spending a few days with is parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bailey. We are alway pleased to meet Frank.
Several took in the Oddfellow’s excursion to Winnipegosis and and brought back a good dose of mosquitoes as souvenirs.
Nurse Johnston, of Dauphin Hospital, and Mrs Johnston are visitors at Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Whew, but its not. Just a sheet of paper between here and the place we hear on Sunday. Looking for a cool place is the order of the day. The river is well patronized.
W. King shipped two Berkshire sows to Robert McGregor, from this herd. There is a bargain for some on in “McNair,” the head of this herd, who is for sale.
A meeting of the Mossey River council will be held at Fork River on Tuesday, July 9.

1912 Jul 4 – Winnipegosis

E.R. Black was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.
The first excursion of the season, was by the Oddfellows of Grandview on Friday. The train brought a large crowd and all spent a pleasant day in boating and other amusements. A notable piece of enterprise on this occasion was the business acumen shown by a number of the ladies of the town by the erecting of booths, and selling of ice cream and refreshments. We are glad to say the young ladies did a good business and realized a nice profit.
Boating is the popular pastime with our citizens just now. At anytime on the river and law the small craft may be seen dodging and darting about.
Mrs. Coffey and her son Ted, returned to Dauphin Saturday, after a short visit with her daughter, Mrs. J.N. McAuley.
Capt. Coffey is here this week making repairs to his boat.
It is rumoured about that the Masonic and Oddfellows lodges of Dauphin will shortly hold an excursion to this place. We hope the report is true and promise the visitors an enjoyable outing.
Nurse Johnston of the Dauphin Hospital staff spent a few days visiting at the home of her mother last week. She returned to Dauphin on Saturday’s train.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 20 – 1912

1912 Jun 20 – Mossey River Council Minutes

Meeting of the Council held in the Council Chamber, Winnipegosis, Tuesday, June 4, 1912. All members present, Reeve Lacey and Councillor Nicholson arriving late.
Coun. Hunt was appointed chairman of the meeting in the absence of the reeve.
The minutes of previous meeting were adopted as read.
Sieffert – McAuley – That R.E. Broadfoot be allowed penalty off his 1911 taxes owing to his cheque to Municipality having been lost in transit. Carried.
Seiffert – Robertson – That Paul Wood be asked to pay taxes on sec. 21-31-18 up to and including the year 1910. Carried.
Seiffert – Robertson – That J.W. McAuley and Thos. Toye be appointed to investigate conditions in Cork Cliff S.D. with a view to constructing a road there; the cost of said road to remain within the bounds of Ward 5 appropriation for the year 1912. Carried.
Robertson – Nicholson – That arrears of taxes due on N.E. 10-29-18 and N.E. 14-29-18, be cancelled. Carried.
McAuley – Seiffert – That arrears of taxes on S.E. 28-31-19 be cancelled. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk notify C. Humphreys that arrears of taxes due on N.W. 16-29-18 must be paid forthwith. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That all bridges of 20ft. or over be built, kept in repair, and generally looked after by Municipality. Carried.
Sieffert – Hunt – That the Armstrong Trading Co. be allowed the use of two wheel-scrapers, to be used in removing earth from their cellar and putting same on the streets of Winnipegosis, as directed by the Councillor; scrapers to be returned when required in good order. Carried.
McAuley – Hunt – That the Council secure, as soon as possible, the services the of government engineer to take the levels and estimate the cost of constructing ditches throughout the Municipality, with a view to borrowing money for the same. Carried.
Hunt – Robertson – That J.W. McAuley and J.S. Seiffert be appointed a committee to look after the fencing Winnipegosis cemetery. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That Councillor for Ward 4 be allowed to accept Peter McArthur’s proposition regarding the sidewalk on block 7, all material to be chargeable to Ward 4, appropriation for the year 1913. Carried.
Nicholson – McAuley – That each road commissioner be authorized to spend his ward appropriations in such work and by what means he considers most advisable. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That statute labour be abolished, and that the amount of money represented by the statute labour commutation in each ward at $4.50 per quarter section, be added respectively to the ward’s appropriation. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That clerk state the case regarding Gensor lands to municipal solicitors and ask that action be taken at once to enforce the payment of arrears of taxes on the same. Carried.
Hunt – Seiffert – That F.B. Lacey, G.E. Nicholson and J.D. Robertson be a committee to inspect Fishing River bridge and decide what is best to be done with same. Carried.
Toye – Robertson – That Frank Slywoski’s taxes on S.W. 18-30-17 be reduced to $17. Carried.
Wm. Paddock was appointed fence viewer for Ward 4, and George Shannon for Ward 6 for the year 1912.
Hunt – Seiffert – That all buildings and other obstructions be removed from the streets of Winnipegosis within 30 days. Carried.
Seiffer – McAuley – That arrears of taxes on the N.E. portion of the S.E. quarter of section 10-31-18 be cancelled up to the year 1910. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Council new adjoin to meet again at the call of the reeve. Carried.

1912 Jun 20 – Fork River

J. McKie of the Iowa Dairy Separator Co., Fargo, was here on business.
F.B. Venables returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Councillor J. Robinson, of Ward six is spending a few days at Dauphin.
We hear the buzz of the plairey once more. Mr. Williams having put in a new plant, is turning out some very good stuff in that line. Give him a trial oiler.
Mrs. Wm. Coultas let for a few days visit to her numerous friends in Dauphin.
The government dredge in charge of Capt. McLean is making good progress on the Mossey River.
Mr. Malley, Methodist student, will be absent a week or ten days attending conference in Winnipeg.
A. Cooper left for a trip to Lloydminster, Sask.
S. Gower left for the south to take a long earned vacation.
Panko Solomon of Mowat, returning from a trip to Dauphin on the Swan River train, undertook to get off at Sifton Junction while the train was running and had to misfortune to break his ankle and is laid off work for some time.
We asked “Billy” if anything unusual had happened. He remarked with a smile. “Don’t you know the Good Shepherds have gone to Winnipeg as we are in for a whole week of rest, which is very acceptable after the corpedo launched at Sifton, Fork River and Winnipegosis, which places were specially mentioned on Sunday regarding party politics, as it’s like football, one is one is apt to get a crack when you are not looking for it. Cut when you are not looking for it. Cut it out friend and be satisfied with the achievements of the 17th of March, as after such fusillades, singing “Peace, perfect peace, seems out of place.”
Mr. Darroch, Dominion homestead inspector, paid a visit to Fork River in the interest of homesteaders apply for their patents.
We were informed that one of the leading farmers of the south part of this district is in search of a hired man and we were asked if we could tell of one. The qualifications are he must be well up in cow, pig and horse logy; preference will be given to one who had been used to a “Jackass” as there is one on the farm and it usually starts braying about four o’clock in the morning, when not on a visit to the summer resort. The said braying means get up and milk the “keys.” Salary will be the same as given to his predecessors. Five dollars per annum; half cash and half in patent medicines and lots of fresh air exercise and the promise of a further rise in salary of five dollars per annum when the Liberals get in power again. So be good as this is the chance of your life if accepted.
Mr. Clements of Dauphin who is farming on a large scale at Fork River, is spending a few day overseeing the work on the farms.

1912 Jun 20 – Winnipegosis

Arrangements are being made for the reception of the Oddfellows excursion here from Grandview on the 28th.
Mike Whotan cut his knee while working up the lake. He was brought to town by boat by Dr. Medd and T. Whale and was taken to Dauphin Hospital on Wednesday.
Thos. Whale, Dr. Medd and F.R. McDonald were visitors to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Dugald McAuley shipped a carload of cattle to Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Archie Stewart left on Wednesday for a trip to Dauphin and Minitonas.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 15 – 1911

1911 Jun 15 – Died From Injuries

Anthony Lefia, a Galician, had both his legs taken off by a box car passing over them in the railway yards here on Sunday morning last. How the accident happened will remain a mystery as the unfortunate man could not speak the English language and was unable to make any explanation. It is suppose that he was attempting to steal a ride when he fell under the moving wheels.

He was taken to the hospital immediately after the accident and everything possible was done for him but Dr. Harrington, who had charge of the case, held out little hope for recovery and as anticipated he passed away early Wednesday morning.

Lefia had been out from Austria but a few months and leaves a wife and family in that country.

1911 Jun 15 – Struck by Lightning

Jas. Bedard, who had been employed on the Burrows’ lumber drive at Grandview, was returning from driving a number of men to the camp on Wednesday last, when he was caught in a thunderstorm and struck by lightning. The electric fluid struck him on the back of the head and ran down his back and side, severely burning him. When discovered Bedrad was unconscious and was immediately taken to Grandview and afterwards brought to the hospital here, where he received treatment and is now on a fair way to recovery.

Bedard is well-known in Dauphin, having been connected with Clark Bros. livery stable the greater part of last year.

1911 Jun 15 – Fork River

Miss M. Nixon; teacher of Pine View School is taking a trip to Winnipeg on business.
It has been raining everyday for about a week and the roads are bad, yet Mr. A. Hunt is smiling, twin girls.
Mr. C. Clark is visiting Dauphin this week.
W. Williams is busy making the sawdust fly. The mill is in full swing under the management of Pat Powers, of Missouri.
The Rural Dean, Rev. S. Wiley, of St. Paul’s Church, Dauphin, will hold a service in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, on Sunday, June 18th, at 3 o’clock and at Winnipegosis in the evening at 7:30.
A. Hodgeson is visiting among his numerous friends at the Fork. He says mosquitoes are a nuisance.
E.H. Walker, school inspector of Dauphin, is here visiting the schools.
Mr. McLeod of Winnipeg is busy buying fat cattle for shipment.
The ladies of All Saints W.A. held a meeting at the rectory recently, considerable business was arranged for the coming years work.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 11 – 1914

1914 Jun 11 – Bad Fire at Ochre River

A disastrous fire occurred at Ochre River on Sunday morning last about 2 o’clock, when the store of the Ochre River Trading Co., together with most of the stock, was destroyed. The fire, when discovered had made considerable headway and the building being a frame one, was soon consumed. Willing hands did what they could to save the contents of the store and keep the fire from spreading.
The building was valued at $4000 and was insured for $2000.
The stock was insured for $12000 and its value placed at a sum in the neighbourhood of $15000 or $16000.
The origin of the fire is a mystery. It is probably that an investigation will be made.

1914 Jun 11 – House Burned

For the second time Mr. Gillies’ house at Sifton, was burned on Saturday night. The structure was a two-story frame building and nearly finished. Some time ago Mr. Gillies’ partly constructed dwelling was burned also. Incendiarism is suspected and the cause of the fire will be investigated.

1914 Jun 11 – Three Killed in Collision

One of the worst accidents that has happened for some time past on the C.N.R. took place just east of Cote, a small station six miles from Kamsack, on Friday night last. It was a head-on collision between No. 2 eastbound and No. 201, speed freight. There is a curve at this point in the road and the two trains were running at a good rate of speed and were right together before the engineers had time to reverse. No. 2 was in charge of Engineer J.H. Arnold and No. 201 Engineer R.T. Perkins, Jas. Clyde was firing for No. 2. and F.J. Smith for No. 201. All four were from this point. Perkins, Clyde and Smith all managed to jump and not one of them received any serious injury. Arnold stuck to his post and was so badly scalded and otherwise inured that he dead a few hours afterwards at the Kamsack Hospital.
F.J. Faiji, mail clerk, and Ross Donaldson, express messenger, were instantly killed. Both ran out of Winnipeg.
Geo. Gougeon, brakeman, of Dauphin was slightly injured.
W.H. Messier and J.A. McVicar were the conductors of the respective trains, the passage and freight. Both escaped unhurt.
None of the passengers on the train were injured, but nearly all received a bad shaking up.

1914 Jun 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Winnipegosis on May 30th.
The minutes of the previous meeting were adopted as read.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now sit as a court of revision.
The clerk reported that no protests had been filled since the court of revision had adjourned.
Hechter-Toye – That the court of revision new adjourn.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now take up the usual municipal matters.
Communications were then read from Prof. Black, the Deputy Minister of Public Works; the Land Commissioner of the Hudson’s Bay Co,; Judge Ryan; J. Irwin; the solicitors for the C.N.R.; the Municipal Solicitor; H. Rustad and a petition from certain ratepayers asking for a bridge.
Hechter-Bickle – That the plan of subdivision of block G and part of block F, village of Winnipegosis, plan being numbered 251, submitted by Munson & Allan, be approved.
Hunt-Bickle – That the secretary write the superintendent of the C.N.R. Dauphin, regarding the putting in of a culvert through the railway at pole No. 22, north of mile board No. 12.
Toye-Hunt – That W. Vincent be paid $13 for his service in securing the title to the roadway through the Champion farm.
Toye-Hechter – That plank be supplied to cover a bridge 20 feet long over Icelandic Creek, on the township line, between 29 and 30, the settlers agreeing to do the work.
Hunt-Bickle – in amendment – That Coun. Robertson and Toye deal with the matter of a bridge across Icelandic Creek and that the coasts be borne by ward 5 and 6. Amendment carried.
Messrs. Macneill and Reid, the delegates from Dauphin, were head regarding the building of a road from Winnipegosis to Dauphin.
Hechter-Hunt – That a vote of thanks be tendered the delegates from Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the council now decide to come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act, a road from Fork River south to the boundary of the municipality and connecting with the proposed road to be built by the Dauphin municipality, between section 35 and 36 in township 28, range 19.
Bickle-Richardson – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter and Hunt be a committee to select the main roads and prepare the preliminary steps required t come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act.
Hechter-Richardson – That a grant of ten bags of flour be made to Seifat Michtka and that the flour by bought from whoever will supply it at the lowest price.
Hunt-Bickle – That in the matter of a petition of certain ratepayers of ward 6 regarding statute labour, the reeve by authorized to ??? in the absence of Coun. Robertson.
Robinson-Hechter – That the reeve be authorized to go to Winnipeg and see the Minister of Public Works with a view to getting a grant for the biding of public roads in the municipality.
Hechter-Hunt – That the public works committee be authorized to begin work and if the weather permits complete the Fork River and Winnipegosis road; the work to be done in accordance with the profile of the Government engineer.
Richardson-Hechter – That on complaint to the clerk and the production of the necessary proof by the complainant, the clerk is hereby instructed to prosecute the owners of animals running at large contrary to the provision of the by laws.
Richardson-Hechter – That the clerk notify parties who have had interments made in the municipal cemeteries to apply at the office of the municipality for their cemetery deeds.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye-Bickle – That Coun. Hechter be authorized to rent two tents to be used by the men on road constructions.
A by-law was passed making an appropriation to the wards on a basis of six mills in the assessment.
Bickle-Toye – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jun 11 – Fork River

Mrs. Chas. Denby, of Winnipegosis, returned home, having spent a week among friends.
Mrs. Kennedy and family have returned from Winnipegosis having spent the weekend there.
W. Williams’ planning mill is running full blast these days and “Billy” is busy shipping lumber.
W. Howiston spent a few days at Winnipegosis and while away we are informed, invested in a schooner. That’s all right “Scotty.”
Mr. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days inspecting work performed by homesteaders.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is visiting here.
Jack Robson and Harry Hunter have returned from a two months trapping and hunting trip and they report a good catch.
E. Williams, lay reader, has returned from attending the Synod at Winnipeg last week. He reports a very busy time.
The mail these days contains many copies of the speech on free wheat by our friend “Bob” Cruise, member for Dauphin. The wheat question does not cut any ice here at present. Its roads and bridges we went. We would be delighted to hear our friend “Bob” converting the Senate and his friends to vote for Borden’s good roads policy which was thrown out last session.
The seeding is over and the crop has been put in good shape, it being one of the finest seasons we have seen for years.
The captain of our fire brigade has prophesized a dry season and is seriously thinking of going into growing watermelons in case of fire. The only thing we can do is to keep smiling as the crops are looking good.
Feming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor here between trains the latter end of the week.
“Joe” Lockhart is filling a car with settlers’ effects and is off for the banana belt. Ta, ta, “Joe” we wish you good luck.
There will be a court of revision at Ethelbert on June 17th. It’s the last chance for getting on the list for the electoral division of Gilbert Plains.
W. King has returned after a two weeks’ trip north. He had a good time, tanks to his two Liberal friends who stuck to him closer than a brother, and “Billy” always appreciates a good thing.
Mrs. Curtis and Mrs. Morrisain, of Texas, U.S., are visiting their friend, Mrs. Nat Little, for a few weeks.
Miss F. Sanderson left for Winnipegosis to take charge of a large diary business started by G. Sanderson, of that burgh.
W. Hunkins and “Jimmy” Bickle passed through here recently at a 2-40 gait.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 30 – 1912

1912 May 30 – Fork River News

The Fork River boys journeyed to the Lake Town on Victoria Day and played football, losing by one goal. Score Winnipegosis 2; Fork River 1; Better luck on 3rd June boys.
Theo. Johnston and J.H. Robinson left here Tuesday for Selkirk for the summer fishing.
Seeding is rushing along now we are getting something like weather.
Don’t forget the picnic on 3rd June, also the concert at night in and of the new parsonage. Everyone come and have a good time.
W.J. Williams is shipping a car of lumber to Winnipegosis.
Cream is coming in faster new and farmers are taking advantage of prepaid express to Winnipegosis by the Armstrong Creamery.
W. Williams was a visitor to Sifton Monday and took in Ashmore’s sale.

1912 May 30 – Winnipegosis Breezes

The boating season is now in full swing and Sunday saw a gull turn out. Langlots’ schooner took a party for a trip on the lake and motor boats belonging to Dr. Medd, H. Parker, Conrad Adams and Dad Denby ware fully loaded with visitors to Snake Island. The day was glorious and everyone had a good time. The hatchery has now ceased operations until next fall; the whitefish fry were weaned about two weeks ago and turned out in the lake by Hughie McKellar, the Government hatchery expert. Hughie has no trade secrets and visitors will always find him ready to impart full information on all matters appertaining to fish culture. Some days he is very interesting.
There was a large turnout for the picnic on Monday, the weather was ideal and everyone spent a happy time. The sports lasted from 2 o’clock until 9 and great rivalry and excitement was shown right to the last. The baseball match between the Fishermen and Town was worse than any dog fight. Doc. Medd turned renegade and pitched for the Fishermen and with a good wind behind him pitched so fast a all that the Town never saw it; the Fishermen also had the umpire bribed (so the Town say). However all were friends again five minutes after the game and in charity to the Town we suppress the score. The football match between Winnipegosis and Fork River was a hard fought game, but the farmer boys are very poor marksmen and the locals won comfortably by two goals to one. The following is a list of the winners of the other events:

EVENTS FOR ADULTS
100 yards – J.E. Mossington
Sack – W. Denby
220 yards – J. Denby
Hop, step, and jump – W. Grearson
Pipe race – Baptiste McLeod
Broad jump – W. Grearson
High jump – W. Grearson
Putting shot – W. Grearson

LADIES’ RACES.
Needle – K. Parker
Skipping – E. Paddock
Egg and spoon – Edna Grenon

BOYS’ RACES.
Age 13 to 16 – C. Burrell
Age 11 to 13 – A. Richard

GIRLS’ RACES.
Age 13 to 16 – E. Paddock
Age 11 to 13 – G. Eggartson
Tots – Leonore Denby

Several summer cottages are about to be built on the new pleasure beach. It is proposed to erect a small pier on the beach and have motor and row boats as livery.
George Cunliffe, of Whale & Cunliffe, left on Tuesday for Winnipeg where he will await the arrival from England, of his future bride, Laura Barkess of Bradford. They will return on Saturday and Mr. and Mrs. Cunliffe will receive a right royal welcome.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 25 – 1911

1911 May 25 – Census Enumerators Here Today

The census enumerators under Commissioner H.P. Nicholson meet here today (Thursday) to receive instructions, so as o be able to commence their work on June 1st. In most of the districts set aside for the enumerators it is thought that they can complete the work in about three weeks time.

1911 May 25 – Fire at Fork River

During the brush fires in the vicinity of Fork River last week, Wm. Williams, who operates a sawmill at that point was a heavy loser. He had his stables, engine room and a number of saw logs burned.
Mr. G.M. Littler, B.A., is a visiting Dauphin on business this week. He held service at Sifton, Sunday 21st.
Mr. McLeod of Winnipeg is busy buying a car of potatoes from the farmers and is paying 25 and 30 cents in trade and consider they are doing the farmer a favour at that price.
Mr. A Roe is able to move around again but unable to work.
The Armstrong Trading Co. has put in an excellent refrigerator. We are unable to say whether it is to keep the store or stove cool as both of them are little on the warm side sometimes.
The ratepayers of Fork River believe the time has come to remove the school into the village as over two-thirds of the scholars come from the south, those that want it should get busy and keep an eye on the bird of paradise.
Our municipal clerk is taking a day off grafting his fruit trees he does his grafting openly. We don’t know when the others do it as we never had an itemized account for three years.
Mr. Joe Lockhart’s sale on the 15th, was a success, considering the busy time. Stock brought a good price; the record price was 60 cents cash for 70 hens. Who says poultry don’t pay.
Council meeting at Fork River on Tuesday, May 30th.