Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 21 – 1915

1915 Oct 21 – Leveson-Gower – Lacey

A quiet home wedding took place at Oak Brae (Fork River) on Wednesday, the 20th inst., when Mr. Sidney Leveson-Gower was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Hendy, daughter of Mr. F.B. Lacey. Rev. R.E. Spence, of Dauphin, performed the ceremony. The bridesmaid was Miss Harriest Lacey and the groomsman, Mr. Garnet E. Lacey, Miss Ada Steckley played the wedding march. The happy couple will spend the honeymoon at Dauphin with friends.

1915 Oct 21 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Phillips, traveller for a store from Winnipeg, spent a day here taking orders from the store. George is one of the old-timers.
Mr. Camur, of the Fork River Mercantile Co., left for Winnipeg with a carload of cattle. Another buyer left with a car of stock for the west.
Ben Warshosky has received another car of Western horse flesh.
Sergant Jack Angus spent the week-end with friends on his way from Winnipegosis to Sewell. The social evening in honour of the boys at Winnipegosis was a great success. We were glad to se the boys as they passed through on their return to Sewell Camp. The Fork Rive boys have returned to Sewell; yes, and what about their send off. Comment is unnecessary.
Mr. F.B. Lacey, reeve, was a Winnipegosis visitor lately.
The winter will soon be on us and the sidewalk on Main Street to the post office is not finished. It will be another case of mud and slush in the spring if something is not soon done. The only thing we are sure of in this municipality is our [1 line missing].
Judging from the weekly consignments of fruit arriving here lately the King’s fruit store seems to get rid of it in short order, which goes to show the service is appreciated by the public.
Harry Grenon, of Winnipegosis, is spending a few days here at the elevator looking after the A.T. Company’s interest.
Sid Gower is spending a few days with Mr. Lacey on the Mossey River.
Threshing is going ahead with all speed. The returns are reported large.

1915 Oct 21 – Winnipegosis

Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Ena Fredickson returned on Monday from a week’s visit to friends in Winnipeg.
Miss Sarah Stevenson, of Red Deer point, is spending a few days in town.
Sergeant Angus and Privates Jim Taylor and Charley Bickle spent a few days with friends on leave of absence.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy was well attended and the proceeds amounted to $10.50.
The council met as a Court of Revision in the Council Chambers on Thursday, the 14th inst., and all protests were dealt with in due order.
There are quite a number of vacant houses in town now as most of the fishermen have gone up the like for the winter fishing.
Geo. Bulter, of Waterhen, spent Saturday in town.
Geo. Adams and Mr. Loire were business visitors in town for the week-end.
The good Samaritan, Thos. Toye, not only keeps our lighthouse shedding their welcome rays but is also a friend in need to animals in difficulty on the prairie. He lifted an old white horse who was down and out on Sunday and sure saved it from slow starvation. The Sunday before he received a party of young people whose boat drifted and grounded close to the lighthouse.
Jas. McInnes returned Sunday from a trip up the lake.
Dr. Medd returned Monday from a trip to Shoal River.
The young ladies of the town are busy these days making toffee for the soldier boys who left here and joined the 79th.
Mr. Peach, inspector of schools, arrived in town on Monday for a few days.
Thomas Ramsay, of Sifton, spent Monday in town and reports things very quiet in the southern town.
D.G. McCaulay shipped a car of cattle to Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Eddie Chermok’s new store is quickly nearing completion and will be ready for the stock in a few days.
Provincial Constable Wait, of Dauphin, was in town for a few days on business.
There was a potato grown on the lake shore at Red Deer point which measured 12 inches long and 3 inches in circumference. This is the country to prow potatoes.
Harry Grenon has been at Fork River the past few days weighing in the grain off the Company farms.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd October, or you will miss the time of your life. Tickets on sale at D. Kennedy’s or at C. Burrell’s barber shop.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 4 – 1914

1914 Jun 4 – Killed by Stroke Lightning

In the midst of life we are in death. The words of the Psalmist were fully realized on Tuesday when a telephone message from Dublin Bay, a point about 15 miles north of town, conveying the sad message that Thos. R. Baylis, a well-known farmer, had been killed by lightning. It appears that decreased was walking along the road at the time carrying a hoe over his shoulder during the prevalence of a thunderstorm that morning when he was stuck by lightning and instantly killed.

HOE BLADE ATTRACTED LIGHTNING

It is believed that the steel blade of the hoe was the means of attracting the lightning. When found on the roadway his clothes were literally torn to tatters, and the tops of the leather of his boots separated from the soles.

DEATH INSTANTANEOUS

The body was at once removed to the home and Dr. Culbertson telephoned for. Mr. Gurton’s automobile was secured and the Dr. and Mrs. Lys, his daughter, made the trip in fast time. After examining the body Dr. Culbertson gave it as his opinion that death was instantaneous.
Deceased has been a resident of the Dublin Bay district for over 12 years and formerly resided at Madoc, Hastings county, Ontario. He was of retiring disposition, but well liked by all who enjoyed his acquaintance. Besides a window he leaves two daughters and four sons, all grown up. The daughters are Mrs. Hugh Lys, of the town, and Mrs. Wm. Dempsey, of Tisdale, Sask.; the four sons all reside at Dublin Bay, and are William, Fredrick, Arthur and Percy. He was 70 years of age.

BURIED AT RIVERSIDE

The funeral took place today from the late residence of deceased to St. Paul’s Church. After service the body was taken to Riverside Cemetery for interment. The service at the church and grave was conducted by the Rev. A.S. Wiley.

1914 Jun 4 – Winnipegosis

Two of our popular young people Miss Mary A. McArthur and Dr. E.A. Medd, were quietly married at the home of the bride’s parents on the 29th inst. They have the best wishes of all for their future happiness. A ball will be given in their honour at the Hotel Winnipegosis on Friday night.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a visitor in our midst lately, returning to Winnipeg on Monday.
Capt. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Pennycock and little daughter left for Winnipeg on Monday.
Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday to Fork River.
Large shipments of fur were sent out on Monday by the Armstrong Trading Co. and Joe Alex.
Rev. F. Elliott is retiring from the Methodist mission here on account of his health.
The Standard Lumber Co. is running their planning mill steadily at present.
The funeral of the late Richard Harrison took place on Sunday and was largely attended. The Rev. F. Elliott conducted the service. Deceased was an old-timer, having settled in this neighbourhood some twenty years ago. He followed stock raising on the considerable scale. He was liked by all who knew him and his death cast a gloom over the community. Two automobiles brought friends from Dauphin on Sunday to attend the funeral. Among the visitors were Thos. Needham, Stuart Geekie, W.A. Brinkman, Dr. Bottomley, J.B. McIntyre, G.L. Irwin and Ross Walker.
Nurse Cummings, who was called here to nurse the late R. Harrison, returned to Dauphin on Monday.
The telephone and post office have been moved to the old Hudson’s Bay Co. store.
The contract for the new school has been let to Neely & Co. of Dauphin.
Pilgrim & Co. recently put down about 900 feet cement floor in the fox ranch here.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 6 – 1913

1913 Feb 6 – Baran Fired Fatal Shot

Monday was the most fateful in the life of John Baran. It opened with the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke in morning and in the afternoon the coroner’s jury found Baran guilty of the shooting.
Coroner Harrington held an inquest in the afternoon, when the following composed the jury: Geo. King, foreman; H.F. Caldwell, John Cole, A.B. Buie, Nelson Taylor, Stewart Baird, Thos. Shaw, F.J. McDonald, R.G. Ferguson, Thos. Jordan, Frank Beely, and Arch. Esplen. Witnesses examined were Dr. Culbertson, as to immediate cause of death; John Tomaski, the man who drove the sleigh that carried Constable Rooke to Baran’s house where he was shot, and Marie Pelech, the woman who lived with Baran.
The jury, in order to receive the woman’s evidence, proceeded to the hospital and for an hour listened to a well connected and intelligent reciting of the incidents which led up to the shooting.
The woman testified that Baran fired two shots from a rifle through the door when Rooke attempted to force an entrance; that she knew that one of the bullets took effect for she examined the spot where Rooke fell exhausted in the snow, when the man who accompanied him left to secure assistance. She stated that she found a pool of blood. She also testified that Baran forced her to state that she fired two shot through the door. The whole affair was brought home to Baran in a most vivid manner.

THE JURY’S VERDICT

The following is the verdict of the jury:
“We, the jury empanelled to hear the evidence as to the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke, find that the said Charles Rooke on Sunday, Jan. 26, 1913, received a bullet in the breast from a rifle in the hands of John Baran and that the said Charles Rooke died on Monday, Feb. 3, 1913, from the effects of this shot.”
The death of Constable Rooke has cast a gloom over the community as he was a good citizen, as well a good officer, unassuming and kind to all.
Marie Pelech, who lived with Baran, is still in the hospital, but is doing as well as can be expected. If she recovers she will have to have her right arm amputated at the shoulder. Her brother, Michael, arrived from Winnipeg Monday morning and was overcome with grief to find his sister in such a pitiable condition. He says he has been looking for her for three years.
Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Munson on Monday on the charge of murder. He was remanded until Friday for trial.
Rooke was born at Redhill, Surrey, England. May 5, 1876, being the son of Inspector-General Rooke, of the Indian army, who was honorary physician to Queen Victoria, and was educated at Willington College. He came to Western Canada in 1895, and served five years with the Northwest Mounted Police. In 1905 the Manitoba government gave him the job of organizing the Manitoba mounted police, a body whose efforts were mainly directed to the suppression of lawlessness along the international boundary line. He made his name a terror to horse thieves, yeggmen and smugglers and soon made the frontier as safe as any other part of the province. Latterly, his headquarters have been here, where he had jurisdiction over much of the north country. In 1909 he married Elizabeth Surrey, who, with one son, survives him.
A brother, E.G. Rooke, news editor of the Nelson News, and former publisher of the Port Hope., Ont. Times, is here to attend the funeral as are also Mr. Geo. Surry, Victoria, B.C., Mrs. Rooke’s brother, and Miss Ellen Surrey, of Galt., Ont., sister of Mrs. Rooke.

1913 Feb 6 – Funeral Today

The funeral of the late Constable Charles Rooke is taking place this afternoon from the family residence 8th Ave., N.E. Vermillion Lodge No, 68, A.F. & A.M., of which deceased was a member having charge of the services. Rev. A.S. Wiley will conduct the service. Interment will be made at Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fraser Given Two Months

Wm. Fraser, who attempted suicide last week by cutting his throat, appeared before P.M. Munson on the 30th ult., and was sentenced to two months in jail. He was taken to Portage by Constable McLean.

1913 Feb 6 – Died From Bullet Wound

Fred Bichardson, a Barnardo boy who was working for Arthur Lee, a farmer at Togo, shot himself in the head Friday with a 22 rifle. He was brought to the hospital here on Saturday, but died shortly after his arrival. The remains were interred in Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fork River

Henry Benner, of Lloydminster, is visiting his parents up the Fork River. He is wanting a car of young cattle to take back with him. No objections to females being among them.
Howard Armstrong has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Dony, left for Bayhead, Nova Scotia, for a two months visit among relations and friends.
D. Kennedy’s high flyer got kicked the other day and is out of business for a short time, consequently Dunk had to fall back on the old reliables for a trip to Winnipegosis.
All the threshing outfits got cold feet early this fall except for Fred Cooper and he is on his last job. Fred’s a stayer and there should be no kick from the farmers as there’s no money in it for either this year as far as threshing goes.
We were out the other day looking for a stray heifer and didn’t find her, but came across someone looking for a pig. They did not mention whether it was a live pig, or dead pig or a blind pig and judging from their track a few hours after they must have run across a pig of some kind. Moral, don’t try to carry more pig than you can handle unless you cover up your tracks.
There is considerable kicking being done among the owners of gasoline engines re the poor gasoline sent up here from Dauphin. It not only wastes our time but puts the engines out of order.
We notice in the Press a long rigmarole about compulsory education also an ad for a teacher for Mowat School. We hear there has been several application received. It seems a pity this school should be closed since the summer holidays, it being in the centre of a settlement where there is a large number of children. The parents seem to be anything but delighted to have the kids miss all the nice weather we have had. We bet dollars to doughnuts that the head push has no children to send or we would have heard of it every week for the last five months.
Can anyone tell us what benefit the majority of the ratepayers receive for their taxes in the Municipality. Of course there are some who go on a pilgrimage to all the meetings looking for snaps and they get them, by gum. The clerk has had a rise of fifty. Oh well, I believe he published the minutes of one council meeting since last June. The municipal auditor was around so look out for the statement three inches by four. We received a copy of the Auditor’s report in book form of 47 pages from Ochre River Municipality. Its good reading and looks like business. A few dollars expended like this would be more appreciated by the ratepayers than paying two road commissioners in ward five, as there has been done the last three years to spend two or three hundred dollars.
The new Oak Brae postoffice as officially opened today. It is situated at Janowski schoolhouse and should prove a great boon to the people of that locality as it has been a deeply felt want. Geo. Basham is postmaster and we feel sure he will fill the bill to all satisfactorily. We hear Billy is sore, but we can’t help these things, so Billy, please remember the little saying “No use crying over spilt milk.” Such is life in the Wolly West.
The annual clearance sale started today 1st Feb. at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store and they are sure slaughtering the prices. This has been a poor year for the farmer so now is your chance to buy right.
Wanted, a boarding house right away for the travelling public.

1913 Feb 6 – Sifton

A ball was held in the Kennedy hall in aid of the English church; about forty couples were present, and a very enjoyable time was spent.
Elaborate arrangements were made for a wedding here on the 31st ult. A large number of guests had assembled and everything was in readiness for the ceremony when it was found that the would-be bride was missing. Consternation reigned for a time and great disappointment was felt, especially by the intended groom.