Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 2, 1919

Big German Gun for Dauphin

While nothing has been definitely settled regarding the disposition of much of the spoils of war captured from the Germans enough is known that Dauphin will have the refusal of one of the big cannons. The railway board, it is understood, is willing to grant sufficient of the right-of-way in front of the Grand View Hotel for a foundation upon which to mount the monster.

Reeve Lacey Wants the Kaiser Shot

To the Editor of the Herald:
SIR—The following is an extract from a letter received from a relative in English since the signing of the armistice and return of the prisoners of war from Germany:
“There have been several boys of Penarth, returned prisoners of war, and some of them have been treated most cruel. One has an eagle branded on each side of his face, his teeth knocked out, and a piece cut off his tongue. Another with an eagle and “God Blast England,” or some such words as that, and a torpedo on his forehead. There are quit a lot of Germans prisoners here and when one sees them one cannot help using strong language when you know they have had such fiendish thins done to our prisoners by these Germans.”
The above is one instance that is recorded out of thousands that are unfortunately too true. God grant that our representatives at the peace conference may not forget the horrible tortures inflicted on those French and Belgian women and children, and, on the noble men of the Allied armies and navies who voluntarily offered their liberty, limbs and lives by thousands to save the world from German bondage. We shall be robbed of victory if those fiendish war lords are not stripped of all they possess and led out and shot by some of the boys they have tortured. Let us back up our army and navy and insist on a death punishment for the Kaiser and his war lords: otherwise there will be no lasting peace.
Fed B. Lacey
Fork River.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on December 18th, all the members being present.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read on motion of Coun. Hunt, seconded by Coun. Namaka.
Communications were read from St. Joseph’s Orphanage, the Bank of Commerce, the fire guardian, J. Rosenthal (re: sale of bridge), P.J. Robertson and T.N. Briggs (re: flooding of land next spring), the Navy League (re: grant), tax accounts of F. Thorsteinson and N. Syder, Lawrence municipality (re: boundary road) and the inspector of legal offices.
McDonell-Reid – That a grant of $250 be made to the Navy League of Canada.
Hunt-Yakavanka – That Constable Lyon push proceedings with a view to having the stable removed from the lane in block 1, Fork River.
Hunt-McDonell – That a rebate of taxes for 1918 of $13.60 be made on the Orange Hall property.
Reid-Yakavanka – That the accounts of Coun. McDonell ($134) and Hunt ($34.50) for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That the account for culverts to be used on the Dauphin-Mossey River boundary of $195.20, at present charged to Ward 1 be transferred to the public works account and applied on the work for which the government grant is given.
Yakavanka-Reid – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That Wards 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 be credited with $230 each of the Government grant, with the understanding that the money be spent on the main roads through the Wards.
Yakvanka-Paddock – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be authorized to obtain material for a bridge across Fishing River, on the west side of 2-29-19.
Reid-McDonell – That the Reeve and Coun. Hunt be delegates to the municipal convention to be held in Winnipeg on January 21st, 22nd, and 23rd.
McDonell-Reid – That the clerk put up notices asking for applications for the position of sec.-treasurer, and also advertise in the Dauphin Herald.
Hunt-Reid – That the council tender Reeve Lacey a hearty vote of thanks for his services to the municipality and wish them every success in the future.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from a two weeks’ visit to Weyburn, Sask.
The Chute brothers from Dauphin passed through here recently wit their teams. They intend to haul fish during the winter on Lake Winnipegosis. This is a local industry which puts an honest dollar within reach of our farmers.
Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, was a recent visitor at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. He has been in poor health for some time past and is going to the hospital for treatment.
Sid Gower is wearing that broad smile that won’t come off. It’s a Daughter of the Empire.
Mr. F. Cooper was a recent visitor to Dauphin.
Coun. Archie McDonell paid Dauphin a visit at the weekend. The genial Archie has just recovered from the flu.
Edwin King has gone to Winnipeg to take a business course.
The new council will assume office on the 7th inst. Your correspondent will watch carefully the moves of our representatives and note them for the Herald. Progress should be the watchword. There is a lot of work awaiting the activity of the council and we all hope they will prove equal to the occasion.

Winnipegosis

At the annual meeting of the Home Economics Society the officer elected were as follows:
President – Mrs. Houchin, re-elected.
Vice – Mrs. Dennett.
Secretary – Mrs. Spence, re-elected.
Treasurer – Miss R. Whale.
With the New Year we have a library of about 100 books belonging to the society and we hope to add another hundred books before the year is out. The January meeting will take the form of a social evening when each member is asked to bring a friend along.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 13 – 1919

1919 Nov 13 – Soldiers Tendered Banquet

A year ago Tuesday the bells of the town were ringing and the whistles blowing. It was a day long to be remembered. The Germans had started the war with the object of conquering the world and had, after the great struggle, hoisted the white flag and asked for the cessation of hostilities. It was a different scene that greeted the eye as one entered the town hall on Tuesday night, November 11th, 1919. Here were tables stretched the full length of the hall, artistically arranged and simply groaning under the load of good things that weighed them down.
The occasion was a banquet tendered the returned boys, their wives and lady friends by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the G.W.V.A. and it was worthy of them. The members of the Auxiliary have been tireless workers for the welfare of the men and this banquet crowned their efforts.
There were between three and four hundred present.
During the dinner hour Major Skinner extended a welcome to all on behalf of the Auxiliary.
A vote of thanks was tendered the ladies on motion of Comrades Bates and Batty.
After the tables were cleared there was a short program followed by a dance. Those taking part were Mrs. Grobb, violin selection; Mrs. R. Hawkins, solo; Rev. H.P. Barrett, song; Miss H. Clarke, recitation. The McMurray orchestra furnished the music for the dance.

1919 Nov 13 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 10th.
Mr. Shield and bride arrived last week and have rented John Hayward’s residence on the Mossey River.
John Judge and Mr. Gourlay from Virden, have arrived. They have rented Briggs brothers’ buildings.
A basket social will be held in the school on the evening of Nov. 21st. The proceeds will be devoted to a fund for the purchase of an organ for the school.
The work on the road that leads to the school is still undone. Children from this district east of the muskeg have not been able to attend school of late on this account. The Dept. of Public-Works has provided a special grant from this road. In view of this it seems strange that an effort has not been made to have the work performed.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

A meeting of the directors of the Agricultural Society was held on the 5th inst. It was decided to pay the prize money at once. As this was the first show held by the society the directors are to be congratulated on its success.
Mrs. Rice, for a number of years was teacher at North Lake School has sold her property and has left the community. Mrs. Rice has lived a number of years in the district and has done good work as a teacher. Her departure from our midst is a matter of regret.
Mr. and Mrs. Caswell, of Hartney, Man., are visiting at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. The young people attended the banquet to the returned soldiers.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Briggs.
All Saints’ S.S. staff held a public meeting on the night of the 6th. About 50 were present. Rev. H.P. Barrett presided. Arrangements were made for the annual Christmas tree, and also to hold a social evening every Wednesday at which there will be a varied program.
A public meeting is called for Friday, 14th inst., for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers’ Association.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

Mrs. Emma Rice wishes to thank all who were kind and considerate to her during her recent illness. She is now comfortably provided for in Dauphin and hops to be able to return to our midst within a short time.

LETTER OF APPRECIATIONS.
On behalf the returned boys of the Fork River district we wish to express our appreciation of the banquet tendered us, the gifts of watches and purses and the uniform kindness shown us upon all occasions. We further wish to acknowledge the efforts of the ladies in preparing the excellent supper provided us. The banquet was a most enjoyable event, the pleasure being shared by a number of friends from outside.
THE COMMITTEE.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 12 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 12 – Badly Injured

Nat Douse, a young man in the employ of the Burrows Mill at Grandview, met with a bad accident last Thursday. While at work in the mill he slipped and fell against the slash saws and sustained injuries to his right shoulder, the muscle and flesh being torn very badly. After he had his wounds dressed at Grandview he was brought to the hospital here. A few days later it was found necessary to amputate his arm at the shoulder. Douse is now making as good progress as can be expected towards recovery.

1911 Oct 12 – Planing Mill Burned

The planning mill belonging to T.A. Burrows at Birch River was destroyed by fire on Monday afternoon. Besides the mill a half dozen cars of lumber were also burned. The loss is covered by insurance.

1911 Oct 12 – Fork River

The heavy rains have tied up the threshing machines and stopped the ploughing. With the present fine weather work will commence again.
Constable G. Weaver has returned from a business trip to Dauphin and reports everything quiet.
W. King, Sam Bailey and D. Wilson paid a visit to Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The fishermen are busy preparing to go up to the lake for the winter’s fishing. It is remarkable how many Conservatives one meets there since the Borden Government was elected.
Mr. Littler is attending the Rural Deanery meeting in Dauphin.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, was up inspecting the government dredge working in the Mossey River.
In the Press, Sept. 28, page 1, is composed of items of Cruise’s big Majority and the Markets is said to be correct. Take the price of barley, No. 3, 60 to 62, No. 4, 60 to 64, first time we ever knew No. 4 to bring more than 3. On another page under the heading of Charvari it is stated barely looks like thirty cents and that the Press will be doing business at the same old stand. Would advise them to take a rest and not contradict themselves so often. On another page is a large rigmarole about T.A. Burrows the gentleman who it has been claimed used his office to feather his nest and was never heard on the floor of the house only to try and protect himself regarding the timber steal. Of course he should have a senatorship. Rats! As yet they have the audacity to talk about Jimmy Harvey and Glen Campbell.
Mr. F.B. Lacey, postmaster general of Oak Brae, is attending Council meeting at Winnipegosis.

1916 Oct 12 – The Week’s Casualty List

Sergt. Frank Burt, killed on Sept. 24th. Burt enlisted at Dauphin with the first contingent two years ago. (Frank Burt, 1876, 46965)
Pte. Anderson Reed Walker, killed. (Anderson Reid Walker, 1895, 2056)
Sergt. Fred. Clark-Hughfield, wounded. (???)
Pte. Hugh Dunston, wounded on shoulder. (Hugh Leo Dunstan, 1896, 150887)
Pte. Jas. A. Justice, wounded. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
Lieut. Percy Willson, died from wounds. (Major Percy Willson, 1883)

1916 Oct 12 – Winnipegosis

Miss Edna Grenon was among the arrivals on Saturday’s train to spend Sunday and Thanksgiving Day at home.
Mrs. P. McArthur has returned from a short visit to Minneapolis.
The “Manitou” has two more trips to make taking fishermen’s supplies up. We trust the present good weather holds so that she may get in safely before freeze-up.
There has been a good deal of liquor in town of late. There is something taking in the liquor law when these boozers can have it shipped up here to them from Ontario and deal it out to other boozers more benighted than themselves. Now that men are scare it would prove a very potent method of wheeling a man over far more effective than money.
Mrs. J.E. McArthur was a passenger on Tuesday’s train going to Winnipeg.
It is reported that Jimmie Taylor, who went to the front with the 79th, has been wounded.
The Red Cross evening at Victoria Hall on Thursday night under the management of Mrs. Hall Burrell and Miss Jarvett, was a great success socially and financially. Over $10 was taken at the door.
Mr. Lacey, of Fork River, was here on Saturday in connection with the business of building the Meadow Land and Don schools.
Miss Leith McMartin spent the week-end at Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 9 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 9 – Accidently Shot

Robt. Charlier, a young man 23 years of age, was brought from Ochre River on Monday to the hospital here. He was pulling a shotgun out of a wagon when it was accidently discharged, the contents lodged in his groin. He is reported progressing satisfactorily.

1913 Oct 9 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy and daughters were visitors to the Lake Town with Mr. Theo. Johnston.
E. Williams returned from Dauphin after attending the rural deanery meeting at that point.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, was visiting friends at Fork River and returned home on the “All Saints” special.
The long distance telephone gang are busy here getting ready to put up the wire which will fill a long felt want.
The elevator is in full swing, with John Clements, in charge he having moved his family from Dauphin here for the winter.
Miss N. Millidge, organizer and managing secretary of the Church of England Women’s Auxiliary, gave an address in the church to the W.A. members, which was well attended
Miss Millidge is the guest of Mrs. W. King, president of the W.A. until Tuesday when they both drove to Winnipegosis to hold a meeting with the members of the W.A. at that point. A successful meeting was held.
Mr. Monnington, of Neepawa, arrived here for a few days chicken shooting and is the guest of his uncle, John Robinson on the Mossey.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. King and Mr. and Mrs. E.E. McKinstry and G.F. King paid our burg a visit in an automobile. They were after the fleet winged prairie chicken. The party were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dunc. Kennedy.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Winnipegosis, spent a short time with her aunt, Mrs. T.N. Briggs lately.
John Robinson and Mr. Monnington have returned from a pleasure trip to Winnipegosis. Both were delighted with that hustling town.
We hear that the government dredge Laurier, which was been under the water for three years, was resurrected. Why was the dredge not left where it was as it was less expense to the country under water, as the other dredge has been all summer poking around a little island that Pat and Mike would take away in a wheelbarrow in less time. The sooner there is a change in the present management the better the settlers will like it as we have competent men around here who are able to run this part of the bis.
Mr. Brandon & Sons, of Mowat, have purchased a large gasoline threshing outfit and are in the field for business. With the number of machines at work if the weather continues fine, the threshing will wind up in another week.

1919 Oct 9 – Fork River

Miss Millidge, organizer of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Anglican Church, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. W. King.
Mrs. Vinning and daughter, of Winnipeg, have returned home after spending a week with Mrs. J. Reid.
T.N. Briggs has invested in an oil pull tractor. This power will turn over the land more rapidly. It’s more speed that counts these times.
Bert Little has taken a trip to Chicago. Fred Tilt is in charge of the store during his absence.
The Cypress River paper, in a recent issue contains the following item:
“Mr. and Mrs. N. Little both old time residents of Cypress River and town this week. They left home in May for an overseas tour, and visited the battlefields of France and Belgium, securing many photos of great interest. They sailed to New York on a French boat and went from there to Toronto near which city Mr. Little purchased a new model 1920 McLaughlin 6 cylinder car and motored to Cypress. They are now on their way home. The same cherry Nat as of old looking as young as ever.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 25 – 1913

1913 Sep 25 – Fork River

John Robinson spent a few days here among his friends after returning from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Weaver left for Winnipegosis, where Mr. W. intends residing having taken a position in the A.T. Co.
Mrs. F.F. Hafenbrak and family returned from a week’s visit to her sister, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis.
Miss Buie and Miss Weatherhead, of Dauphin, spent the week-end here the guests of Miss Weatherhead, teacher.
Miss M. Millidge, ravelling organizer of the Woman’s Auxiliary for the English church, will address the members of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on Monday, September 29th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon in the church.
W. Williams has received another separator, which makes four threshing outfits working within a radius of two miles and all are busy these days, the trouble is to get men to run the machines to their full capacity.
John Richardson is going around with a broad smile. It’s a bouncing boy.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Coomber of Selkirk, are visiting R. Coomber, on the Fork River for a few days.
The Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on the 21st. The church was very tastefully decorated with grain, leaves, fruit and flowers by the ladies and the congregation was the largest on such an occasion. T.A. Worsey, of St. John’s College, preached a very appropriate sermon. There was a good offertory to the Home Mission Fund.
Miss Ena Fredrickson, of Winnipegosis, has taken a position at the A.T. Co. store here.
The C.N.R. telegraph gang are repairing old poles and putting up new ones between here and Winnipegosis.
The members of All Saints’ W.A. are holding an ice cream social in the Orange Hall on Friday night, September 26th. Everybody welcome.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1912

1912 Sep 9 – Fork River

George Sumption, of Dauphin; is spending of short time with Mr. J. Clements on the Chase farm.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, who has been spending her holidays with her parents up the Fork, has returned to Dauphin.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs left for a two motions’ holiday with her friends at Brandon.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here lately taking in the sights.
Professor Gorden Weaver and N.H. Johnston returned from a trip to Winnipegosis on business and after the train run off the track. Misfortunes will happen to the best of regulated railways.
Frank Chase, of Dauphin, was here lately looking after his business interests.
The elevator builders have not arrived yet. We think it will be a mistake to build it on the site picked out. The building would be better if it were moved south on to the street next the cattle chute and
Mr. and Mrs. V.O. Weaver, of Vermont, are visiting their brother Gordon, of East Bay.
Wm. Geekie and son passed through here on their return trip from Strathclair to their home at Winnipegosis.
F. Lacey, of Oak Brae, has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Will Davis, who has invested heavily in real estate in Texas, strongly advocates the use of drain tiles. Will always was practical, especially on mail days when its raining.
Mrs. C. Bradley is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Several people from the Lake Town took in the dance in the Orange Hall on Thursday night past. Brother Robinson played the Fisherman’s Horn Pipe and a very pleasant time was spent.
Wm. Williams and Mr. Venables spent the week-end at Dauphin on business.
A meeting of the council will be held at Fork River on Monday, the 23rd inst.

1912 Sep 9 – Sifton

The wet season now appears to be over and all except to get on with the harvest at once.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Good progress is being made with the Kennedy-Barrie store. Once these gentlemen open they are sure of doing a good business.
Frequent shipments of cattle are being made from here. There’s nothing like mixed farming to bring in the cash between seasons.
Geo. Lampard, wholesale butcher, Dauphin, and W.A. Davis were in town on Monday. These gentlemen brought a number of cattle while here.
This end of the district is open to come under the Drainage Act. It pays at any time to make improvements whether they are drains or building better roads.
Paul Wood’s family are going to reside in Dauphin during the winter so that an opportunity will be afforded the children to go to school.
Now that the Herald is giving interesting personal sketches of prominent men who have resided in the district a long time, I hope the prosperous village of Sifton will not be overlooked. We have several pioneers here who had ouch to do with its development and are will known, viz., Paul Wood, John Kennedy, Coun. Peter Ogrislo, Postmaster Thos. Ramsay, Wm. Ashmore and quite a few others that could be named.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 18 – 1913

1913 Sep 18 – Dynamite Will be Used

Although the lake at the point where young Romeo Fleury was drowned last week has been thoroughly dragged and tramped no trace of the body has been found. Dynamite will now be used to bring the body to the surface.

1913 Sep 18 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Williams and family left for Winnipegosis’ summer resort for a few days.
Mrs. Tarbath and family left for their home in Winnipeg after spending a few weeks wit her sister, Mrs. S. Reid.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and daughter returned from a visit among friends at Dauphin.
The Mowat correspondent has woke up again after being dormant several months, and remarks that the energetic Herald’s correspondent’s criticism on road making, scrapers, etc., is about right, but goes on to state I never refer to mail matte which are going on around our P.O. For the benefit of our Mowat friend I beg to state that I do not know of anything to say against the management of our P.O. here. The P.O. inspector was here a short time ago and found everything in order. There has been no friction here since the Oak Brae P.O. was changed to fresh quarters. This act did not seem to agree with the Mowat correspondent. This reminds us of the Bailey Bridge here. It was condemned by our council over a year ago and notices put up and nothing has been done to it up o date. The people have to go over it safe. A child was thrown out of a rig at this spot and barely escaped with her life. Again the Tilt Bridge has been in use for years and never was properly finished. The Cameron Bridge stringers are so rotten you can pick some of them to pieces. Despite this our council has left its tenders for another bridge; this in the face of a largely signed petition from the ratepayers opposing it.
The ratepayers invited the reeve and council to meet them in the Orange Hall last Saturday night to hear their views on the bridge question and other matters. Only one councillor had backbone enough to face the music. Under the circumstances those present decided there was only one thing to do and that was have a general housecleaning in December. The majority of those present left to serenade Professor Weaver and his bride, who arrived home from their wedding trip. We wish Gordon and his wife long life and happiness.
James Campbell and wife passed through here on their way to spend the winter at the north end of the lake. Jimmy is well-known here and one of the right sort and we wish them both happiness and prosperity.
A very pleasant afternoon was spent recently at the home of Mrs. S. and Mrs. C. Bailey on the Mossey River by their lady friends. Amusements were indulged in and our old friend Sam was quite at home as umpire. If our friends get as efficient with the baseball bat as Ma is with the rolling pin, there’s nothing left but to give them the franchise with as good grace as we can and save our pates.
The harvest festival will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church next Sunday, Sept. 21st at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.
Don’t forget the clearing sale at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store. Now you have your chance. The prices you can’t beat.

POST OFFICE STAFF REPLY.
To the Editor of the Herald:
SIR: – We notice in last week’s issue of the Press some remarks from Mowat regarding our correspondent for the Herald in connection with municipal matters, which we have no particular interest in, but we wish to draw the attention of our readers to the items regarding mail matter trouble at Fork River P.O., which are very much out of place at best as coming from a gentleman and one who holds a position in our midst from whom we expect better things, from whom we should be taking example. We would like to say that personally we are not aware of any trouble in mail matters at this office and if our friend has any complaint he has up to now not made any mention of same to any of our staff here. If there is any trouble we should like to hear it straight and we shall certainly remedy it. If it is a case of soreness or petty personal spite, we shall ignore it. Some of us have made mistakes and are only too willing to admit it but we like to hear our faults to our faces. We are sorry to have taken up so much of your valuable space and thank you for same.

POST OFFICE STAFF.
Fork River.

1913 Sep 18 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Coben is in Dauphin to visit her husband who is in the hospital. Friends here were sorry to hear he had to have his foot taken off.
Mrs. White is visiting with friends at Dauphin.
The fishing has been extra good and large quantities are being brought down from the north end of the lake. Some of the fishermen have returned to town.
On Friday evening the 12th inst. A few of Miss Mabel Shannon’s friends gave her a very pleasant surprise by assembling at the house without invitation and suspending the amusements of the evening to read the following memorial: –
“We the undersigned, express our regret that miss Mabel Shannon is leaving Winnipegosis, but we feel that the business training she is the undergo will enlarge her sphere of usefulness and we wish to show our estimation of her high moral character and our appreciation of her services in post office, church and society by the accompanying token of remembrance from her friends at Winnnipegosis.”
The Rev. R. Turnbull made a very humourous and appropriate speech, and Miss Hayes presented the gift, gloves and bank cheque. Mr. Hulme made a few closing remarks.
The young people enjoyed themselves until time was forgotten. The moon seem especially kind to them as it was light as day, excusing to some extent the lateness of the hour. The entertainment closed with best wishes for Miss Shannon’s success in her business course.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 21 – 1913

1913 Aug 21 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Patrick McLeod, a half-breed, aged 16 years, was drowned at Winnipegosis on Sunday afternoon. He and some other boys were playing about the steamer Manitou, when he fell overboard and was drowned.

1913 Aug 21 – Fork River

Mrs. Jas. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, is spending the week with her daughter at C.E. Bailey’s on the Mossey.
Mr. Noble, Methodist student at Mafeking, is here renewing acquaintances for a few days.
The Methodist picnic was held on the 13th. It was an ideal picnic day and a good crowd turned out considering the busy season. There were sports of all kinds and the booth did a roaring trade. The baseball game between the married and single ladies was won by the single ladies.
Professor Sas Poo was kept busy telling fortunes during his stay here. There is some thing he ken and there’s other things he don’ ken, as the Scotchman would say.
Professor Weaver has severed his connection with the A.T. Co. and is making for his farm at Million. Whether there’s millions in it for Gordon remains to be seen.
Gerald Stuart has left for Winnipeg, where he intends taking up school teaching.
Dunk. Kennedy and wife and S. Bailey returned from the Stampede at Winnipeg and report a lively time.
Mrs. Tallbath and family of Winnipeg, and visiting at the home of her sister, Mrs. Sam Reid, on the Mossey River.
The Power Co. of Dauphin have their survey party busy taking levels on the Mossey River one mile north of town.
The farmers are busy cutting their fall wheat and barley now and by the end of this week cutting will be general. Thee are some fields of real good fall wheat in this district and prospects are away ahead of what was expected considering the wet season.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1910

1910 Aug 8 – Mossey River Council

A meeting of the council was held at Fork River on Thursday, July 14th, all the members present.
The minutes of two previous meetings were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Paddock – That the clerk write the superintendent of the C.N.R. and ask for an increased train service on the Winnipegosis branch.
Lacey-Fleming – That the clerk write to the superintendent of the C.N.R. and request that he appoint some responsible person to take charge of freight delivered at Fork River until it is called for by the person to whom it is consigned.
Hunt-Toye – That the clerk instruct Mr. Pruder re Road Commissioner’s certificate – that he must settle the matter with Mr. Walmsley.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Reeve and Coun. Paddock be a committee to investigate Mrs. McCleods claims.
Toye-Fleming – That Councillors Lacey, Nicholson and Hunt be a committee to see Messrs. Whale and Davis and secure a title to Fork River cemetery.
Lacey- Nicholson – That the Reeve, when in Winnipeg secure to lay out a road from Fork River to Winnipegosis.
Lacey-Toye – That all pathmasters notify the clerk or Road Commissioner of the ward when any serious obstruction or damage has occurred in their respective beats.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the clerk be instructed to write Thos. Shannon and notify him to repair the roadway damaged by him not later than July 18th.
Hunt-Paddock – That motions 5, 6, 7, and 8 of meeting March 13 and motions 15, 16, 17, and 18 of meeting May 21, be expunged.
Lacey-Toye – That S. Bailey be engaged as road commissioner on Main road between Fork River and Winnipegosis at $2.50 per day and that he be empowered to secure the necessary labour at lowest possible cost and to commence work as soon as possible.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the clerk notify M.W. Snelgrove that the Council is prepared to settle for the Shannon road as soon as advised to do so by its solicitor.
Lacey-Fleming – That Road Commissioner Toye’s account for letting and inspecting work amounting to $22.50 to be paid.

A by-law authorizing the loan of $1000 at Bank of Ottawa was passed.
Fleming-Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1910 Aug 8 – Fork River (too late for last issue)

D.F. Wilson returned from seeing the Winnipeg Exhibition last week.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Lockhart left here Monday to attend Brandon fair.
Mrs. S. Bailey returned from Winnipeg last Saturday.
The crops around this district are looking excellent and providing the ether last good a bumper harvest will be the result and the farmers are jubilant.
D. Shinks returned from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
The Church of England picnic which was held at Lake Dauphin last Tuesday was a great success, it was an ideal day and quite a number drove from Fork River. The sports were good and the boys and girls had a good time. The sack race was won by R. King, 1st; E.W. King, 2nd; three legged race, F. King and C. Wilson; married women’s race, Mrs. Kennis, 2nd; long jump E. King; horse race, D. Briggs; egg race, Mrs. G. Shannon, 1st; Mrs. T. Shannon, 2nd. S. Gower and the Rev. H.H. Scrase were busy all the afternoon looking after the sports etc., so as to give everybody a good time. Football between Mowat and Fork River was a hard fought game won by Fork River 1-0; baseball was also indulged in. Mr. F.B. Lacey and S. Gower got the booth and grounds ready and quite a number went on the lake in boats provided.

1910 Aug 8 – North Lake

Mr. and Mrs. F.B. Lacey paid a visit to North Lake last week.
Messrs. Weaver, and Shrog have been stranded on the shores of Lake Dauphin for a few days owning to their raft being unable to ride the waves. They hope to make Million Lighthouse some time this fall.
J. Spearing, who has been in Dauphin Hospital undergoing on operation is back with us again.
Any one wishing to see a good field of wheat should have a look at Tom Glendenning’s. It’s a dandy.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1912

1912 Aug 8 – Thos. Spence Drowned

Thos. Spence, a half-breed, fell out of a boat he was crossing the Mossey River in at Winnipegosis a few days ago and was drowned. His body was recovered shortly after the accident.
Spence was formerly a resident of Dauphin and was about 35 years of age. He leaves a wife and several children.

1912 Aug 8 – Ethelbert

James Miles and family have gone to Stenan, Sask., to live. He is going into business there.
Kenneth McLean is seriously ill at the home of his brother, L.M. McLean. He is very sick and fears are entertained for his recovery. He expressed a wish to see his beloved niece, Cassie, who is at Arran and she came done on Sunday evening.
The new bridge entering the town is finished, and is a fair specimen of local work.
Police Magistrate R. Skaife had several cases before him on Saturday afternoon. Vonella Kuzzett, for threatening his brother-in-law, John Malyszyk, was bound over to keep the peace and he of good behaviour for twelve months. Also Vonella Kuzsyk was fined ten dollars and costs for shooting prairie chickens out of season, or in defaulting month. Nikola Kulchyski was also fined ten dollars and costs for an unprovoked assault on Audrian Skelkuoski, of Fork River, or in default one month.

1912 Aug 8 – Fork River

Professor J. Spearing, of Valley River, spent some time here renewing old acquaintances.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, inspected the work done by the dredge and we have been informed that A. Munro has been appointed dredge master for the present and his work so far is satisfactory.
Miss Joyce Sergant returned home after spending a week’s stay with Mrs. W. Coultas in Fork River.
Gorden Weaver has accepted a position of master mechanic at the Armstrong Trading Co. store.
Miss Grant arrived and will wield the rod of correction at the Pine View School for the coming term.
Miss Cameron who was been spending her holidays at her uncle’s, A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned to Neepawa.
We were pleased to see the Rev. H.H. Scrase walking around town with W. King, warden, the other day and hope that he will be able to take up his work this fall.
Mr. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are having a week’s vacation with Noah Johnston, at Mowat Centre.
H. Armstrong has branched out in the contracting and building line and is building an addition to Mr. Nowsade’s residence.
The ratepayers are of the opine that it is time that an itemized statement of accounts of all ward appropriations and general expenditures, as demanded by the status, be got out in pamphlet form.
Mr. Tubath and family are enjoying their vacation at S. Reid’s on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Chapman and daughter are visiting with W. Coultas.
A very pleasant evening was spent in Orange Hall on Friday. Dancing was indulged till daylight.
The Misses Tindall, of Rathwell, are having a pleasant time at their uncle’s, Me. T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey.
The stores are doing a rushing business these days in raspberries and blueberries.
The postponed picnic at Lake Dauphin was held on the 30th. It was a fine day. Although there was not as large a turnout as usual a very pleasant time was spent in sports and boating.

1912 Aug 8 – Mowat Picnic

Those who chanced their luck at the Mowat picnic, which took place at Dauphin Lake on Mr. T. Briggs’ land, by his kind permission on Tuesday, July 30th were not sorry they put in an appearance. The rain, which came the previous Tuesday no doubt dampened the spirits of some, otherwise we should have had a much larger turnout; despite the fact that one or two of our Fork River worthies would have liked it to be a failure. Dame nature smiled upon us and we had a roaring good time. Nat Little’s oranges and candies were in good demand. Fortunately everyone’s ice cream freezers are not so easily broken and Mrs. C. Clark’s came in fine and handy. Even the lemons were made to “spin out,” no doubt much to the annoyance of some individuals. Hard lines, some of the folks had to leave early and therefor missed most of the sport. The Fairville boys enjoyed themselves immensely to say nothing of the ladies. We tender our hearty thanks to them for their cooperation and sympathy. They came off well in the sports, except in the football match. Keep smiling, better luck in this line next time. Our best thanks are extended to all who tried to make it a success, especially to the Lacey family, Briggs family and Sandy and Mrs. Cameron. Need I add some of the boys did not forget to look sheep’s eyes at the girls. It’s a habit handed down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 26 – 1913

1913 Jun 26 – Soldiers Leave For Sewell

There was a lively scene about the station on Sunday evening when the Manitoba 32nd Light Horse embarked by special train for Sewell. The train brought in 100 troopers and horses from Roblin and they were joined here by the numbers of the Dauphin troop, numbering 74. Col. H.I. Stevenson is in command. The other officers are Major G.C.J. Walker and Capt. H.K. Newcombe. The train was made up of twenty cars including men, horses, supplies, etc. The soldiers were given an ovation by the crowd as the train moved out of the station.

1913 Jun 26 – Fork River

Charles Clark, section foreman here for a number of years, left for Paswegan, Sask., to take on a section there and to arrange for moving his family to that point.
Mrs. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are spending their summer vacation with N. Johnston at Mowat Centre.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, spent a short time in town last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, the latter was formerly Miss Olive Clark, took in Fork River, on their honeymoon trip visiting Mrs. Clark. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston will make their home at Edmonton. We wish them a life of happiness and prosperity.
The herd law will come into force in August in a portion of wards on and three. This has become necessary on account of stock of all kinds being let run and not looked after by the owners as they should be.
At a meeting of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, it was decided to hold their 12th annual picnic at Fork River July 12. A special meeting is called for Saturday night, June 28th, to arrange for the picnic and other business. All members are requested to attend.
Mr. Gunness, of Robin, has arrived here to take over the section left vacant by C. Clark.
Mrs. Capt. Coffey, of Dauphin, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
George says those weeds will have to go or he will know the reason why. Some person with an inquisitive turn of mind is anxious to know if it was necessary to drive around delivering notices before the weeds were up, when a one cent stamp would suffice as heretofore and the travelling around come later on.
Now seeding is over, road making is being talked of. Can our intelligent municipal Daddy and his assistant tell us where to find the tools or have they gone off in the bush browsing as usual. Information on this matter will be thankfully received by a large number of ratepayers.
Sam Hughes, M.P.P., spent a few hours between rains, listening to the wants and troubles of this part of his constituency. No doubt his visit will be beneficial to our neighbourhood.
The Government Agricultural train was here, but owing to general train coming in, it delayed the starting of business, which made the time short. A large number turned out and the ladies had a good time. The addresses though they had to be cut short, were very instructive. The horses and stock were very good and an improvement on last year and credit is due to those in charge. The train left for Winnipegosis at 5.30 in charge of the Prof. of Minnokin Experimental weed farm and Prof. O’Malley, of the Agricultural College.
Prof. G. Weaver, of Millions was renewing acquaintances here for a short time lately.
Saturday was a red letter day here in the departing of two wedding parties, our M.P.P. and this agricultural train. It was a bright day suitable for such occasions and everything passed off quietly.
The football match between the married and single teams has been postponed.
Wm. King returned from court of revision at Gilbert Plains and states that everything passed off quietly.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 13 – 1912

1912 Jun 13 – Fork River

Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove left for a visit to her friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Adams and son of Big Stone, are here loading cordwood for the Armstrong Trading Co., when there are cars.
Mr. McAuley, travelling agent for the Massey Co., spent a few days with D. Kennedy. Travelling agents are all right in their place. What the farmers here want is a better supply of repairs.
The King’s birthday passed off quietly. The Lake Town team failed to appear for the return match. A good dance was held in the Orange Hall by the football team and friends.
Saturday, registration day here, passed off quietly. Several names were added to the list.
Gordon Weaver, of Million, spent a few days with his friends. Gordon scored one goal at football.
There was a ghost around the hall two nights last week and the fair sex did not seem to mind at all.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove returned from Dauphin after spending a few days.
The Fork River football team killed the fatted calf and invited the Winnipegosis team for the return match from the home team and the rustlers. Latest, the Winnipegosis team has the whooping cough and the dropsy caught on the 24th. We trust the doctor will get them in line for the July picnic.
It is rumoured that we are to have an elevator. We hope the rumour is correct as we needs it bad.
K.T. Biggs, the only delegate appointed to represent the Fork River mission, is attending the Synod in Winnipeg this week.
Captain McCartney left for Winnipeg on business.
A very much concert, arranged by Mr. Biggs in aid of the W.A., was held on June 7th in the Orange Hall. The proceeds were given to swell the parsonage fund. The covert was opened by the Mossey River School children singing “Flag of Britain,” which was well rendered, and which gave their teacher, Miss Alserton, much credit. “The Diver” by Mr. McCartney, was well sung and encored. A duet by Ray and Elva Ellis, entitled, “A Boy Called Taps,” was well sung. The next song “Flanagan,” sung by Mr. Culverhouse, was splendid and he was heartily cheered and encored, and a recitation by W. Davis, entitled the “Englishman” was highly appreciated. A quartette by Miss Pearl and Bessie Wilson, Mr. Biggs and Mr. Culverhouse was well rendered. After an interval of a few minutes the Mossey River School children started again and with a chorus, “Summer, Gladsome Summer,” which was well sung, and then another song by Mr. McCartney entitled, “Sleep in the Deep,” and then a song by Mr. Culverhouse “Sang Mackie” and then another recitation by H.H. Benner entitled, “A Minister’s Grievances,” was very laughable and enjoyed by all. This was encored and he came on again and gave another, the last song was “Sweet Genevieve,” by Mr. Culverhouse, Miss Pearl Wilson, Mr. Biggs and Miss Bessie Wilson. The accompanist was Miss Comber, who played well. The chair was taken by W. King and after the sale of ice cream a vote of tanks was given to the chairman and to all who had so very kindly helped. God save the King was sung.
In talking with a farmer about the weather he informed us the moon had a good deal to do with it. To get posted on the matter we looked for the almanac and could now find it, so we turned to the Dauphin Press to see if there was anything from our Mowat friend. Sure there was, we know at a glance how the moon was as at a certain stage of every month it affects his capacious meddle. He seems to be weary of posting as the Mowat Jackass and wants to turn over his troubles to the Fork River scribe. Thanks; we are sure we could not do the same justice as a representative of that animal as our Mowat friend has had long experience in that line. It’s kind of him to compliment us writing funny things to interest the kids, which goes to show he must be in his dotage. The old saying has come true in his case “first a child, then a man,” etc. Our Mowat friend needs something to cheer him up judging from his appearance on his return from the summer resort.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 5 – 1914

1914 Mar 5 – Brattiko Shot Kuzyk

A coroner’s inquest was held on Thursday in the town hall to inquire into the shooting of Mike Kuzyk at Volga, a point 10 miles southeast of Winnipegosis, on Feb. 21st. Dr. Culbertson was the coroner.
The following composed the jury; T. Jordan, D.D. McDonald, W.A. Brinkman, H.G. Hills, S. Vance, J. Blanchflower, E. Webb, Geo. King, foreman.
The evidence of a number of Galicians, including Brattiko himself, was taken. The others heard were Dr. Medd and Constable Hunking, of Winnipegosis.
Brattiko told a rambling story saying that his gun was accidentally discharged and in this way Kuzyk was shot. All circumstances pointed to Brattiko having shot Kuzyk in mistake for a deer. He afterwards admitted he did.
The verdict of the jury was that Kuzyk came to his death by a wound inflicted by a bullet from a rifle in the hands of Nicola Brattiko.
Brattiko was afterwards arrested and appeared before Magistrate Munson on Saturday charged with shooting Kuzyk. After hearing the evidence Brattiko was remanded till Friday, the 6th.
Brattiko is out on bail.

1914 Mar 5 – Killed in Saw Mill

Gilbert Plains, March 2 – An accident at McKendrick’s saw mill, on the Riding Mountain, 21 miles south-east of this town at 5 o’clock on Saturday evening, resulted in the instant death of William Hickle. A young Scotsman, 23 years of age. Something had gone wrong with the cable feed and the engine was slowed down while the men were fixing it. Hickle working up around the saw alone, is suppose to have slipped and fallen with his shoulder against the saw, killing him instantly.

1914 Mar 5 – Fork River

Mrs. J. Parker and daughter are spending a few weeks in Winnipeg.
Gordon Weaver left for the south on important business. We wish him a pleasant trip.
D. Kennedy returned from a short visit to Dauphin, where he attended the Masonic school of instruction.
W. Williams is very busy these days with teams drawing lumber from his limits to his planning mill.
Dr. Gofton, veterinary surgeon, of Dauphin, was here on a professional trip lately.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
J. Angus, of Winnipegosis, was a visitor to this burgh with his dog team. He reports a good trip as the roads are Al. Scotty will vouch for this providing the dogs will keep the road.
Dr. Medd, health officer, was a visitor here this week. Some are still quarantined. It’s better to be sure than sorry.
Ed. Morris, of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend at the home of Fred. King.
Our new settler, Mr. W.I. Brown, is stirring around and getting in shape to start farming in earnest in the spring time.

1914 Mar 5 – Fork River

Thomas Secord, homestead inspector, was here last week inspecting quite a number of claims.
Mr. W. Brown, of Hamilton, Ontario, has purchased the S.E. ¼ of 6-29-17, and intends erecting dwelling house and is bringing his family out shortly.
Nat Little and daughter Miss Grace have returned from a week’s visit in Winnipeg.
Dr. Medd was a visitor here on Saturday on his was from Dauphin.
The storm here on Friday night was the worst experience in years.
I.F. Hafenbrak, Sam Bailey and Wm. King, Country Orange Master, have returned from attending grand lodge meeting in Winnipeg.
D.F. Wilson is away again sporting at the fair at Brandon. “Lucky, Jim, oh, how I envy him.”

1914 Mar 5 – Winnipegosis

Well, this burg is certainly going ahead this spring. Just a few of the things that have happened this week. Sid Coffey bought a lot on Main street from Rod Burrell and is busy hauling material to erect a large theatre. We understand the price paid was a fancy one.
Ed. Cartwright and family of Mafeking, having arrived and are preparing for move in the place he bought from Sid. Coffey.
Wm. Christianson is taking possession of the place he recently purchased from John Seiffert.
Alex Bickle is remodelling his house.
J.O. Grenon has returned from his holiday trip looking the picture of health.
Harry Watson and Jack Angus left on Monday for Dauphin to take in the bonspiel.
Miss Clara Bradley left on Friday for Winnipeg, she intends taking a course in a business college.
Miss Gertie Bradley has arrived home from Brandon.
Miss Jane Paddock is leaving soon for Biggar, Sask., where she was accepted a position.
Miss Hanna Stevenson left last week for Winnipeg.
The curling season being over, the boys are preparing the ice for hockey. We expect they will be trying for the Allan Cup.
A great time is looked for Wednesday night in the Methodist Church. They are giving a box social and concert. A good programme is being prepared.
Postmaster Ketcheson has hone to Dauphin to meet Mrs. Ketcheson, who is retuning from the east.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 13 – 1913

1913 Feb 13 – Baran Committed For Murder

The adjourned preliminary trial of John Baran, under arrest for the murder of Constable Rooke, was concluded on Saturday. Magistrate Munson remanded the prisoner to Portage la Prairie, to stand his trial at the next criminal court on a charge of murder.
The court was called to order at eleven o’clock, the court house being crowded by a throng who were anxious to hear the outcome of the trial.
The prisoner had to be assisted into the court by two officers and appeared in a very weak condition. Later he fell from his chair to the floor, where he was allowed to lie during the trial.
Dr. Harrington gave evidence as to his attendance on Constable Rooke, and stated death to have been caused by the bullet wound, and resultant weakness.
When the charge was read the prisoner declined to make any statement. Bertram Ryan, for the defence, admitted that Baran had fired the shot which killed Constable Rooke, but pleaded justification on a plea of provocation, claiming Baran could not have known it was an officer of the law who was demanding entrance and then breaking in the door of his house, and that Baran had a right to defend his home and had fired the shot with the intention only of frightening away whoever was forcing his door. He asked to have the charge at least modified to one of manslaughter.
In passing sentence, Magistrate Munson severely criticized the past character of the prisoner and had no hesitation in committing him on a charge of murder to stand his trial at the Portage spring assizes.

1913 Feb 13 – Salt Wells to be Worked

That there is abundance of salt in the Lake Winnipegosis region is well known. For years the springs there have been running freely with brine and thousands of tons of the best salt going to waste each year. It is now proposed to tap the springs and install machinery to reduce the brine and manufacture the output into salt for various uses. The quality of the salt, after it has gone through a purifying process is reported by those who have made experiments with it, to be of the highest grade. It is probable that a salt reducing plant will be built at Winnipegosis town. The salt can be brought down the lake in its raw state and later manufactured into various grades to suit the market demand. During the past three months three entries were made at the Dominion Lands office here for mines and as the capital to develop them is already assured the enterprise will undoubtedly be established.

1913 Feb 13 – Section Foreman Loses His Life

Harry Mushynski, section foreman for the C.N.R. at Pine River lost his life on Saturday in a peculiar manner. The pipes at the water tank froze up and Mushynski and another man descended into the well with a pot of live coals to thaw them out. When the two men got down the well the gas from the pot became too strong for them and Mushynski was overcome and fell into the water and was drowned. His companion managed to get out of the well. Coroner Harrington held an inquest on Mushynski on Sunday and the jury rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts.
Mushynski was highly spoken of by Supt. Irwin as a faithful employee of the company. He was 28 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.

1913 Feb 13 – Fork River

Howard Armstrong left for a trip up the lake teaming.
Herman Godkin, one of Dauphin’s energetic real estate agents, is spending the weekend at W. Williams.
C.E. Bailey and Wm. King returned from attending the county L.O.L. meeting at Dauphin.
Pat Powers, who has been running a threshing outfit at Winnipegosis, returned and is renewing acquaintances.
Henry Benner left here with a car of cows and young cattle for his ranch at Lloydminster.
Professor G. Weaver of East Bay, passed through here en route to the North Pole to lecture on diversified farming, etc.
Mr. and Mrs. C. White, of Winnipegosis, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s on Sunday.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson is visiting her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, of Neepawa, returned home after spending a few weeks with A. Cameron at Mowat Centre.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, was in town on business lately.
Sid Howlett and family have returned from the north end of the lake, where he spent the winter fishing and reports fishing good. He is going out on his homestead at Million.
“Say, Pat, it seems too bad the Mowat correspondent cant’s get his proper rest lately.” “What’s the matter now Mike?” “Well, he says the blooming politicians at Ottawa will keep haggling over the $35,000,000 Borden is sending to the dear old mother country after the assistance she has given us financially and otherwise for years. You remember a short time ago in the Press the M.C. wanted and howled for an all-Canadian navy. Now he turns around and poses for peace and spend the money in P.O. and roads.” Pat, “Well, I prefer it in Dreadnoughts as we have had enough of the sort of roads he has been instrumental in dishing up to us the last two or three years. I wonder which way he will jump next.” Mike, “Don’t be too hard on him, chure you know he handled the Liberal cheque book for years and there is a few blank forms left and our friend expected to be Admiral of Sir Wilfy’s dinky navy, but the election knocked that into a cocked hat and the blank cheques are no use now and the P.O. is like the elevator he twitted us about some time ago lost, strayed or stolen. When dear T.A. got licked we lost our telegraph office here and now we are getting the peace racket put up to us. Now someone has got to the end of their rope.” “Say, Pat, did yees notice divil a word does our Liberal friends print or say regarding the dredge contract let by the late Liberal government and that is being looked into by Borden.” “Oh, that’s a horse of another color.” M.C. stop grouching.
Wm. Amos, of Deloraine, travelling agent for the Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., was a visitor at Wm. King’s.
Miss Lizzie Clark paid a short visit to her parents here.
J. McAulay, traveller for the Massey-Harris Co., stopped over to see D. Kennedy on business for that firm.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church every Thursday evening at 8 o’clock during Lent and next Sunday, Feb. 16, at 3 o’clock, D.D. at 2 o’clock.
Geo. Dickason, of Dauphin, is around soliciting patronage for the Laurentia Milk Co., at Neepawa, and offers these prices till Mar 1st. $2.50 per hundred lbs, of sour cream; thirty-seven cents per pound of butter fat; sweet cream; forty-two cents per pound butter fat.
Our genial friend, Andrew Powers, is wearing a broad smile these days owning to the arrival of a new baby girl and Bob Rowe is also the happy father of a little baby girl. We wish them both the best of luck.
We notice in the correspondence from our Mowat friend in the Press of last week’s issue some very sensational items, more especially the one referring to so much grouching at outside points on account of the high cost of living and would like to say the prices quoted are far from correct. We always were under the impression that our Mowat friend was at all times ready to advertise this district at its truth worth and endeavor to get more land settled up, but by the remarks referred to we are at a loss to know just what is meant by this sarcasm and would refer him to some time ago and his remarks regarding the loss of the late P.O. at Oak Brae to the district and the damage it would do to this part of Manitoba in the way of getting this land settled up. For the benefit of our Mowat friends and the public in general we would like to give the correct prices of the products of the farm and forest at Fork River today. He quotes wheat 50c to 60c, barley 25c, potatoes 35c, pork 9c, beef 6c, seasoned wood $1.65, greed wood, $1.25. Now the correct prices of these are as follows: (Elevator prices), wheat 89c, 88c, ble, according to grades. Barley 32c and 40c being offered by outside parties and refused. Green pole wood $1.75 a cord and season poplar $1.75; butter 30c, eggs 30c, pork 10c, beef 7c and 7 ½ in trade.
Council meets at Winnipegosis on Thursday, the 20th inst.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 15 – 1914

1914 Jan 15 – Krafchenko Seen at Sifton

While the hunt for Krafchenko has centred principally in Winnipeg it is now known beyond a doubt he passed through Dauphin well disguised. That he is known and has friends in the Sifton district is also a fact. Several years ago, when arrested and taken to Prince Albert, he remained with a friend at the northern village for over a week. The people come from the same part of Europe as Krafchenko. A Winnipeg official is on the trial and developments may be expected.

1914 Jan 15 – Fork River

Mr. Elliott of Lloydminster, Sask., and Mr. Rowe, of Harding, Man., were here lately looking for cattle to ship out to their reach in Saskatchewan.
M. Mayir, government road inspector, was a visitor at W. King’s, afterwards leaving for Winnipeg.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Winnipegosis, returned home after having spent a few days with Mrs. T.N. Briggs on the Mossey.
Vivian Hafenbrak, Miss. G. Cooper and Miss Shannon have returned to Dauphin.
Miss Weatherhead, of Dauphin, is in charge of the Mossey River School for another term.
Mrs. Nat Little is on a short visit to Winnipeg.
Mr. Russell, of Sifton has returned from holidays and commenced his duties as teacher at Pine View School.
The new council for 1914 met at council chamber, Fork River, on January 6. Present, Reeve King, Councilors Hunt, Hector, Richardson, Robinson, Toye and Bickle. There was also present a large number of rate-payers and everything passed off satisfactory.
Peter Robinson, of Mowat and his gang are busy this nice weather repairing the Bailey Bridge.