Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 15 – 1921

Brakeman Tuck Killed

George F. Tuck, brakeman, was killed at noon Monday in the Canadian National Railway yards at Swan River. He jumped from the Prince Albert through freight train as it was pulling into the station. He slipped, fell backward under the moving cars, and was killed instantly. Tuck was 23 years old and a native of England. He was a returned soldier and had been a resident of Dauphin for little over a year.

The funeral took place from Farrell’s Undertaking Parlors on Wednesday afternoon to Riverside cemetery. The service was conducted by the Rev. Philip Duncan.

Fined for Assault

Fred Beyko appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday, December 12th, charged with assaulting Harry Derkacz. Beyko was found guilty and fined $20 and costs, amount in all to $46.75. Both parties belong to the Valley River district.

Fork River

The mighty hunters have returned from their annual trek. Some bring spoils others a long face.

The annual meeting of the U.F.M. will be held in the school house on Friday evening, December 16. This is the business meeting of the year and everyone is requested to turn out. A directors meeting will be held right after the annual meeting and the evening will finish with a dance and supper. Everyone turn out and have a good time.

The teachers are working hard on the Christmas entertainment to be held on the 22nd. The “kiddies” are rounding into shape and there is a promise of a fine evening ahead. Do not forget the date.

Municipal nomination day passed over very quickly. Reeve Robertson was returned by acclamation. In Ward 2 we have Sam Hrushovey and Joe Fedorovitch. Ward 6 Metro Fediuk, Nicola Panagopka and Arthur Shannon, while Ward 4 has Mr. Hart and Frank Thorsteinson.

T.B. Venables has completed part of his new home and has moved in for the winter. Mr. Venables will complete building operation in the spring.

James Tate lost his home by fire some days ago. The family was away at the time and as far as can be learned there was little if any fire in the stove at the time.

Stanley King was a visitor during the hunting season. Stanley is an old-timer and is always a welcome visitor.

E.V. Lockwood and family have returned from a trip to Chicago, where they were visiting Mrs. Lockwood’s folks.

Cordwood is coming into town and the price is a bit lower than for some time.

In fixing up for the winter do not forget to see Tilt for insurance. No matter what it is he has insurance to cover it.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 10 – 1921

1921 Nov 10 – I.O.D.E.

To-morrow, Armistice Day, as a tribute to Canada’s dead heroes, members of La Verandrye Chapter will flood the streets with their hand-made poppies. Corps of workers have been enlisted for the task, and every citizen will be asked to buy a poppy in memory of a soldier “lying in Flanders fields.”

The Red Poppy was chosen by Canadian women as the fitting bower with which to honor Canada’s army on Armistice Day. It is hoped that the citizens will co-operate with us in making Canadian Poppy Day a huge success. Proceeds of the sale are solely for patriate purposes.

1921 Nov 10 – L.A. to G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting will be held in the new hall on Tuesday, Nov. 15th. A full attendance is request.

The bazaar was a success. This is a feather in the ladies’ hats.

The dance will be held on Saturday as a usual in the Veterans’ new hall. Admission 50c.

1921 Nov 10 – Fork River

Your correspondent missed last week through having the hook worm or some other equally no-good excuse.

The Fork River Women’s institute met on the 5th November to receive the report of the retiring president, Mrs. E. Lockwood. The women are to be commended for the deep interest they are taking in fitting up the school kitchen.

The regular social evening of the Fork River U.F.M. will be held on Friday evening, Nov. 11. Every one turn out and have a good time. Cards and dancing will be the order of the evening.

E.V. Lockwood is disposing of his property north of the town.

Our old resident, “Bill” Tuck, says he is going west and grow up with the country. Hop-to-it, Bill, you have our best wishes.

Mike and Carl Lundy have recently purchased the livery stable of Harry Little. They intend to carry on a general dray and livery business.

The school trustees have just received their winter supply of coal. The kiddies are assured of a comfy building for winter.

The Mossey River Rural Credits Society held a meeting on the first to talk matters over with the members. Each and every member is requested to call and see the secretary on or before the next meeting, which will be held on December 3, 1921.

Mr. and Mrs. J. Peterson have left for Winnipeg, where they expect to spend the winter. Their house is for rent or sale. For terms apply to F.J. Tilt.

Mr. and Mrs. Shuchett have a friend who has just arrived from Russia, having been ten months making the trip. What a difference this lady must find between Russia and her present home.

Tax notices are out and the usual cry is heard up and down the land. Our school rate is high but we believe it could be reduced by bringing the two schools together.

Big game permits will shortly b on sale at the office of Fred J. Tilt.

N. Panagobka is putting on a sale on the 19th inst. here is a chance for those who have some spare cash.

A. Cameron, of Cypress River, was a visitor this week. Sandy is hale and hearty and is always a welcome visitor in our midst.

Our crops are not what we expected this fall but we are in far better shape than some districts in southern Manitoba. Fork River has never known an absolute crop failure and we don’t expect to. Readjustment must come after a war such as we have gone through and we feel that ere long we will be back on a pre-war basis. Good bless (? old kaiser bill.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 22, 1920

Ethelbert

We have been asked to publish a copy of telegram sent to the Acting Prime Minister at Ottawa by the Ruthenians of this vicinity. It is herewith:
“Canadians of Ukrainian descent, in mass meeting assembled at Ethelbert, unanimously protest against the brutal invasion of Ukrainian East Galicia by imperialistic Poland, against the decision of Peace conference of July 11th, sanctioning the invasion, and against the decision of Supreme Council of November 20th awarding to Polish invaders a mandate over Ukrainian East Galicia for twenty five years. We appeal through the Canadian Government to the Government of Great Britain and other allied governments and people to right great wrong done to four million Ukrainians of East Galicia. We urge governments to have polish invading armies withdrawn from Ukrainian East Galicia to have that territory occupied by inter-allied armies, and to compel Poland to make reparation for destruction of Ukrainian villages and towns, and to indemnify families of civilians murdered by Polish soldiery or robbed by Polish officials. We appeal to governments to settle East Galician question in accordance with wish of people concerned. We request the Canadian Government to convey this our appeal to the government of Great Britain and to British plenipotentiaries at Paris.”
The above protest shows clearly where the root of wrong is and what the Ukrainians demand.

Fork River

The first annual Grain Growers’ Masquerade Ball, which took place Friday evening, the 16th of January, was a huge success and the big event of the New Year. The costumes were varied and created a pretty color scheme. There were six prizes awarded. Miss Gertrude Cooper as a Japanese lady, and Mr. D. Briggs, as a soldier, were awarded the prize for the best dancers. Mrs. Charles Bailey, representing a Gypsy fortune teller, was awarded first prize for best lady’s costume; Miss Viola Rowe, representing a country maid with her quaint hat, dress and crook was awarded second prize. Dr. A.J. Little, representing a colored dude was awarded first prize for best gentleman’s costume. Mr. Milton Cooper as Pierrot, was awarded second prize. The prize for best comic costume was awarded to Mr. Norman Shannon, who represented a tramp. The judges were Mrs. T.B. Venables, Mrs. A.J. Little and Mr. Williamson. After the judging and unmasking at midnight refreshments were served.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rawson are moving to Winnipegosis.
Fork River Literary and Debating Society met at the home of Mrs. A.J. Little, Saturday evening last to discuss the next debate, which will be held Wednesday evening, Feb. 4.
Fork River Women’s Institute met at Mrs. Tuck’s Saturday afternoon for the election of officers and to appoint directors for Agricultural Society. Mrs. A.J. Little was elected Secretary to succeed Mrs. Ina Briggs, Mrs. T.B. Venables and Mrs. McEachern were elected directors.
Mr. Fleming Wilson, Mr. T.B. Venables, Mr. Duncan Briggs, delegates to the Grain Growers’ convention held at Brandon, gave their reports on Tuesday evening’s meeting.

Winnipegois

The Tennis Club is arranging to hold a masquerade ball on Friday, Feb, 18th. A ball is always popular and a masquerade ball doubly so. This dance promises to be the event of the season.
The fish catch has been exceptionally good this winter. The December catch was the largest in the history of the late. Many of the fishermen will return from the north early next month.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 15, 1919

Four Men Badly Injured

Mr. Arthur Fisher, who resides in the Burrow district, is erecting a large barn. Last Friday four men, John Neely, Frank Potter, John James and Geo. Smith were engaged erecting the rafters when a whirlwind came up suddenly collapsing the timbers. Neely, Potter and Smith were badly injured by the failing timbers. James, who was working on the top, jumped when the rafters commenced to fall, but was unable to clear himself and was struck and injured. Mr. Neely was so badly injured that his condition will not yet permit of his removal to town.

G.W.V.A.

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, May 8th, between 30 and 40 of the comrades being present. Owing to the unavoidable absence of the president, Capt. F. Scrase, Comrade G.F. Johnston, vice president, took the chair.
Applications were received from 13 returned soldiers for membership, all of which were accepted. This makes the membership of the local branch 195 and a considerable increase on this is expected in the near future.
The secretary has since this meeting been informed that a special meeting has been called by Premier Norrie to consider the memorial question for this province, on May 16th. It has, therefore, been decided to send a delegate to this meeting to represent this branch.
During the past week a donation of $112.65 was received from the citizens of the Ethelbert district, per Rev. G. Tymchuk. The thanks of the association are due to all the subscribers of the above mentioned donation.
A grant of $25 to this association has been received from the Dauphin Automobile club. This has been acknowledged and thanks are due to the members of the club for same.
On May 23rd and 24th the “Better ‘Ole” is being put on at the Star theatre. This is to be under the auspices of the G.W.V.A. Ask any returned man what he thinks of it and he will soon convince you, to say the least of it, that it will be well worth seeing, and at the same time give the association a lift.
A meeting was held on Friday, the 9th in connection with the G.W.V.A. Sports Day, to be held on 1st July, and arrangements made for appointing the various committees to make same a success. Posters are to be got out advertising same. The committee are requested to note that the next meeting will be held on Friday, may 16th, at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is essential.
Members are asked to note that the Manitoba Provincial Command have issued a weekly paper devoted to the returned solider. It is known as the Manitoba Veteran, and will be issued weekly. The rate is 5c per copy or $2 per year. Sample copies have been received and if the paper continues like the sample a bright future is assured. Subscriptions are taken by the local secretary of the G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Billy Tuck has gone to Dryden, Ont., for a short trip.
W.R. Snelgrove is around again after his illness. He has moved on to the Chase farm, having exchanged his Dauphin residence for the property.
Steve Warrawrork, of Volga, has purchased the Slobodizan farm from W.R. Snelgrove.
Corp. Duncan Briggs and Private Tom Briggs and H. Craighill have arrived from overseas. They are looking hale and hearty.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cameron and children, from Neepawa, are visiting at Mr. Nat Little’s house.
Robt. Rowe intends Fording it to town for the future, having purchased a Ford car from Nat Little.
Wm. Northam is busy fencing the farm be purchased south of town.
All Saints S.S. will meet as usual at 2 o’clock, Sunday, 18th inst.
Rain is falling as I write and it is welcome. All the wheat is about in. The season for work has been very favorable.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 6, 1919

Cold Weather

After January furnishing us with a delightful brand of weather. February started in with a falling temperature. The Government thermometer registered as follows: Monday, 10 below zero; Tuesday 19 below and Wednesday 5 below.

The Great Air Battle of Major W.G. Barker

(By Mrs. Thos. Playford)

Among the deeds that have been done
By airmen brave and skilled,
This last great air feat of the war,
With wonder all has filled.

O’er Mormal fores, all alone,
One brave aerial knight,
Flew searching for the British troops,
Or foe air craft in sight.

He soon espied a German plane;
Attacked it then and there,
And soon the enemy machine
Was broken in the air.

But still another hostile craft
Was coming very nigh,
Just then the young Canuck was stunned,
A shot had pierced his thigh!

But soon the major was alert,
There, in the dangerous spot,
For fifteen Hun planes now came near,
To fire the deadly shot.

But the brave boy his shots did fire,
So deftly and so well,
That though against such odds he fought
Three of the foe craft fell.

But he another wound received,
And fainted clean away,
But again he mastered his machine,
And did once more hold sway.

He flew at one great hostile craft,
It fell, but in his pride.
Just then his left arm, bruised and smashed
Hung useless by his side

With one hand left to steer and shoot,
While foes the air did fly
Those watching saw and held their breath,
At that cool, deadly skill.

Some minutes longer in the air
He played the awful game,
Put out of action two more for fair,
Then to the earth he came.

Our boy! Who nigh on sixty plane;
Single handed fought that day,
Now lies a sorely wounded lad
In Rouen far away.

And all who watched him on that day
So nobly act his part,
That he’ll soon recover from his wounds
Is hoped by each brave heart.

Dauphin’s brave boy has laurels won
From our Allies o’er the sea,
But for this great deed of valor done
He got the prized V.C.

And when he comes back home again
Having won so much renown
Won’t be proudly welcome by
Dauphin, his native town!

And while, at home, his parents wait
The coming of their boy,
All hearts that love the Maple Leaf,
Heard of his deeds with joy.

And when she had this story heard,
Of daring, skill and pluck,
Old England bowed her head and said,
“God bless our young Canuck.”

And when in after years we read,
In history, song and story,
Of man a great heroic deed.
That won both fame and glory.

Of all the deeds of airmen brave,
Not many will compare
With this fight of our Major hold,
Knight-errant of the air.

Dauphin, Jan. 31st, 1919.

Fork River

Wm. Williams has left for Lake Winnipegosis, where his new timber limit is located. He intends commencing operations on the limit this winter. C. Bugg and W. Tuck went with him.
Miss H. Lacey has returned from a week’s visit in Winnipeg.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, have left on a trip to the coast.
Owen Pruder, of the Northern elevator, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
A number of cars of baled hay have been shipped from this point this winter. A good price has been realized. This is an industry that might be greatly developed.

Winnipegosis

A delightful old-fashioned evening party was held in the Rex Hall on Wednesday, Jan. 29th, under the direction of Miss McArthur, in aid of the Red Cross Society. Many old-time dresses were resurrected, and especially winning was Mrs. Shears in a costume representing Dickens’ Mrs. Sarah Gamp, Mr. Shears caused many a laugh as Mr. Pickwick. Mrs. Steele, the Misses Grenon, Mrs. (Dr.) Medd, Mrs. Morrison, Mrs. Campbell (of Sifton), Miss Paddock, Mrs. Ummell and many other ladies in old-time dresses made one feel they had stepped back fifty years. Mrs. A. Snelgrove had her hair dressed in a pretty Victorian fashion, while many other styles made one think of the Middle Ages. Everyone was delighted with the violin selections rendered by Mr. Shears and Mrs. Campbell. We would also like to thank Mrs. Medd, Miss Arnason, Miss Macarthur, the Misses Grenon, Mrs. F.S. Giggins and Mr. Wills for their help with the program. The ladies on the refreshment committee also deserve great credit. A dance finished up a most successful event.