Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 3 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 3 – Fined $50 and Costs

Fred Buchij, a Galician, had a row over cattle with another Galician at Valley River. In the melee Buchij ran a pitchfork into the other man. The case was tried before P.M. Munson on Wednesday and Buchij fined $50 and costs. He paid up.

1912 Oct 3 – Killed at Kamsack

Thos. Powell, formerly of Dauphin, was killed at Kamsack on Monday. He was a car repairer. He was working under a car when a train shunted on the track and shoved the car over him. He was badly crushed. Powell was at one time an employee in the railway shops here.

1912 Oct 3 – Threshing Progress

Threshing commenced in several parts of the district this week and will be general if the fine weather continues. A great deal of the grain is being stacked this fall with the object of going ahead with the plowing.

1912 Oct 3 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 25th Sept. All members present.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Sarnia Bridge Co., Supt. Irwin, of C.N.R., the solicitors, the Highway Commissioner, J.P. Grenon and the Million for the Manitoba League.
A report of the public works committee condemning the Bailey Bridge unsafe for traffic was read.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Minster of Public Works be asked to send an engineer to examine the site of the Bailey Bridge and that government aid be asked for to construct it.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the clerk write Supt. Irwin, of the C.N.R., re ditch from Mossey River north to the Sanderson Creek and also re crossing on Cocker Road.
Seiffert – Nicholson – That the council pass a by-law to expropriate a roadway sixty six feet wide along the west side of the C.N. through the N.W. 18-30-18.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask that some of the members of its council meet Reeve Lacey and Coun. Robertson at the bridge across the Mossey River on the boundary line between the two municipalities to consider what is best to be done as the bridge is becoming unsafe.
Nicholson – Toye – That no action be taken towards collecting the price of the Shannon road from Thomas Shannon till Dec. 1st, 1913.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the declarations of Councillors McAuley, Toye and Nicholson for $13.80, $17.70 and $24.30 respectively for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Nicholson – Robertson – That no person be allowed to dump garbage within 200 yards of any residence, street or road in the village of Fork River, and that the Armstrong Trading Co., be notified to remove the refuse deposited by them behind the Orange Hall immediately.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the Minister of the Interior re memorialized to throw the swamp lands in the municipality open for the homesteads.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the C.N.R. be asked to place an agent at Fork River during the shipping season.
A by-law to establish the rate for 1912 was passed, the rates being municipal rate, 12 mills; municipal commissioner’s rate ½ a mill, and the general school rate 4 mills.
McAuley – Toye – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis on November 1st.

1912 Oct 3 – Fork River

The Rev. H.H. Scrase visited Rural Dean Wiley and on his return visited Sifton on church business.
Thomas Shannon returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The northern Elevator Co., has a gang here putting up an elevator. An elevator is needed here and it will fill a long felt want.
Archie McKerchar and W. Clarkson of Winnipegosis, spent Wednesday evening with the boys at the Orange Hall and report things booming among the fishermen there.
The cattle buyers are getting busy. One shipped part of a car of sheep last week.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Donnie, visited Mrs. J.E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, last week.
Mrs. H. Scrase returned from Winnipegosis after spending a few days with her friends and while there attended the installation of officers of the W.A. at the point.
A large number attended the council meeting but no miracles have been performed so far to the satisfaction of the people as promised year ago.
Mrs. C.L. White, of Winnipegosis, is visiting at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Jim Parker is now living on the old Parker farm and keeps his gang moving. We are always glad to see new faces among us.
Rev. H. Scrase will hold divine service in All Saints’ Church every Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at Fork River and Winnipegosis school house every Sunday at 7.30 p.m. and at Sifton on Mondays and Tuesdays evening as will be arranged there by next Sunday.
Nat Little arrived home on the special Saturday evening from his trip south. Specials seem to be the order of the day. Nothing like lots of train service, if they only come the same day as advertised. Nuff said.

1912 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

Fine weather is again with us and our people are wearing pleasant faces. Do you know, people are a good deal like the weather, they change quickly. When the sun is shining all have pleasant faces; when it is dull and overcast long dismal countenance surround us. Give us the man who smiles whether it rains or shines. He’s the one worth while.

Friend, life will frequently grow
Dreary: no fortunate isles
Lie where time’s dun water flow
Give me the fellow who smiles.

Peter McArthur returned to town on Saturday from Dauphin.
All Saints’ Church was the scene of a pretty wedding on Monday, when William Christensen was united in the holy bond of wedlock to Marie Louise Lebel. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Derome of Makinak.
The “old-timers” sketches running in the Herald are quite interesting. Winnipegosis has a few men who are well worth writing up. They have seen the country under all conditions, and what’s more, have made good. We’ll name just a few. peter McArthur, Jos. Grenon, Sr., Tom Whale, and Hughie McKellar, the fish expert. To have Hughie tell the history of the little fishes from the cradle to the table, would prove a mighty interesting chapter. In a future issue of the herald Hugie will be asked to tell what he knows.
Capt. Coffey has been here during the past week. The Capt. is nothing if not optimistic. He looks for a good season fishing.

1918 Oct 3 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. T. Grenier, Makinak, killed in action. (Telesphore Joseph Grenier, 1895, 291698)
Pte. Chas. W. Skinner, Dauphin, wounded and missing. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)
Pte. Harold Tomalin, Dauphin, killed in action. Pte. Tomalin was a fireman on the C.N.R. when he enlisted last January. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Tomalin, reside at Magnet, Man. (Harold Tomalin, 1896, 2129193)

1918 Oct 3 – Dramatic Meeting on Battle Front

One of the Dauphin boys writes the Herald of a dramatic meeting he had with another local boy at night. “We were,” he writes; “on the move and had come to a stop on account of the congestion of traffic. A fleet of Fritz’s planes came out and dropped about fifty bombs around us. Looking around by the light that the bombs made I saw another Dauphin boy about ten feet away. We only had time for a handshake and wish for “good luck” when the traffic moved on.

1918 Oct 3 – Fork River

Mr. Pettit, of Winnipeg, paid this burgh a visit in the interest of the new Victory War Bond campaign.
Mrs. Tait, of Indian Head, Sask., is visiting at her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Timewell.
Mr. Love has arrived from Lake Manitoba and has taken charge of the Salada School, west of town.
Max King was a visitor to Winnipeg for a few days on business with the Military branch.
We notice Dauphin merchants are closing their stores at 6.30 p.m. What a contrast to some of our stores in this burg which are kept open much longer hours and sometimes on Sundays. The latter should be stopped at once.
James McDonald has finished his residence and moved into it.
T.A. Briggs has received a shipment of horses for Bonanza farm. The man who is able to receive a bunch of horses these days must have a bonanza bank account.
Fork River farms are in demand a good prices. Several deals are likely to go through shorty.
A Herald subscriber tells your correspondent he is mistaken when he states that “King potato” has not been crowned. He sure is the crowned potentate of this part of the country at any rate.

1918 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

RED CROSS NOTICE.
The annual meeting of the Red Cross Society will be held on Tuesday evening, the 8th of October, at 8 o’clock, in Rex Hall. Every member is requested to be present. A report of work done during the year will be made by the secretary, and officers will be elected for the coming year. It is for the purpose of electing officers that a full attendance is requested.
Don’t forget that this work is for the wounded men of our army and navy, who have been winning the victories we are so jubilant about just now.

E.L. MACARTHUR,
Sec.-Treasurer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 30 – 1915

1915 Sep 30 – Threshing Held Up

Threshing operations have been suspended during the past week on account of wet weather. The returns coming in from the separators continue to be large.

1915 Sep 30 – Ethelbert

During the last four weeks I. Arnovitch has shipped eight carloads of cattle from this point.
The new Presbyterian mission hospital is nearing completion. It is going to be a commodious structure.
Threshing operations are entirely suspended owing to wet weather.
Mr. Ben Brachman, our enterprising merchant, was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.
Mr. Bert Kennedy and family have arrived from Canora and will reside here.
The wood market is commencing to be more active of late. Prices still remain at the old figure, but will advance as the weather gets colder.

1915 Sep 30 – Winnipegosis

There was a most enjoyable dance in the Rex Hall on Friday evening, which was well attended although the weather was so bad.
The Hon. Hugh Armstrong and Mrs. Armstrong are spending a few days in town.
Dr. Bottomley and Dr. Culberton, of Dauphin, were in town on Tuesday operating on Miss Pearl Paddock, who has been very ill with appendicitis. We are very glad to report. Miss Paddock a little better and trust soon to see her around again.
Mrs. Anderson left for Winnipeg on Saturday’s train accompanied by her sister, Miss Ruth Sanders.
Chas. Stewart, of Dauphin, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Don’t forget court of revision on Oct. 9th. All complaints must reach the clerk ten days previous to that date and be duty filled by him.
Mr. Hall has accepted a position with the Standard Lumber Co., as successor to Mr. Barbour, who resigned to join the army.
H. Loiw, of Waterhen, is spending a few days in town.
Geo. Adam spent Saturday in town.
Mr. James, of Winnipeg, is a business visitor in town for a few days.
We hear fall fishing will soon be over and everyone will be getting in shape for outfitting for the winter. Where has our summer gone?
If looking for a good shave or hair cut don’t miss the red, white and blue post on Main Street.
There was a ten cent tea at the home of Mrs. Whale on Wednesday afternoon from 3 to 5 in and of a local family in want.
We are glad to see Jim McInnes around again after being laid up for a few days.
We are sorry to report the accident to Mrs. J.E. Parkers, who fell and broke her leg the other evening.
Geo. Lyons and D. Kennedy spent Wednesday in Fork River on municipal business and report crops already for threshing.
John Marshinsky has traded his boat for an automobile.
Ed. Chirmok is building a store next to the Methodist Church and intends starting business this fall.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 6 – 1913

1913 Feb 6 – Baran Fired Fatal Shot

Monday was the most fateful in the life of John Baran. It opened with the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke in morning and in the afternoon the coroner’s jury found Baran guilty of the shooting.
Coroner Harrington held an inquest in the afternoon, when the following composed the jury: Geo. King, foreman; H.F. Caldwell, John Cole, A.B. Buie, Nelson Taylor, Stewart Baird, Thos. Shaw, F.J. McDonald, R.G. Ferguson, Thos. Jordan, Frank Beely, and Arch. Esplen. Witnesses examined were Dr. Culbertson, as to immediate cause of death; John Tomaski, the man who drove the sleigh that carried Constable Rooke to Baran’s house where he was shot, and Marie Pelech, the woman who lived with Baran.
The jury, in order to receive the woman’s evidence, proceeded to the hospital and for an hour listened to a well connected and intelligent reciting of the incidents which led up to the shooting.
The woman testified that Baran fired two shots from a rifle through the door when Rooke attempted to force an entrance; that she knew that one of the bullets took effect for she examined the spot where Rooke fell exhausted in the snow, when the man who accompanied him left to secure assistance. She stated that she found a pool of blood. She also testified that Baran forced her to state that she fired two shot through the door. The whole affair was brought home to Baran in a most vivid manner.

THE JURY’S VERDICT

The following is the verdict of the jury:
“We, the jury empanelled to hear the evidence as to the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke, find that the said Charles Rooke on Sunday, Jan. 26, 1913, received a bullet in the breast from a rifle in the hands of John Baran and that the said Charles Rooke died on Monday, Feb. 3, 1913, from the effects of this shot.”
The death of Constable Rooke has cast a gloom over the community as he was a good citizen, as well a good officer, unassuming and kind to all.
Marie Pelech, who lived with Baran, is still in the hospital, but is doing as well as can be expected. If she recovers she will have to have her right arm amputated at the shoulder. Her brother, Michael, arrived from Winnipeg Monday morning and was overcome with grief to find his sister in such a pitiable condition. He says he has been looking for her for three years.
Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Munson on Monday on the charge of murder. He was remanded until Friday for trial.
Rooke was born at Redhill, Surrey, England. May 5, 1876, being the son of Inspector-General Rooke, of the Indian army, who was honorary physician to Queen Victoria, and was educated at Willington College. He came to Western Canada in 1895, and served five years with the Northwest Mounted Police. In 1905 the Manitoba government gave him the job of organizing the Manitoba mounted police, a body whose efforts were mainly directed to the suppression of lawlessness along the international boundary line. He made his name a terror to horse thieves, yeggmen and smugglers and soon made the frontier as safe as any other part of the province. Latterly, his headquarters have been here, where he had jurisdiction over much of the north country. In 1909 he married Elizabeth Surrey, who, with one son, survives him.
A brother, E.G. Rooke, news editor of the Nelson News, and former publisher of the Port Hope., Ont. Times, is here to attend the funeral as are also Mr. Geo. Surry, Victoria, B.C., Mrs. Rooke’s brother, and Miss Ellen Surrey, of Galt., Ont., sister of Mrs. Rooke.

1913 Feb 6 – Funeral Today

The funeral of the late Constable Charles Rooke is taking place this afternoon from the family residence 8th Ave., N.E. Vermillion Lodge No, 68, A.F. & A.M., of which deceased was a member having charge of the services. Rev. A.S. Wiley will conduct the service. Interment will be made at Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fraser Given Two Months

Wm. Fraser, who attempted suicide last week by cutting his throat, appeared before P.M. Munson on the 30th ult., and was sentenced to two months in jail. He was taken to Portage by Constable McLean.

1913 Feb 6 – Died From Bullet Wound

Fred Bichardson, a Barnardo boy who was working for Arthur Lee, a farmer at Togo, shot himself in the head Friday with a 22 rifle. He was brought to the hospital here on Saturday, but died shortly after his arrival. The remains were interred in Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fork River

Henry Benner, of Lloydminster, is visiting his parents up the Fork River. He is wanting a car of young cattle to take back with him. No objections to females being among them.
Howard Armstrong has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Dony, left for Bayhead, Nova Scotia, for a two months visit among relations and friends.
D. Kennedy’s high flyer got kicked the other day and is out of business for a short time, consequently Dunk had to fall back on the old reliables for a trip to Winnipegosis.
All the threshing outfits got cold feet early this fall except for Fred Cooper and he is on his last job. Fred’s a stayer and there should be no kick from the farmers as there’s no money in it for either this year as far as threshing goes.
We were out the other day looking for a stray heifer and didn’t find her, but came across someone looking for a pig. They did not mention whether it was a live pig, or dead pig or a blind pig and judging from their track a few hours after they must have run across a pig of some kind. Moral, don’t try to carry more pig than you can handle unless you cover up your tracks.
There is considerable kicking being done among the owners of gasoline engines re the poor gasoline sent up here from Dauphin. It not only wastes our time but puts the engines out of order.
We notice in the Press a long rigmarole about compulsory education also an ad for a teacher for Mowat School. We hear there has been several application received. It seems a pity this school should be closed since the summer holidays, it being in the centre of a settlement where there is a large number of children. The parents seem to be anything but delighted to have the kids miss all the nice weather we have had. We bet dollars to doughnuts that the head push has no children to send or we would have heard of it every week for the last five months.
Can anyone tell us what benefit the majority of the ratepayers receive for their taxes in the Municipality. Of course there are some who go on a pilgrimage to all the meetings looking for snaps and they get them, by gum. The clerk has had a rise of fifty. Oh well, I believe he published the minutes of one council meeting since last June. The municipal auditor was around so look out for the statement three inches by four. We received a copy of the Auditor’s report in book form of 47 pages from Ochre River Municipality. Its good reading and looks like business. A few dollars expended like this would be more appreciated by the ratepayers than paying two road commissioners in ward five, as there has been done the last three years to spend two or three hundred dollars.
The new Oak Brae postoffice as officially opened today. It is situated at Janowski schoolhouse and should prove a great boon to the people of that locality as it has been a deeply felt want. Geo. Basham is postmaster and we feel sure he will fill the bill to all satisfactorily. We hear Billy is sore, but we can’t help these things, so Billy, please remember the little saying “No use crying over spilt milk.” Such is life in the Wolly West.
The annual clearance sale started today 1st Feb. at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store and they are sure slaughtering the prices. This has been a poor year for the farmer so now is your chance to buy right.
Wanted, a boarding house right away for the travelling public.

1913 Feb 6 – Sifton

A ball was held in the Kennedy hall in aid of the English church; about forty couples were present, and a very enjoyable time was spent.
Elaborate arrangements were made for a wedding here on the 31st ult. A large number of guests had assembled and everything was in readiness for the ceremony when it was found that the would-be bride was missing. Consternation reigned for a time and great disappointment was felt, especially by the intended groom.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 16 – 1913

1913 Jan 16 – Building for 1913

Dauphin undoubtedly enjoyed the greatest building boom during this year which has occurred in the history of the town. Already plans are being prepared for a dozen modern residences. The business blocks which will be built during the year include the Bennett block, McDonald-Voight block and one or two others which are under contemplation.

1913 Jan 16 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. J. Cameron, of Neepawa, are spending a few weeks with Alex Cameron, of Mowat Centre.
Wm. Davis returned from fish haul of a few days and reports fishing good this year.
John Nowsed, who was teaching school at Aberdeen, Sask., is spending his vacation with his parents.
R.C. Sparling, of Dauphin, is here on business for the companies he represents.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Cooper returned from a visit to the Lake Town.
Miss M. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, will wield the rod of correction over her scholars of Mossey River School, having the position of teach for 1913.
Messrs. Bawden and Simpson of Dauphin, interviewed Mr. D.F. Wilson at his office on business.
Max and Fred. King are busy among the farmers sawing their wood and crushing their grain with their gasoline outfit.
Miss Pearl Wilson returned from a week’s visit among her friends at Sifton.
Mr. Sturdy is back from his trip to the city and is looking good and as sturdy as ever.
Threshing is making slow progress these cold days. We are told W.R. had so many men he had to turn them out for want of room.
Wm. King, county master, is away on his annual trip visiting the Orange Lodges in Dauphin county.
The Press keeps ringing the changes on what Sir Wilfy did and what he did not do. If they only publish what he didn’t do when he had the chance, they would have the biggest paper in Canada.