Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 6 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 6 – Fork River

Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. They report a very pleasant time.
F.B. Lacey from Mowat Centre, returned from a visit to Dauphin on business and to attend the teachers’ convention.
We are informed that Capt. Cain, of Mowat, left for Dauphin to take out a license of some sort. Time will tell whether it is for fish, flesh or fowl.
Mrs. Frost and daughter, of Rathwell, are visiting her daughter, Mrs. Reid, on the Mossey River.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey, is spending the week in Dauphin, with friends.
Archie McDonald, who has been busy with a gang ditching on the company’s farm here, has returned to Winnipegosis, the ground having frozen too hard to do any more work this season.
Miss J. Weatherhead, teacher of the Mossey River School, spent the weekend with friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Roe, of Neepawa, has left for the west with his second consignment of cattle from this point.
John Seiffert, and Steve Letwyn, of Winnipegosis, are busy among the farmers, buying cattle for the company’s at South Bay.
Wm. Coultas has invested in stock and intends stall feeding them for Xmas beef. We believe Billy is on the road to become a millionaire in the near future. Farmers take notice and follow suit.
Frank Clawson, of Dauphin, is here renewing old acquaintances.
Mrs. N. Little, and daughter, Miss Grace, took a trip south on business for a few days.
Mr. O’Callagan, of Portage la prairie, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is visiting the Co.’s store on his semi-annual tour of inspection, and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Messrs. Sturdy, White and Shears, of Winnipegosis, are busy at the Co.’s store this week taking stock.
Mrs. Stonehouse and daughter, Miss Sylvia paid the lake town a visit this week.
Hallowe’en passed off with the usual result. Some are minus their gates, others are looking for strayed buggies. The bell of All Saints’ received its annual visit and was fixed up as usual to keep it from running away, while the other building is left in peace as usual. This is where unity comes in, we suppose; yes, with a vengeance.
Our Winnipegosis friends seem to be grieved at the way they are used by the Mossey River municipal board and would like to know if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map. Better ask somebody else, I guess. But one thing we do know at tax paying time we are not allowed to forget our residence. Not very likely Mike.

1913 Nov 6 – Winnipegosis

Capt. Coffey was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday’s train.
The ice on the lake is firm enough to permit travel between the mainland and Snake Island. If the weather becomes warm again which it threatens now, navigation will be resumed.
Frank Hechter left for Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday. Frank is up and down pretty often and helps keep the C.N.R. running.
J.P. Grenon is off to Quebec, where he will study mink farming. The mink farm at Macaza has proved a decided success and he is anxious to learn something of the methods employed in rearing this little animal which produces such a fine grade of fur. The fox branch of Mr. G’s ranch is making progress, and there is every prospect of it becoming a profitable industry. Fish and fur producing animals abound in this part of the West and if the industries flourish as we hope they will there is no reason why the people here should not become prosperous, if not wealthy. The fishing industry is a great asset and the timber resources are large and are being profitable exploited. With good land for farming and cattle raising at the back of all, no part of he West offers better inducements for settlers than this town and district.
The telephone line is now completed and it is sure to prove a great convenience. Postmaster Ketcheson is in charge of the service. The connections are small at present but they are sure to grow. Those connected up with the service are Canadian Lakes Fishing Co., The Armstrong Trading Co. and Frank Hechter. Dauphin is the Central checking office.
Cattle buyers have been in the district of late but have not secured many animals as that canna Scot, Capt. Dugald McAuley, usually covers the district like a blanket.

1919 Nov 6 – Soldiers Banqueted at Fork River

One of the largest banquets held in Northern Manitoba took place at Fork River on Friday night, the 31st ult. The banquet was gotten up by the people of the Mossey River municipality and tendered to the returned soldiers. The supper was held in the Orange Hall, and it is estimated that fully two hundred and fifty people sat down to the splendid spread prepared by the ladies of the district.
Mossey River municipality was well represented by her sturdy sons in France and Flanders, and, like all Canadians, they did their part well. Some of the boys were destined not to return and today rest under the sod across the ocean. Others survived their wounds. The occasion was one for rejoicing.
Each soldier was remembered in a tangible form and presented with either a gold watch and guard or a well-filled purse. It was a recognition of the men well worthy of any community.

TOAST LIST.
Following the supper there was a short toast list. Mr. Geo. King, of Dauphin, was toastmaster. The list included “The King.”
“The British Empire,” proposed by Geo. Spence, of Winnipegosis, and responded to by Principal Jonasson, of Winnipegosis, and the Rev. Mr. Roberts.
“The Municipality of Mossey River,” proposed by ex-Reeve F.B. Lacey, and responded to by Coun. Hunt and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
“Our Hosts and Hostesses,” was proposed by the Rev. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin.
The address to the soldiers was read by Mr. Wm. King, and the presentations made by Sergt. Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
The men made suitable replies, in which they each returned their heartfelt thanks.
At the conclusion of the speech making the hall was cleared and the young people indulged in a dance.
There were a number of guests present from Dauphin, Winnipegosis and other points.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 23 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 23 – Committed Suicide

Douglas Casey, aged 27 years, was found dead in a bedroom in the King Edward hotel, Gilbert Plains, on Wednesday. The man had committed suicide by taking carbolic acid. Little is known about Casey. He worked during the fall for a Joseph Carbert and is supposed to hail from Vancouver.
Coroner Harrington went to Gilbert Plains and after hearing the facts of case decided an inquest was not necessary.

1913 Oct 23 – Sad Drowning Accident

Isaac, the three year old son of Wm. Miner, who lives three miles south-west of town, was drowned in the Vermillion River on Wednesday afternoon. The little fellow strayed to the river and in some way fell in.

1913 Oct 23 – Telephone Line to Winnipegosis

The Manitoba Government telephone line has been completed to Winnipegosis.

1913 Oct 23 – Fork River

Mrs. Albert Cooper left to meet her husband at a place where they will take up their residence for the winter months.
Mr. Rowe, of Rathwell, came in on Saturday’s train and rustled up two cars of stock. He left on Monday’s train. Mr. Rowe is a record buyer as he pays the price and gets the goods in short order.
Miss Cox. From Ontario is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Fred. Cooper, on the Fork River, for a short time.
Wm. Northam left for Weyburn, Sask., where he will spend a few months on business in connection with his trade.
Wm. Hunkins, assessor is busy these days traveling a round among the settles west.
The long distance government telephone has been installed in the post office
Several automobiles passed through here on Sunday. The cars were bound for Winnipegosis.
Mrs. J. Gunness and Mrs. I. Humphreys returned from a visit to the Lake Town and enjoyed the ride on the C.N.R. local express.
We notice W. King has a very nice bunch of Berkshire pigs from registered stock which he is clearing out at $5.00 a piece.
Wm. Houston has returned from Winnipegosis and intends assisting in the A.T. Co. store for the winter. “Scotty” is a real hustler behind the counter and we are glad to see him back.

1919 Oct 23 – Fork River

Will Northam, has purchased a house and lot in town from J. MacDonald and will take up his residence with us.
E. Lockwood and family have arrived from Regina. Mr. L is the new station agent.
Bert Little and family have arrived from Chicago to take up their residence.
Ben Cameron has charge of the White Star elevator and is handling considerable grain.
A pleasant time was spent at the Orange Hall on Friday evening, when a dance and presentation was given to our returned boys. Proceedings started at nine sharp and a good crowd turned out for the occasion. Dancing occupied those present until eleven o’clock when an address was read by the se.-treasurer of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee. Presentation of watches was next on the program. Corp. Briggs, Pte. Briggs, Pte. Gasena, Pte. Reader and Drive S. Craighill each receiving a watch as a small token for the service they have rendered their country. Pte. A. King who was “over there” for four years returned while the dance was on but for some reason did not get his watch with the rest. I wonder why? The banquet for the boys is to be given on Friday evening, Oct. 31. Let us hope everyone will turn out and have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 15 – 1913

1913 May 15 – Baran to Hang on Tuesday

A Portage la Prairie dispatch says: All hope of reprieve for John Baran under sentence of death for the murder of Constable Rooke, has been given up, and preparations will be started the latter part of the week for the carrying out of the sentence that he be hanged on Tuesday, May 20. Portage is without a sheriff and for that reason none of the new officials are to discuss the matter, but the duty will probably devolve on George Muir, the duty sheriff although he has yet received no definite instructions to prepare to carrying out the death sentence. It is known, however that the gallows will be erected in the jail yard the latter part of this week, and it is understood that a government official will arrive about Saturday to superintendent this week. Portage has never had a hanging and the official are not versed in what is really necessary.

1913 May 15 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Williams as returned from Dauphin hospital, where she has been for some time.
Mrs. J. Rice, of North Lake, is visiting Dauphin on important business.
Sandy Cameron, one of the bonanza farmers of Mowat Centre is through seeding. Got a hustle on and left the rest of us.
Mrs. C. Clark has returned from the south after spending a month there. She is greatly benefited in health by the trip.
J.D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre who had been ailing for some time, passed away May 9th at the ripe age of 80 years. The several members of his family have the sympathy of the people of this settlement in their sad bereavement. The funeral took place from the homestead on Sunday he 11th.
Rev. H.H. Scrase returned from Sifton, having held service there on Friday night.
We are informed that Fred. Tilt has rented the house on Nat Little’s farm and intends going into market gardening. We wish Fred. success in his venture.
Capt. Douglas passed through here on his way to Winnipegosis with his trotter.
Dunk Kennedy was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Rev. W.A. Fyles, B.A., S.S. Field secretary, will hold Communion services at All Saints’ Church at 3 o’clock and at Winnipegosis at 7:30.

1913 May 15 – Winnipegosis

The ice is still in the lake but there are now indications of warmer weather and its disappearance will be hailed with satisfaction. Once the water is clear the gasoline and sail boats will again dot the water. This is a joyful time but altogether too short in this northern climate. Boating is a splendid pastime the world over. Winnipegosis, I may say, has some capable skippers, and time is destined to become a summer resort.
Frank Hechter returned last week from a trip to Dauphin and Canora.
J.P. Grenon and daughter returned from a brief visit to Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday.
It is understood the Commissioner of telephones has under consideration the extension of the telephone line from Sifton to Winnipegosis. Whether the old line will be utilized o an entirely new one constructed deponeth saith not.
Miss Parker, who spent a few days visiting in Dauphin, returned home on Tuesday.
Miss Bertha Johnstone is visiting at her home here.
With the approach of June wedding bells will peal.
Mr. Clarkson returned from Dauphin on Saturday with Mrs. Clarkson, who has been in the hospital there for a couple of weeks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 13 – 1911

1911 Apr 13 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on the 20th alt. Coun. Paddock absent.
Communications were read from Algoma Steel Bridge Co., Chairman of the Telephone Commission, stating that a telephone line would be built through Fork River to Winnipegosis this coming season; from Supt. Fisher of C.N.R.; Western Municipal News, re vital statistic register; Salvation Army and Campbell, Simpson & Macneill.
Lacey – McAuley – That the secretary write the superintendent of C.N.R., the Minster of Railway and the Railway Commission, urging the necessity of a tri-weekly service on the Winnipegosis branch.
McAuley – Hunt – That the swamp on the road allowance, lying north of secs. 35 and 36, tp. 30, range 19, be corduroyed and that A.E. Groff be appointed foreman at $2 per day and that he be empowered to employ men at $1.50 per day, or man and team at $3 per day.
The following accounts were passed by the Finance committee: J. Nawasod, assisting surveyor, $3; W. Clark, $3; St. Boniface Hospital, $3; postage, $2; team with survey party, $7; F.B. Lacey, expenses to convention, $15.75.
Nicholson – Lacey – That the tender of he Algoma Steel Bridge Co. for the building of a combination steel and wood bridge across the Fork River between sections 21 and 28, tp. 29, range 19, for the sum of $230 be accepted.
A by-law appointing the officers for 1911, was passed; the noxious weed inspectors being T.B. Venables and W. King of Fork River, and W. Marcroft and I.K. Robinson of Winnipegosis.
McAuley – Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

1911 Apr 13 – Fork River

Geo. Nicholson had the misfortune to have his house and contents burnt last week. How the fire originated is a mystery. He had no insurance.
Mr. Homey, the horse dentist, is busy fixing up horses around Fork River. We have to do something with the hay as the railway seems unable to move it fast enough, and shippers are losing money on account of not being able to make prompt shipments.
A.H. Hodgson was a visitor to Fork River to spend the week-end.
A Press correspondent is shouting reciprocity because he can send to American firms and purchase barbwire and binder twine cheaper than he can get it at Fork River. We wonder if this is the individual that was giving us pointers on building a few weeks ago. We can’t all be R.C. and chairman of Boards of Public works committee. How about that municipal scheme for bringing settlers in? Rush it along, lots of room.
The people of Fork River spent an amusing evening in the Orange Hall listening to an entertainment given by Prof. Sas Koo Tam consisting of songs, recitations and vocals bits. Some of us will need remodelling before we can get into paradise. Its the first time we were aware we had Miltonia in Fork River.
W. Williams has moved his sawing outfit from Lake Dauphin here ready to saw the logs drawn by the settlers to Fork River. Billy’s a hustler in the sawdust line.
Our genial P.M., Mr. N. Little, has the greatest display of farm Implements ever seen in Fork River. If you want anything in that line give him a call. Say taw care those bandies don’t get stuck in those culvert pipes they might get damaged before they have time to experiment with them.
P. Ellis paid a flying visit to Dauphin. He believes in ascending and descending. Flying machines are all right if they run level. Call and get prices before buying. Blank forms on hand.
Wm. King has been under the weather the last two weeks. Its just a complaint he caught when the old McKenzie government was in power; times were hard then, soup kitchens were opened all over Canada. Billy says he had to consume so much free trade soup to get a little nourishment he never rightly recovered, in fact it stopped his growth. His one consolation is he’ll never have a show with the fellow who was to big to get into Paradise.