Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 15 – 1921

Brakeman Tuck Killed

George F. Tuck, brakeman, was killed at noon Monday in the Canadian National Railway yards at Swan River. He jumped from the Prince Albert through freight train as it was pulling into the station. He slipped, fell backward under the moving cars, and was killed instantly. Tuck was 23 years old and a native of England. He was a returned soldier and had been a resident of Dauphin for little over a year.

The funeral took place from Farrell’s Undertaking Parlors on Wednesday afternoon to Riverside cemetery. The service was conducted by the Rev. Philip Duncan.

Fined for Assault

Fred Beyko appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday, December 12th, charged with assaulting Harry Derkacz. Beyko was found guilty and fined $20 and costs, amount in all to $46.75. Both parties belong to the Valley River district.

Fork River

The mighty hunters have returned from their annual trek. Some bring spoils others a long face.

The annual meeting of the U.F.M. will be held in the school house on Friday evening, December 16. This is the business meeting of the year and everyone is requested to turn out. A directors meeting will be held right after the annual meeting and the evening will finish with a dance and supper. Everyone turn out and have a good time.

The teachers are working hard on the Christmas entertainment to be held on the 22nd. The “kiddies” are rounding into shape and there is a promise of a fine evening ahead. Do not forget the date.

Municipal nomination day passed over very quickly. Reeve Robertson was returned by acclamation. In Ward 2 we have Sam Hrushovey and Joe Fedorovitch. Ward 6 Metro Fediuk, Nicola Panagopka and Arthur Shannon, while Ward 4 has Mr. Hart and Frank Thorsteinson.

T.B. Venables has completed part of his new home and has moved in for the winter. Mr. Venables will complete building operation in the spring.

James Tate lost his home by fire some days ago. The family was away at the time and as far as can be learned there was little if any fire in the stove at the time.

Stanley King was a visitor during the hunting season. Stanley is an old-timer and is always a welcome visitor.

E.V. Lockwood and family have returned from a trip to Chicago, where they were visiting Mrs. Lockwood’s folks.

Cordwood is coming into town and the price is a bit lower than for some time.

In fixing up for the winter do not forget to see Tilt for insurance. No matter what it is he has insurance to cover it.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 12 – 1914

1914 Nov 12 – Men for Second Contingent

The following have successfully passed the preliminary medical examination here this week conducted by Dr. Bottomley. The men are now drilling at the barracks under Sergeant-Major. Goodall and Sergeant Highfield. There are 50 men wanted from district No. 10., which territory is almost all in the Dauphin district, for the Second Contingent.
A.G. Cockrill, Dauphin. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
T. Boakes, Swan River. (Thomas Boakes, 1892, 81084)
A. Kerr, Swan River.
F. Conley, Benito.
S.J. Ellis, Dauphin.
W.J. Falconer, Dauphin. (William John Falconer, 1894, 106218 SGT)
J.L. Younghusband, Dauphin.
J.W. Cleaver, Dauphin. (John Wesley Cleaver, 1890, 106138)
Andrew Andrew, Dauphin. (Andrew Andrew, 1883, 81019 CSM)
J.W. Meek, Dauphin. (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578 QMS)
Glen H. Pettis, Dauphin. (Glen Haslome Pettis, 1893, 81704 SGT)
H. Knight, Dauphin.
A. Richmond, Swan River.
W.H.G. Cattermole, Grandview. (William Harry Gage Cattermole, 1879, 81140)
H. Wade, Dauphin.
D. Leigh, Ashville. (Duncan Blake Leigh, 1893, 106356)
A. Towns, Grandview. (Alfred Towns, 1893, 81894 LCP)
Jas. Walkey, Dauphin.

1914 Nov 12 – Fork River

Mr. R.M. Bell has left for a short vacation to Brandon and Russell.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown, of Alexandria, Ont., are visiting their daughter, Mrs. A. Snelgrove.
Mrs. Joe Hunter left for home at Severn Bridge, Ont., after spending a few weeks with her sons, Sam and Harry.
The school was closed on Wednesday. The kids enjoy a holiday in the middle of the week or at any other time.
Mr. T.B. Venables has left for a vacation trip to Boissevain. Major Humphries is in charge of the farm during his absence.
Mr. Sam Hunter has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mr. Sydney Howlet, of Million, paid his friends of this burgh a visit, while passing through from Winnipegosis.
The Orangemen’s patriotic ball on November the 5th was admitted by all to be the best event of the kind ever held in this little burgh. There were fifty couple present, Dauphin, Dublin Bay, Sifton and Winnipegosis represented. The music was furnished by the Russell family and several others. From the opening at nine o’clock with the grand march till the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at 4:30, everything moved along pleasantly and most enjoyably. The ladies furnished a good supper. Speeches and songs were given during that interval. The song, “It’s a Long, Long, Way to Tipperary” by the three Russell children was well received. Ice cream was served by the ladies of the Women’s Auxiliary and a nice sum realized for the fund. The Orangemen wish to thank the public for the assistance given towards making it a success.

1914 Nov 12 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Bradley is fast recovering from the effects of the burning she received on Hallowe’en night.
Mr. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Monday.
Dr. Medd took Mrs. R.C. Birrell to Dauphin on Monday for treatment. Mrs. B. has been in unsatisfactory health for some time past.
Capt. Coffey arrived on Wednesday’s train.
We see that Charlie White has been appointed fishery overseer for the province. We hope that this does not mean that our old friend may have to pull up stakes and locate elsewhere.
What Winnipegosis would be without a curling club it is hard to say. It is truly our chief winter sport. A meeting was held recently to organize and the feeling prevails that the game will be as popular as ever this season. Dr. Medd is president and Fred McDonald secretary-treasurer. The curlers have taken over the rink from Mr. Whale, and will manage it themselves this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 4 – 1915

1915 Mar 4 – Playing Joke and is Head

Swan River, Feb. 26 – J. Hoey, a homesteader living near here, is dead as the result of playing the leading part in a practical joke. He was at some distance from his shack when he saw his chum come out. He thought it would be a good joke to imitate a wolf and see what happened. He crouched down low and began to howl like a wolf. The other man immediately got his rifle and shot. The bullet struck Hoey in the thigh. He was rushed to the hospital, where the leg was amputated. The shock, however, was too much and he died shortly after.

1915 Mar 4 – Thought He Had to Carry a Broom

A Galician seeing so many on the streets this week carrying brooms, asked a citizen if this was a new war regulation. He was jocularly told it was. The man then went into a store and bought a broom and proudly walked up Main Street with the “weapon” elevated over his shoulder at 45 degrees.

1915 Mar 4 – Fork River

Mr. G. O’Neil, of Mowat, is off on a visit to Rainy River.
Miss S. Lacey has returned from a few weeks’ visit with friends at Rainy River.
Mr. Munro and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt.
Mrs. R. McEachern spent a few days at the Lake Town lately visiting he sister, Mrs. E.J. Morris.
J. Denby and Tom Sanderson, of Winnipegosis, paid this burgh a visit on business and are looking hale and hearty after their winter up the lake fishing.
Mr. Steede, lay reader, paid a visit to Sifton in connection with church work last week.
Mr. Wm. Howitson have a dance to his many friends on Friday night in the hall. A very good time was spent.
W. King returned from attending the 43rd annual session of the Provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Manitoba at Winnipeg, on Friday. He reports the largest meeting in the history of the lodge. Arrangements were made for entertaining the Triennial Council of Ireland and the Grand Lodge of British North America next summer.
Reeve Lacey and D.F. Wilson are attending the Trustees’ Convention at Winnipeg this week.

1915 Mar 4 – Sifton

Mr. James McAuley and Mr. Eberby of the Massey-Harris Co., were visitors in town last week.
Sid Coffey was in our midst last week and gave a good show with is moving pictures, but unfortunately there was a very poor attendance. Cheer up, “Sid,” better luck next time.
Mr. Oliver Abraham has been busy hauling wheat to the elevator for the last few days. He is putting about two carloads through the elevator. We trust he will be successful in getting a top price as the wheat is of good quality.
There was half a carload of cattle shipped out of here this week. We would like to know what has become of Robt. Brewer this last week or two. Surely his smiling face would be welcomed back again.
Mr. Walters, Mr. Kitt and Mr. Onlette, of this burgh, visited the Grain Growers Association concert and dance at Fairville last Friday and report having had a good time.

1915 Mar 4 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J.P. Grenon is in Winnipeg undergoing an operation.
J. Denby, Wm. Denby, Sr., and W. Johnson, are Winnipeg visitors this week.
Mr. Chas. Stewart, of Dauphin, was in town on business, and left on Friday’s train.
Government officials, Sweny and Taylor, were here on Friday inspecting the works.
Mrs. Jack Denby has been on the sick list for a few days, but is around again.
Mrs. Theo Johnston left on Monday for Dauphin to visit Mr. and Mrs. King.
Mr. Ed. Morris left for Dauphin on Friday’s train.
Mrs. Wm. Williams, of Fork River, is a visitor in town.
Mr. and Mrs. Himie Cohen, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. F. Hechter this week.
Jim McInnes had a run for his life on Friday evening. A call was made to the rink that there was a deuce of a rumpus at the hotel, and, of course, Jim can home on the bound to settle the dispute, but to his surprise he found about 25 o 40 lads and lassies waiting for him and Mrs. McInnes in parlour. On their entering the brunch demanded the dining room cleared out, which was done in short order. It being Mr. McInnes’ birthday a dance was enjoyed till the wee sma’ hours of the morning. Jim has not given his age away yet, imitating the ladies in this respect.