Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 14, 1919

Fair Notes

Some of the ladies were quite disappointed that there was no baby show this year. The baby show was very popular in past years and it was undoubtedly an oversight that it was not held this year. Mr. John Gorby, who was had charge of this department in past years, is the champion of the ladies and the babies and it will not be his fault if the show is not held next year. The babies are out greatest national asset and their welfare is contributed to by information supplied by physicians and professional nurses at these exhibitions.
The directors worked hard for several weeks to complete the details of the fair and have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts were appreciated and the exhibition a success in every way.
Chas. Murray, the patient and tireless secretary, had a busy three days of it.
The stock parade, headed by the band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was a striking feature on Friday.
Over 5000 people passed through the turnstiles on Friday.
The War Saving and Theft Stamp advertising display was very much in evidence on the grounds. The entrance to the grounds, the main building, grand stand, ticket office and other places throughout the grounds were nicely decorated with different lines of posters. It was evident that Mr. Blackadar intended that the large crowds that gathered each day on the grounds should be thoroughly informed regarding this movement.

Successful Exhibition

The 28th annual fair of the Dauphin Agricultural society, held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of last week, was the most successful in its history. And this, too, in the face of the fact that the farmers were in the midst of the harvest. While it is true there was a falling off in most of the departments it is a noteworthy fact the exhibits generally were of a superior class. The livestock was the best ever shown here. Two notable herds were J.D. McGregor’s Aberdeens and John Graham’s shorthorns. In the Clydesdale, Percherons, Agricultural and light horses many fine animals were shown and nearly all the leading breeders of the district were represented.
The poultry section was by long odds the best in the history of the society. The exhibit was not only large but of the highest quality. Much credit is due the Poultry Association and its energetic secretary. Wm. Murray, for the success achieved.
The attractions were exceptionally good. The band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders from Winnipeg furnished the music on Friday and the splendid program was enjoyed by all.
Credit is due Mr. Wm. Rintoul for the manner in which the numerous young ladies executed the intricate dances. The little girls also did exceptionally well.
The Scotch dancing by the two little Simpson girls, to the music of the bagpipes played by their father, caught the fancy of the big crowd.
At 1.30 several hundred war veterans assembled in front of the grand stand and on behalf of the citizens Mayor Bowman extended them a hearty welcome. In his address he referred to the historic places in France where the Canadians made history and achieved undying fame. Robt. Cruise, M.P., also spoke, Major Williams, in the absence of Brig. Gen. Ketchen, replied on behalf of the men. Major Skinner added a few words in regard to a suitable memorial for those who had made the supreme sacrifice.

Fork River

E. Harris, formerly of Bracebridge, Ont., is visiting at the home of Fred Cooper.
Don’t forget to come to Fork River’s annual agricultural show, Friday, August 15th.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s, Dauphin, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican church, Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24 h, at 3.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake school, has returned home from visiting at Cypress River and Neepawa and is feeling better after her trip.
The White Star Co.’s new elevator is nearly completed. Thus the commercial importance of this centre grows.
Owen Pruder is busy overhauling the Northern elevator so as to have it ready for the fall delivery of grain.

Sifton

The marriage of Miss Anna Farion, daughter of Fred Farion, merchant, of this place, to Mr. W. Belashta of Canora, was celebrated at St. Paul’s parish church, on Wednesday, the 6th inst., at 9 p.m. Bishop Budka, with the assisting priests, officiated. Some two or three hundred invited guests were present. The church had been very tastefully decorated with flowers, which blended very pleasingly with the handsome costumes of the bride and attendants. To the lively strains of a bridal chorus, sung in Little Russian, the bride and groom, showered with confetti, and guests repaired to the large Ruthenian hall, where en exceptionally well appointed supper was served. Covers for at least two hundred and fifty were laid and the tables were used for several relays of guests. The hall was very tastefully festooned and draped, with roses and asters as floral decorations. An orchestra, composed of Ruthenians, four brothers, from Winnipeg, played very pleasingly and tastefully. Bishop Budka, on behalf of the guess, toasted the bride and bridegroom, the latter responded very neatly both in Little Russian and English. Dancing was kept up until daylight. A. Kozak, one of the old national Cossack dances, given most artistically by Miss Belashka, of Winnipeg, and Mr. Dyk, of Dauphin, was much admired; also the tasteful fox-trotting of Mr. Assifat. A number of visitors from Winnipeg were present, amongst others, Mrs. Stefanyk, Mr. and Mrs. Badnac, Dr. Pasdrey, and Lieut. Kreman editor of the Canadian Ruthenian. Mr and Mrs. Belashta have left for Canora, their future home, where Mr. Belashta is in the legal profession.
During the evening Mr. —– spoke at some length about the conflict between the Poles and so-called Ukrainians, the West Galicians, stating that Premier Lloyd George had alone amongst the Allied powers at the peace conference, expressed himself in favor of an independent Ukraina, separate from the claims of the Polish aristocracy. He was followed by Mr. F. Taciuk, of Dauphin. A collection, totaling one hundred and twenty dollars, was taken up to be forwarded to Europe for use against the Poles.

Winnipegosis

Geo. G. Spence, who was formerly manager for the Hudson’s Bay Company here, has bought T.H. Whale’s general store.
There is an average crop in this district in spite of the dry season. The grain is nearly all cut and threshing will soon commence.
All the fishermen in town are bustling getting in supplies and preparing for the fall fishing. Two of the companies large boats leave here within the next few days for points at the north end of the lake.
A party of forty business men came up from Dauphin Sunday and took a trip fifty miles up the lake, upon the steamer “Armenon.” The trip was an enjoyable one and everyone was delighted with it. A net was set on the voyage out and was taken in on the return voyage. Nineteen fish were caught and Mr. Dan Hamilton auctioneered them off and got as much as $2.00 for a “sucker.” A Dominion and a Provincial M.P. were among the party.
The English Church is holding a regular Sunday service at Winnipegosis.
The town council is planning for a new municipal hall and extensive sidewalks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 17, 1919

Fined $200 for Operating Still

Nikola Presiloski, of Valley River, appeared before the police magistrate this week on the charge of “operating a still illegally.” He pleaded guilty and was fined $200 and $7 costs. The brand of whiskey manufactured by Presiloski is said, by those who sampled it, to be the best they ever imbibed.
Constable Coleridge, laid information against Joe Woiak, for failing to register under “Alien Enemy Act.” He was fined $10 and $5 costs.

G.W.V.A. Barn Dance

A barn dance was held on July 10th under the auspices of the Great War Veterans’ association in the barn of Mr. Arthur Fisher, Burrows. Some 150 people made the trip, and as the roads were good and the weather all that could be desired, a good time was spent. The McMurray orchestra was in attendance and, as usual, this was an assurance that the music was of the highest order. After all expenses had been paid a good sum was turned over to the association which will help their work and bring nearer the fond hope of the members that at some time, and it is hoped soon, they will be able to see their way to having quarters owned by the association as a permanent home for the veterans of the district. The thanks of the association are due to Mr. Fisher, who has placed his barn at the disposal of the association on two occasions this summer, and also to the various ladies and gentlemen who assisted in the arrangements.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members of the above Association are asked to note that the meeting will be on Thursday night at 9 o’clock in place of 8 as usual. This change is to prevent a clash with the baseball game to be played the same evening. Members are requested to put in an appearance as matters of importance will be discussed. The executive of the association is informed that an Order-in-Council has been passed extending the War Service Gratuity to men that have seen service in England, but did not proceed to France. Particulars have been requested as to the manner in which application should be made for same and comrades will be notified on receipt of same.
This association wishes to thank those ladies who kindly sent cakes for the dance recently held at Mr. Fisher’s barn, also to Mr. Fisher for the use of his place.

Peace Day Observance

Dauphin citizens will observe Peace Day by a short service in the town hall at 10 a.m. In the afternoon a basket picnic will be held in the park with a program of sports for the children.

Sentenced to Five Years

The town of Dauphin laid a charge of “vagrancy” against Wm. Boyko. He appeared for trial before P.M. Hawkins on Monday. He entered a plea of not guilty but was convicted and sentenced to five years imprisonment in the Industrial Training School at Portage la Prairie on Tuesday. Boyko’s previous record is bad.

Winnipegosis

Geo. Spence, who has been overseas for over two years, returned home last week.
A party of surveyors are surveying the new railway line from Toutes Aides to Winnipegosis.
Miss A. St. Godard, of the Pas, is visiting her sister before going to Winnipeg to reside.
Misses Myrtle and Edna Grenon were passengers to the city on Saturday to meet their father. They will leave for Minneapolis to send their holidays.
Mrs. St. Amour and Misses A. and H. St. Godard left on Saturday for a visit to Winnipeg.
A fire occurred in the Armstrong Trading Company’s oil sheds this week, but was put out before serious damage was done.
F.G. Shears, J.P. Grenon and A.H. Steele have left for Winnipeg in connection with the suit started by the Armstrong Trading Co. against J.P. Grenon as to the ownership of the Winnipegosis hotel.
This has been a dry season here but lots of rain has fallen this week which has put the crops in good condition.
The lake steamers have been overhauled and have made several successful trips up to the north end of the lake, establishing new fishing posts.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 3, 1919

Case Transferred to Winnipeg

The case of the Armstrong Trading Co. vs. J.P. Grenon and J. McInnes, which was among the list of King’s Bench cases here, has been transferred to Winnipeg. This has been done for the benefit of the counsel who are all Winnipeg residents. The case starts today (Thursday).

Great War Veterans Hold Big Celebration

Fortune smiled on the Great War Veterans on Tuesday. Their first celebration was a splendid success viewed from all standpoints. The weather was ideal, and the crowds the largest that ever visited the town. Between four and five thousand people were on the Exhibition grounds in the afternoon. There was not a hitch to mark the day’s program.
The parade in the morning attracted much attention and favorable comment was heard on all sides on the many and varied representations in the line of march. There were cars decorated with flags without number, and it appeared as if every boy and girl in the town carried the colors.

Verdict for Mrs. Haley

Mrs. Jos. Haley has secured a verdict for $10,000 in the count at Saskatoon against the Canadian National Railway for the death of her husband. Joseph Haley was killed at Hawke’s spur, a mile west of Hudson’s Bay Junction in the fall of 1918 by being caught between a loading platform and a freight car. Action was instituted in the province of Saskatchewan owing to the accident having occurred there. The case came to trial at Saskatoon on June 25th, when judgment was given for $10,000. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented the plaintiff.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, June 10th, Coun. Yakavanka absent. The minutes of last meeting were read and adopted.
Communication were read from the solicitor re Bowlen judgment; Fred Wenger, account against ward 2; the teacher of South Bay S.D.; W.H. Paulson re taxes; three applications for the position of road commissioner; Bank of Nova Scotia re line of credit; Dept. of Public Works re road across 3-31-18; Geo. Lvon re wood on road; the estimates of Mossey River S.D., and a largely signed petition from ratepayers in south-east corner of the municipality and Lawrence municipality praying for a road on boundary line.
Hunt-Namaka – That a grant of $250 be made to the Fork River agricultural society.
Marcroft-Paddock – That after hearing the circumstances the taxes on the se 2-31-19 be allowed to stand over till the coming December, and that the penalty on them be cancelled.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $150 be made to the Returned Soldiers’ committee for the purpose of giving a banquet to returned soldiers.
Marcroft-Reid – That the secretary obtain designs of monuments from the different marble works with a view to erecting a monument to the memory of all Mossey River soldiers who were killed in the war.
Marcroft-Namaka – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be a committee to select, stake out and authorize the use of a nuisance ground for Fork River.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $10 be made to the South Bay Boys and Girls’ club.
Hunt-Namaka – That a special meeting of the council be held at Fork River on Saturday, June 14th.
Reid-Namaka – That Mrs. Domeric be refunded the taxes of 1918, with the exception of the special school tax.
Reid-Namaka – That the reeve and sec.-treasurer be a committee to deal with matters regarding the council chamber at Winnipegosis.
Marcroft-Namaka – That the account of Coun. Reid ($22) for letting and inspecting work be printed.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the auditor’s report be printed.
Reid-Namaka – That the accounts of the meeting of Jan. 7th, March 5th, and those of today, as recommended by the finance committee, be passed.
Bylaws were employing the collector at $5 per day when instructed to go out by the reeve and sec.-treasurer, appointing James Bickle road commissioner, and repealing the bylaw making the councilors road commissioners. Also authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of Mossey River School District, No. 999, on a $12,000 debenture bylaw.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

A gang of men are engaged building a new elevator. This will make the second elevator at this point.
Gus. Andrus, Jim Parker and G. Lacey have invested in tractors and are busy turning over the soil.
The heavy rain of Saturday gave the hand a good soaking and the crops are greatly befitted by it.

Mossey River School Report

The following is a list of pupils who were successful in the recent mid-summer exams:
Grade VII—Honors; Bob Williams. Pass; Ben Shuchett.
Grade VI—Nathan Shuchett, David Nowasod.
Grade V—Honors; Arthur Jamieson.
Grade IV—Mildred Carlson, Amos Carlson, Bill Williams, Sofie Beyko.
Grade III—Goldie Shuchett, Edna Hafenbrak, Earnest Hafenbrak, Donald McEachern, Tony Beyko.
Grade II—Birdie Stonehouse, Roy Dewbury, Allie Dewbury, Steve Nowasod, Jack Puchaylo.
Grade I sr—Kate Williams, Milo Carlson, Peter Zerba.
Class A—Clarice Carlson, Mary Stefishon, Tommy Hafenbrak, Cornie Chipley.
Gertrude M. Cooper, teacher.

Winnipegosis Public Schools

Grade IV to Grade V—Honors; Theary Frederickson, Benjamin Ketcheson, Lawrence Marchenaki. Pass; Gladys Cartwright, Jos. Mikit, Clara Hubble, Alexina Dumas, Charlie Adam, Mary Langlois, Harry Whale, Muriel Snelgrove, Rae Spence.
Primary to Grade II—Pass; Olive Shears, Vera Wills, Christine Schaldemose, Glen Dunby, Marie Loire, Hugh Johnson, Elizabeth Bradbury, Brynhildur Bjornsson, Grace Campbell, Bert Hubble, Chas. Spence, Harriet McLeod, Paul Lemchuk.
T. Tozer, Teacher.

Grade IV jr. to Grade IV sr.—Honors: John Marchenski, Rose McAuley. Pass: Agnes Burrell, Mary Chermak, Margaret Sanderson, M. Mapes, Albert Dumas, Sarah Klyne, Mary Richard, Donald McAuley, Violet Groff, Wm. Mapes, Olivina Langlois, Blennie St. Matt, Jessie Paddock, Jas. Richard, Hilliard Denby, Beverley Scchaldemose.
Grade III to Grade IV—Pass: Jos. Ponliot, Daisy Walmsley, Frank Wallace, Myrtle Snelgrove, Lawrence McDonell, Martha Sanderson, Wall. Pouliot, Ralph McAuley.
Following is a list, in order of merit, of successful pupils in the recent yearly examinations in Winnipegosis public schools:
Grade VII to Grade VIII—Pass: Tina Marchenski, Margaret Robinson, Ernest Needham.
Grade VI to Grade VII—Honors: Margaret Magnusson, James Brown, Kathleen Dempsey, Margaret McAuley, Charlotte Bradley. Pass: Paul Rudiak, Grace Whale, Cecil Paddock, Frank Needham.
Conditional—Alice Mapes, Harvey McAuley.
Grade V to VI—Honors: Mary Marcuenski, Evelyn Groff, Svava Frederickson, Charlotte Adam, Addie Ketcheson, Gordon Rognvaldson, Edith Hubble. Pass: Muriel Burrell, Annie Denby, Archie McLellan, Amelia Adam, Hjalmtyr Thorarinsson, Jos. Schaldemose.
Grade V Jr. to Grade V Sr—Honors: Leo Magnusson. Pass: Harvey Grenon, Verna Denby, Esther Hechter, Evolda Whale, Felix Magnusson, Gifford Campbell, George Campbell.
M. McMartin, Teacher.
Leith McMartin, Teacher.

Grade II to Grade III—Honors; Fred Magnusson, Jennie Ogryzlo, Margaret McLellan, Annie Dubinak, Stearnie Fredrickson, Stephen Zawrich, Alvina St. Godard, Sarah Alex, Mary Lyons, Myrtle Clarkson, Roderick St. Matt, Jos. Hechter, Mark Brown, Annie Zuk, Alex Klyne, Uric Lavergna. Pass; Wm. Wallock, D’Elroy Pouliot, Medos Langlois, Wm. Flamand.
Conditional: Ernest Seiffert, Bruce McAuley, Florence Paddock.
Grade I to Grade II—Honors: Viva Burrill, Lilian Bilenduke, Mary Kruchek, Donald Morris, Iva Whale, Vera Rognvaldson, Dolly Morris, Annie Marchenski, Armand Langlois, Nora Demery, Keitcha Snelgrove. Pass; Chas. Kachoe, Roderick Klyne, Dan McKay, Stephen Ogryzlo, John Semchuk, Fred St. Matt, Jos. Vermette, Helen Fiddler.
L. Levites, Teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 26, 1919

The Great Strike Over

The greatest strike in the history of the country is virtually over. The sympathetic strike has been declared off and hundreds of the strikers have returned to work and others are returning as fast as places can be found for them.
The staff of the Dauphin Telephone Exchange all returned to work on Wednesday, and the local trains are scheduled to run again. Most of the men, if not all, are expected to be back at their places in the shops by the end of the week.

Winnipegosis

The Great War Veterans’ Association held a successful picnic at the baseball grounds here on June 20th. The program of sports was attractive and drew a large crowd of visitors. There were foot races for men, women and children. Fast and slow horse races were also held. There was other variety with the hop.-step and jump race, the running jump and the tug of war. Fork River won the football game and Winnipegosis won the baseball game. Each team got a prize of $25, and both games were spirited and hotly contested.
Mrs. E.A. Morrison, after spending a few months holiday with her daughter, Mrs. E. Cartwright, has departed for her home in Kerrobert, Sask.
Hugh Armstrong was a business visitor in town last week.
Mrs. Geo. Spence has left for Winnipeg to meet her husband who is returning from overseas after over two years military service.
Miss M. Olsen, who has been nursing C. Burrell, left on Tuesday for her home in Winnipeg.
R. Montgomery, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is in town for a few days on business.
The season is very dry here and rain is badly needed.
The strike in Winnipeg is making conditions awkward and the town is having trouble in getting mail and freight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 2, 1919

Big German Gun for Dauphin

While nothing has been definitely settled regarding the disposition of much of the spoils of war captured from the Germans enough is known that Dauphin will have the refusal of one of the big cannons. The railway board, it is understood, is willing to grant sufficient of the right-of-way in front of the Grand View Hotel for a foundation upon which to mount the monster.

Reeve Lacey Wants the Kaiser Shot

To the Editor of the Herald:
SIR—The following is an extract from a letter received from a relative in English since the signing of the armistice and return of the prisoners of war from Germany:
“There have been several boys of Penarth, returned prisoners of war, and some of them have been treated most cruel. One has an eagle branded on each side of his face, his teeth knocked out, and a piece cut off his tongue. Another with an eagle and “God Blast England,” or some such words as that, and a torpedo on his forehead. There are quit a lot of Germans prisoners here and when one sees them one cannot help using strong language when you know they have had such fiendish thins done to our prisoners by these Germans.”
The above is one instance that is recorded out of thousands that are unfortunately too true. God grant that our representatives at the peace conference may not forget the horrible tortures inflicted on those French and Belgian women and children, and, on the noble men of the Allied armies and navies who voluntarily offered their liberty, limbs and lives by thousands to save the world from German bondage. We shall be robbed of victory if those fiendish war lords are not stripped of all they possess and led out and shot by some of the boys they have tortured. Let us back up our army and navy and insist on a death punishment for the Kaiser and his war lords: otherwise there will be no lasting peace.
Fed B. Lacey
Fork River.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on December 18th, all the members being present.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read on motion of Coun. Hunt, seconded by Coun. Namaka.
Communications were read from St. Joseph’s Orphanage, the Bank of Commerce, the fire guardian, J. Rosenthal (re: sale of bridge), P.J. Robertson and T.N. Briggs (re: flooding of land next spring), the Navy League (re: grant), tax accounts of F. Thorsteinson and N. Syder, Lawrence municipality (re: boundary road) and the inspector of legal offices.
McDonell-Reid – That a grant of $250 be made to the Navy League of Canada.
Hunt-Yakavanka – That Constable Lyon push proceedings with a view to having the stable removed from the lane in block 1, Fork River.
Hunt-McDonell – That a rebate of taxes for 1918 of $13.60 be made on the Orange Hall property.
Reid-Yakavanka – That the accounts of Coun. McDonell ($134) and Hunt ($34.50) for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That the account for culverts to be used on the Dauphin-Mossey River boundary of $195.20, at present charged to Ward 1 be transferred to the public works account and applied on the work for which the government grant is given.
Yakavanka-Reid – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That Wards 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 be credited with $230 each of the Government grant, with the understanding that the money be spent on the main roads through the Wards.
Yakvanka-Paddock – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be authorized to obtain material for a bridge across Fishing River, on the west side of 2-29-19.
Reid-McDonell – That the Reeve and Coun. Hunt be delegates to the municipal convention to be held in Winnipeg on January 21st, 22nd, and 23rd.
McDonell-Reid – That the clerk put up notices asking for applications for the position of sec.-treasurer, and also advertise in the Dauphin Herald.
Hunt-Reid – That the council tender Reeve Lacey a hearty vote of thanks for his services to the municipality and wish them every success in the future.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from a two weeks’ visit to Weyburn, Sask.
The Chute brothers from Dauphin passed through here recently wit their teams. They intend to haul fish during the winter on Lake Winnipegosis. This is a local industry which puts an honest dollar within reach of our farmers.
Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, was a recent visitor at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. He has been in poor health for some time past and is going to the hospital for treatment.
Sid Gower is wearing that broad smile that won’t come off. It’s a Daughter of the Empire.
Mr. F. Cooper was a recent visitor to Dauphin.
Coun. Archie McDonell paid Dauphin a visit at the weekend. The genial Archie has just recovered from the flu.
Edwin King has gone to Winnipeg to take a business course.
The new council will assume office on the 7th inst. Your correspondent will watch carefully the moves of our representatives and note them for the Herald. Progress should be the watchword. There is a lot of work awaiting the activity of the council and we all hope they will prove equal to the occasion.

Winnipegosis

At the annual meeting of the Home Economics Society the officer elected were as follows:
President – Mrs. Houchin, re-elected.
Vice – Mrs. Dennett.
Secretary – Mrs. Spence, re-elected.
Treasurer – Miss R. Whale.
With the New Year we have a library of about 100 books belonging to the society and we hope to add another hundred books before the year is out. The January meeting will take the form of a social evening when each member is asked to bring a friend along.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 6 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 6 – Fork River

Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. They report a very pleasant time.
F.B. Lacey from Mowat Centre, returned from a visit to Dauphin on business and to attend the teachers’ convention.
We are informed that Capt. Cain, of Mowat, left for Dauphin to take out a license of some sort. Time will tell whether it is for fish, flesh or fowl.
Mrs. Frost and daughter, of Rathwell, are visiting her daughter, Mrs. Reid, on the Mossey River.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey, is spending the week in Dauphin, with friends.
Archie McDonald, who has been busy with a gang ditching on the company’s farm here, has returned to Winnipegosis, the ground having frozen too hard to do any more work this season.
Miss J. Weatherhead, teacher of the Mossey River School, spent the weekend with friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Roe, of Neepawa, has left for the west with his second consignment of cattle from this point.
John Seiffert, and Steve Letwyn, of Winnipegosis, are busy among the farmers, buying cattle for the company’s at South Bay.
Wm. Coultas has invested in stock and intends stall feeding them for Xmas beef. We believe Billy is on the road to become a millionaire in the near future. Farmers take notice and follow suit.
Frank Clawson, of Dauphin, is here renewing old acquaintances.
Mrs. N. Little, and daughter, Miss Grace, took a trip south on business for a few days.
Mr. O’Callagan, of Portage la prairie, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is visiting the Co.’s store on his semi-annual tour of inspection, and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Messrs. Sturdy, White and Shears, of Winnipegosis, are busy at the Co.’s store this week taking stock.
Mrs. Stonehouse and daughter, Miss Sylvia paid the lake town a visit this week.
Hallowe’en passed off with the usual result. Some are minus their gates, others are looking for strayed buggies. The bell of All Saints’ received its annual visit and was fixed up as usual to keep it from running away, while the other building is left in peace as usual. This is where unity comes in, we suppose; yes, with a vengeance.
Our Winnipegosis friends seem to be grieved at the way they are used by the Mossey River municipal board and would like to know if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map. Better ask somebody else, I guess. But one thing we do know at tax paying time we are not allowed to forget our residence. Not very likely Mike.

1913 Nov 6 – Winnipegosis

Capt. Coffey was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday’s train.
The ice on the lake is firm enough to permit travel between the mainland and Snake Island. If the weather becomes warm again which it threatens now, navigation will be resumed.
Frank Hechter left for Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday. Frank is up and down pretty often and helps keep the C.N.R. running.
J.P. Grenon is off to Quebec, where he will study mink farming. The mink farm at Macaza has proved a decided success and he is anxious to learn something of the methods employed in rearing this little animal which produces such a fine grade of fur. The fox branch of Mr. G’s ranch is making progress, and there is every prospect of it becoming a profitable industry. Fish and fur producing animals abound in this part of the West and if the industries flourish as we hope they will there is no reason why the people here should not become prosperous, if not wealthy. The fishing industry is a great asset and the timber resources are large and are being profitable exploited. With good land for farming and cattle raising at the back of all, no part of he West offers better inducements for settlers than this town and district.
The telephone line is now completed and it is sure to prove a great convenience. Postmaster Ketcheson is in charge of the service. The connections are small at present but they are sure to grow. Those connected up with the service are Canadian Lakes Fishing Co., The Armstrong Trading Co. and Frank Hechter. Dauphin is the Central checking office.
Cattle buyers have been in the district of late but have not secured many animals as that canna Scot, Capt. Dugald McAuley, usually covers the district like a blanket.

1919 Nov 6 – Soldiers Banqueted at Fork River

One of the largest banquets held in Northern Manitoba took place at Fork River on Friday night, the 31st ult. The banquet was gotten up by the people of the Mossey River municipality and tendered to the returned soldiers. The supper was held in the Orange Hall, and it is estimated that fully two hundred and fifty people sat down to the splendid spread prepared by the ladies of the district.
Mossey River municipality was well represented by her sturdy sons in France and Flanders, and, like all Canadians, they did their part well. Some of the boys were destined not to return and today rest under the sod across the ocean. Others survived their wounds. The occasion was one for rejoicing.
Each soldier was remembered in a tangible form and presented with either a gold watch and guard or a well-filled purse. It was a recognition of the men well worthy of any community.

TOAST LIST.
Following the supper there was a short toast list. Mr. Geo. King, of Dauphin, was toastmaster. The list included “The King.”
“The British Empire,” proposed by Geo. Spence, of Winnipegosis, and responded to by Principal Jonasson, of Winnipegosis, and the Rev. Mr. Roberts.
“The Municipality of Mossey River,” proposed by ex-Reeve F.B. Lacey, and responded to by Coun. Hunt and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
“Our Hosts and Hostesses,” was proposed by the Rev. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin.
The address to the soldiers was read by Mr. Wm. King, and the presentations made by Sergt. Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
The men made suitable replies, in which they each returned their heartfelt thanks.
At the conclusion of the speech making the hall was cleared and the young people indulged in a dance.
There were a number of guests present from Dauphin, Winnipegosis and other points.