Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 23, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

Regular meeting of the above association was held on the 9th inst. about 40 comrades being in attendance. Application for membership was received from 9 returned men, all of whom were accepted.
The committee appointed to consider the question of building a home for the returned men reported that they had approved a design for a veterans’ home as presented to them by Mr. H. Payton, the architect, this sketch being placed before the comrades for approval. Instructions have been given to Mr. Payton to finish the design and it is hoped to have these drawings shortly to place before the public so that when an appeal is made for help in the construction there will be no doubt in the mind of anyone as to where the money is going. It is also felt that the plans under consideration will not only meet the needs of the veterans but will meet with the approval of the community and be a credit to the town of Dauphin and district, and will give those interested in the welfare of the returned men the opportunity of expressing their appreciation.
The members of the above mentioned committee are as follows: Comrades J.D. Neeley, H. Oliphant, F. Neeley, F. Bumstead, D. Kitney, J.W. Skinner, W.F. Terrell, W. Wright, C. Lane, H.H. Olson, E.C. Batty (chairman) and J.M. Chalmers (secretary). Any of the afore-mentioned committee will be only too pleased to go into the matter of the building and give all the information that is desired.
We are informed that the Ladies’ Auxiliary intend putting on a dance on Hallowe’en Eve (Oct 31st). Some very fine prizes have been donated, and all are asked to bear the date in mind and come and have a good time.
I have been asked to state that Comrade R.H. Elliott has lost his service button. The number of which is 163371. Anyone finding same will please return it to the G.W.V.A. rooms or to the above mentioned. These buttons cannot be replaced and also that it is a criminal offence to be in possession of one unless the certificate belonging to same is also in the possession of the bearer.
On Thursday, 14th, the Victorian Serenaders performed at the town hall under the auspices of this Association. The show was as usual good, and the music after for the dance was generally conceded to be first rate. The house was not as good as might have been hoped, but this was in a large measure due to the weather and the fact that there have been several other attractions during the month. However it was a well-paying proposition and the proceeds will be used in the furtherance of the building proposition.
On Nov. 3rd the third of the series of the concerts to be run under the auspices of this association will be placed on at the town hall. This time it is the Canadian Juveniles and it will not be necessary to say a great deal about these as they are well known to the residents here. The Gray Girls, who are travelling with this company, have already established a reputation for themselves in Winnipeg second to none; the same also applying to Charlie Wright. We would strongly recommend this entertainment to all and would ask that we be given the usual support of the public and so enable us to bring that home for the veterans a little nearer to a possibility.
Members are asked to note that the regular meeting will be on the 23rd inst., and a full attendance is requested. Now that the bulk of the farm work for the season is through, there is no reason why the members should not attend, and it is only by so doing that we can accomplish anything for the bettermen in general of the returned men.

Sir Henry Drayton to Speak

The Victory Loan Committee have their organization completed and the canvases for both town and rural will commence Monday, Oct. 27th. A public meeting will be held at Dauphin on Oct., 29th, at which Sir Henry Drayton, Minister of Finance, is expected to speak.

Fork River

Will Northam, has purchased a house and lot in town from J. MacDonald and will take up his residence with us.
E. Lockwood and family have arrived from Regina. Mr. L is the new station agent.
Bert Little and family have arrived from Chicago to take up their residence.
Ben Cameron has charge of the White Star elevator and is handling considerable grain.
A pleasant time was spent at the Orange Hall on Friday evening, when a dance and presentation was given to our returned boys. Proceedings started at nine sharp and a good crowd turned out for the occasion. Dancing occupied those present until eleven o’clock when an address was read by the se.-treasurer of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee. Presentation of watches was next on the program. Corp. Briggs, Pte. Briggs, Pte. Gasena, Pte. Reader and Drive S. Craighill each receiving a watch as a small token for the service they have rendered their country. Pte. A. King who was “over there” for four years returned while the dance was on but for some reason did not get his watch with the rest. I wonder why? The banquet for the boys is to be given on Friday evening, Oct. 31. Let us hope everyone will turn out and have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 14, 1919

Fair Notes

Some of the ladies were quite disappointed that there was no baby show this year. The baby show was very popular in past years and it was undoubtedly an oversight that it was not held this year. Mr. John Gorby, who was had charge of this department in past years, is the champion of the ladies and the babies and it will not be his fault if the show is not held next year. The babies are out greatest national asset and their welfare is contributed to by information supplied by physicians and professional nurses at these exhibitions.
The directors worked hard for several weeks to complete the details of the fair and have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts were appreciated and the exhibition a success in every way.
Chas. Murray, the patient and tireless secretary, had a busy three days of it.
The stock parade, headed by the band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was a striking feature on Friday.
Over 5000 people passed through the turnstiles on Friday.
The War Saving and Theft Stamp advertising display was very much in evidence on the grounds. The entrance to the grounds, the main building, grand stand, ticket office and other places throughout the grounds were nicely decorated with different lines of posters. It was evident that Mr. Blackadar intended that the large crowds that gathered each day on the grounds should be thoroughly informed regarding this movement.

Successful Exhibition

The 28th annual fair of the Dauphin Agricultural society, held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of last week, was the most successful in its history. And this, too, in the face of the fact that the farmers were in the midst of the harvest. While it is true there was a falling off in most of the departments it is a noteworthy fact the exhibits generally were of a superior class. The livestock was the best ever shown here. Two notable herds were J.D. McGregor’s Aberdeens and John Graham’s shorthorns. In the Clydesdale, Percherons, Agricultural and light horses many fine animals were shown and nearly all the leading breeders of the district were represented.
The poultry section was by long odds the best in the history of the society. The exhibit was not only large but of the highest quality. Much credit is due the Poultry Association and its energetic secretary. Wm. Murray, for the success achieved.
The attractions were exceptionally good. The band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders from Winnipeg furnished the music on Friday and the splendid program was enjoyed by all.
Credit is due Mr. Wm. Rintoul for the manner in which the numerous young ladies executed the intricate dances. The little girls also did exceptionally well.
The Scotch dancing by the two little Simpson girls, to the music of the bagpipes played by their father, caught the fancy of the big crowd.
At 1.30 several hundred war veterans assembled in front of the grand stand and on behalf of the citizens Mayor Bowman extended them a hearty welcome. In his address he referred to the historic places in France where the Canadians made history and achieved undying fame. Robt. Cruise, M.P., also spoke, Major Williams, in the absence of Brig. Gen. Ketchen, replied on behalf of the men. Major Skinner added a few words in regard to a suitable memorial for those who had made the supreme sacrifice.

Fork River

E. Harris, formerly of Bracebridge, Ont., is visiting at the home of Fred Cooper.
Don’t forget to come to Fork River’s annual agricultural show, Friday, August 15th.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s, Dauphin, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican church, Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24 h, at 3.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake school, has returned home from visiting at Cypress River and Neepawa and is feeling better after her trip.
The White Star Co.’s new elevator is nearly completed. Thus the commercial importance of this centre grows.
Owen Pruder is busy overhauling the Northern elevator so as to have it ready for the fall delivery of grain.

Sifton

The marriage of Miss Anna Farion, daughter of Fred Farion, merchant, of this place, to Mr. W. Belashta of Canora, was celebrated at St. Paul’s parish church, on Wednesday, the 6th inst., at 9 p.m. Bishop Budka, with the assisting priests, officiated. Some two or three hundred invited guests were present. The church had been very tastefully decorated with flowers, which blended very pleasingly with the handsome costumes of the bride and attendants. To the lively strains of a bridal chorus, sung in Little Russian, the bride and groom, showered with confetti, and guests repaired to the large Ruthenian hall, where en exceptionally well appointed supper was served. Covers for at least two hundred and fifty were laid and the tables were used for several relays of guests. The hall was very tastefully festooned and draped, with roses and asters as floral decorations. An orchestra, composed of Ruthenians, four brothers, from Winnipeg, played very pleasingly and tastefully. Bishop Budka, on behalf of the guess, toasted the bride and bridegroom, the latter responded very neatly both in Little Russian and English. Dancing was kept up until daylight. A. Kozak, one of the old national Cossack dances, given most artistically by Miss Belashka, of Winnipeg, and Mr. Dyk, of Dauphin, was much admired; also the tasteful fox-trotting of Mr. Assifat. A number of visitors from Winnipeg were present, amongst others, Mrs. Stefanyk, Mr. and Mrs. Badnac, Dr. Pasdrey, and Lieut. Kreman editor of the Canadian Ruthenian. Mr and Mrs. Belashta have left for Canora, their future home, where Mr. Belashta is in the legal profession.
During the evening Mr. —– spoke at some length about the conflict between the Poles and so-called Ukrainians, the West Galicians, stating that Premier Lloyd George had alone amongst the Allied powers at the peace conference, expressed himself in favor of an independent Ukraina, separate from the claims of the Polish aristocracy. He was followed by Mr. F. Taciuk, of Dauphin. A collection, totaling one hundred and twenty dollars, was taken up to be forwarded to Europe for use against the Poles.

Winnipegosis

Geo. G. Spence, who was formerly manager for the Hudson’s Bay Company here, has bought T.H. Whale’s general store.
There is an average crop in this district in spite of the dry season. The grain is nearly all cut and threshing will soon commence.
All the fishermen in town are bustling getting in supplies and preparing for the fall fishing. Two of the companies large boats leave here within the next few days for points at the north end of the lake.
A party of forty business men came up from Dauphin Sunday and took a trip fifty miles up the lake, upon the steamer “Armenon.” The trip was an enjoyable one and everyone was delighted with it. A net was set on the voyage out and was taken in on the return voyage. Nineteen fish were caught and Mr. Dan Hamilton auctioneered them off and got as much as $2.00 for a “sucker.” A Dominion and a Provincial M.P. were among the party.
The English Church is holding a regular Sunday service at Winnipegosis.
The town council is planning for a new municipal hall and extensive sidewalks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 24, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above Association was held last Thursday, July 17th, Comrade F. Scrase, president, in chair.
Application for membership was received from eleven returned men, all of which were accepted. This now brings the total membership of the Dauphin Branch to 271. It is hoped that same will reach the 500 before the end of the year. Any returned men in the town that have not become members up to the present are asked to do so at an early ate, for like all other things, many can help one, and the greater the membership then so much more will be able to be done for the returned man by the association.
The auditors’ report for the past six months was submitted, and on motion of Comrades Armstrong and Miles it was accepted.
During the past year considerable progress has been made by the local branch in the town. The present new quarters were opened in March and between three and four hundred men have slept in these rooms during that period. When it is considered that no charge is made for the use of these and the fact that it is sometimes next to impossible to secure a room in the town on shot notice, the use and benefit of the rooms to the retuned men that are here looking for land and getting information and particulars re the Soldier Settlement, can be readily seen. The rooms are also used to a very great extent by the returned men of the town in the evenings, and also by the boys who are living on the farms when they are in town during the day, and were it not for them it would be hard to find a place for them to spend the time, especially the men that are here to make entry on land and are compelled, owing to waiting for trains, etc., to stay in the town over night or in some cases two or three days.
Application was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary for the use of the large hall on Aug. 6, 7 and 8 for the purpose of serving dinner, and same was granted by the comrades.
The next meeting of the association will be July 31st, and members are requested to make note of the date.

Peace Day Celebration

In spite of the counter attractions elsewhere the citizens turned out in large numbers to celebrate Peace Day in Dauphin. At 10 a.m. about 250 people gathered for a Union Thanksgiving Service, which was conducted by Captain Kitson and Rev. Harry P. Barrett, while the address was given by Rev. J.A. Haw.
At 1.30 the children gathered at the two schools and a procession of about 40 automobiles, crowded with happy youngsters, headed by the town band, went along Main street to Fourth avenue and Second street to the park. In the park races were run for all children and in many events there were so many competitors it was necessary to have two and sometimes three beats.
The grown-ups of the town brought baskets and quite a number of family parties were to be seen enjoying picnic tea on the grass. Hot water was supplied and a booth managed by the members of the Children’s Aid Society, under the conductorship of Mrs. Vance, dispensed ice cream, sandwiches, lemonade, etc. in aid of the Home.
The whole day’s programme was arranged at two hurriedly called meetings at which Mr. George King was chairman. It would be impossible to mention all who contributed to the success of the day, but we must make note of the energy and interest of the Committee, Rev. Harry P. Barrett, Messrs. Ramsay Skinner, R.J. Malcolm, Rintoul, D. Sutherland, Wright, Barker and Ferguson.

Fork River

Harvest is expected to begin at once. There is some good crop in the district this season, and the quality, too, is expected to be high.
Wm. Coultas is building a dwelling on his farm.
S.B. Reid and family are visiting at Rathwell, Man.
Fred. Cooper and Mr. Hunt and family are on a vacation to Saskatchewan points.
The wild raspberry crop is a prolific one this season and canned raspberries will be found settlers’ tables this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 20, 1919

5 Cases on Assize Docket

The spring assizes for the Dauphin Judicial District opened on Tuesday with Mr. Justice Metcalfe, presiding. There are five cases on the docket, which are as follows:
King vs. F.B. Race, theft of liquor from railway car.
King vs. H. Porteous, Roblin, assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
King vs. Geo. Kuzio, Winnipegosis, sedition.
King vs. John Bouazuv, Roblin, posting obscene letter.
King vs. W.B. Dempsey, Winnipegosis, forcible entry upon land.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Formal Opening of Club Rooms
The new club rooms of the G.W.V. association, in the Lilly block, were formally opened by Mayor Bowman on Tuesday, the 18th.
In opening the proceedings Mayor Bowman said it gave him great pleasure to be with them that evening. He regretted the absence of the president who was indisposed and hoped that he would soon be restored to his usual good health. He paid a high complement to the officers of the association for undertaking an enterprise of such magnitude and to the ladies of the auxiliary, who had done so much to help forward the good work. The aims of the association needed no explanation, it being well-known that it was formed for the betterment and uplift of veterans of the great war just ended. In closing his worship said that public opinion would be behind any association formed for the help and assistance of the returned men and extended the best wishes of the citizens of Dauphin and district to the association. He then formally declared the club rooms open.
A short programme followed, Miss Maggie Stark giving a humorous reading and Mrs. Heaslip a song, for which she received a well-merited recall. Major Skinner gave an address in which he touched on many subjects of great interest to the veterans and townspeople. The McMurray orchestra contributed several selections and its presence at any function is always heartily welcomed.
Dancing at once commenced, while in the assembly and recreation rooms a series of games of progressive whist were strongly contested. Mrs. Nash won the ladies’ prize, the gentleman’s prize going to Comrade Jack May.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary provided an abundance of toothsome delicacies, which were enjoyed, and for which they received hearty thanks. Dancing was kept up with spirit till an early hour, McMurray’s orchestra furnishing the magic.
There was a large gathering and the function was voted one of the best ever held in Dauphin.

Race Case Proceeding

The grand jury found a true bill in the King vs. Race, and the evidence of a number of witnesses for the crown was heard. This (Thursday) morning the case for the defence was started. The trial is attracting much interest. F.B. Simpson is the crown prosecutor and J.L. Bowman is defending Race.

Mossey River Council

The council of the municipality of Mossey River met at Fork River on the 5th inst., as a court of revision. After the numerous appeals were disposed of the minutes of the last council meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Reparation Committee, Ottawa, the solicitors re. Hartman account, H. Houchin re use of council chamber for War Veterans, H. Shannon asking for refund of taxes, the secretary of the Weed Commission, A. Gunmunderson asking to be struck off the assessment roll, J.C. Adam re taxes on lot in Winnipegosis, the rural municipality of Wallace re equalized assessment, the Manitoba Returned Soldiers’ Commission.
A petition praying for the dismissal of the collector and another asking for the building of a road on the correction line; also two applications for the position of weed inspector.
Hunt-Reid – That Simpson, McGirr & Co., solicitors for the municipality, be instructed to apply to the legislature of the province of Manitoba at the present sitting for a special act legalizing the assessment for the yea 1918, and that the council approve of the draft form of act hereto appended and authorized the solicitors to consent to such amendments of revision thereof as may be required by the law amendments committee of the legislature.
That W.B. Findlater, M.P.P. for Gilbert Plains, be requested to introduce the said special act to the legislature.
Hunt-Namaka – That the clerk write solicitors re Hartnian account with the village of Winnipegosis.
Hunt-Yakavanka – Whereas, the Union of Manitoba Municipalities, at its recent convention in Winnipeg, pledged the co-operation of all municipal councils and officials in Manitoba to the Returned Soldiers’ Manitoba Commission in its work of reestablishing in civil occupations soldiers returning from the war; and, whereas, the municipality of Ochre River has regarded I as a patriotic duty to do everything possible to assist in this commendable purpose; therefore, be it resolved, that this municipality hereby undertakes to obtain satisfactory employment for all returned soldiers who were residents of this municipality at the time of enlistment, or, in the even of it being found impossible so to do, to promptly report to the commission, giving reasons for such failure and the address where the returned unemployed soldier may be found. The clerk is hereby directed to give such assistance to the commission as is necessary for the carrying out of the purpose of this resolution. Carried.
Hunt-Reid – That Edwin W. King be appointed weed inspector for year 1919 at a salary of $125 per month, and that is duties begin on the 15th day of May, and continue up to the 15th day of October, and that the clerk in notifying him of his appointment, ask him to attend the convention of weed inspectors to be held in Winnipeg.
The council adjourned to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, March 17.
Robt. Marsland was here last week with his sawing and crushing outfit.
Frank Sharp has been on the sick list for a few days.
Mrs. Russell has received the good news that her son, Pte. Walter, is on his way home from overseas.
The chips will soon begin to fly as there is quite a number of new buildings going up in the spring.
The Grain Growers meet the first Friday in each month. At the last meeting matters of importance were dealt with. Resolutions were passed asking for a reduction in the tariff and refusing concessions to the liquor interests.
There has been considerable land cleared of scrub during the winter, and breaking will be pushed forward in the spring.
The school questions is the burning issue of the hour.

Sifton

A very crowded meeting was addressed by Mr. R. Fletcher and others in Wycliff School last Thursday, the 13th inst., on the question of “Municipal Schools.” Much interest was shown in the bylaw and it is thought that it will be supported on the 25th. Mr. Dyk spoke in Ruthenian and Paul Wood occupied the chair.
Three carloads of lumber are being unloaded by local farmers.
It is proposed to build a municipal public hall here and a bylaw will to all probability by voted on to sanction the borrowing of a sum of money on debentures for that purpose.
From all accounts Sifton is not proud of its new liquor detective or spotter. Nor is he of much practical use here as we are all on the “water wagon” just now.
It is expected that the new government trunk highway, Winnipeg to Swan River, will run through Sifton. No better route could be found.
Logs, hay, straw, fence posts, etc., are being feverishly drawn. If the snow held until June – which heaven forbid! – there would still be that last load to draw.
Our local barber recently did 43 shaves and 17 haircuts from 7 p.m. until closing time. A pretty good records – but then, he only opens on Saturday evenings.
Mr. Thos. Winshy has replaced Mr. Wheeler as manager of the Bank of Commerce. He thinks Sifton has a bright future, and with a few mines, factories and so on opened up may make quite a city. Joking aside, we have a first-class site for an up-to-date creamery. Who will build it? Not tow, only one. We have two mills.
A progressive whist drive is advertised for next Friday evening in Wycliff School. Refreshments, prizes and a good time – all for 25 cents.

Breathe gentle zephyrs o’er snow-covered state,
Blow steady south wind, cross forest and lake
Urge spring-time sun they perennial power,
Burst waiting bud and unfold bashful flower.

Lines of winged strangers flock up from the south.
Sound calls and carols from many a mouth.
Fiel is long time white turn your black into green,
Gild fruitful autumn with glorious sheen.

Winnipegosis

One of the brightest events of the social season was a tea given by Mrs. Steele on the 17th. The decorations in the spacious drawing room were appropriately Irish in honor of the Saint and the same bright spring color prevailed throughout all the rooms and even reflected in the costumes of the young ladies serving and prepared out from the sandwiches. The event took the form of a shower to assist the young ladies of the Order of the Needle with a bazaar which the are planning.
Andrew Lunn, who has been hauling stone on a contract for the Manitoba Gypsum Company, will be through next week.
Mr. Hamilton returned last week with his family and will shortly move into the Bradley house.
The Red Cross Committee are planning a box social on the 27th in Rex Hall.
A large crowd was at the station to welcome Charlie Burrell on is return from overseas. He was somewhat exhausted from the trip up but is resting nicely now and will be glad to see his friends.
S. Coffey has his moving picture show in full swing again.

Winnipegosis

The second production of the Winnipegosis Dramatic Society which took place on the 7th inst., was a very creditable one. The play chosen, “The Arrival of Kitty,” is a 3-act farce of good construction, smart action and bright dialogue, and amused the house greatly. The cast was well balanced, so well balanced that special mention of individual’s would be out of place, each one of the players, including the Pup, having earned his or her meed of praise. The production showed marks of greater experience on the part of the promoters, and improvement in this direction is not yet complete.
The gross receipts amounted to $121, the allocation of which, and plans for the future, will be discussed at an early meeting of the society.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 9 – 1915

1915 Dec 9 – Private Jas. Craig on Wrecked Steamer

Private James Craig was on the hospital boat that struck a mine in the English Channel recently and was wrecked. In a letter to his brothers here he gives a description of his thrilling experience as follows:
I would have written you before this but I didn’t know how long I might have been in the last place I was in or whether I would go back to my regiment. Instead of going to my regiment the doctor sent me to the base and then across to England so here I am in the hospital with some kind of disease in my joints, more especially in one of my knees and the experience I came through when coming across the Channel hasn’t helped me any. I have something to be thankful for in being here at all. I suppose you will have seen in the papers of that disaster to the hospital ship being sunk by a mine in the Channel an over 80 wounded soldiers were drowned. Well, I was on the boat at the time and I have to thank Providence that I was amongst the saved. He boat was sunk three miles from Dover. I was in the upper deck astern at the time she struck the mine. There must have been a big hole torn in her for she immediately began to sink ahead and listing to the portside. There was only one boat got away full. I got in the boat nearest me and when it was full nobody knew anything about how to lower it. We kept tugging and pulling at the block ropes but nothing wound work and thee was none of the crew to be seen to let us see or help us to get it launched, so we all got out again. By that time a lot of the fellows had jumped overboard and as the ship was still going though slower, they were left behind struggling in the water. It wasn’t long before a destroyer came along side so close that a number of men jumped on to it but it moved off for some reason. Later the boat came close in again and some more got on it.

JUMPED INTO THE SEA.
I was in the act of making a jump, but it was too far away at the time, so I stood for a minute or two thinking and taking in the situation. In thinking what would be best to do, I rushed down below and got hold of a lifebelt. When I got up I could hardly stand on deck there was so much list. Well, I took up a position ready to jump. I had thrown off my heavy overcoat and taken off my boots. I don’t know how long I stood there watching her gradually sinking; finally, I thought it was time for getting clear of her before she sunk so I jumped into the water and got several good mouthfuls of it for the sea was pretty choppy at the time. Before I jumped I saw some rowboats making for us so I struck out to meet them. I was picked up by one of them and put on destroyer. The ship that was nearest us at the time was coming to our assistance when she also struck a mine and sunk.
I left the ship none too soon, just two or three minutes after she went out of sight. There were some heartrending scenes that I won’t forget as long as I live. When I was in the water I could see the propellers still running above me and some ropes had got entangled around them and were making a terrible noise.

1915 Dec 9 – Private Izon Wounded

Mr. John Izon, of Dauphin Plains, received a little from his brother, Private Hubert Izon, this week. The letter contains the information that Hubert, who was in the trenches in France, was hit on the shoulder by a piece of shell; the shell driving the bone in for about three inches. He is at present in the hospital at Taplon, England, and slowly recovering from the wound.

1915 Dec 9 – Military Notes

J.W. Skinner, locomotive shop foreman of the C.N.R., has received his lieutenancy commission in the 53rd battalion. He will be quartered in Dauphin during the winter under Lt.-Col. Gillespie and starts on duty his week.
Et. Severn, of Winnipeg, one of Lt.-Col. Gillespie’s staff, arrived in town this week, to whip the Dauphin ???.
The recruits now number 45, and together with the staff of officers the total enlistment is about 50.

1915 Dec 9 – Fork River

Mr. E. Hunt, from Ontario, is a visitor to his brother Mr. A. Hunt for a couple of weeks.
Mrs. Sam Reid [1 line missing] a visit to friends in Winnipeg for a week.
Mrs. J. Chippey received word her mother was very sick and left on the train for a week’s visit at her home.
Mr. D. Scarth, of Hartney, is a visitor with Mr. T.N. Briggs during the hunting season.
Mrs. Little and daughter, Miss Grace are visitors to Winnipeg for a few days.
Mrs. Paul Wood and children of Sifton, are visiting Mrs. D.F. Wilson on the homestead in the Mossey.
Mr. Sam Reid left with his hay press for the old Hood ranch on Lake Dauphin having taken a contract to pressing hay for Shand & Thomas of Dauphin.
Mr. W. King received a letter from his son Edwin, of the 44th Batt., which is in England, who states that things are quite lively over there. The weather is wet and sloppy. This is quite a contrast to the dry winter weather of Manitoba, and the boys feel the change badly.
Several parties left on the 1st to take in the hunt for the big game.
Hunter Bros. shipped their first load of Lake Dauphin fish on Saturday.
Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, was here loading for 25 head of yearlings and two year olds which he will feed for winter.

1915 Dec 9 – Winnipegosis

There was a most successful skating carnival in the rink on Monday night, in aid of the Red Cross Society. The turnout was splendid and the door receipts were $??. The ladies served tea and coffee at ten cents a cup which will bring the total receipts up to a good figure. The prize winners were Miss Myrtle Grenon, Mr. ???, Mrs. ??? McMartin, Miss Geekie, Miss Crawford, Mr. R. Bradley, Miss Margaret Bradley, Miss A. Hechter, Miss Esther Hechter, Miss Beth MacAulay and ??? Cecil Paddock.
Sam Sanderson had the misfortune to lose a valuable team of horses last week in a crack in the ice.
John Redisk is all smiles these days – it is a baby girl.
Frank Hechter returned from Waterhen after spending a week there. He reports fishing good.
The new store across the ??? is doing a good business.
We are sorry to report the death of Mr. and Mrs. Dudley’s little baby girl, which took place on the 4th inst. The funeral was on the 7th.
The council had their regular monthly meeting on the ?th inst., and among other business they passed the herd law. A copy of same can be had at the clerk’s office.
Mr. L???, rancher of Waterhen, passed through here on his way to Winnipeg for a business visit.
C.L. White, fishing overseer, made a quick trip to River last week.
Dr. Medd and Rev. Kirkpatrick left on Wednesday for the west on a hunting expedition.
W.R. Paddock, left for Pine River and Garland on business.
Threshing is now finished in this district and the crops have been very good.
The town is livening up now that the fish teams are coming in so steady.
The Municipal elections are over again for another year and everyone is happy.
New settlers still keep coming in here and we are glad to welcome them.
Mr. Kenny Morris, of the 79th Battalion, spent a few days leave of absence with friends here.
Rev. Mr. Kirkpatrick, an old-timer, here took the service in the Methodist Church on Sunday last, and the church was crowded to its utmost capacity.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 13 – 1919

1919 Nov 13 – Soldiers Tendered Banquet

A year ago Tuesday the bells of the town were ringing and the whistles blowing. It was a day long to be remembered. The Germans had started the war with the object of conquering the world and had, after the great struggle, hoisted the white flag and asked for the cessation of hostilities. It was a different scene that greeted the eye as one entered the town hall on Tuesday night, November 11th, 1919. Here were tables stretched the full length of the hall, artistically arranged and simply groaning under the load of good things that weighed them down.
The occasion was a banquet tendered the returned boys, their wives and lady friends by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the G.W.V.A. and it was worthy of them. The members of the Auxiliary have been tireless workers for the welfare of the men and this banquet crowned their efforts.
There were between three and four hundred present.
During the dinner hour Major Skinner extended a welcome to all on behalf of the Auxiliary.
A vote of thanks was tendered the ladies on motion of Comrades Bates and Batty.
After the tables were cleared there was a short program followed by a dance. Those taking part were Mrs. Grobb, violin selection; Mrs. R. Hawkins, solo; Rev. H.P. Barrett, song; Miss H. Clarke, recitation. The McMurray orchestra furnished the music for the dance.

1919 Nov 13 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 10th.
Mr. Shield and bride arrived last week and have rented John Hayward’s residence on the Mossey River.
John Judge and Mr. Gourlay from Virden, have arrived. They have rented Briggs brothers’ buildings.
A basket social will be held in the school on the evening of Nov. 21st. The proceeds will be devoted to a fund for the purchase of an organ for the school.
The work on the road that leads to the school is still undone. Children from this district east of the muskeg have not been able to attend school of late on this account. The Dept. of Public-Works has provided a special grant from this road. In view of this it seems strange that an effort has not been made to have the work performed.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

A meeting of the directors of the Agricultural Society was held on the 5th inst. It was decided to pay the prize money at once. As this was the first show held by the society the directors are to be congratulated on its success.
Mrs. Rice, for a number of years was teacher at North Lake School has sold her property and has left the community. Mrs. Rice has lived a number of years in the district and has done good work as a teacher. Her departure from our midst is a matter of regret.
Mr. and Mrs. Caswell, of Hartney, Man., are visiting at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. The young people attended the banquet to the returned soldiers.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Briggs.
All Saints’ S.S. staff held a public meeting on the night of the 6th. About 50 were present. Rev. H.P. Barrett presided. Arrangements were made for the annual Christmas tree, and also to hold a social evening every Wednesday at which there will be a varied program.
A public meeting is called for Friday, 14th inst., for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers’ Association.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

Mrs. Emma Rice wishes to thank all who were kind and considerate to her during her recent illness. She is now comfortably provided for in Dauphin and hops to be able to return to our midst within a short time.

LETTER OF APPRECIATIONS.
On behalf the returned boys of the Fork River district we wish to express our appreciation of the banquet tendered us, the gifts of watches and purses and the uniform kindness shown us upon all occasions. We further wish to acknowledge the efforts of the ladies in preparing the excellent supper provided us. The banquet was a most enjoyable event, the pleasure being shared by a number of friends from outside.
THE COMMITTEE.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 10 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 10 – Fork River

Miss S. Lacey, of Oak Brae, returned from a short visit to Mrs. J. Spearing of Valley River.
Mrs. Wm. Ramsay, of Sifton, was a visitor with Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase at the vicarage.
Mrs. Wm. King returned home after a week’s say with her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, who is leaving for the north end of the lake for the winter.
J. Playford and Fleming Wilson were visitors here from Dauphin on business.
S. Biggs has given up the Mowat School and is leaving for Dauphin.
H.H. Benner, an old-timer, is travelling around for a few days in the educational chariot renewing acquaintances. We are all pleased to see Harcourt. He is now a regular walking encyclopaedia on real estate.
The C.N.R. bridge gang spent a few days here pile drying and fixing bridges.
Mr. Lampard, of Dauphin, is busy rounding up a car of fat cattle for shipment.
Duncan Briggs, Professor Robinson and Fred Storrar have left with T. Johnston for the winter’s fishing at Dawson’s Bay.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson, who has been spending a week with her daughter, Mrs. L. Humphreys, of Dauphin, returned home Saturday.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs arrived home from a month’s vacation spent with friends in Brandon.

1918 Oct 10 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Albert Jackson Weir, Valley River, wounded. (Albert Jackson Weir, 1888, 2193343)
Pte. Douglas Wells Bentley, Dauphin, wounded. (Douglas Wells Bentley, 1897, 469933)
Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, wounded. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Robert Stanley Colebeck, Dauphin, wounded. (Robert Stanley Colbeck, 1896, 1072198)
Pte. Charles Winstanley Skinner, Dauphin, was wounded and taken to the dressing station. While being conveyed from the dressing station to the hospital he was struck by a bomb and killed. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)