Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 30, 1919

Can a Doctor Sell Liquor?

Dr. Wilmot, of Roblin, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday, on several charges preferred by the inspector for selling liquor contrary to the provisions of the act. One charge was dismissed and decision reserved in the others.

Chief Little Issues Warning

Young men and boys would be well advised to take warning as regards their conduct on Hallowe’en. Annually there has been a wanton destruction of the citizens’ property by the gangs of organized rowdies. This year steps have been taken by Chief Little and staff to put an end to this class of amusement. All damage done will have to be paid for, as well as the appearance of the parties in court.

Daughters of Empire Rally

The rally of the Daughters of the Empire here on Tuesday, the 28th inst., was largely attended, every Chapter being represented, which included the Pas, Grandview and Gilbert Plains. The meeting was held in the town hall and was presided over by the Rev. J.A. Cormie.
Mrs. Aldridge was the first speaker and she spoke in the interest of the establishment of a hospital for the people of Servia. She related in a pathetic and impressive manner the great sufferings of these people and the heroic way in which they had faced and overcome every difficulty. Mrs. Aldridge spent much time in Servia during the war and incidents she related were from personal experience.

Details of War Memorial

In explaining the war memorial, Mrs. G.H. Smith, National Educational secretary of the order, told the meeting that in detail the plan of the I.O.D.E. is to establish ideals of patriotism and give the children in the schools a truly British education by acquainting them with the ideals, the traditions and the institutions of Britain. Illustrated lectures on the history and geography of the Empire will be given in schools. All non-English will be supplied with one of I.O.D.E. British historical libraries within the next few years. A lecture fund for the teaching and study of British history will be established and some eminent lecturer brought to Canada at least once a year. Pictures of Canada’s part in the war will be given to 1000 schools, 100 schools in Manitoba to be among the number. Travelling scholarships to the extent of $1200 to university graduates in history will be awarded to each province. A second scholarship of greater value may then be established for these nine scholarship winners. An endowment fund of $500,000 is being collected for this purpose.
On rising to speak, Ms. Colin H. Campbell, provincial president, was warmly greeted. After expressing her great pleasure at having the privilege of again speaking to a Dauphin audience, se made a strong appeal on behalf of the Victory Loan. She pointed out that it was the duty of everyone to the best of their ability to assist the country at this time by subscribing what they could. Mrs. Campbell also spoke for a few minutes on the war memorial.
During the evening Mrs. Rogers sang a solo and miss Pear M. Tucker and Miss Irma Struthers contributed instrumentals.
At the conclusion of the meeting the visitors and the members of the chapter repaired to the rest room, where refreshments were served, and a couple of hours spent in social intercourse.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 27.
Mrs. Sharp has left for Winnipeg and will shortly cross the ocean to visit London.
Mr. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has returned from Brandon, and will conduct meetings at different points in our district. Some of the methods of the Army may be open to criticism but there is much to commend them. They hit out straight from the shoulder every time.
The rally meeting of the Grain Growers, recently held at the house of Thos. Toye, was well attended. Mr. Dixon, barrister, of Winnipegosis, was the sparker. The farmers’ platform and other issues were clearly explained.
The Ontario elections have given the farmers a big boost. The west is awaiting its opportunity.
Mr. Frank Sharp and bride arrived home from Winnipeg a few days ago. We wish the bride and groom every happiness and when their troubles come, may they be nothing worse than “little Sharps.”
Tom Toye grew a potato this season which weighted 4 lbs. The late Capt. Coffey brought the seed of these potatoes to Canada from the United States. There has bot been anything in the potato line to equal them for heavy yielding or excellent flavor.
An October cold dip is not common, but during the last few days the thermometer has been hovering round the zero mark.

Fork River

J. Shuchitt has opened a pool room and barber shop on Main Street.
Misses L. and K. Briggs are attending the wedding of one of their sisters at Hartney. Mr. Russell is teaching the Fork River School during their absence.
Don’t forget the returned soldiers’ banquet in the Orange Hall, Friday night, Oct. 31st. Supper will be served at 6.30. Tickets, $1.00.
Jim Parker returned from a two weeks’ trip to Saskatchewan points.
It begins to look as if winter has come to stay.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 25, 1919

Dauphin Industry Checked

(From The Winnipeg Free Press.)
Some districts are dogged by misfortune. Here we have a proposal in the House of Commons to abolish hanging just as Dauphin was coming to the fore as a good place to grow help.

Farms Sold for Big Prizes

Frick brothers, from Illinois, purchased the Hambleton and Puchalski farms this week. Both are half sections and close to town. The price paid for the former was $30,500 and the latter $35,000.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Sept. 23.
Duncan Crerar has returned home from Winnipeg after interviewing Hon. Dr. Thornton in regard to our school affair.
The Coffey and Grenon farm here was sold the other day to two American farmers for the sum of $7000.
Mrs. Sharp is leaving soon for England. Her absence will be regretted sincerely by her numerous friends.
The second lawsuit between Cooper and Russell will be heard before J.P. Tilt, of Fork River, on the 24th inst.
The Grain Growers’ of this district will hold a meeting at the house of Jas. Laidlaw on Friday, Oct. 2nd. Members are requested to be present.
Thos. Toye has purchased from Jas. Costello, of Alberta, the famous Clydesdale stallion “Gay Lad.”
Pte. John Heywad, of Virden, has taken up land in this district and has brought in his stock. He is busy securing a supply of hay for the winter.
Vacant land in this district is nearly all being taken up by returned soldiers.
Capt. Wm. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has gone to Brandon. He has been holding meetings here at different points.
The weather of the past week has been unfavorable for haying and harvesting operations.
The municipal grader working between Winnipegosis and Fork River does not seem to be making as good progress as we would like, but, before offering criticism, we will bide our time.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Women’s Institute was held in the Union church Friday evening, Sept. 10th. A goodly number of the members were present and the programme proved a very interesting one. Misses Ruth McCauley and Lottie Black gave a very pleasing duet. Miss Kathleen Dempsey delighted the audience with a recitation, Mrs. Houchin gave a splendid and well prepared paper on the subject, “Why Women Should be on the School Board.” Miss M. McMartin gave a talk, and illustrated the difficult subject, “Chilling of Childhood.” She explained in her usual intelligent manner what helps to make a beautiful life. Ten cent tea in aid of the library fund was served at the close by Misses Falconer and MacDougall, when the meeting closed with “God Save the King.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 20, 1919

5 Cases on Assize Docket

The spring assizes for the Dauphin Judicial District opened on Tuesday with Mr. Justice Metcalfe, presiding. There are five cases on the docket, which are as follows:
King vs. F.B. Race, theft of liquor from railway car.
King vs. H. Porteous, Roblin, assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
King vs. Geo. Kuzio, Winnipegosis, sedition.
King vs. John Bouazuv, Roblin, posting obscene letter.
King vs. W.B. Dempsey, Winnipegosis, forcible entry upon land.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Formal Opening of Club Rooms
The new club rooms of the G.W.V. association, in the Lilly block, were formally opened by Mayor Bowman on Tuesday, the 18th.
In opening the proceedings Mayor Bowman said it gave him great pleasure to be with them that evening. He regretted the absence of the president who was indisposed and hoped that he would soon be restored to his usual good health. He paid a high complement to the officers of the association for undertaking an enterprise of such magnitude and to the ladies of the auxiliary, who had done so much to help forward the good work. The aims of the association needed no explanation, it being well-known that it was formed for the betterment and uplift of veterans of the great war just ended. In closing his worship said that public opinion would be behind any association formed for the help and assistance of the returned men and extended the best wishes of the citizens of Dauphin and district to the association. He then formally declared the club rooms open.
A short programme followed, Miss Maggie Stark giving a humorous reading and Mrs. Heaslip a song, for which she received a well-merited recall. Major Skinner gave an address in which he touched on many subjects of great interest to the veterans and townspeople. The McMurray orchestra contributed several selections and its presence at any function is always heartily welcomed.
Dancing at once commenced, while in the assembly and recreation rooms a series of games of progressive whist were strongly contested. Mrs. Nash won the ladies’ prize, the gentleman’s prize going to Comrade Jack May.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary provided an abundance of toothsome delicacies, which were enjoyed, and for which they received hearty thanks. Dancing was kept up with spirit till an early hour, McMurray’s orchestra furnishing the magic.
There was a large gathering and the function was voted one of the best ever held in Dauphin.

Race Case Proceeding

The grand jury found a true bill in the King vs. Race, and the evidence of a number of witnesses for the crown was heard. This (Thursday) morning the case for the defence was started. The trial is attracting much interest. F.B. Simpson is the crown prosecutor and J.L. Bowman is defending Race.

Mossey River Council

The council of the municipality of Mossey River met at Fork River on the 5th inst., as a court of revision. After the numerous appeals were disposed of the minutes of the last council meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Reparation Committee, Ottawa, the solicitors re. Hartman account, H. Houchin re use of council chamber for War Veterans, H. Shannon asking for refund of taxes, the secretary of the Weed Commission, A. Gunmunderson asking to be struck off the assessment roll, J.C. Adam re taxes on lot in Winnipegosis, the rural municipality of Wallace re equalized assessment, the Manitoba Returned Soldiers’ Commission.
A petition praying for the dismissal of the collector and another asking for the building of a road on the correction line; also two applications for the position of weed inspector.
Hunt-Reid – That Simpson, McGirr & Co., solicitors for the municipality, be instructed to apply to the legislature of the province of Manitoba at the present sitting for a special act legalizing the assessment for the yea 1918, and that the council approve of the draft form of act hereto appended and authorized the solicitors to consent to such amendments of revision thereof as may be required by the law amendments committee of the legislature.
That W.B. Findlater, M.P.P. for Gilbert Plains, be requested to introduce the said special act to the legislature.
Hunt-Namaka – That the clerk write solicitors re Hartnian account with the village of Winnipegosis.
Hunt-Yakavanka – Whereas, the Union of Manitoba Municipalities, at its recent convention in Winnipeg, pledged the co-operation of all municipal councils and officials in Manitoba to the Returned Soldiers’ Manitoba Commission in its work of reestablishing in civil occupations soldiers returning from the war; and, whereas, the municipality of Ochre River has regarded I as a patriotic duty to do everything possible to assist in this commendable purpose; therefore, be it resolved, that this municipality hereby undertakes to obtain satisfactory employment for all returned soldiers who were residents of this municipality at the time of enlistment, or, in the even of it being found impossible so to do, to promptly report to the commission, giving reasons for such failure and the address where the returned unemployed soldier may be found. The clerk is hereby directed to give such assistance to the commission as is necessary for the carrying out of the purpose of this resolution. Carried.
Hunt-Reid – That Edwin W. King be appointed weed inspector for year 1919 at a salary of $125 per month, and that is duties begin on the 15th day of May, and continue up to the 15th day of October, and that the clerk in notifying him of his appointment, ask him to attend the convention of weed inspectors to be held in Winnipeg.
The council adjourned to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, March 17.
Robt. Marsland was here last week with his sawing and crushing outfit.
Frank Sharp has been on the sick list for a few days.
Mrs. Russell has received the good news that her son, Pte. Walter, is on his way home from overseas.
The chips will soon begin to fly as there is quite a number of new buildings going up in the spring.
The Grain Growers meet the first Friday in each month. At the last meeting matters of importance were dealt with. Resolutions were passed asking for a reduction in the tariff and refusing concessions to the liquor interests.
There has been considerable land cleared of scrub during the winter, and breaking will be pushed forward in the spring.
The school questions is the burning issue of the hour.

Sifton

A very crowded meeting was addressed by Mr. R. Fletcher and others in Wycliff School last Thursday, the 13th inst., on the question of “Municipal Schools.” Much interest was shown in the bylaw and it is thought that it will be supported on the 25th. Mr. Dyk spoke in Ruthenian and Paul Wood occupied the chair.
Three carloads of lumber are being unloaded by local farmers.
It is proposed to build a municipal public hall here and a bylaw will to all probability by voted on to sanction the borrowing of a sum of money on debentures for that purpose.
From all accounts Sifton is not proud of its new liquor detective or spotter. Nor is he of much practical use here as we are all on the “water wagon” just now.
It is expected that the new government trunk highway, Winnipeg to Swan River, will run through Sifton. No better route could be found.
Logs, hay, straw, fence posts, etc., are being feverishly drawn. If the snow held until June – which heaven forbid! – there would still be that last load to draw.
Our local barber recently did 43 shaves and 17 haircuts from 7 p.m. until closing time. A pretty good records – but then, he only opens on Saturday evenings.
Mr. Thos. Winshy has replaced Mr. Wheeler as manager of the Bank of Commerce. He thinks Sifton has a bright future, and with a few mines, factories and so on opened up may make quite a city. Joking aside, we have a first-class site for an up-to-date creamery. Who will build it? Not tow, only one. We have two mills.
A progressive whist drive is advertised for next Friday evening in Wycliff School. Refreshments, prizes and a good time – all for 25 cents.

Breathe gentle zephyrs o’er snow-covered state,
Blow steady south wind, cross forest and lake
Urge spring-time sun they perennial power,
Burst waiting bud and unfold bashful flower.

Lines of winged strangers flock up from the south.
Sound calls and carols from many a mouth.
Fiel is long time white turn your black into green,
Gild fruitful autumn with glorious sheen.

Winnipegosis

One of the brightest events of the social season was a tea given by Mrs. Steele on the 17th. The decorations in the spacious drawing room were appropriately Irish in honor of the Saint and the same bright spring color prevailed throughout all the rooms and even reflected in the costumes of the young ladies serving and prepared out from the sandwiches. The event took the form of a shower to assist the young ladies of the Order of the Needle with a bazaar which the are planning.
Andrew Lunn, who has been hauling stone on a contract for the Manitoba Gypsum Company, will be through next week.
Mr. Hamilton returned last week with his family and will shortly move into the Bradley house.
The Red Cross Committee are planning a box social on the 27th in Rex Hall.
A large crowd was at the station to welcome Charlie Burrell on is return from overseas. He was somewhat exhausted from the trip up but is resting nicely now and will be glad to see his friends.
S. Coffey has his moving picture show in full swing again.

Winnipegosis

The second production of the Winnipegosis Dramatic Society which took place on the 7th inst., was a very creditable one. The play chosen, “The Arrival of Kitty,” is a 3-act farce of good construction, smart action and bright dialogue, and amused the house greatly. The cast was well balanced, so well balanced that special mention of individual’s would be out of place, each one of the players, including the Pup, having earned his or her meed of praise. The production showed marks of greater experience on the part of the promoters, and improvement in this direction is not yet complete.
The gross receipts amounted to $121, the allocation of which, and plans for the future, will be discussed at an early meeting of the society.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 6, 1919

King Decorates Maj. Barker

London, March 4 – King George held an investiture Saturday at Buckingham Palace and conferred eight Victoria Crosses and many other military honors.
The hero of the occasion was Major WM. G. Barker, of the Royal Air forces, of Dauphin, who received not only the Victoria Cross, but the Distinguished Service Order with bar and the Military Cross with two bars.

Major Barker Writes Major Bowman

Anglo-Chilian Hospital,
6 Grosvenor Square.
London, W. 1, 7, 2, 19.
Dear Mr. Bowman:
I received your very kind and most welcome cablegram while in the hospital in France, but owing to the difficulty I have in writing I have delayed answering it till now.
I have been on my back for 15 weeks, but will soon be getting about now. The wound in my right thigh is doing well; but the one in my left hip is pretty bad yet. My left elbow is missing but the arm is doing well.
I am of course, anxious to get back to Canada and Dauphin again, and hope to be able to travel in about three months’ time if no complications set in.
I remain sincerely yours,
W.G. BARKER

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, March 1.
A meeting of the farmers of the district was recently held for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers’ Association. The meeting was addressed by Ernest Marcroft, who outlined the objects of the association in a very clear and concise manner. The officers elected are as follows: President Thomas Toy; vice, D. Crerar; sec.-treasurer, Frank Sharp. Six directors were appointed with James Laidlaw as chairman.
A social was held on the 21st alt. in connection with the association and was a very successful affair.
The meetings of the branch will be held on the first Friday in each month. All farmers who are interested in the Grain Growers movement are invited to attend the meetings. The ladies are also invited to attend.
Adelard Dumas, of North Dakota, arrived here last week and is staying with Mr. Laidlaw for a short time. His family and stock will arrive later on.
Walter Cooper is still keeping up his reputation as a worker. He has cleared up most of his farm this winter and shows remarkable vitality for a man of 72 yeas of age.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 23, 1919

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Jan. 20th.
William Little was a visitor at the home of Tom Toye. Seems like old times to see Bill around again.
Mr. Lonn has bought the Seiffert farm on the Mossey. He has also bought section 11, the Grenon farm, and has bought his seed from the Bicton Heath seed farm for the coming season.
James Playford is going to turn the land upside down on the Hudson Bay holding. This land has been waiting for just such treatment for a long time.
James Laidlaw is busy hauling logs on to his homestead to build. Jim is a hustler and we would like to see a few more of his kind come to this district.
What about the corduroy leading to the Bicton Heath School? Is has not yet been completed. Does this mean that the children living on the east of this swamp are going to have another summer holiday? It is about time that the government stepped in and saw the work done.
Co-operative Grain Growers’ meeting will be held at the Bicton Heath schoolhouse on Wednesday, January 29th, at 7. Every farmer should be present.
Mr. Dumas, from North Dakota, has bought John McAuley’s farm in this district, and will be here in the early spring.
George Lyons was through this district this week. George is a good fellow, but is not always welcome in his capacity as tax collector.
Frank Sharp will leave shortly for Winnipeg. Frank says that there will be no mistake this time.

Fork River

Miss Katie Robertson has left on a visit to Neepawa.
Reeve Venables and Coun. Hunt are attending the convention of the Union of Municipalities at Winnipeg this week. Mrs. Venables accompanied Mr. Venables to the city.
Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, was a recent visitor to our town.
F.F. Hafenbrak, M. Cooper and H. Hunter went to Dauphin to attend the degree meeting of Coronation lodge, L.O.L.
Mrs. D. McEachren and son Donnie are visiting in Winnipeg.
Ed. Humphreys has returned to town. He is still smiling.
Miss Nellie Briggs, of Hartney, is a visitor at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs.
Mr. D. McLean and Miss Birdie McLean have gone to Regina. Birdie intends to spend the rest of the winter with her aunt, Mrs. Vance.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 9, 1919

Major Barker’s Great Record

Major W.G. Barker, Canada’s third air V.C. now holds the record for fighting decorations, according to the Canadian Daily Record. He holds, beside the V.C., the D.S.O., with two bars; the D.F.C.; the M.C., with two bars; the Croix de Guerre, and the Italian Cross of Honor. His record for enemy planes destroyed is 50.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Jan 4.
W.C. Cooper’s barley averaged 60 bushels to the acre. At present prices this proved a paying crop.
Mr. Waddell’s youngest son died from influenza. He has the sympathy of the neighborhood in his great loss.
Thos. Toye is just recovering from an attack of the Flu. Even King Flue had to retire from the ring when he tackled an old stager like Tom.
Willie Bennett, who has been very sick, is recovering.
Robt. Marshland will soon be on his rounds with his sawing and crushing outfit. Bob is back from the war, but before his return he helped knockout Kaiser Bill.
F. Sharp has left for Winnipeg. It is not expected he will return a one.
A Grain Growers association will be organized in this district shortly.
Tom Toye still swears by his muskrat story and maintains the weather so far has been correctly indicated by the little water rat.
A petition is being circulated praying that the council to pass a by-law permitting stock to run at large at nights.
I see that ex-Reeve Lacey wants to Kaiser shot. Fred is far being alone in his desire.

Winnipegosis

Orville McGinnis, whose leg was crushed by a block of ice falling upon it, and who had to have it amputated above the knee, is doing well.
John Dempsey was charged before Police Magistrate Whale with breaking open a fish shed belonging to Ben Hechter. The magistrate referred the case to Dauphin where the accused was committed to take his trial at the next assizes. In the meantime Dempsey is out on bail.
In spite of the loss of a number of nets through floating ice at the beginning of the season, and accidents in the nature of teams falling through the ice, the fishermen are making a large catch of fish.
There is a movement on foot in this vicinity to have a grain elevator established at Winnipegosis in the near future. The farmers have been hauling their grain to Fork River, but this proves too expensive and reduces the profits.
The flu epidemic has struck Winnipegosis. Four families have been down with it recently but are picking up again. There have been no deaths as yet.