Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 5 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 5 – Fork River

Miss M.B. Nixon left for Winnipeg, for a weeks visit among friends.
Miss Muriel Alterton, of Mossey River, and Miss Grant, of Pine View Schools attended the convention at Dauphin.
Mrs. Geo. Shannon and Mrs. Kennedy returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Wm. King expressed to E. Walker, of Dauphin, a trio of Mammoth Bronze turkeys for breeding purposes.
Fred Cooper, W. Williams and T. Shannon’s threshing outfits are busy these days.
D.F. Wilson, F.B. Lacey and J. Seiffert, members of the council, returned from a week’s trip to the Municipal Convention at Winnipeg.
Miss Lizze Clark returned to Dauphin after spending a few days at her home.
Mr. Monington, of Neepawa, is staying with J. Robinson for the hunting season.
Duncan Kennedy has received two shipments of pure bred Plymouth Rocks from Portage la Prairie last week and is now in the market with pure bred roosters.
Joe Lockhart was elected trustee for Mossey River School for the coming term in place of Wm. King, who retires this term.
Looking over the Herald we notice the annual statement of receipts and expenditures for ten months of the municipality of Mossey River. Just the same old two by four statement. Why not publish in book form in detail like Dauphin. Our council seems to be behind the times in this respect. Year after year we are asking for this to see where our money is expended and this year we cannot see where any of it has been expended on the roads.

1912 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

The annual school meeting was held in the school house on Monday, a large number of ratepayers being present. Messrs. Grenon, Whale and Thomas were elected as trustees for the coming year and Mr. Shear continues as sec.-treasurer. Mr. Hulme’s engagement is for the year. The master of a new school to be erected was discussed. The lots have already been secured, as we hope it will not be long till they are build on.
Rev. H.H. Scrase remained in town from Sunday’s service till Tuesday.
Harry Grenon is preparing to open a business in the late Hudson’s Bay post.
The Misses Paddock had a party last night to entertain Miss Hazel Coffey who has been visiting the Misses Whale while Mr. and Mrs. Whale made a trip to Dauphin.
We are pleased to see certain patients are able to be out again.
The young people’s enjoyment on the lake will be curtailed since the snow has come.
A few of the men from the fishing camps took advantage of the recent glistening ice to make a trip back to town, an enviable one “on their steely feet so bright.”
Mrs. Bradley has enjoyed a most delightful visit from her sister, Mrs. Armstrong. Miss Charlotte accompanies her aunt back to Portage.
Mr. and Mrs. Hippesley, of South Bay, have returned from a trip to Dauphin. Regret is felt at the probability of their moving West to B.C.
A visit to Mrs. Johnston’s home would assure anyone of the benefit on illness to be gained by sojourning there.
Miss Hayes reports an interesting convention held in Dauphin.
Hunters are arriving in town in pursuit of the fleet footed game of the woods.

1918 Dec 5 – Blew Out His Brains

Telesphore Gagnon, who resided with his two sons at Valpoy, 15 miles northeast of Ste. Rose, committed suicide last week by blowing out his brains with a shotgun. Gagnon lost his wife a year ago, and also suffered lose to his property by fire. These matters preyed on him until his mind became unbalanced and led him to commit the rash act. He was 60 years of age.

1918 Dec 5 – Had Arm Amputated

Thos. Switzer, who resides in the Sandringham district, had the misfortune to accidentally discharge his rife, the bullet entering his left arm. He was brought to the hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the arm below the elbow.

1918 Dec 5 – Major Barker Critically Ill

A cablegram from France to Mr. G. Barker at the end of the week states that the condition of his son William is critical.

1918 Dec 5 – Military Funeral

Pte. Wilbur Olsob, of the 226th Batt., who died of influenza, was accorded a military funeral, he arrangements being in the hands of the G.W.V.A. The funeral cortege assembled at 2.30 p.m. at Farrell’s undertaking parlours on Friday afternoon, where a service was conducted by Rev. J.A. Haw, who also officiated at the graveside. About 50 members of the association, under command of Capt. Scrase, attended. Lieut. Clark and Sergt. Chambers were in charge of he firing party.

1918 Dec 5 – Rural Nominations

MOSSEY RIVER
Reeve – T.B. Venables, F.B. Lacey, J.D. Robertson
Ward 1 – J. Yakavanka
Ward 3 – E.A. Marcroft
Ward 5 – J. Namaka

1918 Dec 5 – Victoria Cross for Barker

Major Wm. G. Barker has been awarded the highest honour possible for distinguished service at the front, the Victoria Cross.
Other Dauphin boys who have been decorated, include:
Military Cross – Lawrence Shand
Military Medals – Stuart R. Widmeyer (deceased), G.A. Jackson, Geo. F. King, N. Chard, A. Douglas and J. Fletcher

1918 Dec 5 – Fork River

Mrs. M. Angus has returned to Winnipeg after spending two weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Craighill.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Brewer are patients in the hospital at Dauphin.
W. King, I.H.C. agent, has just finished a warehouse in which to store implements.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Northam have taken up their residence in the parsonage for the winter.
H. Swartwood, of Dauphin, was a recent visitor in our midst.
Sid Frost has left for Rathwell. Before leaving Wm. King, on behalf of Sid’s many friends here, presented him with a valuable violin and case in recognition of his services in a musical way.
Wm. Williams was a Dauphin visitor on Tuesday.
F.B. Lacey, T.B. Venables and J.D. Robertson are the nominees for the reeveship.
The Fork River, Mossey River and Pine View Schools are still closed.
Several of the hunters have returned. Which one shot the steer?

Pte. N. MacCauley, of Winnipegosis, was among the returned soldiers from overseas this week.

1918 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

A special peace thanksgiving service was held in the Union Church on Dec. 1st. The church was well decorated with flags of the Allies, and was packed to overflowing. The hymns were of a joyful, patriotic and military character, and were heartily sung. The Rev. A.E. Hook conducted the service and took on his subject, “Trusting in God.” He gave a vivid description of the terrible struggle which had lasted over four years, and spoke of the murmurings which had sometimes arising during the war. People had doubted if there was a God and if there was he was not a righteous God. The termination of the war, however, had vindicated God as a righteous God. He said that we had many things to be thankful for because of the war. He mentioned principally that drink and practically been abolished and that nations had been awakened into prayer in a manner they had never done before.
The ban, which had closed down all public gatherings during he epidemic of influenza, was lifted last week and there are no cases in town, though there are a few in the rural districts.
The first load of fish from the lake arrived in town on Tuesday. The fishing has been delayed somewhat on account of the mild weather, but the prospects of a large catch are good.
D. Roy Grenon skated into town today from Waterhen, a distance of over 25 miles.
Winnipegosis reports over two crowns to its credit in the Victory Loan Drive.
Two carloads of wheat were shipped out of town this week.
The fishermen have started to put up ice for summer use.
The collectors report that subscriptions to the Mercantile Sailors’ Fund are coming in well.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 12 – 1912

1912 Sep 12 – Arm Broken in Runaway

A spirited team belonging to Geo. Lampard ran away on Wednesday afternoon. The driver, Thos. McKay, was thrown out of the rig and had his left arm broken.

1912 Sep 12 – Infantry for Dauphin

A movement is on foot in town to organize a military regiment. A preliminary meeting was held in Harvey & Bowman’s office on Monday evening, when Dr. Walker was appointed chairman and L. Shand secretary. It is proposed to have four companies if possible. A public meeting will be held shortly at which Col. Steele will be the speaker and afterwards officers selected.

1912 Sep 12 – Ethelbert

The awful thunderstorm, and the great rain of Wednesday has left things in very bad shape here, and unless we have a spell of fine weather the prospects are none too good.
K. McLean is still improving and is able to be up and about, but he is still very weak and thin.
All the material and engine for the elevator are on the ground, but as yet no signs of the builders. They will have to get a hustle on.
There were two cases before R. Skaife on Saturday. Mrs. J. Rewniak asked that her husband, J. Rewniak, be bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months. The evidence went to show that John had been persistently ill-treating her ever since their marriage over two years ago, and that he had very recently threatened to shoot her father, an old man who is close on seventy, with the handle of a hay fork twice on the arm, making it black because he tried to protect her. He was bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months or forfeit $100.
The next case was a mixed up affair. Marko Dubyk sold a pig to N. Tkatchzuk, for five dollars, the pig to be delivered as soon as possible. Marko brought the pig to town, met some friends; they went and had drinks together, and entrusted the pig to Olexa Stassuk, to take to Tkatchzuk, but instead he took it home. Then he have it to S. Basaraba, who put it in his stye, and kept it for some weeks. Ultimely Olexa asked $3 for Tkatchzuk, and he should have his pig. This Tkatchzuk refused to give, but instead he wanted the pig, and $5.50 as a sort of fine for them keeping the pig. The case was decided as follows: Basaraba was ordered to take the pig to Tkatchzuk, and without any compensation for the feed of the pig. O. Stassuk had to pay the costs of the court, as his share of the fun, and Tkatchzuk as told that it was only the magistrate who had the privilege of extracting penalties.
Later Rewniak wanted the magistrate to order his wife to go back to him, but he was advised to treat her kindly in future, and then perhaps she might go back. But Maru says no, never.
The station has got the name “Ethelbert” printed in bold letters at both ends of the building, so that all who run can read.

1912 Sep 12 – Fork River

Sydney Howlett, of E. Million, spent a few days here and took a trip to Winnipegosis on business.
Garent Lacey has returned home after a few months vacation south looking for a high spot.
“Bishop” McCartney took a trip to Winnipegosis hunting his carriage. “Bejiggered if they get it again,” says the Bishop.
Nat Little has returned from a week’s visit to the States.
Our Mowat friend seems surpassed to see a gasoline boat about the size of a coffee pot, go from Winnipegosis to Lake Dauphin and return, and pats himself on the back, as its the dredge that did the trick. Why good sized boats loaded with freight passed up and down the Mossey, fifteen and twenty years ago.
Mrs. Wm. King who has been visiting at Vancouver and California. She says the Fork looks more like home.
D. Kennedy has purchased another “gee gee” for his delivery wagon. Just see the dust fly.
Duck shooting is the order of the day. It’s hard on the feathers.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from a visit to Dauphin and Sifton.
Thomas Shannon has been treating fall wheat for the farmers for seed and several have commenced sowing it.
We are informed some one is looking for a schooner to find the levels after the storm and he is not alone. There’s schooners and schooners.
Lost or strayed, the minutes of three or four council meetings.
Teacher, “What is it Tommy.” “Dad says we will get them all right if we had an assistant. We must not expect too much after such an electric storm. It’s so depressing.”
John Clements and family of Dauphin, arrived to take off his crop in the Chase farm.
Nat Little has put on a new wagon for delivering cream at the station.
The planer has started up again, and Billy Williams is making the shavings fly.

1912 Sep 12 – Sifton

Stephen Kosy’s stable was struck by lightening last Thursday. There were in the stable, a team of horses, harness and fifty hens. Fortunately the horse broke the board and ran out but the harness and hens were burned. Stephen had his stable insured.
On the same date Hnat Skarnpa’s stable was burned, lightening being the cause.
The harvest has been checked for a few days by bad weather.
Four of our well-known citizens have formed a company and will build a big store. Our Fedor of Blue Store does not like to see any more stores in own. He would rather buy out Pinkas and have the while business to himself.
The rumour is abroad that in a short time some of the Ruthenians intend to organize a co-operative store. Building is to begin next week.
Thos. Ramsay is busy building a new postoffice and boarding house.
Paul Wood has bought three lots in block one from Nicola Haschak.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 6 – 1914

1914 Aug 6 – C.N.R. Excursion to Winnipegosis

The 2nd annual picnic of the Dauphin employees of the Canadian Northern Railway will be held on Tuesday, August 18th, at Winnipegosis. An excellent programme of events has been arranged, consisting of foot races, boat races, swimming races, lake trips, dancing, tug-of-war, and a baseball match, mechanical dept. vs. traffic dept. Band in attendance. Train will leave Dauphin at 8:30 a.m. and returning will leave Winnipegosis at 8 p.m.

1914 Aug 6 – Dauphin Officers 32nd Horse

The 32nd Manitoba Horse will undoubtedly be pressed into service. “C” men. The following are the officers:
Major G.C.J. Walker.
Captain. H.K. Newcombe.
Lieutenants P. Wilson, E. Manby, L. Shand, E.P. Milward.
Sergeant-Major Fletcher; Sergts. T. Coghian, G. Fraser, Alguire.

1914 Aug 6 – From the Seat of War

London, Aug. 6.
The war situation is extremely critical at present. All Europe is little better than a vast powder magazine.
The British fleet is concentrated in the North Sea and it is quite probable that important engagements have already taken place. All cables are being used almost exclusively for war purposes.
The cutting of the German telegraph and telephone connections and the severance of the German trans-Atlantic cable virtually cut Germany from communication with other countries. Reports from France, Belgium, Holland and Russia showed that Germany’s armies were steadily moving east and west, and that her advance posts were in contact with the opposing Russian and French armies.

1914 Aug 6 – Glen Campbell to Raise Scout Troop

The Militia department at Ottawa has received an offer from Glen Campbell offering to raise and command a troop of scouts.
Several Dauphin men have been offered positions in the troop and some, it is understood, will accept.

1914 Aug 6 – Fork River

Gerald Stuart, of Winnipeg, is spending his holidays with his aunt, Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, and is putting in a good time at the lake.
Mr. Earie, engineer, and his assistant are putting in an apparatus for taking the levels of the Mossey River at Wilson’s.
E. Williams, lay reader, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. J. Reid of North Lake, and has a very enjoyable time.
J.R. Roblin, Government engineer, paid Reeve King a visit in connection with the roadwork being doe in the municipality.
Several ratepayers turned out to the annual school meeting on Saturday night. No “biz” was done as the books were not audited. It’s strange how the heat affects even our school officers.
Mrs. King had tomatoes ripe in the last week of July in her garden and also corn.
A good rain is needed to cook things off.
W.W. Cooper and family, who have been absent from this burgh over a year, returned and are staying with their people, Walter Cooper, Sr., on the Mossey River.
We hear F.B. Lacey is to be the councillor for ward 6, as unfortunately Sam Reid’s papers did not arrive till twenty minutes past two, and the returning officer refused to take them then and stated it was law. Yes, that is the law. What a difference; a week ago a farmer wanted redress for stock destroying his crop and every obstacle was put in the way to prevent him securing justice.
Pat says give a calf rope enough and it will hang itself in time. True, and if public opinion is anything to bank on there will be no one to cut the calf down.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey has returned from Winnipeg and reports a present holiday.
We notice in the Winnipegosis news that the Fork River dredge has been sent to Pine Creek, while the Winnipegosis lays rotting on the river. More will be heard of this unfair deal to Fork River later on.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 18 – 1914

1914 Jun 18 – Off for Camp Sunday

The 32nd Manitoba Horse leave on Sunday night for camp at Sewell. The Dauphin troop will go ?? strong this year. There are expected to be 2000 men all told at the camp. Moving pictures will be one of the sources of entertainment.
The officers of the Dauphin troop are as follows:
Major G.C.J. Walker
Captain H.K. Newcombe
Lieutenants E. Manby, M.F. Wilson, L. Shand, E.P. Millward
Regiment S.M., A.C. Goodall
Squadron S.M., Fistches
Sergeants T. Coghlan, G. Fraser, T.D. Massy, Alguire
Corporals W. Cede, H. Wade, Alguire, Chard
The ??? party consisting of C.N.S. Wade, Frank ???, cook, and Private W. ??? have on Thursday night for the camp.

1914 Jun 18 – Ethelbert

Court of revision will be held here Wednesday, 17th inst., with Judge Ryan presiding.
The old McLean flourmill is being overhauled and rebuilt. Another story will be added. The Kennedy Mercantile Co. now own the mill.
The school accommodation is now over taxed, the outcome of this will be that a new building will have to be erected, or an addition built. How would it do to have a consolidated school, and build an up-to-date building. Ethelbert is going to grow, let us anticipate the future.
Principal White is in Dauphin this week with five scholars writing on entrance, grade IX and grade X. The following are the pupils: Entrance, Jessie McMillian and Ben Brachman; grade 9, Maggie Wager and Willie Masticub; grade 10, Wsldmar Masticub.
The crops are looking well, but rain is now needed.
F.K. Slipets, our municipal clerk, is building a new house.
On Thursday night last there was a baseball match between the married and single men. The benedicts won by a nice margin. Ethelbert has some good ball material and will be heard of during the summer when they get more practice.
A petition is in circulation with the object of having the C.N.R. move their station at this point. The location of the building is such that it makes it very inconvenient for passengers and the public to reach it, having to cross the sliding to reach it. It is expected that the company will comply with this reasonable request.
N.A. Hryhorenznk, general agent for the International Harvester Co., went to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Jun 18 – Fork River

Frank Hafenbrak spent a few days in Dauphin last week. While away he purchased a team of mares with foals at foot.
D. Kennedy was a visitor to Dauphin last week.
Wm. Murray, of Dauphin, provincial auditor, is staying with Clerk Wilson while auditing the municipal books.
W. King has returned from a trip to Winnipeg on municipal affairs. He reports the crops are looking well along the line.
Nat Little was unfortunate in losing one of his valuable brood mares last week.
A. McDonald is busy these days on the road from the A.T. Co. Ltd.
Cap. Coffey, of Dauphin, paid this burgh a visit in his automobile last week.
The boys got busy last week and organized a football club. The first game of the season was played on Saturday night between Mowat and Fork River, which ended in a draw.
John Angus, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend here and is of the opinion this is the most restful place he has stuck in his travels. There are several others believe so, too.
Mr. Atkinson, of Prince Albert, has rented the Chase farm and is busy seeding it with barley.
Gen. Neil, of Rainy River, has returned to Mowat experimental duck farm for the summer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 23 – 1913

1913 Jan 23 – Triplets Expired

Mr. and Mrs. Watson Shand were blessed with the birth of triplet daughters last Saturday. The event was regarded as a most important one and strong hopes were held out that they would all live, but fate decreed otherwise and death claimed the babies.

1913 Jan 23 – Will Oppose Military Move

The move to organize a regiment of the militia here will be opposed by those who do not favor it at the meeting tonight. Among those who are expected to speak against it are Messrs. L. Atkin and J. Franssen.

1913 Jan 23 – Sifton

Cold weather and late trains, which keep us waiting for the mails, just about chronicle our daily experiences of late.
Peter Ogryzlo, of the Dominion Lands office, was a visitor here over Sunday. He will shortly remove with his family to Dauphin.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin last week.
Bishop Budka held services here on Sunday last. The attendance was not large as might have been expected owing to the very cold weather.
The concert in the church which was to have been held on Sunday, was put off owing to the visit of Bishop Budka.
Very little wood is coming of late owing to the cold weather.

1913 Jan 23 – Winnipegosis

What’s new? “Well, to tell the truth, there’s nothing.” The weather is cold and la grippe is prevalent, but our snug little town is no worse than elsewhere, which is something to be thankful for. Just for a relief we will dash off a few lines of verse.

Now, should a place become morbid like this;
Though gossip and tale-bearing we greatly miss.
The rocks that abound, yet none on this side;
Suggest native metals well known far and wide.
When they’re unearthed may we properly use
To build up, and adorn the temple of muse,
Besides to know what is good for the mumps
Is truly enough to put one in the dumps
We’ll brush us all up, with pure atmosphere
That should enhance the dullest wit here.