Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 28 – 1915

1915 Oct 28 – Almost Fatal Shot

Peter Nykolak, a young Ruthenian living at Sifton, had a love affair which he took to heart very much. The young lady of his affections proved fickle and Peter sought consolation by the suicide route on Saturday morning last. He used a large revolver in trying to commit the act, the bullet entering the lower part of his chin and came out near the bridge of his nose. The blood flowed freely from the wound and it looked for a time like the final act in Peter’s career. When Dr. Harrington arrived he found the wound a dangerous one, but not necessarily fatal.
The injured man was brought to the hospital here and is now on a fair way towards recover.

1915 Oct 28 – Fined at Winnipegosis

The Winnipegosis Fox Ranch Co., was fined $35 and costs on Tuesday by Mr. P.M. Whale. The company was charged with buying moose meat for their foxes on the ranch.
Sam Sanderson, a halfbreed was fined $10.00 for selling moose meat. He was also found guilty of having moose meat in his possession. For this charge he was left off on suspended sentence. Game guardian Joyce prosecuted.

1915 Oct 28 – Recruiting to Start at Once

Dauphin has been created by the Militia Dept. headquarters for a detachment area and provincial battalion. Recruiting will start at once with Major Walker as recruiting officer.

1915 Oct 28 – Fork River

Mrs. William Allan, of Grandview, is visiting at her daughter’s, Mrs. T. Dewsberry.
Section Foreman Dewberry has quite a broad smile these days. It’s all owing to the “wee new section foreman.” Nurse Tilt says he’s a bouncer.
Mr. Beatty, traveller for the Mooney Confectionery Co., of Winnipeg, was busy here on Monday taking orders.
The err has commenced in earnest that no more are to be had for grain. The stook threshing is finished and the stacks are fast disappearing. The yield is fair, but prices are low and the grade is poor owning to early frost.
Nat Little is fitting around in his auto. It is running all the better for having a prolonged rest.
Mr. Rowe, of Arden, is busy here buying up a shipment of cattle for his farm.
We had our first fall of snow on Monday, the 25th, which is a gentle reminder to prepare for winter.
Felix Marantz, merchant of Sifton, arrived here this week in his auto and spent a short time with Mr. Shuchett on business.
Mr. and Mrs. Sid Gower arrived home from their honeymoon on Saturday, which was spent at Dauphin. We whish them long life and happiness.
Mr. Woods, post office inspector of Winnipeg, spent sometime here last week going into post office affairs. He found everything O.K.
Mr. Frank Hechter, councilor for ward 4, was a visitor here on business last week. Frank generally wears a smile; he finds it costs no more than a grouch.
Private Alex. Reader, of the 45th battalion, was here renewing acquaintances last week. He has returned to Sewell.
Jack Chipley and family are off on a visit to friends at Metton for a week.

1915 Oct 28 – Sifton

Presentation to Mr. Wm. Walters on his departure from Sifton to join “The Colours,” Oct. 19th, 1915, Canadian Expeditionary Force – Allies vs. Germany, etc.
Mr. Walters – On behalf of a few friends of Sifton, Dublin Bay and the district you have served so faithfully in the past, we have the pleasure in presenting you with this wrist watch as a little token of our esteem and regard for your good fellowship, ready courtesy and obliging manner. We trust, as its hands mark the fleeing hours, the time will bring yourself nearer to a safe and happy return to take up your duties once amongst us.
The boy scouts presented themselves at the early morning train as a guard of honour to wave their last farewell to Mr. Walters, who cordially shook hands with each scout, hoping he would soon come back to them again.
A large number of the friends of Mr. Walters met for a farewell supper at Mr. Ashmore’s to make him a presentation address. Thirty-two sat down to supper and the evening was spent in a convivial manner, whiling away the house with laughter and song to the strains of music some of the best local talent being present.
Football – The Boy Scouts played their return match on Father Sabourin’s grounds with the boys of his school. The whole of he Wycliffe School children were present to see the match. There were also many other spectators who vociferously harangued the scouts. Although the Catholic School team was much heavier than the Scouts, their grounds very cramped, and a high wind blowing, the game resulted in a draw. It was a tough game and the Catholic boys pressed hard for a score towards the finish, but the gallant little fellows responded to the rush and held their own with courage and determination seldom found in boys of tender years.
Trafalgar Day – The Sifton scouts were very busy on Trafalgar Day, responding to the British Appeal through H.R.H., the Duke of Connaught, chief scout of Canada, in collecting for the Red Cross Fund. By their untiring efforts it is expected to forward over $50 from Sifton and district. The scouts would be glad to take this opportunity of thanking most cordially their many patrons for their kindness to them; also Mr. Paul Wood, who lent his team to take the troop out east.
The provincial assistant and organizer, Mr. A.T. Macintosh, will visit the Sifton scouts this week.
Miss Reid and Mrs. (Rev.) Scott, [1 line missing] Presbyterian Mission House here, paid a visit to ??? ??? ??? on the labours to renew acquaintances with their old pupils. They were pleased to visit the Wycliffe Schools, where they were shown round and entertained by pleasing songs from the school children.

1915 Oct 28 – Winnipegosis

The grand masquerade ball in the Rex Hall last Friday was a roaring success, and the costumes were a credit to our northern town. The hall was filled to its utmost capacity and the proceeds, after paying all expenses, amounted to $17.25, which includes a donation of $3.00 from Mr. Sid. Coffey, and goes to the Patriotic Fund. Much credit is due the management for the arrangement, and for such a happy evening. The prize winners were: lady’s best representative costume, 1st., “Britannia,” Miss McMartin; gentlemen’s best representative costume, 1st, “Cavalier,” J.P. Grenon; lady’s second prize, “French Doll,” Mrs. McInnes; gentlemen’s second prize, “Bullfighter,” Mr. Adams, Sifton; third prize, “Turk,” W. Morton; gentlemen’s first prize, comic, “Uncle Sam,” D. Kennedy; lady’s first prize, comic, “Folly,” Miss Bertha Magnasson; gentlemen’s second prize, comic, “Clown,” Harry Grenon; lady’s second prize, comic, “Coaster woman,” Miss C. Bradley. The judges were Miss E. MacArthur, Mrs. Dennett and Dr. Medd, and much praise is due these ladies and the doctor for the able manner in which the judging was done. Miss MacArthur presented the prizes.
W. Morton left on Monday’s train for a two weeks’ vacation to Winnipeg and eastern points.
Mr. F. Partridge is in charge of the station during Mr. Morton’s absence.
Mr. Joyce, game guardian, is again with us on business.
Fred Clarke, the fur traveller, is spending a few days in town and we are always glad to see his merry smile.
D.G. Macaulay left on Monday for Chicago and eastern cities on business.
Mr. Andrews and friends left on Sunday [1 line missing].
We understand quite a few more recruits have enlisted from here and will be leaving us on Wednesday. This town has done well for he size of it. We are proud of our boys.
Mrs. Burrell (grandma) left us on Monday for her old home in Collingwood, Ont., for an extended visit and she will be greatly missed by us all. Mrs. Comf. Burrell accompanied her to Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 7 – 1915

1915 Oct 7 – Fork River

Mr. Lorne Tilt has returned from the States and is visiting with his parents on the old homestead.
Mr. Ben Warshosky, horse and cattle buyer, left last week for Winnipeg with 2 carloads of fat cattle.
Fred Puluk, merchant of Oak Brae, was in town for a consignment of goods shipped here for his store.
Private F.J. Storrar is home from Sewell camp for a few days visiting his friends and looks quite spruce in his khaki.
Last winter the government officials advised the farmers to put in all the wheat they could and in many instances land was sown that should have been summer fallowed. Now the bad weather stops threshing and no plowing can be done. The government now comes out with the warning “Don’t thresh too soon.” Advice is cheap. It’s cheap money the farmer wants to be able to borrow. Interest at 8 to 12 percent, which is put up to us by the manufacturer when our crops are a failure by frost or otherwise are no good.
Mr. Shuchell, general merchant, is spending a few days at the Peg rustling bargains for his customers hereabouts.
Mr. John Chipley has returned from Hamiota, having spent a month harvesting.
Several men, who went out to harvest, are returning on account of the bad weather. Work is at a standstill lately.
Mr. Geo. Lyons, municipal tax collector, is busy these days. The job seems to agree with him.
W. King, J.P., received word that his appointment has been rescinded. “Billy” remarked with a smile, “that it knocked Doe Bryant’s yarn into a cocked hat when he (the doc) remarked that the Grits were always willing to wack up with a good Conversation.”
[1 line missing] Winnipegosis, was a visitor here inspecting the safe with the intention of moving it to Winnipegosis for the use in the clerk office.
Mr. A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned from a business trip to Dauphin at the week-end.

1915 Oct 7 – Sifton

Mr. Walters, of the Standard Lumber Co., joins the colours.
It was with regret that the young people of Sifton heard of the departure of Mr. Walters to join the colours. Mr. Walters has always identified himself with the best interests of the young people of the town, and has acted as scout master of the 1st Sifton patrol of Boy Scouts, which he was largely instrumental in forming. The patrol, in recognition of his kind work among them, met at his office in full dress uniform and presented him with a gold mounted cigarette holder. Mr. Bousfield, school principal, made the presentation and after a brief resume of the good work and happy reminiscences with the patrol, congratulated Mr. Walters and assured him of the party good [1 line missing] Sifton for his safe return among the heroes of a well-won fight.

1915 Oct 7 – Winnipegosis

The fishermen all arrived from their camps per the S.S. Manitou on Saturday morning, as the fall fishing is over. They will never get in shape for going up the lake for the winter.
We are glad to report Miss Pearl Paddock making rapid progress to recover.
Private Joe Johnston, Sid. King, Wm. Wright and Bert Arrowsmith are spending their leave of absence at their homes here. They are looking well and in uniform are a credit to the army.
Thomas Toye had a narrow escape from a serious accident Wednesday, when his horse took fright and bolted. A bunch of dogs got fighting under the horse and rig. These dogs want to be tied up before some one gets seriously hurt.
The council passed an early closing by-law at their last meeting; which comes into force on Oct. 8th.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. Whale was well attended and the proceeds amounted to $7.00.
Geo. Adams, of Waterhen, spent Sunday in town.
Mr. Derachers, of Pine Creek, is spending a few days in town.
A ten-cent tea will be held at the home of Mrs. White on Wednesday, Oct. 6th, in aid of a local family.
Frank Hechter spent a few days in Winnipeg on business last week, returning Monday.
We are getting three trains a week steady new and what is sill better news three mails also.
Mr. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is spending a few days in town at the home of her mother, Mrs. Theo. Johnston.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 23 – 1915

1915 Sep 23 – Recruits for Sewell

The following recruits have enlisted in the 45th Batt. from Dauphin since Aug. 15th, and are now in training at Sewell camp: Bird McKinstry, A. Schoole, Cunningham, J. Brown, F. Storrar, W.H. Johnston, J. Cahill, J. Bartrup, J. Angus, W. Young, A.L. Cocking, W. Rindholm, E. Smith, B.F. Sparks, G. Spoueer, W. Mealing, and J. Hutson.
Sergt. Weeks will be in Dauphin and district until Oct. 15th and expects to get more recruits as the battalion is listed for England at an early date.

1915 Sep 23 – Winnipegosis

There was a most enjoyable dance in the Rex Hall on Thursday evening last in honour of Mr. Barbour and Mr. Burby who are joining the colours to do their bit for their country.
Sam McLean held a bailiff sale of furniture on Saturday, which was well attended and he had no trouble getting bidders, especially on the organ.
Frank and Ben Hechter attended the Jewish services in Dauphin Friday and Saturday.
The Ladies’ baseball team had a practice game on Wednesday when the Browns beat the Blues by 16 runs. Miss Geekie had the misfortune to get hit in the eye by the ball.
D.F. Wilson, of Fork River, passed through here on Friday for South Bay with notices of election for councillor [1 line missing] the army lately.
Quite a number are up north after the ducks. Mr. McInnes took a party across the lake in his gasoline launch Thursday.
Private Walter Munro arrived from Brandon on Saturday to spend a few days leave here with his friends. He reports the boys all well.
Mr. Rutlege, of the Pas, is spending a few days in town.
W.B. Sifton arrived from the north with is gang, having completed his lumber cut.
There was a children’s hour held in the Church of England on Friday evening, which was a great success thanks to Mrs. Bradley.
Constable Clarkson is busy these days rounding up dogs without tags, parties with dogs at large without tags had better keep their eye on the pound.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 2 – 1915

1915 Sep 2 – More Recruits for Sewell

Recuriting-Sergant Weeks has enlisted 12 more men during the week. Among the new men are A. Schoole and J.P. Cunningham, Ochre River; F.J. Storrar and Wm. Johnston, Fork River; John Cahill, East Bay, and James Brown, Dauphin. Besides these several Ontario men have also enlisted. These men left for Sewell this (Thursday) morning.

1915 Sep 2 – Fork River

The bridge gang of the C.N.R. are here putting our new station house that arrived on a flat car the other day in the place of the old one which is to be transferred to Fishing River siding. There is something remarkable about the size of our new station house which has fooled several already. Mike had several hen coops made out of packing cases and one went astray and Pat told him he might find it at the siding. On Mike’s arrival there he came to the conclusion and the only difference between the station and his stray hen coop was there had been some paintspot on the state some time ago. He suggested [1 line missing] track train day to keep the trains from passing the station without knowing it.
Another carload of horses arrived from Mr. Levins, of Winnipeg, for Mr. Masshosky, horse dealer.
“Say, Mike, is it true that company men pay so much a month for doctor?” “I believe so Pst. It is done from a humane point of view as by the time three or found pounds of crab apples have been sampled out of a case besides plums, peaches and oranges the doctor has to be called in. They are sick and so is the merchant who pays freight and express and loses his profits.”
Mr. Shouldice, of Valley River, is a visitor here for a few days on business.
Messrs. Glendenning and Hunter have received a New Daisy Separator, which is larger, and more up-to-date than the old one. It will be ready for business as soon as grain is ready to thresh.
Dr. Evans, of Brandon, was the guest of Mr. Nat Little for a short stead.
Nurse Tilt has returned and is spending a few weeks at the homestead.
Everything has been pretty dead around this burg since election, but things brightened up for a short time on Wednesday. One of the company’s team of horses [1 line missing] while standing in front of the express office and hiked for the bush, taking up trees by the roots for some distance. The whole town rushed out to gather fragments. Strange to say the ??? ??? though without a scratch. Archie says that’s where educated horses come in.
Mr. Nat Little has been appointed payee for the Northern elevator at this point.

1915 Sep 2 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Coffey is spending a few days, the guest of her daughter, Mrs. J.W. Macaulay.
The tugs Iona and Isabelle arrived Saturday with a raft of lumber from the mill at Grave’s Point.
The tug Odenae left Sunday for the north with Mr. Plunkett’s survey parties.
Sid. Coffey motored to Dauphin Sunday.
Mrs. Hall Burrell and Miss Evelyn left for Winnipeg on Wednesday. Miss Evelyn is undergoing an operation.
Charles Macrothur, of Winnipeg, is a visitor in town for a few days.
New settlers still keep flocking in here and we are glad to welcome them. They all seem greatly satisfied with our country here and intend staying and locating.
Mr. Rosenbaum, cattle buyer of Winnipeg, is in town looking up another car of fat stock.
The school is now in full swing under an efficient staff of teachers.
Wm. Campbell, of Camperville, spent Monday in town.
Mr. Max Resnuik, of Winnipeg, arrived in town Friday to take a position with Mr. Frank Hechter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 16 – 1914

1914 Jul 16 – Both Drew Gun

There was a lively time at Ashville on Monday and it looked like a shooting bee at one stage. John Burnison, a section man, has been acting strange of late and among other things was threatening to shoot residents. He drive his wife and family from the house and shot a cow belonging to Fred Kemp, the storekeeper. He services of Constable Levins, of the town force, were called into requisition and in company with John Campbell, son of Glen, he went to the house. Burnison told the men to get out and to enforce his order moved emphatically reached for his gun. As he raised the weapon Levins flashed out his revolver and Burnison wilted, dropped the gun. He was then placed under arrest and brought to Dauphin by automobile.

JOHNNY SPRINTED.

When Burnison raised the gun, Johnny Campbell, who was in the room, waited for no further display of hostility, but bolted out the door, dashed through the potato patch and over the back fence. As far as known at Ashville he holds all records for this kind of a sprint up to the present.

1914 Jul 16 – Cadets at Sewell Camp

For the first time in cadets history of this province a camp has been conducted and found to be a success, the boys coming from all parts of the province. The days were given over to drills and training in the various branches of cadet work. Reveille call for rising at 6:30, breakfast at 7:00, cleaning up lines to 8:30, when Divine service was conducted, making it impressive with the boys taking part in the singing and responsive reading; 9 to 11 inspection in drills, musketry signalling, first aid, physical training. 12:00, noon dinner; 1:00 to 2:15, rest; 2:30 to 4:00, drilling and general training work; from 4:00 to 5:00, rest, shower bath, etc.; 6:00 p.m., tea; 7 to 9 games and sports; lights out at 9.45. The above makes up the daily routine of camp life, and for the men in charge there were not many idle moments.

SPORTS CURTAILED

It was planned to have Saturday given over entirely to games and sports, but owning to the great storm that passed over the camp this programme was greatly curtailed, only eleven events being run off. Dauphin won five firsts and one second in these events. Our boys, however, kicked because they could not make it an even six firsts. This was a very creditable showing, however, hen you consider tat there were over 20 contingents of cadets in camp, most of who entered teams for the sports.

SUNDAY ROUTINE

Sunday was given over to drying clothes and blankets after the washing of Saturday’ storm, we were able, however, to have our church parade on Sunday afternoon, when the boys made a fine showing in the march past Col. S.B. Steele, Camp Commandant.

GIMLI NEXT YEAR

The camp this year has been largely in the nature of an experiment, and both officers and men profited by the experience gained, which will be conductive to better results in next year’s camp, which we are informed, on good authority, will be held at Gimli, making a more interesting camp for the boys.

PRESENTATION OF PRIZES

Presentation of prizes won by the Dauphin Cadets will take place as soon as the prizes active from Winnipeg, when both Messers. Manby and Batty will express their appreciation of the boys in camp.

PRIZES WON

The following were won by the Dauphin cadets:
Seniors – 220 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st. 440 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st.
Juniors – Standing broad jump – C. Bossons, 1st.
Horse and rider – C. Bossons and E. Struthers, 1st.
Relay Race – Struthers, Bossons, Dunstan and C, Dickerson, 2nd.

1914 Jul 16 – Notes From the Firing Line

Our boys were seldom late for the Knife and Fork Parade.
Some boys were sick, but after one visit to the hospital tent and a taste of the medicine, were able to appear again at the dining tent.
It was a surprise to the officers in charge what a lot of food the boys could consume.
Sammy Dunstan only had seven eggs, three cups of coffee and five slices of bread and butter for breakfast on Friday morning.
It took a special dish to hold the porridge for the Tierney Bros.
2nd Lieut. Lowes’ tent was the quietest one in the whole came at 6.30 a.m.
After dinner on Wednesday G. White could hardly see and had o be taken to the hospital.
Who stole the pies from the cook’s tent on Friday, July 10th?
Instructors Manby and Batty were on duty from 6 a.m. to 11.45 p.m.; everybody here sleeps with one eye open.
The Dauphin Mouth Organ Band and Quartette, consisting of Messrs. Lowes, C. Batty, Gougeon, C. Fickerson, Dunstan and Murphy, made night horrible after hours.
Sammy Dunstan, with his long blue shirt, was the star of the baseball diamond.
Our four boys, who attended the ambulance class, passed with such high honours, that they have decided to stand practice here. The charge will be moderate.
With the aid of our expect signallers, Dauphin Cadets won the sham fight on Friday night.
We wonder by whose order the mixture was put into the tea on Friday night.
Instructors Manby and Batty had their beds made every day by the cadets. We don’t think.
Gougeon and Kuryk are open to give lessons in wrestling. Charges very moderate.
Our boys were always the first in the grub tent and the last out.
Mr. Campbell, of Souris (late of Dauphin), took some interesting group photos of our boys.
The mud fight a 8.30 p.m. Saturday night was a sight never to be forgotten.
The thanks of the boys are due to Mr. Moor and Mrs. Smithers, of the Winnipeg Y.M.C.A., for the assistance rendered us in various ways.

1914 Jul 16 – Fork River

Mr. Sinstiski, who has been here the last two weeks, took great interest of the Liberal party. He is said to be a cattle buyer but no stock has been shipped up to date. All the bests are off. Nuff said.
Hurrah for Sam Hughes! This northern county knows a good man when we have him, and what we have we will hold, as Scotty says.
Edwin King, of Kinistimo, Sask., is spending his holidays at his home here.
The members of L.O.L., No. 1765, attended the Methodist Church on Sunday, the 12th. Rev. Bro. Clixby, of Winnipegosis, preached the sermon. There was a fair turn out considering the hot weather.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, is spending her holidays with her grandmother. Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove, on the Mossey.
Walter Clark, of Paswegan, Sask., has returned home after spending a few days among friends here.
Mr. Runny, of Saskatchewan, liberal representative, has returned home with an enlarge cranium, as an election souvenir in remembrance of Fork River.
The Misses Briggs, of Brandon, are visiting at their aunt’s Mrs. T.N. Briggs.
Dr. Shortreed, at his meeting here, stated that the Roblin government was supported by the rabble. As the people here did not agree with these sentiments they did their best on the 10 h to leave him at home to think over the errors of speech, trusting that in future he will have respect for the opinion of others.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son returned from a week’s visit with friends at Million.
Mr. Sam Lowery returned to Winnipeg after a week’s visit here in connection with his farm.

1914 Jul 16 – Winnipegosis

Progress is being made with the new four rooms brick school. The building promises to be adequate to our needs for the present.
Contractor Neely returned on Monday from Dauphin.
Several new residences are going up in town. Among those building are Donald Hattie, Capt. Mapes and Steven Bros.
Coun. Hechter and J.P. Grenon are taking in the exhibition at Winnipeg this week.
The steamer Manitou will commence making trips to the north end of the lake this week.
Capt. Coffey and Jos. Grenon, Sr., are building a boat with a 65 foot keel. The boat will be operated by steam power.
The elections are over and a feeling of goodwill towards all pervades us. The stress of battle is often trying and during the heat of it we are prone to lose our tempers. But this we are glad to say is only a temporary lapse. Misrepresentation should never be resorted to even in the heat of battle. In the report sent the Press of the meting at Fork River, Mr. Lacey went far out of his way to misrepresent sent Mr. Grenon and others. There was no disturbance at the meeting as Dr. Shortreed will readily admit if appealed to. The truth should be the first consideration in sending out newspaper reports.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 9 – 1914

1914 Jul 9 – Boy Scouts at Sewell

The Dauphin contingent of Boy Scouts, numbering 50, left on Wednesday for Sewell, where they go into camp for a week. The boys are in charge of Lieut. E. Manby and Mr. E. Batty.
The officers of the corps are:
Patrol leaders – Stanley Nicholson, Clarence Bossons, Percy Lowes and Tom Walker.
Corporals – W. Gardiner, Henry Terrell, Ed. Gougeon and Cliff. Baird.
New uniforms, including belts and hats, were supplied to the boys before they left and they looked spic and span.
They left on No. 2 as the train pulled out they lustily joined in singing.
“Where the boys are dog-gone glad to lay in Sewell;
“Sew” – I don’t know how to spell it.
But I am going to my home in Sewell camp.”

1914 Jul 9 – Fork River

The Reeve has proclaimed Monday, July 13, a civic holiday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 26 – 1913

1913 Jun 26 – Soldiers Leave For Sewell

There was a lively scene about the station on Sunday evening when the Manitoba 32nd Light Horse embarked by special train for Sewell. The train brought in 100 troopers and horses from Roblin and they were joined here by the numbers of the Dauphin troop, numbering 74. Col. H.I. Stevenson is in command. The other officers are Major G.C.J. Walker and Capt. H.K. Newcombe. The train was made up of twenty cars including men, horses, supplies, etc. The soldiers were given an ovation by the crowd as the train moved out of the station.

1913 Jun 26 – Fork River

Charles Clark, section foreman here for a number of years, left for Paswegan, Sask., to take on a section there and to arrange for moving his family to that point.
Mrs. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are spending their summer vacation with N. Johnston at Mowat Centre.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, spent a short time in town last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, the latter was formerly Miss Olive Clark, took in Fork River, on their honeymoon trip visiting Mrs. Clark. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston will make their home at Edmonton. We wish them a life of happiness and prosperity.
The herd law will come into force in August in a portion of wards on and three. This has become necessary on account of stock of all kinds being let run and not looked after by the owners as they should be.
At a meeting of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, it was decided to hold their 12th annual picnic at Fork River July 12. A special meeting is called for Saturday night, June 28th, to arrange for the picnic and other business. All members are requested to attend.
Mr. Gunness, of Robin, has arrived here to take over the section left vacant by C. Clark.
Mrs. Capt. Coffey, of Dauphin, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
George says those weeds will have to go or he will know the reason why. Some person with an inquisitive turn of mind is anxious to know if it was necessary to drive around delivering notices before the weeds were up, when a one cent stamp would suffice as heretofore and the travelling around come later on.
Now seeding is over, road making is being talked of. Can our intelligent municipal Daddy and his assistant tell us where to find the tools or have they gone off in the bush browsing as usual. Information on this matter will be thankfully received by a large number of ratepayers.
Sam Hughes, M.P.P., spent a few hours between rains, listening to the wants and troubles of this part of his constituency. No doubt his visit will be beneficial to our neighbourhood.
The Government Agricultural train was here, but owing to general train coming in, it delayed the starting of business, which made the time short. A large number turned out and the ladies had a good time. The addresses though they had to be cut short, were very instructive. The horses and stock were very good and an improvement on last year and credit is due to those in charge. The train left for Winnipegosis at 5.30 in charge of the Prof. of Minnokin Experimental weed farm and Prof. O’Malley, of the Agricultural College.
Prof. G. Weaver, of Millions was renewing acquaintances here for a short time lately.
Saturday was a red letter day here in the departing of two wedding parties, our M.P.P. and this agricultural train. It was a bright day suitable for such occasions and everything passed off quietly.
The football match between the married and single teams has been postponed.
Wm. King returned from court of revision at Gilbert Plains and states that everything passed off quietly.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 25 – 1914

1914 Jun 25 – With the Soldiers at Sewell

Sewell, June 23rd.
We made a splendid journey down here upon which the C.N.R. might be congratulated. Arrived Monday, 5 a.m., but immediately we reached the place allotted to us, before we had even tied our horses, we got a terrific downpour of rain for about 3 hours, which drenched every man to the skin. As we were all kept busy, we soon got warm, and no one is the worse, in fact it helped to wake up some of the sleepy ones.
Everything down here, travelling, food and routine in general is 50 percent better than last year, and things are running nice and smoothly. The regiment compares very favourably with any other. I might conclude by saying that one of the things which has caused the Dauphin boys the most pleasure is the report we have received to the effect that Dauphin received its share of the much needed rain for the benefit of its crops.

CLEANED FROM A HORSES BACK.

Our younger troopers say they left their hearts with the girls at Dauphin.
We missed Capt. Newcombe the first few days. He missed the ducking we all got, so the honours are even.
Major Walker is smiling. He says he is proud of the boys and he knows crops are growing at Dauphin.
There are nearly twice the number in camp this year than there was last.
It isn’t fair to tell tales out of school but there are a couple of incidents which have happened in camp which I will relate later. There is a laugh coming to the girls sure.
Frank Beyette is dishing up the hash this year as usual. Frank is some cook and the rations are better this year than last. But Frank is mad some of the hungry boys “hooked” his pan of hot biscuits.
Q.M. Sergt. Wade is as busy as a washerwoman and as happy as a clam.

1914 Jun 25 – Winnipegosis

It is election talk and nothing but election talk.
Candidate Sam Hughes was in town on Saturday.
J.P. Grenon returned from a trip to Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday.
Constable Hunking took a Galician named John Soloway to Dauphin on Monday. Soloway has shown signs of insanity and will be examined at Dauphin as to his condition.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes will address a meeting here on Saturday night next.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 18 – 1914

1914 Jun 18 – Off for Camp Sunday

The 32nd Manitoba Horse leave on Sunday night for camp at Sewell. The Dauphin troop will go ?? strong this year. There are expected to be 2000 men all told at the camp. Moving pictures will be one of the sources of entertainment.
The officers of the Dauphin troop are as follows:
Major G.C.J. Walker
Captain H.K. Newcombe
Lieutenants E. Manby, M.F. Wilson, L. Shand, E.P. Millward
Regiment S.M., A.C. Goodall
Squadron S.M., Fistches
Sergeants T. Coghlan, G. Fraser, T.D. Massy, Alguire
Corporals W. Cede, H. Wade, Alguire, Chard
The ??? party consisting of C.N.S. Wade, Frank ???, cook, and Private W. ??? have on Thursday night for the camp.

1914 Jun 18 – Ethelbert

Court of revision will be held here Wednesday, 17th inst., with Judge Ryan presiding.
The old McLean flourmill is being overhauled and rebuilt. Another story will be added. The Kennedy Mercantile Co. now own the mill.
The school accommodation is now over taxed, the outcome of this will be that a new building will have to be erected, or an addition built. How would it do to have a consolidated school, and build an up-to-date building. Ethelbert is going to grow, let us anticipate the future.
Principal White is in Dauphin this week with five scholars writing on entrance, grade IX and grade X. The following are the pupils: Entrance, Jessie McMillian and Ben Brachman; grade 9, Maggie Wager and Willie Masticub; grade 10, Wsldmar Masticub.
The crops are looking well, but rain is now needed.
F.K. Slipets, our municipal clerk, is building a new house.
On Thursday night last there was a baseball match between the married and single men. The benedicts won by a nice margin. Ethelbert has some good ball material and will be heard of during the summer when they get more practice.
A petition is in circulation with the object of having the C.N.R. move their station at this point. The location of the building is such that it makes it very inconvenient for passengers and the public to reach it, having to cross the sliding to reach it. It is expected that the company will comply with this reasonable request.
N.A. Hryhorenznk, general agent for the International Harvester Co., went to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Jun 18 – Fork River

Frank Hafenbrak spent a few days in Dauphin last week. While away he purchased a team of mares with foals at foot.
D. Kennedy was a visitor to Dauphin last week.
Wm. Murray, of Dauphin, provincial auditor, is staying with Clerk Wilson while auditing the municipal books.
W. King has returned from a trip to Winnipeg on municipal affairs. He reports the crops are looking well along the line.
Nat Little was unfortunate in losing one of his valuable brood mares last week.
A. McDonald is busy these days on the road from the A.T. Co. Ltd.
Cap. Coffey, of Dauphin, paid this burgh a visit in his automobile last week.
The boys got busy last week and organized a football club. The first game of the season was played on Saturday night between Mowat and Fork River, which ended in a draw.
John Angus, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend here and is of the opinion this is the most restful place he has stuck in his travels. There are several others believe so, too.
Mr. Atkinson, of Prince Albert, has rented the Chase farm and is busy seeding it with barley.
Gen. Neil, of Rainy River, has returned to Mowat experimental duck farm for the summer.