Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 22 – 1910

1910 Sep 22 – Serious Accident

Scaffold Collapses With Three Men – Arthur Milner Has Back Broken
While engaged Wednesday afternoon in shingling the first rows of Engineer R.T. Perkin’s new residence on 3rd Ave. S.W. the scaffold from which they were working suddenly collapsed with A. Milner, Wesley and Wallace Cleaver, throwing the former two to the ground 20 feet below. Wallace Cleaver managed to catch on to a window sill and saved himself. The crash of the falling scaffolding was heard some distance and brought several neighbours to the spot at once. The unfortunate men where extricated from the fallen timbers and carried to the home of Mr. Geo. Sergant and on the arrival of Dr. Bottomley taken to hospital. On examination of the two men it was found that Cleaver had several ribs broken, while Milner was more seriously injured, his spine being broken between the shoulders, and it is feared he has slim chances of recovery.
Milner is a young Englishman and came to Dauphin from Gladstone two years ago. He has taken an active art in he town band as solo cornet player. His father resides in the north of England and is being communicated with.

1910 Sep 22 – Fork River

The funeral of Mrs. S. Lowry took place last Saturday. Quite a large number of friends came to pay their respects, the service was conducted by Rev. W. Rowan.
Mrs. W. Stonehouse who has been away in Ontario for some time returned last Saturday.
Threshing is in full swing and crops are turning out well.
Mr. A.B. Hodgson who has been here for some time left last Saturday for Winnipegosis to enter the employ of the Armstrong Trading Co.
W. Stonehouse is building a house for himself in this village.
Mrs. Northam of Weyburn came here last Wednesday and intends to stay here.
Harvest Festival will be held at Mowat on Sunday, Sept. 25 at 11 o’clock, preacher Rev. H.H. Scrase.

1910 Sep 22 – North Lake

Messrs Hunter and Glendenning have commenced threshing and report wheat turning out good.
Settlers of this district tender their sympathy to Mr. Sam Lowry in his bereavement.
Councillor Lacey is now getting ready to ditch some of the main roads leading to Fork River and Winnipegosis.
Rev. H.H. Scrase preached an impressive sermon at Mowat last Sunday, touching on the death of Mrs. Sam Lowry. Quite a number were present.

1910 Sep 22 – Sifton

Fine weather prevails and is greatly appreciated by every one just now, at this time of the year, as it will either 3 northern or 1 northern. Threshers are busy everywhere about.
W. Kyscyzks new outfit was considerably disabled for a couple of days. Some culprit carefully distributed old iron, taking great pains to well place it in the centre of the sheaves in many of the stooks on Paul Wood’s farm. The separator was somewhat crippled a number of times and had to undergo repairs.
H.L. Troyer, Secretary of the Toronto Bible training school, Toronto and Miss E. Spargue, who have been visiting the mission house for a couple of days left for the east on Tuesday last.
Rev. Sabourin returned last week from Montreal where he has been attending the Eucharistic Congress.
A Mr. White of Winnipeg has been viewing the district in search of land to buy. There’s plenty of land to be had if you’ve got the money. Certainly a good locality for mixed farming.
The Manitoba Government telephone gang have unloaded a couple of cars of telephone poles and other material. We can certainly appreciate such things in sight.
To Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Gillis, a bouncing boy. “Be it ever so humble there’s no place like home.”
Soapy looks as happy and pleasant as ever as he gracefully strides down the street. Who said he was married four times to one woman?

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 14 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 14 – Political Meetings at Fork River

Glen Campbell held a meeting at Fork River on the 8th inst., which was well attended and much enthusiasm shown. There was no Government speaker and the Grits were conspicuous by their absence.
On the night of the 11th, Mr. Cruise held his meeting supported by Messer. McKinstry and McDonald, and quite unexpectedly Mr. Campbell turned up just before the meeting began. The Orange Hall was well filled as the Conservatives of Fork River were not afraid to hear both sides of the question for they did not know that Glen would be at the meeting. Had they not attended Mr. Cruise’s meeting would have been a small one.

1911 Sep 14 – Fork River

Mr. A. Harvey, an old timer who still owns property in this district, is on a visit to Mr. S. Bailey and renewing acquaintances.
T.N. Briggs’ threshing outfit arrived on Tuesday’s train and is guaranteed to thresh anything in sight from pumpkins to gerkins.
Reciprocity seems to have upset even the clerk of the weather, as we are having very poor harvest weather and a slight tinge of frost.
Mr. Glen Campbell held a meeting in the Orange Hall on the 8th, which was well attended. There were over 100 farmers and a large number of ladies present. Mr. Campbell spoke on reciprocity from a farmer’s standpoint in a plain telling way. His arguments were convincing and plainly showed the audience the reciprocity pact in its true colour and that it would be to Canada’s disadvantage. Mr. Cruise was invited bout did not put in an appearance.
Mr. Forbes of Rivers, has been in the district a few days looking over the land. He is well satisfied with Fork River and is likely to invest in a farm.
The following are a few reasons why the scribe cannot support Cruise, the non-resident candidate and why he objects to the Laurier Government. Look them over and see how few of the ministers retain public confidence. Has there ever been anything worse than Mr. Pugsley in public life in Canada. The corruption exposed in his department exceeds the McGreevy scandal during the Conservative regime. Sir Wilfred has not retired Pugsley as Sir John Thompson retired Langevin. A commission of Liberals has declared the Marine Department under Mr. Broduer, corrupt from end to end, yet he has been retained and now goes not he Supreme Court Bench. The administration of the Militia Department has been as bad as any. The printing bureau scandals have been covered up. The Oliver charges were sidetracked by the dissolution of parliament, notwithstanding pledges given by the Government upon which an adjournment was secured. Sir Wilfred Laurier made the late Mr. Prefontaine, his minister of Marine, when he knew he was corrupt. In fact he had a national reputation for corruption. But Sir Wilfred gave him one of the big spending departments. Mr. Fielding allowed the Farmers’ Bank to open its doors when he had abundance of evidence that it was a crooked organization from its very inception. Look over the ministers in the Laurier Government as it appeals for supper in 1911 and compare the administration with that of 1896 and see how are they mighty fallen. What a descent from Sir Oliver Mowat to Pugsley; from Sir Louis Davis to Broduer; from Sir Henri Joly to Oliver. Sir Wilfred does not want such a comparison to be made. He has introduced the reciprocity issue to cover up the corruption of his colleagues. The Press would try to persuade farmers to vote for the Grit candidate and put back into power Laurier and the most corrupt Government in existence. They might fool a few Jackdaws. The scribe’s advance is turn them out and try a new broom which in our experience always sweeps clean.

1916 Sep 14 – Fork River

P. Zack, of Winnipeg, has purchased the stock of J.S. Nowosad and intends carrying on the business. Mr. Nowosad has accepted a position with the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Sergant, of Kamsack, and late of Dauphin, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. W. Coultas on the Fork River.
Miss Pearl Wilson is teaching the Pine View School for the present.
On Sunday morning Mrs. Archie McMillian passed away after a period of illness. Deceased was one of the old settlers. The last three years the family resided at Kindersley, Sask. Of late Mrs. McMillian has been residing with her daughter, Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
The harvest home festival services in All Saints’ Church were well attended and the services were interesting throughout. The church was tastefully decorated for the occasion with flowers, fruit and vegetables and those who took part deserve credit. Mr. Butler preached his farewell sermon. He left for Wycliffe College on Monday to take up his studies. His departure is regretted.
Rain has delayed thrashing operations.
The duck pond opposite the post office is increasing in area. There should be good shooting when the season opens.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1912

1912 Aug 8 – Thos. Spence Drowned

Thos. Spence, a half-breed, fell out of a boat he was crossing the Mossey River in at Winnipegosis a few days ago and was drowned. His body was recovered shortly after the accident.
Spence was formerly a resident of Dauphin and was about 35 years of age. He leaves a wife and several children.

1912 Aug 8 – Ethelbert

James Miles and family have gone to Stenan, Sask., to live. He is going into business there.
Kenneth McLean is seriously ill at the home of his brother, L.M. McLean. He is very sick and fears are entertained for his recovery. He expressed a wish to see his beloved niece, Cassie, who is at Arran and she came done on Sunday evening.
The new bridge entering the town is finished, and is a fair specimen of local work.
Police Magistrate R. Skaife had several cases before him on Saturday afternoon. Vonella Kuzzett, for threatening his brother-in-law, John Malyszyk, was bound over to keep the peace and he of good behaviour for twelve months. Also Vonella Kuzsyk was fined ten dollars and costs for shooting prairie chickens out of season, or in defaulting month. Nikola Kulchyski was also fined ten dollars and costs for an unprovoked assault on Audrian Skelkuoski, of Fork River, or in default one month.

1912 Aug 8 – Fork River

Professor J. Spearing, of Valley River, spent some time here renewing old acquaintances.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, inspected the work done by the dredge and we have been informed that A. Munro has been appointed dredge master for the present and his work so far is satisfactory.
Miss Joyce Sergant returned home after spending a week’s stay with Mrs. W. Coultas in Fork River.
Gorden Weaver has accepted a position of master mechanic at the Armstrong Trading Co. store.
Miss Grant arrived and will wield the rod of correction at the Pine View School for the coming term.
Miss Cameron who was been spending her holidays at her uncle’s, A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned to Neepawa.
We were pleased to see the Rev. H.H. Scrase walking around town with W. King, warden, the other day and hope that he will be able to take up his work this fall.
Mr. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are having a week’s vacation with Noah Johnston, at Mowat Centre.
H. Armstrong has branched out in the contracting and building line and is building an addition to Mr. Nowsade’s residence.
The ratepayers are of the opine that it is time that an itemized statement of accounts of all ward appropriations and general expenditures, as demanded by the status, be got out in pamphlet form.
Mr. Tubath and family are enjoying their vacation at S. Reid’s on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Chapman and daughter are visiting with W. Coultas.
A very pleasant evening was spent in Orange Hall on Friday. Dancing was indulged till daylight.
The Misses Tindall, of Rathwell, are having a pleasant time at their uncle’s, Me. T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey.
The stores are doing a rushing business these days in raspberries and blueberries.
The postponed picnic at Lake Dauphin was held on the 30th. It was a fine day. Although there was not as large a turnout as usual a very pleasant time was spent in sports and boating.

1912 Aug 8 – Mowat Picnic

Those who chanced their luck at the Mowat picnic, which took place at Dauphin Lake on Mr. T. Briggs’ land, by his kind permission on Tuesday, July 30th were not sorry they put in an appearance. The rain, which came the previous Tuesday no doubt dampened the spirits of some, otherwise we should have had a much larger turnout; despite the fact that one or two of our Fork River worthies would have liked it to be a failure. Dame nature smiled upon us and we had a roaring good time. Nat Little’s oranges and candies were in good demand. Fortunately everyone’s ice cream freezers are not so easily broken and Mrs. C. Clark’s came in fine and handy. Even the lemons were made to “spin out,” no doubt much to the annoyance of some individuals. Hard lines, some of the folks had to leave early and therefor missed most of the sport. The Fairville boys enjoyed themselves immensely to say nothing of the ladies. We tender our hearty thanks to them for their cooperation and sympathy. They came off well in the sports, except in the football match. Keep smiling, better luck in this line next time. Our best thanks are extended to all who tried to make it a success, especially to the Lacey family, Briggs family and Sandy and Mrs. Cameron. Need I add some of the boys did not forget to look sheep’s eyes at the girls. It’s a habit handed down.