Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 11 – 1914

1914 Jun 11 – Bad Fire at Ochre River

A disastrous fire occurred at Ochre River on Sunday morning last about 2 o’clock, when the store of the Ochre River Trading Co., together with most of the stock, was destroyed. The fire, when discovered had made considerable headway and the building being a frame one, was soon consumed. Willing hands did what they could to save the contents of the store and keep the fire from spreading.
The building was valued at $4000 and was insured for $2000.
The stock was insured for $12000 and its value placed at a sum in the neighbourhood of $15000 or $16000.
The origin of the fire is a mystery. It is probably that an investigation will be made.

1914 Jun 11 – House Burned

For the second time Mr. Gillies’ house at Sifton, was burned on Saturday night. The structure was a two-story frame building and nearly finished. Some time ago Mr. Gillies’ partly constructed dwelling was burned also. Incendiarism is suspected and the cause of the fire will be investigated.

1914 Jun 11 – Three Killed in Collision

One of the worst accidents that has happened for some time past on the C.N.R. took place just east of Cote, a small station six miles from Kamsack, on Friday night last. It was a head-on collision between No. 2 eastbound and No. 201, speed freight. There is a curve at this point in the road and the two trains were running at a good rate of speed and were right together before the engineers had time to reverse. No. 2 was in charge of Engineer J.H. Arnold and No. 201 Engineer R.T. Perkins, Jas. Clyde was firing for No. 2. and F.J. Smith for No. 201. All four were from this point. Perkins, Clyde and Smith all managed to jump and not one of them received any serious injury. Arnold stuck to his post and was so badly scalded and otherwise inured that he dead a few hours afterwards at the Kamsack Hospital.
F.J. Faiji, mail clerk, and Ross Donaldson, express messenger, were instantly killed. Both ran out of Winnipeg.
Geo. Gougeon, brakeman, of Dauphin was slightly injured.
W.H. Messier and J.A. McVicar were the conductors of the respective trains, the passage and freight. Both escaped unhurt.
None of the passengers on the train were injured, but nearly all received a bad shaking up.

1914 Jun 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Winnipegosis on May 30th.
The minutes of the previous meeting were adopted as read.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now sit as a court of revision.
The clerk reported that no protests had been filled since the court of revision had adjourned.
Hechter-Toye – That the court of revision new adjourn.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now take up the usual municipal matters.
Communications were then read from Prof. Black, the Deputy Minister of Public Works; the Land Commissioner of the Hudson’s Bay Co,; Judge Ryan; J. Irwin; the solicitors for the C.N.R.; the Municipal Solicitor; H. Rustad and a petition from certain ratepayers asking for a bridge.
Hechter-Bickle – That the plan of subdivision of block G and part of block F, village of Winnipegosis, plan being numbered 251, submitted by Munson & Allan, be approved.
Hunt-Bickle – That the secretary write the superintendent of the C.N.R. Dauphin, regarding the putting in of a culvert through the railway at pole No. 22, north of mile board No. 12.
Toye-Hunt – That W. Vincent be paid $13 for his service in securing the title to the roadway through the Champion farm.
Toye-Hechter – That plank be supplied to cover a bridge 20 feet long over Icelandic Creek, on the township line, between 29 and 30, the settlers agreeing to do the work.
Hunt-Bickle – in amendment – That Coun. Robertson and Toye deal with the matter of a bridge across Icelandic Creek and that the coasts be borne by ward 5 and 6. Amendment carried.
Messrs. Macneill and Reid, the delegates from Dauphin, were head regarding the building of a road from Winnipegosis to Dauphin.
Hechter-Hunt – That a vote of thanks be tendered the delegates from Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the council now decide to come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act, a road from Fork River south to the boundary of the municipality and connecting with the proposed road to be built by the Dauphin municipality, between section 35 and 36 in township 28, range 19.
Bickle-Richardson – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter and Hunt be a committee to select the main roads and prepare the preliminary steps required t come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act.
Hechter-Richardson – That a grant of ten bags of flour be made to Seifat Michtka and that the flour by bought from whoever will supply it at the lowest price.
Hunt-Bickle – That in the matter of a petition of certain ratepayers of ward 6 regarding statute labour, the reeve by authorized to ??? in the absence of Coun. Robertson.
Robinson-Hechter – That the reeve be authorized to go to Winnipeg and see the Minister of Public Works with a view to getting a grant for the biding of public roads in the municipality.
Hechter-Hunt – That the public works committee be authorized to begin work and if the weather permits complete the Fork River and Winnipegosis road; the work to be done in accordance with the profile of the Government engineer.
Richardson-Hechter – That on complaint to the clerk and the production of the necessary proof by the complainant, the clerk is hereby instructed to prosecute the owners of animals running at large contrary to the provision of the by laws.
Richardson-Hechter – That the clerk notify parties who have had interments made in the municipal cemeteries to apply at the office of the municipality for their cemetery deeds.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye-Bickle – That Coun. Hechter be authorized to rent two tents to be used by the men on road constructions.
A by-law was passed making an appropriation to the wards on a basis of six mills in the assessment.
Bickle-Toye – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jun 11 – Fork River

Mrs. Chas. Denby, of Winnipegosis, returned home, having spent a week among friends.
Mrs. Kennedy and family have returned from Winnipegosis having spent the weekend there.
W. Williams’ planning mill is running full blast these days and “Billy” is busy shipping lumber.
W. Howiston spent a few days at Winnipegosis and while away we are informed, invested in a schooner. That’s all right “Scotty.”
Mr. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days inspecting work performed by homesteaders.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is visiting here.
Jack Robson and Harry Hunter have returned from a two months trapping and hunting trip and they report a good catch.
E. Williams, lay reader, has returned from attending the Synod at Winnipeg last week. He reports a very busy time.
The mail these days contains many copies of the speech on free wheat by our friend “Bob” Cruise, member for Dauphin. The wheat question does not cut any ice here at present. Its roads and bridges we went. We would be delighted to hear our friend “Bob” converting the Senate and his friends to vote for Borden’s good roads policy which was thrown out last session.
The seeding is over and the crop has been put in good shape, it being one of the finest seasons we have seen for years.
The captain of our fire brigade has prophesized a dry season and is seriously thinking of going into growing watermelons in case of fire. The only thing we can do is to keep smiling as the crops are looking good.
Feming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor here between trains the latter end of the week.
“Joe” Lockhart is filling a car with settlers’ effects and is off for the banana belt. Ta, ta, “Joe” we wish you good luck.
There will be a court of revision at Ethelbert on June 17th. It’s the last chance for getting on the list for the electoral division of Gilbert Plains.
W. King has returned after a two weeks’ trip north. He had a good time, tanks to his two Liberal friends who stuck to him closer than a brother, and “Billy” always appreciates a good thing.
Mrs. Curtis and Mrs. Morrisain, of Texas, U.S., are visiting their friend, Mrs. Nat Little, for a few weeks.
Miss F. Sanderson left for Winnipegosis to take charge of a large diary business started by G. Sanderson, of that burgh.
W. Hunkins and “Jimmy” Bickle passed through here recently at a 2-40 gait.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 5 – 1914

1914 Mar 5 – Brattiko Shot Kuzyk

A coroner’s inquest was held on Thursday in the town hall to inquire into the shooting of Mike Kuzyk at Volga, a point 10 miles southeast of Winnipegosis, on Feb. 21st. Dr. Culbertson was the coroner.
The following composed the jury; T. Jordan, D.D. McDonald, W.A. Brinkman, H.G. Hills, S. Vance, J. Blanchflower, E. Webb, Geo. King, foreman.
The evidence of a number of Galicians, including Brattiko himself, was taken. The others heard were Dr. Medd and Constable Hunking, of Winnipegosis.
Brattiko told a rambling story saying that his gun was accidentally discharged and in this way Kuzyk was shot. All circumstances pointed to Brattiko having shot Kuzyk in mistake for a deer. He afterwards admitted he did.
The verdict of the jury was that Kuzyk came to his death by a wound inflicted by a bullet from a rifle in the hands of Nicola Brattiko.
Brattiko was afterwards arrested and appeared before Magistrate Munson on Saturday charged with shooting Kuzyk. After hearing the evidence Brattiko was remanded till Friday, the 6th.
Brattiko is out on bail.

1914 Mar 5 – Killed in Saw Mill

Gilbert Plains, March 2 – An accident at McKendrick’s saw mill, on the Riding Mountain, 21 miles south-east of this town at 5 o’clock on Saturday evening, resulted in the instant death of William Hickle. A young Scotsman, 23 years of age. Something had gone wrong with the cable feed and the engine was slowed down while the men were fixing it. Hickle working up around the saw alone, is suppose to have slipped and fallen with his shoulder against the saw, killing him instantly.

1914 Mar 5 – Fork River

Mrs. J. Parker and daughter are spending a few weeks in Winnipeg.
Gordon Weaver left for the south on important business. We wish him a pleasant trip.
D. Kennedy returned from a short visit to Dauphin, where he attended the Masonic school of instruction.
W. Williams is very busy these days with teams drawing lumber from his limits to his planning mill.
Dr. Gofton, veterinary surgeon, of Dauphin, was here on a professional trip lately.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
J. Angus, of Winnipegosis, was a visitor to this burgh with his dog team. He reports a good trip as the roads are Al. Scotty will vouch for this providing the dogs will keep the road.
Dr. Medd, health officer, was a visitor here this week. Some are still quarantined. It’s better to be sure than sorry.
Ed. Morris, of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend at the home of Fred. King.
Our new settler, Mr. W.I. Brown, is stirring around and getting in shape to start farming in earnest in the spring time.

1914 Mar 5 – Fork River

Thomas Secord, homestead inspector, was here last week inspecting quite a number of claims.
Mr. W. Brown, of Hamilton, Ontario, has purchased the S.E. ¼ of 6-29-17, and intends erecting dwelling house and is bringing his family out shortly.
Nat Little and daughter Miss Grace have returned from a week’s visit in Winnipeg.
Dr. Medd was a visitor here on Saturday on his was from Dauphin.
The storm here on Friday night was the worst experience in years.
I.F. Hafenbrak, Sam Bailey and Wm. King, Country Orange Master, have returned from attending grand lodge meeting in Winnipeg.
D.F. Wilson is away again sporting at the fair at Brandon. “Lucky, Jim, oh, how I envy him.”

1914 Mar 5 – Winnipegosis

Well, this burg is certainly going ahead this spring. Just a few of the things that have happened this week. Sid Coffey bought a lot on Main street from Rod Burrell and is busy hauling material to erect a large theatre. We understand the price paid was a fancy one.
Ed. Cartwright and family of Mafeking, having arrived and are preparing for move in the place he bought from Sid. Coffey.
Wm. Christianson is taking possession of the place he recently purchased from John Seiffert.
Alex Bickle is remodelling his house.
J.O. Grenon has returned from his holiday trip looking the picture of health.
Harry Watson and Jack Angus left on Monday for Dauphin to take in the bonspiel.
Miss Clara Bradley left on Friday for Winnipeg, she intends taking a course in a business college.
Miss Gertie Bradley has arrived home from Brandon.
Miss Jane Paddock is leaving soon for Biggar, Sask., where she was accepted a position.
Miss Hanna Stevenson left last week for Winnipeg.
The curling season being over, the boys are preparing the ice for hockey. We expect they will be trying for the Allan Cup.
A great time is looked for Wednesday night in the Methodist Church. They are giving a box social and concert. A good programme is being prepared.
Postmaster Ketcheson has hone to Dauphin to meet Mrs. Ketcheson, who is retuning from the east.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 26 – 1914

1914 Feb 26 – Arrested on Murder Charge

The following dispatch was received from Edmonton on Saturday and concerns two parties which are well known around Sifton and Dauphin, Charles Turcunuk and his wife, who is better known as Mrs. Lena Wilson.
About four years ago Turcunuk worked for the railway being engaged cleaning out cars. He afterwards went West to Edmonton, where he started a boarding house among the foreigners and has been doing well up to the time of the advent of his wife a weeks ago. Those who were acquainted with him while he was in Dauphin speak highly of him.
Mrs. Turcunuk, or Wilson, as she was known about town, only left here a few weeks ago for Edmonton. During the Rooke trial she acted as interpreter for the crown.
Charles Turcunuk, a boarding and lodging housekeeper, was arrested this morning on a charge of murdering his four-months-old child in Sifton.
Mrs. Wilson has made a statement that Turcunuk murdered their four-months-old child and afterwards made her promise not to tell the police, or anyone else. She heard the child crying, and all of a sudden it stopped. She ran upstairs to the bedroom and found the child dead on the bed; her husband was standing a few feet away and looking at the corpse. It was then that he grabbed a carving knife and holding it over her head while she knelt on the floor commanded that her mouth be sealed and her tongue be silent forever.

SHE TOLD SECRET

Convinced that her husband would carry out his terrible threat, Mrs. Wilson obeyed and promised to keep the secret, and this morning after seeing Turcunuk escorted to the prisoner’s dock to answer to a charge of non-support, she told the story to Deputy Chief Wright, and other police officials and in doing so submitted a written statement that will be used in evidence at the preliminary hearing next Tuesday morning.
The charge of non-support had just finished and the man fined $75 and costs, when Magistrate Massie commanded him to stand up to listen to a second charge.

1914 Feb 26 – Fork River

Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have left on a trip east on business.
W.J. Johnston, of Mowat, has returned from Mafeking where he spent the winter fishing.
W. King returned the latter end of last week from a business trip to Winnipeg, and states there are a large number there taking in the bonspiel and the Agricultural college course.
Prof. J. Robinson returned from fishing up north and there is little doubt but he will soon have the Fork River band in shape for any emergency.
We notice the minutes of the municipal meeting were published the following week after the meeting in the Herald. This is as it should be Promptness is what the people look for and appreciate.
Mr. T. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days in this burgh.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son, Donnie, are spending a week in Winnipeg.
“B and K” are not breaking any law of the country, Mowat friend. So try again. We have no doubt that the late Oak Brae mail carrier thought it an interesting event every Saturday and we are also sure though it a more interesting and wonderful stroke of luck when the cheques came along. It is not everyone gets paid for carrying their own mail. We don’t hold our meeting on Sunday friend. Get wise and shake yourself. Nuff for this time. Practice what you preach.

1914 Feb 26 – Winnipegosis

The bonspiel will open on Wednesday at one o’clock with sixteen rinks. Keen competition is looked for, as there is a large number of very valuable prizes. Some of the fellows that have been saying all winter what they would do if they wee only skips, will have a chance to try their hand now.
A very serious shooting accident took place about 25 miles south east of here on Monday. A Galician by the name of Kusyk, being shot through the back with a 44. Calibre rifle. The bullet passed through his abdomen. Dr. Medd was sent for and advised him to go to Dauphin Hospital to undergo operations. Since it is learned he has died.
Mrs. A.E. Groff, who has been on the sick list, we are glad to report is much better.
Frank Hechter arrived home from the Winnipeg bonspiel on Friday looking as hearty as ever.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Winnipeg and points east.
The W.A. are giving an alphabet party at the home of Mrs. Bradley on Tuesday evening.
Since the parcel post rates went into effect there is a large increase in parcels passing through the mail. The mail carrier is talking about getting a horse. But we see that Eaton’s still left Morten handle their catalogues.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 21 – 1915

1915 Jan 21 – 90 New Enlisted

There are 90 out of the 110 men required now enlisted. They are a fine lot of men taken as a whole. Sergeant instructors are Highfield and Fletcher. The men are now well advanced in drill.

1915 Jan 21 – Going to the Front

Nurse Margaret Cummings has been offered and accepted a position on nursing staff of the medical department of the army. She leaves for Ottawa to-night (Thursday). This is the second graduate nurse of the Dauphin General Hospital called, the other being Miss Hudson, who is now in England.
Dr. Jas. C. King, of Humboldt, has been appointed to the medical corps with the rank of first lieutenant. His commission dates from January 1st.
Captain Newcombe will go to Winnipeg on Feb. 1st to attend the military school of instruction.

1915 Jan 21 – Got Contract for Lighthouse

Mr. Frank Neely has been notified by the Dept. of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa, that he is the successful tenderer for the proposed lighthouse at Winnipegosis. Mr. Neely is now making arrangements for the material. A.J. Hunt has the contract for the painting.

1915 Jan 21 – Letter From Lewis Barnard

Mr. Thos. Barnard received a letter from his son Lewis, who is with the first contingent at Salisbury Plain this week. He states, in the letter, that he visited the Dauphin men at their camp recently and found them in bad quarters and quite a number sick. The sickness, he says, was nearly altogether confined to the older men. They were still occupying tents and the mud around the tents was fully a foot deep.
Mr. Barnard enlisted at Prince Albert and went to the front with the Saskatoon section.
Lewis has the distinction of being the second best shot in the regiment for rapid firing.

1915 Jan 21 – Mrs. Arnold Wins Case

Shortly after the death of Mr. Jas. Arnold, engineer, in the collision on the C.N.R. near Kamsack last summer. Mrs. Arnold applied through her solicitor, Mr. Bowman, for compensation. This was refused by the railway company and a suit was entered under “The Workman’s Compensation Act” of Saskatchewan, claiming a considerable amount of damages. When the case was ready to come to trial the officials of the company had evidently changed their minds for a cheque for the full amount claimed was forwarded to Mr. Bowman.

1915 Jan 21 – No Trace of Deserter Yet

Private John Alexander deserted on Saturday from the Dauphin contingent, and although the wires have been busy no trace of him has yet been ascertained. All that is known is the Alexander took the train south.

1915 Jan 21 – Fork River

Mr. Thos. Secord, of Dauphin, homestead inspector, spent a short time here lately.
Mr. W. Williams and gang of men left for his timber limits east of Lake Dauphin, where they will run his sawing outfit for the winter.
A large party of neighbours met at the home of Mr. A. Hunt on Wednesday evening the 13th, when a very pleasant evening was spent in dancing and social recreation.
Messrs. Walmsley, Hunking and Toye, of Winnipegosis, were visitors to this burgh on municipal matters lately.
The A.T. Co. have been very busy shipping cordwood lately.

1915 Jan 21 – Sifton

Mr. Robt. Brewer was in our midst last week and purchased a number of hogs. He states that business is still good with him and still has a pleasant smile for everyone.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt, the well drillers, left here last week and are now busy drilling wells around Ethelbert. Their outfit is a good one.
Since sleighing has commenced there is quite a lot of hardwood coming into town and our friend Fred Farion, seems to be the “Cordwood King.”
Joe Shand, of Dauphin, was a visitor here last week on his way from Ethelbert, where he had been on business.
The grist mill here has been running very steady this last week owing to the roads being good for sleighing and the people are now able to bring their grain to town.
We are all looking forward to business being a little brighter now that all the holidays are over.

1915 Jan 21 – Winnipegosis

A concert was held here on Friday evening in aid of the Red Cross society. Everybody turned out for the good cause, and a pleasant evening was spent. The sum of $30.00 has been forwarded direct to the society at Toronto, making in all a total of $70.00 sent from Winnipegosis, in addition to three shipments of bandages, pillows, etc.
It is understood the incorporation of the town will not take place until the return of the fishermen from the north. A considerable portion of our population is away at present.
Capt. Wm. Sifton, who is in charge of the Standard Lumber Co.’s camp at the north end of the lake, is visiting at Dauphin. The captain says the output of logs this winter will be limited.
We are all patiently waiting for the return of the fishermen. When they are away the town is like the play of “Hamlet” with “Hamlet” left out. And, you know, the nimble dollar of the fishermen is like the fish, it has the faculty of slipping from one to the other.
Like everything else, curling is expected to boom when the boys return from the north end of the lake. Up to the present it has been on the slow side.

Winnipegosis

1915 Jan 21 – Winnipegosis

Chas. White returned on Saturday night from his rounds as fish inspector, and reports the fishing good.
To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Christianson, a daughter, on Jan. 13th.
Jack Matthews is on the sick list, but is reported improving.
Mr. F. Neely, of Dauphin, has been awarded the contract for the new lighthouse.
The young ladies of the town are giving a dance and skating party on Wednesday evening, the 20th.