Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 8 – 1910

1915 Dec 8 – Shot for a Deer

What might have proved a fatal accident to a hunter occurred in the Riding Mountain south of Gilbert Plains on Friday last. William, the 18-year-old son of Jas. D. Sutherland was hunting in the mountain and was attired in white. He was coming through the scrub when the white of his legs was noticed by another hunter, by the name of Dimmick from Roblin, who at a distance of 2200 yards fired at him for a deer and hit him in the right leg, the ball breaking it. Sutherland immediately ell and yelled loudly which prevented Dimmick from again firing as he had the rifle to his shoulder a second time when he heard the yells. As the two men were a long distance away from any habitation, Dimmick had to carry the wounded man three miles to a farmer’s house when medical aid was procured and young Sutherland brought to the Dauphin Hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1915 Dec 8 – Fork River

Miss Lane, from Dauphin is spending a few days up here before proceeding to her home in Winnipeg.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of Mowat School was taken seriously ill last week and returned to Dauphin to be under the doctor’s hands. We all hope she will soon be herself again.
F. Storrar paid a visit Dauphin lately.
A Christmas tree and entertainment will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the English Church, on Friday evening, December 23rd, at eight o’clock. A good time is expected for the children. Admission all children free, but a charge for admission will be made to adults.
Mr. Letwin has been appointed as assistant to Mr. D. Kennedy in the Armstrong Store here.

1915 Dec 8 – Sifton

Bert Kennedy, of Canora, Sask., who was a patient in the Dauphin Hospital with typhoid, was a visitor to his brother John Kennedy for a few days before returning to his house at Canora.
Miss Scott, Neepawa, was a visitor at the Presbyterian mission house for a couple of days. Miss Scott is always welcomed at the mission house.
Rev. Johnston, of Gilbert Plains, held services here on Wednesday evening last. The sermon was well put and much appreciated.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held service on Thursday evening. Quite a large crowd congregated.
The moose shooting season is on again. Rudolph Spruhs is one of the number to leave for the haunts of the antlered monarch.
The Manitoba Government Telephones have a construction gang camped in the village doing construction work east of town.
On Tuesday Messrs. Buckwold & Levin shipped out three cars of cattle to Winnipeg.
The elevator of the British America Elevator Co. had to close down on Saturday for lack of cars to ship out. This is said to be the first experience of this kind since the elevator was erected. The opportune arrival of empty cars has now, however relieved the situation.
Rev. J.A. Sabourin is having a furnace and hot water heating system installed by M. Cardiff, of Dauphin, in his new building which is being rapidly completed. A new R.C. Church is expected to be erected next summer.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Melynik a few days ago a pair of twin girls. All three doing well.
With the late fall of snow the farmers are quickly taking advantage of the good sleighing and hustling their grain to market.

1915 Dec 8 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit of the Methodist Church, Winnipegosis, on Sunday next. Subject: The Call to Advance.
Teamsters here have been busy freighting fish from the various fishing grounds up the lake. They are impartment men and must needs be well catered for. Recognizing this fact the Misses Geekie and Black have opened a new restaurant at which good, solid, substantial meals are served at all hours. This is just what was needed in our busy little town. The fact that hot meals can be obtained at all hours, would see to be a guarantee of success. We wish them luck.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 6 – 1910

1910 Oct 6 – First Automobile Accident

The first automobile accident in town to write of happened Friday evening. Eric Nicholson driving his father’s (H.P. Nicholson) horse on Vermillion Street, collided with J.W. Johnston’s automobile just as it was coming over the crossing at his lane on the ave, N.W., Mr. Johnston immediately put on the emergency break but the machine struck the horse before it was stopped. On examination for casualties it was found that the animal had received a broken leg. The two veterinary, Dr. Bryant, was telephoned for to dispatch the animal.

1910 Oct 6 – Thresher Fatally Injured

Gilbert Plains, Man., Oct. 1 – Mike Genik, who was working on the threshing machine of Frank Morris, on the farm of Fred Manns, was run over by the front wheel of the engine last night, receiving internal injuries which, it is said, will prove fatal.

1910 Oct 6 – Fork River

A meeting of the Council was held here last week, when some important business was done.
Miss Hansford of Winnipegosis, paid us a visit was done.
Rev. H.H. and Scrase visited Mr. and Mrs. Lacey at Oak Brae last week.
Mowat School house was prettily decorated last Sunday on the occasion of their Harvest Festival. A nice congregation attended.
We are all wondering if the Fork River and Winnipegosis road will be ready for use this coming winter. Slow progress seemed to be made on account of scarcity of teams and men.
A spark from the engine was the cause of a load of wheat being burned up in the wagon owned by Mr. W. King was badly damaged.
Mrs. Tilt from Dauphin, came up last week.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very eloquent sermon to the congregation of All Saints Church which was greatly appreciated. His subject was “The Holy Eucharist Congress at Montreal” and replied to Father Vaughan, who said that Protestantism is a soulless religion and that Canadian public schools are Godless schools. Mr. Scrase handled the subject well.

1910 Oct 6 – To the Herald:

SIR – I notice in the press an article dated September 17th, from a Mowat correspondent, re Government Elevator, which he thinks is lost, strayed or stolen. If either of these three things have happened it, the people of this vicinity would not be surprised to hear of it dropping out of the Mowat mail bag some day as it is remarkable what that mail bag will consume – tacks, sugar and other things too numerous to mention.
I have never heard of such a thing happening an elevator but we have had an experience like that in post offices up here. Fishing River being mentioned in the Mowat article reminds me what happened a few years ago, the settlers of Fishing River petitioned the Ottawa Government for a post office. Did they get the post-office at Fishing River? Not your life! It was lost, strayed or stolen as a new post office was located shortly after, not a hundred miles from Fishing River. If our Oak Brae P.M. would put the same energy behind the mail cart as he uses on his pen, knocking at the Provincial Government, the Winnipegosis mail it carries would get here before the train leaves and not have to lay over and the people would appreciate it very much.

A Fork River Correspondent

1910 Oct 6 – North Lake

Councillor Lacey has let quite a few contracts for road work lately, which will help the Galicians to get around easier.
John Bolinski is erecting a dwelling and stable on his farm on the lake shore.
Rev. H.H. Scrase conducted harvest thanksgiving service at Mowat School house last week. His text was very appropriate. The school house was tastefully decorated by Misses Charlotte and Harriet Lacey.
If any person comes in contract with a threshing outfit looking for work, be so kind as to show them the way here in case they get lost.

1910 Oct 6 – Sifton

Fine weather continues. Threshing progressing very nicely.
Mr. Carruthers and gentlemen friend from Valley River, paid our village a visit on Tuesday evening. “Me thinks” a fair inducement.
The Rev. Sabourin is moving the R.C. Church to a property across the road from the present location.
The Rev. Archbishop of Lemburg, Galicia accompanied by Archbishop Langevin, St. Boniface, is expected at Sifton in the near future, in the interests of the Greek rite of the R.C. Church.
A number of our villagers went out to Lake Dauphin on Saturday for the day’s shooting.
The Sifton village mock council met on Wednesday of last week. After the minutes of the previous meeting were read and several very important communications were brought up and read before the council after which some heated discussions followed.
The matter of the excessive use of the Comfort Soap miniature wagons on the sidewalks of the village, was brought to the attention of the council, that the practice be immediately stopped, thus lessen the dangers to pedestrians exceeding the speed limit by law. After due discussion the motion was seconded by Alderman Dneufre, that the constable be ordered to put the by-law in force respecting this and in failure of that recommended that the family production be curtailed.
A complaint was also read from some residing in the farther wards east, of a nuisance of late in that locality. The west winds of late are heavily laden with the smell of carrion. The constable was ordered to investigate and see that all dead mosquitos, horses or horse flies, be buried at once by or at the expense of the parties responsible.
Alderman Pantoline thought that the nuisance ground was being moved too near the centre of the town anyway and wanted to know of the constable what was being done re the manure heaps which were called to his attention some time ago and demanded to know why he was not taking action. Alderman Dneufre thought the constable very dilatory in the performance of the duties of his position and said that he could produce a more competent party at less salary to take the place of the present policeman. Some charged graft repeatedly in the way of that officer’s position, others demanded investigation.
It was then moved by Alderman Dneufre and seconded by Pinkas that the matter of graft in the police commissioner’s office be investigated and reported to the council at the next meeting. Council then adjourned to again meet at the usual date.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 29 – 1910

1910 Sep 29 – Buried in Well

Kamsack, Sask., Sept. 25 – A funeral service, attended by circumstances that are unique in the history of Canada, took place Saturday on the farm of John Bowes, sixteen miles south of here. At the top of a 73 foot shaft that had been sunk for a well and at the bottom of which lay the remains of Elwer Olson, aged 35, of Yorkton. Rev. J. Morrison conducted a service for the dead. The shaft has been closed up and the body will remain for ever in the deep and improvised grave. Hansen was overcome by gas in the well and attempts to recover the body were fruitless.

1910 Sep 29 – Died from Burns

Miss Mabel Gunn of Makinak, aged 28 years, died Tuesday from burns received last week through an accident in handling coal oil. The young lady was trying to squelch a blaze on the floor with a rug, when her clothing caught on fire, and before it was put out she received terrible burns.
The unfortunate lady lingered nearly a week and everything possible was done to relive her suffering.
The funeral to the Makinak cemetery took place Wednesday.
Miss Gunn was favourably known throughout the Dauphin district, being one of Makinak’s earliest residents and having, with her sister, run a boarding house there for years. Her demise is keenly felt by the citizens of that community.

1910 Sep 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Comber left here for her home in Selkirk last week.
Mr. Frame from Treherne has been visiting friends here.
On Sunday Sept. 18th, Mrs. E. Morris gave birth to a little girl.
Quite a large congregation attended the Harvest Festival Service at Winnipegosis last Sunday night when a special sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Car loads of wheat are being shipped from this point.
Tom Toye’s youngest child died last week and was buried at Winnipegosis. The burial service was taken by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Cattle buyers are busy in this district. Quite a number of cattle have been sold lately and shipped to Winnipeg.
Fleming Wilson from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Harvest Festival Service will be held at the English Church on Sunday evening, October 9th, at 7.30.

1910 Sep 29 – Sifton

Mr. F.E. Nex of Whitemouth, is visiting his father-in-law, Mr. Ludwig Zarowoney. Fred bicycled from Winnipeg to McCreary, where he boarded the train.
Rev. Sabourin was in Winnipeg last week on business.
School Inspector Walker of Dauphin, inspected the village school on Tuesday last.
Miss A. Griffith of Fishguard, Eng., is visiting her brother-in-law, Mr. W Carr.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Barrie have just returned home, after a couple months visit to his parents in “ye auld Scottish hielands” near Aberdeen. Bill reports a vey pleasant trip.
Theo. Stefanik of Winnipeg, addressed a large open air gathering here on Wednesday of last week in the interest of the community. Mr. Rawson of Dauphin was noticed in the gathering.
Charl Holinski is about completing the building of his new home. A fireside gathering is expected to initiate the new house when finished, so no doubt Mr. Jordan of Dauphin will be likely called upon to send up the necessary for the occasion, which is usually quite in evidence at such times.
Mr. and Mrs. T.A. Kitt and son of Valley River, visited Sifton on Sunday.
Miss Bessie Wilson of Fork River, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Paul Wood.
Mr. W. Carr went to Winnipegosis on Saturday on business.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 22 – 1910

1910 Sep 22 – Serious Accident

Scaffold Collapses With Three Men – Arthur Milner Has Back Broken
While engaged Wednesday afternoon in shingling the first rows of Engineer R.T. Perkin’s new residence on 3rd Ave. S.W. the scaffold from which they were working suddenly collapsed with A. Milner, Wesley and Wallace Cleaver, throwing the former two to the ground 20 feet below. Wallace Cleaver managed to catch on to a window sill and saved himself. The crash of the falling scaffolding was heard some distance and brought several neighbours to the spot at once. The unfortunate men where extricated from the fallen timbers and carried to the home of Mr. Geo. Sergant and on the arrival of Dr. Bottomley taken to hospital. On examination of the two men it was found that Cleaver had several ribs broken, while Milner was more seriously injured, his spine being broken between the shoulders, and it is feared he has slim chances of recovery.
Milner is a young Englishman and came to Dauphin from Gladstone two years ago. He has taken an active art in he town band as solo cornet player. His father resides in the north of England and is being communicated with.

1910 Sep 22 – Fork River

The funeral of Mrs. S. Lowry took place last Saturday. Quite a large number of friends came to pay their respects, the service was conducted by Rev. W. Rowan.
Mrs. W. Stonehouse who has been away in Ontario for some time returned last Saturday.
Threshing is in full swing and crops are turning out well.
Mr. A.B. Hodgson who has been here for some time left last Saturday for Winnipegosis to enter the employ of the Armstrong Trading Co.
W. Stonehouse is building a house for himself in this village.
Mrs. Northam of Weyburn came here last Wednesday and intends to stay here.
Harvest Festival will be held at Mowat on Sunday, Sept. 25 at 11 o’clock, preacher Rev. H.H. Scrase.

1910 Sep 22 – North Lake

Messrs Hunter and Glendenning have commenced threshing and report wheat turning out good.
Settlers of this district tender their sympathy to Mr. Sam Lowry in his bereavement.
Councillor Lacey is now getting ready to ditch some of the main roads leading to Fork River and Winnipegosis.
Rev. H.H. Scrase preached an impressive sermon at Mowat last Sunday, touching on the death of Mrs. Sam Lowry. Quite a number were present.

1910 Sep 22 – Sifton

Fine weather prevails and is greatly appreciated by every one just now, at this time of the year, as it will either 3 northern or 1 northern. Threshers are busy everywhere about.
W. Kyscyzks new outfit was considerably disabled for a couple of days. Some culprit carefully distributed old iron, taking great pains to well place it in the centre of the sheaves in many of the stooks on Paul Wood’s farm. The separator was somewhat crippled a number of times and had to undergo repairs.
H.L. Troyer, Secretary of the Toronto Bible training school, Toronto and Miss E. Spargue, who have been visiting the mission house for a couple of days left for the east on Tuesday last.
Rev. Sabourin returned last week from Montreal where he has been attending the Eucharistic Congress.
A Mr. White of Winnipeg has been viewing the district in search of land to buy. There’s plenty of land to be had if you’ve got the money. Certainly a good locality for mixed farming.
The Manitoba Government telephone gang have unloaded a couple of cars of telephone poles and other material. We can certainly appreciate such things in sight.
To Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Gillis, a bouncing boy. “Be it ever so humble there’s no place like home.”
Soapy looks as happy and pleasant as ever as he gracefully strides down the street. Who said he was married four times to one woman?

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 15 – 1910

1910 Sep 15 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 15 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 15 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 15 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 10 – 1910

1910 Sep 10 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 10 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 10 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 10 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.