Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 4 – 1917

1917 Oct 4 – Week’s Causalities

Pte. Geo. H. Winters, Dauphin, wounded. (George Henry Winters, 1897, 1000224)

1917 Oct 4 – Fork River

D.F. Wilson has purchased Mr. Williams’ threshing outfit.
Rural Dean Price of Swan River will hold baptismal and holy communion service at Mowat at 11 o’clock in the morning, and in All Saints’, Fork River, at 3 in the afternoon, and Winnipegosis at 7.30 in the evening.
W. King has sold his shorthorn stock bull to T.A. Rothwell, of Melton.
W. Williams has received a new separator.
Several cars of fat cattle go out of here every train. While grain growing is staple with us, there is no doubt but the basis of our advancement will be from stock raising.
The Winnipegosis liquor cases on Tuesday created quite a stir here. The “boys”, we hear, won out.
Rev. A.S. Russell is a visitor to the Peg on church business. He intends taking in charge of this mission for the winter.
Archbishop Matheson intends visiting Fork River and holding confirmation services in All Saints’ sometime this month.

1917 Oct 4 – Winnipegosis

In loving memory of Eva, dearly beloved child of Quarter-Master Sergeant Frank Hechter, now of France, and Minnie Hechter, who died Sept. 1st, 1917:
We miss the gentle child
More than words can ever tell,
But you are happy there above
Where loving angels dwell.

Your tender arms no longer
Embrace us with your love,
But they are now encircling,
God’s eternal dove.

We love thee, darling Eva,
As only God knows how,
But He loved you better
As He has shown us now.

That Divine and Holy Father,
Looked upon this world so grim,
And thought are the world would defile your spirit
He would take you back to Him.

But, oh, how can we forget,
Your face so pure and sweet,
And your eyes that never opened,
But for to love and greet.

We still look up and whisper,
Sweet Eva come back to me,
But you only smile and answer,
“I wait up here for thee”
Inserted by her aunt, Mrs. B.P.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 19 – 1910

1910 May 19 – A Brilliant Sight

The sight of Halley’s comet as witnessed by a few of Dauphin’s citizens early Thursday morning will not be forgotten. It did not appear on regulation time of scientists at 11 Wednesday evening but came in view about 4 a.m. Thursday. It was a fine sight, appearing like a huge ball of fire with brilliant colour of light radiating from it. It was in plain view for twenty minutes.

1910 May 19 – Arrested at Dauphin

John Demoria, a half-breed was arrested at Dauphin Tuesday by Constable Hunking of Winnipegosis. Demoria is accused of breaking into the house of P. McLeod at Winnipegosis and stealing a quantity of goods, which were subsequently recovered. Constable Hunking took his man to Sifton Wednesday, where he was met with a rig and drove to Winnipegosis. Demoria will be tried on the charge of house breaking.

1910 May 19 – Death of Mrs. Glen Campbell

The wife of Glen Campbell, M.P., died at Gilbert Plains on Tuesday.

1910 May 19 – Travelled with a Corpse

Sitting with a corpse for several miles was the gruesome experience of Peter McEwen of Spruce Creek, Saturday last. He was bringing an aged neighbour, Wade Rothwell, to the hospital, when the gentleman expired on the road. Mr. McEwen’s feelings can be better imagined than described, when he made the discovery that Rothwell was dead. The remainder of the trip was hurriedly made and medical aid summoned, but the spark of life had fled.
Deceased was 74 years of age and resided at Spruce Creek for several years. He had been suffering from an old complaint from some time before his death. The remains were taken to Wawanesa for entertainment.

1910 May 19 – Winnipegosis

Dredging the mouth of the Mossey River commenced this week and will be continued during the summer, T. Poquette, of Selkirk, is in charge of the work.
Constable Hunking is at Dauphin, where he went to arrest a half-breed named John Demoria, who broke into the residence of P. McLeod and helped himself to various articles.
Capt. Coffey made a trip north last week in his boat. He was accompanied by Messrs. W. Sifton and F. Herchmer.
Trappers who brought in their catches of muskrat skins lately met with a surprise when they learned that the price had fallen about 25 percent.