Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 30, 1919

Can a Doctor Sell Liquor?

Dr. Wilmot, of Roblin, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday, on several charges preferred by the inspector for selling liquor contrary to the provisions of the act. One charge was dismissed and decision reserved in the others.

Chief Little Issues Warning

Young men and boys would be well advised to take warning as regards their conduct on Hallowe’en. Annually there has been a wanton destruction of the citizens’ property by the gangs of organized rowdies. This year steps have been taken by Chief Little and staff to put an end to this class of amusement. All damage done will have to be paid for, as well as the appearance of the parties in court.

Daughters of Empire Rally

The rally of the Daughters of the Empire here on Tuesday, the 28th inst., was largely attended, every Chapter being represented, which included the Pas, Grandview and Gilbert Plains. The meeting was held in the town hall and was presided over by the Rev. J.A. Cormie.
Mrs. Aldridge was the first speaker and she spoke in the interest of the establishment of a hospital for the people of Servia. She related in a pathetic and impressive manner the great sufferings of these people and the heroic way in which they had faced and overcome every difficulty. Mrs. Aldridge spent much time in Servia during the war and incidents she related were from personal experience.

Details of War Memorial

In explaining the war memorial, Mrs. G.H. Smith, National Educational secretary of the order, told the meeting that in detail the plan of the I.O.D.E. is to establish ideals of patriotism and give the children in the schools a truly British education by acquainting them with the ideals, the traditions and the institutions of Britain. Illustrated lectures on the history and geography of the Empire will be given in schools. All non-English will be supplied with one of I.O.D.E. British historical libraries within the next few years. A lecture fund for the teaching and study of British history will be established and some eminent lecturer brought to Canada at least once a year. Pictures of Canada’s part in the war will be given to 1000 schools, 100 schools in Manitoba to be among the number. Travelling scholarships to the extent of $1200 to university graduates in history will be awarded to each province. A second scholarship of greater value may then be established for these nine scholarship winners. An endowment fund of $500,000 is being collected for this purpose.
On rising to speak, Ms. Colin H. Campbell, provincial president, was warmly greeted. After expressing her great pleasure at having the privilege of again speaking to a Dauphin audience, se made a strong appeal on behalf of the Victory Loan. She pointed out that it was the duty of everyone to the best of their ability to assist the country at this time by subscribing what they could. Mrs. Campbell also spoke for a few minutes on the war memorial.
During the evening Mrs. Rogers sang a solo and miss Pear M. Tucker and Miss Irma Struthers contributed instrumentals.
At the conclusion of the meeting the visitors and the members of the chapter repaired to the rest room, where refreshments were served, and a couple of hours spent in social intercourse.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 27.
Mrs. Sharp has left for Winnipeg and will shortly cross the ocean to visit London.
Mr. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has returned from Brandon, and will conduct meetings at different points in our district. Some of the methods of the Army may be open to criticism but there is much to commend them. They hit out straight from the shoulder every time.
The rally meeting of the Grain Growers, recently held at the house of Thos. Toye, was well attended. Mr. Dixon, barrister, of Winnipegosis, was the sparker. The farmers’ platform and other issues were clearly explained.
The Ontario elections have given the farmers a big boost. The west is awaiting its opportunity.
Mr. Frank Sharp and bride arrived home from Winnipeg a few days ago. We wish the bride and groom every happiness and when their troubles come, may they be nothing worse than “little Sharps.”
Tom Toye grew a potato this season which weighted 4 lbs. The late Capt. Coffey brought the seed of these potatoes to Canada from the United States. There has bot been anything in the potato line to equal them for heavy yielding or excellent flavor.
An October cold dip is not common, but during the last few days the thermometer has been hovering round the zero mark.

Fork River

J. Shuchitt has opened a pool room and barber shop on Main Street.
Misses L. and K. Briggs are attending the wedding of one of their sisters at Hartney. Mr. Russell is teaching the Fork River School during their absence.
Don’t forget the returned soldiers’ banquet in the Orange Hall, Friday night, Oct. 31st. Supper will be served at 6.30. Tickets, $1.00.
Jim Parker returned from a two weeks’ trip to Saskatchewan points.
It begins to look as if winter has come to stay.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 20, 1919

5 Cases on Assize Docket

The spring assizes for the Dauphin Judicial District opened on Tuesday with Mr. Justice Metcalfe, presiding. There are five cases on the docket, which are as follows:
King vs. F.B. Race, theft of liquor from railway car.
King vs. H. Porteous, Roblin, assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
King vs. Geo. Kuzio, Winnipegosis, sedition.
King vs. John Bouazuv, Roblin, posting obscene letter.
King vs. W.B. Dempsey, Winnipegosis, forcible entry upon land.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Formal Opening of Club Rooms
The new club rooms of the G.W.V. association, in the Lilly block, were formally opened by Mayor Bowman on Tuesday, the 18th.
In opening the proceedings Mayor Bowman said it gave him great pleasure to be with them that evening. He regretted the absence of the president who was indisposed and hoped that he would soon be restored to his usual good health. He paid a high complement to the officers of the association for undertaking an enterprise of such magnitude and to the ladies of the auxiliary, who had done so much to help forward the good work. The aims of the association needed no explanation, it being well-known that it was formed for the betterment and uplift of veterans of the great war just ended. In closing his worship said that public opinion would be behind any association formed for the help and assistance of the returned men and extended the best wishes of the citizens of Dauphin and district to the association. He then formally declared the club rooms open.
A short programme followed, Miss Maggie Stark giving a humorous reading and Mrs. Heaslip a song, for which she received a well-merited recall. Major Skinner gave an address in which he touched on many subjects of great interest to the veterans and townspeople. The McMurray orchestra contributed several selections and its presence at any function is always heartily welcomed.
Dancing at once commenced, while in the assembly and recreation rooms a series of games of progressive whist were strongly contested. Mrs. Nash won the ladies’ prize, the gentleman’s prize going to Comrade Jack May.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary provided an abundance of toothsome delicacies, which were enjoyed, and for which they received hearty thanks. Dancing was kept up with spirit till an early hour, McMurray’s orchestra furnishing the magic.
There was a large gathering and the function was voted one of the best ever held in Dauphin.

Race Case Proceeding

The grand jury found a true bill in the King vs. Race, and the evidence of a number of witnesses for the crown was heard. This (Thursday) morning the case for the defence was started. The trial is attracting much interest. F.B. Simpson is the crown prosecutor and J.L. Bowman is defending Race.

Mossey River Council

The council of the municipality of Mossey River met at Fork River on the 5th inst., as a court of revision. After the numerous appeals were disposed of the minutes of the last council meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Reparation Committee, Ottawa, the solicitors re. Hartman account, H. Houchin re use of council chamber for War Veterans, H. Shannon asking for refund of taxes, the secretary of the Weed Commission, A. Gunmunderson asking to be struck off the assessment roll, J.C. Adam re taxes on lot in Winnipegosis, the rural municipality of Wallace re equalized assessment, the Manitoba Returned Soldiers’ Commission.
A petition praying for the dismissal of the collector and another asking for the building of a road on the correction line; also two applications for the position of weed inspector.
Hunt-Reid – That Simpson, McGirr & Co., solicitors for the municipality, be instructed to apply to the legislature of the province of Manitoba at the present sitting for a special act legalizing the assessment for the yea 1918, and that the council approve of the draft form of act hereto appended and authorized the solicitors to consent to such amendments of revision thereof as may be required by the law amendments committee of the legislature.
That W.B. Findlater, M.P.P. for Gilbert Plains, be requested to introduce the said special act to the legislature.
Hunt-Namaka – That the clerk write solicitors re Hartnian account with the village of Winnipegosis.
Hunt-Yakavanka – Whereas, the Union of Manitoba Municipalities, at its recent convention in Winnipeg, pledged the co-operation of all municipal councils and officials in Manitoba to the Returned Soldiers’ Manitoba Commission in its work of reestablishing in civil occupations soldiers returning from the war; and, whereas, the municipality of Ochre River has regarded I as a patriotic duty to do everything possible to assist in this commendable purpose; therefore, be it resolved, that this municipality hereby undertakes to obtain satisfactory employment for all returned soldiers who were residents of this municipality at the time of enlistment, or, in the even of it being found impossible so to do, to promptly report to the commission, giving reasons for such failure and the address where the returned unemployed soldier may be found. The clerk is hereby directed to give such assistance to the commission as is necessary for the carrying out of the purpose of this resolution. Carried.
Hunt-Reid – That Edwin W. King be appointed weed inspector for year 1919 at a salary of $125 per month, and that is duties begin on the 15th day of May, and continue up to the 15th day of October, and that the clerk in notifying him of his appointment, ask him to attend the convention of weed inspectors to be held in Winnipeg.
The council adjourned to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, March 17.
Robt. Marsland was here last week with his sawing and crushing outfit.
Frank Sharp has been on the sick list for a few days.
Mrs. Russell has received the good news that her son, Pte. Walter, is on his way home from overseas.
The chips will soon begin to fly as there is quite a number of new buildings going up in the spring.
The Grain Growers meet the first Friday in each month. At the last meeting matters of importance were dealt with. Resolutions were passed asking for a reduction in the tariff and refusing concessions to the liquor interests.
There has been considerable land cleared of scrub during the winter, and breaking will be pushed forward in the spring.
The school questions is the burning issue of the hour.

Sifton

A very crowded meeting was addressed by Mr. R. Fletcher and others in Wycliff School last Thursday, the 13th inst., on the question of “Municipal Schools.” Much interest was shown in the bylaw and it is thought that it will be supported on the 25th. Mr. Dyk spoke in Ruthenian and Paul Wood occupied the chair.
Three carloads of lumber are being unloaded by local farmers.
It is proposed to build a municipal public hall here and a bylaw will to all probability by voted on to sanction the borrowing of a sum of money on debentures for that purpose.
From all accounts Sifton is not proud of its new liquor detective or spotter. Nor is he of much practical use here as we are all on the “water wagon” just now.
It is expected that the new government trunk highway, Winnipeg to Swan River, will run through Sifton. No better route could be found.
Logs, hay, straw, fence posts, etc., are being feverishly drawn. If the snow held until June – which heaven forbid! – there would still be that last load to draw.
Our local barber recently did 43 shaves and 17 haircuts from 7 p.m. until closing time. A pretty good records – but then, he only opens on Saturday evenings.
Mr. Thos. Winshy has replaced Mr. Wheeler as manager of the Bank of Commerce. He thinks Sifton has a bright future, and with a few mines, factories and so on opened up may make quite a city. Joking aside, we have a first-class site for an up-to-date creamery. Who will build it? Not tow, only one. We have two mills.
A progressive whist drive is advertised for next Friday evening in Wycliff School. Refreshments, prizes and a good time – all for 25 cents.

Breathe gentle zephyrs o’er snow-covered state,
Blow steady south wind, cross forest and lake
Urge spring-time sun they perennial power,
Burst waiting bud and unfold bashful flower.

Lines of winged strangers flock up from the south.
Sound calls and carols from many a mouth.
Fiel is long time white turn your black into green,
Gild fruitful autumn with glorious sheen.

Winnipegosis

One of the brightest events of the social season was a tea given by Mrs. Steele on the 17th. The decorations in the spacious drawing room were appropriately Irish in honor of the Saint and the same bright spring color prevailed throughout all the rooms and even reflected in the costumes of the young ladies serving and prepared out from the sandwiches. The event took the form of a shower to assist the young ladies of the Order of the Needle with a bazaar which the are planning.
Andrew Lunn, who has been hauling stone on a contract for the Manitoba Gypsum Company, will be through next week.
Mr. Hamilton returned last week with his family and will shortly move into the Bradley house.
The Red Cross Committee are planning a box social on the 27th in Rex Hall.
A large crowd was at the station to welcome Charlie Burrell on is return from overseas. He was somewhat exhausted from the trip up but is resting nicely now and will be glad to see his friends.
S. Coffey has his moving picture show in full swing again.

Winnipegosis

The second production of the Winnipegosis Dramatic Society which took place on the 7th inst., was a very creditable one. The play chosen, “The Arrival of Kitty,” is a 3-act farce of good construction, smart action and bright dialogue, and amused the house greatly. The cast was well balanced, so well balanced that special mention of individual’s would be out of place, each one of the players, including the Pup, having earned his or her meed of praise. The production showed marks of greater experience on the part of the promoters, and improvement in this direction is not yet complete.
The gross receipts amounted to $121, the allocation of which, and plans for the future, will be discussed at an early meeting of the society.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 19 – 1914

1914 Nov 19 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred five miles west of Sifton on the 18th, when Joseph Thomashewski, aged 30 years, lost his life. He was out hunting rabbits at the time. He wounded one and as the little animal started to run away he raised the gun and struck at struck at it. The gun was discharged by the act and the contents lodged in his stomach. The unfortunate man died on the spot.

1914 Nov 19 – Fire at Mossey River

Thos. Glendenning, whose farm is at the mouth of the Mossey River at Lake Dauphin, had his stables destroyed by fire on Friday last, the 13th isn’t. All the contents of the stables were burned. There was no insurance.

1914 Nov 19 – Had Hand Taken Off

Leslie Nash, a boy 14 years of age, was brought from Roblin on Tuesday and placed in the hospital here. He was out hunting rabbits at Roblin, when his gun was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his left arm. The wound was a bad one and was found necessary to amputate the hand. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.

1914 Nov 19 – Little Girl Smothered

A sad fatality happened at Gilbert Plains on Wednesday, when Thos. Poole’s two-year-old daughter was smothered. The little girl, 2 years old and her brother, 4 years, were left in the home, while Mrs. Poole was absent for a short time. In the meantime fire started with the result that the little girl was smothered. The boy will recover.

1914 Nov 19 – Ethelbert

The sleighing is fine. Farmers are bringing in wood now.
The Ethelbert mill is running all right now. This is what is wanted, a good mill.
Henry Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Nov 19 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, municipal tax collector, spent a short time here on business lately.
Mr. Fleming, of the Northern Elevator has returned from a few days visit to his old home in Veregin, Sask.
Mr. D. Kennedy, manager of the A.T. Co., returned from a short vacation south and reports having enjoyed his outing.
Mrs. C. Clark’s friends will be pleased to hear she has arrived safely at her home in Paswegan, Sask.
The threshermen’s annual ball came off on Friday night and proved an enjoyable affair. Everyone enjoyed the outing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” and we trust all arrived safe.
The Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, took the service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Sid Gower, who has been spending the summer at Winnipeg, is renewing acquaintances here.
Mr. Green has returned from Dauphin, having taken Mr. Wiley’s place at St. Paul’s on Sunday.

1914 Nov 19 – Winnipegosis

Miss Bernice Walker, of Dauphin, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Ross, returned home by Monday’s train.
Hon. Hugh and Mrs. Armstrong are visiting at the home of Mrs. Bradley.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele arrived in town on Saturday’s train from Warroad, en route to Mafeking. They are visiting at the home of Mrs. J.P. Grenon.
A number of young folks took this season’s first sleigh ride to Fork River to the Threshermen’s ball. All report having a good time.
The curling and skating rinks are fast getting into shape. E.R. Black has the contract for making the ice.
The bachelor apartments were the scene of an enjoyable evening last week. A whist drive and any oyster supper finished a very pleasant evening.
Ed. Cartwright and family left on Monday’s train for Mafeking, where Mr. Cartwright looks after the interests of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.
Ben Hechter has been laid up trough sickness for the past few days.
When are we going to have the formal opening of the new school?
Jos. Grenon, manager of the Winnipegosis hatchery, left on Monday’s train for Fort Qu’Appelle, with sixteen million whitefish eggs, for the new government hatchery there.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 16 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 16 – Boy Killed

A sad accident happened near Ashville on Friday, when Michael, the 12 year old son of Joseph Sosnowski, who lives near Valley River, was run over by the engine of Winters’ threshing outfit and instantly killed. The boy was following the engine round and jumping on and off it securing rides. At the time the accident happened the boy was standing on it when it suddenly started, throwing him under one of the big wheels which passed over his body instantly killing him.

1913 Oct 16 – Fork River

Bert Cooper left for Winnipeg and expects to spend a few months there on business. D.F. Wilson returned from a trip south on important business. Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre, is on a visit to friends at Neepawa, in company with her grandson, Mr. Monnington, who after paying a visit here left for his home. Thos. Toye, councillor for ward 5 is making an inspection trip. The annual children’s service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, on Oct. 19th. Parents are requested to come and bring the little ones and help make this a hearty service. All are cordially invited. The first fall of snow fell on Friday and stopped threshing for a day or two. This week will about wind up the threshing. Fred. Cooper and W. Northam, returned from a rip to the Lake Town on business. Things are quiet there, most of the fishermen having left for the winter fishing at different points up the lake. Mr. Elliot, the new Methodist student for this mission, who is living at Winnipegosis, is visiting among his people here. T.N. Briggs, municipal road contractor, is busy making the dirt fly. We notice that municipal toothpick has managed to get across the track and the postmaster’s Plymouth Rocks are using it to pick their teeth with after it has been laying all summer on the platform. Mike says up to the present he wondered what it was got for. There are several buyers around rustling up cattle this fall. We have been informed that Harry Little has been appointed bailiff in the absence of W. Stonehouse. John Reid, of Sifton, paid us a visit on Sunday and Mr. Williams returned with him for evening service at that point.

1913 Oct 16 – Sifton

A new house not quite completed, belonging to J.G. Gillies, was burned last week. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Wasyl Felix Marantz returned on Saturday night from Dauphin, where he attended the Jewish service.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

1919 Oct 16 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

1919 Oct 16 – Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 6 – 1914

1914 Aug 6 – C.N.R. Excursion to Winnipegosis

The 2nd annual picnic of the Dauphin employees of the Canadian Northern Railway will be held on Tuesday, August 18th, at Winnipegosis. An excellent programme of events has been arranged, consisting of foot races, boat races, swimming races, lake trips, dancing, tug-of-war, and a baseball match, mechanical dept. vs. traffic dept. Band in attendance. Train will leave Dauphin at 8:30 a.m. and returning will leave Winnipegosis at 8 p.m.

1914 Aug 6 – Dauphin Officers 32nd Horse

The 32nd Manitoba Horse will undoubtedly be pressed into service. “C” men. The following are the officers:
Major G.C.J. Walker.
Captain. H.K. Newcombe.
Lieutenants P. Wilson, E. Manby, L. Shand, E.P. Milward.
Sergeant-Major Fletcher; Sergts. T. Coghian, G. Fraser, Alguire.

1914 Aug 6 – From the Seat of War

London, Aug. 6.
The war situation is extremely critical at present. All Europe is little better than a vast powder magazine.
The British fleet is concentrated in the North Sea and it is quite probable that important engagements have already taken place. All cables are being used almost exclusively for war purposes.
The cutting of the German telegraph and telephone connections and the severance of the German trans-Atlantic cable virtually cut Germany from communication with other countries. Reports from France, Belgium, Holland and Russia showed that Germany’s armies were steadily moving east and west, and that her advance posts were in contact with the opposing Russian and French armies.

1914 Aug 6 – Glen Campbell to Raise Scout Troop

The Militia department at Ottawa has received an offer from Glen Campbell offering to raise and command a troop of scouts.
Several Dauphin men have been offered positions in the troop and some, it is understood, will accept.

1914 Aug 6 – Fork River

Gerald Stuart, of Winnipeg, is spending his holidays with his aunt, Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, and is putting in a good time at the lake.
Mr. Earie, engineer, and his assistant are putting in an apparatus for taking the levels of the Mossey River at Wilson’s.
E. Williams, lay reader, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. J. Reid of North Lake, and has a very enjoyable time.
J.R. Roblin, Government engineer, paid Reeve King a visit in connection with the roadwork being doe in the municipality.
Several ratepayers turned out to the annual school meeting on Saturday night. No “biz” was done as the books were not audited. It’s strange how the heat affects even our school officers.
Mrs. King had tomatoes ripe in the last week of July in her garden and also corn.
A good rain is needed to cook things off.
W.W. Cooper and family, who have been absent from this burgh over a year, returned and are staying with their people, Walter Cooper, Sr., on the Mossey River.
We hear F.B. Lacey is to be the councillor for ward 6, as unfortunately Sam Reid’s papers did not arrive till twenty minutes past two, and the returning officer refused to take them then and stated it was law. Yes, that is the law. What a difference; a week ago a farmer wanted redress for stock destroying his crop and every obstacle was put in the way to prevent him securing justice.
Pat says give a calf rope enough and it will hang itself in time. True, and if public opinion is anything to bank on there will be no one to cut the calf down.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey has returned from Winnipeg and reports a present holiday.
We notice in the Winnipegosis news that the Fork River dredge has been sent to Pine Creek, while the Winnipegosis lays rotting on the river. More will be heard of this unfair deal to Fork River later on.