Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 11 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 11 – Fork River

Mr. Mornington, of Neepawa, is spending the hunting season with John Robinson, of Mowat.
Several cars are being loaded with bailed hay at this point. The hay is of good quality.
David Briggs, of Brandon, and Ed. Briggs, of Souris, are visiting their brother, T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey during the hunting seasons.
John Tidsberry of Dauphin, spent a few days here on business lately.
John Clemens was lucky enough to get a noose and is now busy shipping grain from the elevator as farmers are busy drawing in grain this nice weather.
The municipal election is in full blast and the candidates are busy as bees.
Fred Cooper and W. Williams have returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The mayor, aldermen and several others of Winnipegosis, attended the nomination at Fork River. Everything passed off quietly.
Wm. Foley and Mr. Elliot were visitors here on Sunday last.
Nat Little and son are buying up another shipment of cattle.
Fork River has a blacksmith now. Once as been wanted for some time badly. Another new industry is a laundry.
The annual school meeting for Mossey River S.D. was held in the municipal office on Dec. 1st. A. Hunt the retiring trustee, was returned for another term. A school in the village is needed very much as the majority of the scholars have to travel a mile and a half from the village and often farther.
Wm. Northam has returned from a visit to Weyburn, Sask.

1919 Dec 11 – Two Fatal Accidents

Two accidents occurred at the weekend which resulted fatally. Oliver Trann, who was employed by Evans & McEwen at their sawmill in the Riding Mountain, was killed on Friday by a falling tree. He was a resident of Crystal City, Man., and 28 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children.
Peter Terresdale, aged 22 years, received he contents of a shotgun in the left hand and abdomen at McPherson’s camp on Saturday afternoon. He was removing a shotgun from a sleigh when it accidentally discharged. He was taken to the hospital and died there on Sunday afternoon. Deceased’s home in in Indiana.

1919 Dec 11 – Fork River

The Christmas tree arranged for to be held in Orange Hall on Christmas eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ Church, has been cancelled. The S.S. will have their Xmas tree in the church on Xmas eve, and the staff hopes to have a pleasant time with the scholars.
Rev. Mr. Roberts held service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, 7th inst.
At the annual meeting of Purple Star L.O.L. No. 1765, the brethren decided to hold a ball on New Year’s Eve. Good music and supper. Admission, gents, $1.
The following officers of Purple Star, L.O.L., were elected: Bro. Fred. King, W.M.; H. Hunter, D.M.; M. Cooper, chaplain; W. King, R.S., reelected; A. Hunt, F.S. C.E. Bailey. Treas.; Edwin King, D of C.; F.F. Hafenbrak, lecturer; S. Reid, D.L.; F. Cooper, 1st com.; W. Russell, Fred. Armstrong, J. Bickel, committeemen.
A very interesting debate took place in All Saints’ Church on the evening of Dec. 3rd, under the auspices of the Sunday school. Subject of debate was, “Resolved, that a city boy has greater advantages than a country boy.” The captain for the affirmative was Mrs. A.J. Little; negative, Mr. Jarvis. Very interesting points where given on both sides although the negative won by five points. Chairman for the evening was W. King; critic, D.F. Wilson, Sr.; judges, Miss Hess, Mrs. E.V. Lockwood and D.F. Wilson, Jr. These regular Wednesday evening meetings are for the advancement of the Sunday school and any one interested in the work are invited. Meeting for Dec. 10th will be in the form of a parlor field meet and is in the hands of The Daniel’s Band, Mr. Lockwood’s class of boys.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 6 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 6 – Fork River

Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. They report a very pleasant time.
F.B. Lacey from Mowat Centre, returned from a visit to Dauphin on business and to attend the teachers’ convention.
We are informed that Capt. Cain, of Mowat, left for Dauphin to take out a license of some sort. Time will tell whether it is for fish, flesh or fowl.
Mrs. Frost and daughter, of Rathwell, are visiting her daughter, Mrs. Reid, on the Mossey River.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey, is spending the week in Dauphin, with friends.
Archie McDonald, who has been busy with a gang ditching on the company’s farm here, has returned to Winnipegosis, the ground having frozen too hard to do any more work this season.
Miss J. Weatherhead, teacher of the Mossey River School, spent the weekend with friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Roe, of Neepawa, has left for the west with his second consignment of cattle from this point.
John Seiffert, and Steve Letwyn, of Winnipegosis, are busy among the farmers, buying cattle for the company’s at South Bay.
Wm. Coultas has invested in stock and intends stall feeding them for Xmas beef. We believe Billy is on the road to become a millionaire in the near future. Farmers take notice and follow suit.
Frank Clawson, of Dauphin, is here renewing old acquaintances.
Mrs. N. Little, and daughter, Miss Grace, took a trip south on business for a few days.
Mr. O’Callagan, of Portage la prairie, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is visiting the Co.’s store on his semi-annual tour of inspection, and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Messrs. Sturdy, White and Shears, of Winnipegosis, are busy at the Co.’s store this week taking stock.
Mrs. Stonehouse and daughter, Miss Sylvia paid the lake town a visit this week.
Hallowe’en passed off with the usual result. Some are minus their gates, others are looking for strayed buggies. The bell of All Saints’ received its annual visit and was fixed up as usual to keep it from running away, while the other building is left in peace as usual. This is where unity comes in, we suppose; yes, with a vengeance.
Our Winnipegosis friends seem to be grieved at the way they are used by the Mossey River municipal board and would like to know if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map. Better ask somebody else, I guess. But one thing we do know at tax paying time we are not allowed to forget our residence. Not very likely Mike.

1913 Nov 6 – Winnipegosis

Capt. Coffey was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday’s train.
The ice on the lake is firm enough to permit travel between the mainland and Snake Island. If the weather becomes warm again which it threatens now, navigation will be resumed.
Frank Hechter left for Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday. Frank is up and down pretty often and helps keep the C.N.R. running.
J.P. Grenon is off to Quebec, where he will study mink farming. The mink farm at Macaza has proved a decided success and he is anxious to learn something of the methods employed in rearing this little animal which produces such a fine grade of fur. The fox branch of Mr. G’s ranch is making progress, and there is every prospect of it becoming a profitable industry. Fish and fur producing animals abound in this part of the West and if the industries flourish as we hope they will there is no reason why the people here should not become prosperous, if not wealthy. The fishing industry is a great asset and the timber resources are large and are being profitable exploited. With good land for farming and cattle raising at the back of all, no part of he West offers better inducements for settlers than this town and district.
The telephone line is now completed and it is sure to prove a great convenience. Postmaster Ketcheson is in charge of the service. The connections are small at present but they are sure to grow. Those connected up with the service are Canadian Lakes Fishing Co., The Armstrong Trading Co. and Frank Hechter. Dauphin is the Central checking office.
Cattle buyers have been in the district of late but have not secured many animals as that canna Scot, Capt. Dugald McAuley, usually covers the district like a blanket.

1919 Nov 6 – Soldiers Banqueted at Fork River

One of the largest banquets held in Northern Manitoba took place at Fork River on Friday night, the 31st ult. The banquet was gotten up by the people of the Mossey River municipality and tendered to the returned soldiers. The supper was held in the Orange Hall, and it is estimated that fully two hundred and fifty people sat down to the splendid spread prepared by the ladies of the district.
Mossey River municipality was well represented by her sturdy sons in France and Flanders, and, like all Canadians, they did their part well. Some of the boys were destined not to return and today rest under the sod across the ocean. Others survived their wounds. The occasion was one for rejoicing.
Each soldier was remembered in a tangible form and presented with either a gold watch and guard or a well-filled purse. It was a recognition of the men well worthy of any community.

TOAST LIST.
Following the supper there was a short toast list. Mr. Geo. King, of Dauphin, was toastmaster. The list included “The King.”
“The British Empire,” proposed by Geo. Spence, of Winnipegosis, and responded to by Principal Jonasson, of Winnipegosis, and the Rev. Mr. Roberts.
“The Municipality of Mossey River,” proposed by ex-Reeve F.B. Lacey, and responded to by Coun. Hunt and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
“Our Hosts and Hostesses,” was proposed by the Rev. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin.
The address to the soldiers was read by Mr. Wm. King, and the presentations made by Sergt. Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
The men made suitable replies, in which they each returned their heartfelt thanks.
At the conclusion of the speech making the hall was cleared and the young people indulged in a dance.
There were a number of guests present from Dauphin, Winnipegosis and other points.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 16 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 16 – Boy Killed

A sad accident happened near Ashville on Friday, when Michael, the 12 year old son of Joseph Sosnowski, who lives near Valley River, was run over by the engine of Winters’ threshing outfit and instantly killed. The boy was following the engine round and jumping on and off it securing rides. At the time the accident happened the boy was standing on it when it suddenly started, throwing him under one of the big wheels which passed over his body instantly killing him.

1913 Oct 16 – Fork River

Bert Cooper left for Winnipeg and expects to spend a few months there on business. D.F. Wilson returned from a trip south on important business. Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre, is on a visit to friends at Neepawa, in company with her grandson, Mr. Monnington, who after paying a visit here left for his home. Thos. Toye, councillor for ward 5 is making an inspection trip. The annual children’s service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, on Oct. 19th. Parents are requested to come and bring the little ones and help make this a hearty service. All are cordially invited. The first fall of snow fell on Friday and stopped threshing for a day or two. This week will about wind up the threshing. Fred. Cooper and W. Northam, returned from a rip to the Lake Town on business. Things are quiet there, most of the fishermen having left for the winter fishing at different points up the lake. Mr. Elliot, the new Methodist student for this mission, who is living at Winnipegosis, is visiting among his people here. T.N. Briggs, municipal road contractor, is busy making the dirt fly. We notice that municipal toothpick has managed to get across the track and the postmaster’s Plymouth Rocks are using it to pick their teeth with after it has been laying all summer on the platform. Mike says up to the present he wondered what it was got for. There are several buyers around rustling up cattle this fall. We have been informed that Harry Little has been appointed bailiff in the absence of W. Stonehouse. John Reid, of Sifton, paid us a visit on Sunday and Mr. Williams returned with him for evening service at that point.

1913 Oct 16 – Sifton

A new house not quite completed, belonging to J.G. Gillies, was burned last week. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Wasyl Felix Marantz returned on Saturday night from Dauphin, where he attended the Jewish service.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

1919 Oct 16 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

1919 Oct 16 – Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 28 – 1913

1913 Aug 28 – Broke His Leg

John Coleen, of Red Deer Point, Lake Winnipegosis, broke his leg on Tuesday by falling out of a wagon. He was brought to the hospital here on Wednesday by Dr. Medd.

1913 Aug 28 – Ethelbert

Peter Pundy was arraigned before Magistrate Skaife last week charged by George Marantz with plastering manure over he windows of his store. He was found guilty and the fine and costs amounted to $31. There is talk of Pundy appealing the case.
Wheat cutting is going ahead with all possible speed. The bulk of the crop will be cut by Saturday night.
The Ruthenians have organized a Conservative association with a good membership. The following are the officers elected: Sam Hughes, M.P.P., Honorary President; N.A. Hryhorczuk, President; P. Kuzyk, Vice; K.F. Slipetz, sec.-treasurer and organizer.

1913 Aug 28 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens of Dauphin, spent a short time renewing old acquaintances last week.
Mr. Morrison, of the Canadian Oil Co. of Winnipeg, was busy here taking orders for gasoline and oil.
Our weed inspector is busy these days. One of our farmers was mulcted to the tune of twenty-five dollars and costs. We are informed another man at Winnipegosis was put to the trouble of having a gang of men cutting down a common weed for sow thistle. This weed business seems a complicated proposition and needs handling very carefully. The enforcing of the act has become a necessity here.
We are informed that a new fruit store is in operation. Opposition is the life of trade we are told.
Fred. Storrar returned from Winnipegosis, where he had charge of a booth during the picnic and reports a swell time.
Mrs. McEacheron and son, Donny, are spending, a few days with her sister, Mrs. E. Morris, at Winnipegosis.
In the absence of the constable last week we hear the lady suffragettes held a successful meeting and everything passed off quietly till they meet again.
Mrs. Kennedy and family and Miss A. Godkin returned from Winnipegosis, after spending a week at that point among their numerous friends.
Quite a number took in the trainmen’s picnic to Winnipegosis and report having a good time there.
James McDonald returned from a two weeks’ visit among friends in the south and is looking hearty and has resumed charge of the express automobile.
Picture to yourself Main Street east in our little burgh where night after night a band of from twenty to forty head of cattle laying around till there is not room to pass between them and the dwelling houses with a team and the aroma that arises with a hot sun beating down on it every day. Again, a benighted traveller crossing over in the dark and landing in one of those pyramids dedicated to the memory of cowology. A voice calling to be helped out and a pillar of brimstone and fire arises blazoned with it, to the downfall of those who put the herd law out of existence. Is it not a disgrace to a civilized community to put up with such a state of affairs.
Mrs. W. King returned from a short stay at Winnipegosis with her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, during the illness of her little son who died last week.
The Rev. Mr. Roberts held service in the Methodist Church on the 24th.
The Rev. Mr. Wosney will hold service in All Saints’ English Church every Sunday at three in the afternoon till further notice.
The first car of fish of the season passed through here from Lake Winnipegosis last week.
A large assortment of vegetables is shipped from this point which is sampled by the stock running at large to the discomfort of the shipper.