Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 14, 1919

Fair Notes

Some of the ladies were quite disappointed that there was no baby show this year. The baby show was very popular in past years and it was undoubtedly an oversight that it was not held this year. Mr. John Gorby, who was had charge of this department in past years, is the champion of the ladies and the babies and it will not be his fault if the show is not held next year. The babies are out greatest national asset and their welfare is contributed to by information supplied by physicians and professional nurses at these exhibitions.
The directors worked hard for several weeks to complete the details of the fair and have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts were appreciated and the exhibition a success in every way.
Chas. Murray, the patient and tireless secretary, had a busy three days of it.
The stock parade, headed by the band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was a striking feature on Friday.
Over 5000 people passed through the turnstiles on Friday.
The War Saving and Theft Stamp advertising display was very much in evidence on the grounds. The entrance to the grounds, the main building, grand stand, ticket office and other places throughout the grounds were nicely decorated with different lines of posters. It was evident that Mr. Blackadar intended that the large crowds that gathered each day on the grounds should be thoroughly informed regarding this movement.

Successful Exhibition

The 28th annual fair of the Dauphin Agricultural society, held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of last week, was the most successful in its history. And this, too, in the face of the fact that the farmers were in the midst of the harvest. While it is true there was a falling off in most of the departments it is a noteworthy fact the exhibits generally were of a superior class. The livestock was the best ever shown here. Two notable herds were J.D. McGregor’s Aberdeens and John Graham’s shorthorns. In the Clydesdale, Percherons, Agricultural and light horses many fine animals were shown and nearly all the leading breeders of the district were represented.
The poultry section was by long odds the best in the history of the society. The exhibit was not only large but of the highest quality. Much credit is due the Poultry Association and its energetic secretary. Wm. Murray, for the success achieved.
The attractions were exceptionally good. The band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders from Winnipeg furnished the music on Friday and the splendid program was enjoyed by all.
Credit is due Mr. Wm. Rintoul for the manner in which the numerous young ladies executed the intricate dances. The little girls also did exceptionally well.
The Scotch dancing by the two little Simpson girls, to the music of the bagpipes played by their father, caught the fancy of the big crowd.
At 1.30 several hundred war veterans assembled in front of the grand stand and on behalf of the citizens Mayor Bowman extended them a hearty welcome. In his address he referred to the historic places in France where the Canadians made history and achieved undying fame. Robt. Cruise, M.P., also spoke, Major Williams, in the absence of Brig. Gen. Ketchen, replied on behalf of the men. Major Skinner added a few words in regard to a suitable memorial for those who had made the supreme sacrifice.

Fork River

E. Harris, formerly of Bracebridge, Ont., is visiting at the home of Fred Cooper.
Don’t forget to come to Fork River’s annual agricultural show, Friday, August 15th.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s, Dauphin, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican church, Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24 h, at 3.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake school, has returned home from visiting at Cypress River and Neepawa and is feeling better after her trip.
The White Star Co.’s new elevator is nearly completed. Thus the commercial importance of this centre grows.
Owen Pruder is busy overhauling the Northern elevator so as to have it ready for the fall delivery of grain.

Sifton

The marriage of Miss Anna Farion, daughter of Fred Farion, merchant, of this place, to Mr. W. Belashta of Canora, was celebrated at St. Paul’s parish church, on Wednesday, the 6th inst., at 9 p.m. Bishop Budka, with the assisting priests, officiated. Some two or three hundred invited guests were present. The church had been very tastefully decorated with flowers, which blended very pleasingly with the handsome costumes of the bride and attendants. To the lively strains of a bridal chorus, sung in Little Russian, the bride and groom, showered with confetti, and guests repaired to the large Ruthenian hall, where en exceptionally well appointed supper was served. Covers for at least two hundred and fifty were laid and the tables were used for several relays of guests. The hall was very tastefully festooned and draped, with roses and asters as floral decorations. An orchestra, composed of Ruthenians, four brothers, from Winnipeg, played very pleasingly and tastefully. Bishop Budka, on behalf of the guess, toasted the bride and bridegroom, the latter responded very neatly both in Little Russian and English. Dancing was kept up until daylight. A. Kozak, one of the old national Cossack dances, given most artistically by Miss Belashka, of Winnipeg, and Mr. Dyk, of Dauphin, was much admired; also the tasteful fox-trotting of Mr. Assifat. A number of visitors from Winnipeg were present, amongst others, Mrs. Stefanyk, Mr. and Mrs. Badnac, Dr. Pasdrey, and Lieut. Kreman editor of the Canadian Ruthenian. Mr and Mrs. Belashta have left for Canora, their future home, where Mr. Belashta is in the legal profession.
During the evening Mr. —– spoke at some length about the conflict between the Poles and so-called Ukrainians, the West Galicians, stating that Premier Lloyd George had alone amongst the Allied powers at the peace conference, expressed himself in favor of an independent Ukraina, separate from the claims of the Polish aristocracy. He was followed by Mr. F. Taciuk, of Dauphin. A collection, totaling one hundred and twenty dollars, was taken up to be forwarded to Europe for use against the Poles.

Winnipegosis

Geo. G. Spence, who was formerly manager for the Hudson’s Bay Company here, has bought T.H. Whale’s general store.
There is an average crop in this district in spite of the dry season. The grain is nearly all cut and threshing will soon commence.
All the fishermen in town are bustling getting in supplies and preparing for the fall fishing. Two of the companies large boats leave here within the next few days for points at the north end of the lake.
A party of forty business men came up from Dauphin Sunday and took a trip fifty miles up the lake, upon the steamer “Armenon.” The trip was an enjoyable one and everyone was delighted with it. A net was set on the voyage out and was taken in on the return voyage. Nineteen fish were caught and Mr. Dan Hamilton auctioneered them off and got as much as $2.00 for a “sucker.” A Dominion and a Provincial M.P. were among the party.
The English Church is holding a regular Sunday service at Winnipegosis.
The town council is planning for a new municipal hall and extensive sidewalks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 24, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above Association was held last Thursday, July 17th, Comrade F. Scrase, president, in chair.
Application for membership was received from eleven returned men, all of which were accepted. This now brings the total membership of the Dauphin Branch to 271. It is hoped that same will reach the 500 before the end of the year. Any returned men in the town that have not become members up to the present are asked to do so at an early ate, for like all other things, many can help one, and the greater the membership then so much more will be able to be done for the returned man by the association.
The auditors’ report for the past six months was submitted, and on motion of Comrades Armstrong and Miles it was accepted.
During the past year considerable progress has been made by the local branch in the town. The present new quarters were opened in March and between three and four hundred men have slept in these rooms during that period. When it is considered that no charge is made for the use of these and the fact that it is sometimes next to impossible to secure a room in the town on shot notice, the use and benefit of the rooms to the retuned men that are here looking for land and getting information and particulars re the Soldier Settlement, can be readily seen. The rooms are also used to a very great extent by the returned men of the town in the evenings, and also by the boys who are living on the farms when they are in town during the day, and were it not for them it would be hard to find a place for them to spend the time, especially the men that are here to make entry on land and are compelled, owing to waiting for trains, etc., to stay in the town over night or in some cases two or three days.
Application was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary for the use of the large hall on Aug. 6, 7 and 8 for the purpose of serving dinner, and same was granted by the comrades.
The next meeting of the association will be July 31st, and members are requested to make note of the date.

Peace Day Celebration

In spite of the counter attractions elsewhere the citizens turned out in large numbers to celebrate Peace Day in Dauphin. At 10 a.m. about 250 people gathered for a Union Thanksgiving Service, which was conducted by Captain Kitson and Rev. Harry P. Barrett, while the address was given by Rev. J.A. Haw.
At 1.30 the children gathered at the two schools and a procession of about 40 automobiles, crowded with happy youngsters, headed by the town band, went along Main street to Fourth avenue and Second street to the park. In the park races were run for all children and in many events there were so many competitors it was necessary to have two and sometimes three beats.
The grown-ups of the town brought baskets and quite a number of family parties were to be seen enjoying picnic tea on the grass. Hot water was supplied and a booth managed by the members of the Children’s Aid Society, under the conductorship of Mrs. Vance, dispensed ice cream, sandwiches, lemonade, etc. in aid of the Home.
The whole day’s programme was arranged at two hurriedly called meetings at which Mr. George King was chairman. It would be impossible to mention all who contributed to the success of the day, but we must make note of the energy and interest of the Committee, Rev. Harry P. Barrett, Messrs. Ramsay Skinner, R.J. Malcolm, Rintoul, D. Sutherland, Wright, Barker and Ferguson.

Fork River

Harvest is expected to begin at once. There is some good crop in the district this season, and the quality, too, is expected to be high.
Wm. Coultas is building a dwelling on his farm.
S.B. Reid and family are visiting at Rathwell, Man.
Fred. Cooper and Mr. Hunt and family are on a vacation to Saskatchewan points.
The wild raspberry crop is a prolific one this season and canned raspberries will be found settlers’ tables this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 13, 1919

Flogging Advocated

The problem of dealing with the small boy who smokes is troubling many of the teachers, the members of the school board and even the members of the town council, which body, at its last meeting appointed Coun. Houston and Katz to cooperate with the trustees as to the best means of remedying this undesirable sate of affairs.

Flogging Advocated
A correspondent writes: “We hear a great deal about the small boy who goes to school smoking and having tobacco on his person and the regrets expressed that the trouble can’t be remedied. If these boys attended school in England they would soon be disciplined, and in no namby-pamby style either. They would simply be flogged, and if one application was not sufficient the second strapping would effect the cure. But, after all is the small boy to blame when he sees the bigger boys parading the streets smoking both pipe and cigarette? Perhaps now that we have a committee to investigate they will bring in a report which will offer suggestions concerning the big boy as well as the small boy as to the bad effects of tobacco on the developing youth.”

Memorial Committee Busy

Chairman W. Rintoul, of the memorial committee, states that progress is being made. No definite plans have been considered as yet. A suggestion that an up to date skating and curing rink be built as a “memorial” is meeting with much favor in some quarters. Some favor a “community building,” others a monument, and so forth.

Opening G.W.V. Club Rooms

The new club rooms of the Great War Veterans will be opened on Tuesday evening next, the 18th inst. There will be a short musical program at which Mayor Bowman will preside. Later there will be dancing and cards. Refreshments will be served. The McMurray orchestra will furnish the music. The public are invited to attend.

“Still” Operators Fined

For some time past there has been an increasing supply of what is known as “domestic’ manufactured liquor. The manufacture was exclusively in the hands of the foreign element. Almost any tin vessel from a teapot to a ten gallon can was improvised as a “still.” And despite the crudeness of the particles used to manufacture the “liquor” a fairly good brand is said, by those who sampled it, to have ben produced in some cases. But the promoters’ dreams of accumulating wealth in an easy manner, were destined to failure. Collector Ball was soon wise to the operation of the “stills” and with the assistance of the local police, rounded up three parties who were either operating or connected with the enterprises.
The parties were Mike Torharczuk, Fred Moranczuk and M. Silverman. Informations were laid under the Inland Revenue act, and they appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday and were found guilty. Torharczuk and Moranczuk were each $200 and costs, and Silverman $250 and costs.

War Bride to Arrive

The first war bride that is to come to Dauphin is expected to arrive about the first of next week. During the month of December Sergt. Harold Crowe was married to a young lady in London. The young couple sailed on the Grampian, which was due to arrive at Halifax on Wednesday.

Fork River

Pte. Eales and his war bride have arrived from overseas. They are visiting at the home of H. Pearson.
The manager of the Northern Lumber Co. was a recent visitor to our town. The company may open a lumber yard here.
Mr. Osborne, municipal auditor, is auditing the books of the municipality. When he is through we shall expect the council to have the report printed. This is the only way the ratepayers have of knowing how their money is being spent and the law directs that the report be published.
Mr. Martin, homestead inspector, was here last week in connection with the applications of returned soldiers for land.
The stork visited the home of H. Little last week and left a wee girlie.
Wm. King is visiting Dauphin and Winnipeg this week.
Jack Richardson has purchased a registered Holstein bull, having sold his old sire to Thos. Toye, of Bicton Heath.
The committee which is looking after the interests of the returned soldiers has been organized and is now composed as follows: Owen Pruder, S.L. Gower, A. Hunt, J. Shuchett, J.D. Robertson, Thos. Briggs, F. Cooper, and W. King, sec.-treasurer.

Ethelbert

At a well attended meeting of the Ukrainian farmers held at Ethelbert on March 1st, the following resolution were unanimously passed. Over $100 was collected at the gathering which will be devoted to assisting the returned men.

RESOLUTION NO. 1
1. Having experienced the hardship of the newcomer, we therefore wish to help the returned men to settle with their families on the land. We are ready to volunteer at any time to graciously help any returned soldier settling in our district on the land by offering at least one day’s work on his farm in plowing or doing any required improvements, and will also arrange to have his family and luggage brought from the station to his respective land.
2. We also wish to assure such newcomers that friendly and neighborly assistance will always be at their disposal and that such returned men shall not suffer an want or hardship of a beginner. Carried.

RESOLUTION NO. 2
That we, as one of the Dominion Communities of Canada, do express our belief and faith in the principle of the League of Nations which has recently come into being at the Peace Conference at Paris.
That while believing in the self interim nation of nationalities, we cordially support the idea of human brotherhood and the new international order expressed in its terms.
That we look to the League as the ultimate solvent of the barriers which have hitherto divided mankind and plunged them in recurring strife.
That we also believe the protection of customs tariff the most potent and evil of all the barriers against the unity of mankind must be broken down to insure the permanence of political peace and the continued effectiveness of the League.
That we hold the Farmers’ platform as adopted by the Grain Growers’ conventions recently held in the Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, to be a welcome step in the direction of that universal free trade which must be chief buttress of a stable international order.
And also that we cordially support the other reforms contained in the same platform.

RESOLUTION NO. 3
That we wish that a committee be appointed whose duty it will be to help the returned men coming into our midst. Carried.