Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 22, 1920

Ethelbert

We have been asked to publish a copy of telegram sent to the Acting Prime Minister at Ottawa by the Ruthenians of this vicinity. It is herewith:
“Canadians of Ukrainian descent, in mass meeting assembled at Ethelbert, unanimously protest against the brutal invasion of Ukrainian East Galicia by imperialistic Poland, against the decision of Peace conference of July 11th, sanctioning the invasion, and against the decision of Supreme Council of November 20th awarding to Polish invaders a mandate over Ukrainian East Galicia for twenty five years. We appeal through the Canadian Government to the Government of Great Britain and other allied governments and people to right great wrong done to four million Ukrainians of East Galicia. We urge governments to have polish invading armies withdrawn from Ukrainian East Galicia to have that territory occupied by inter-allied armies, and to compel Poland to make reparation for destruction of Ukrainian villages and towns, and to indemnify families of civilians murdered by Polish soldiery or robbed by Polish officials. We appeal to governments to settle East Galician question in accordance with wish of people concerned. We request the Canadian Government to convey this our appeal to the government of Great Britain and to British plenipotentiaries at Paris.”
The above protest shows clearly where the root of wrong is and what the Ukrainians demand.

Fork River

The first annual Grain Growers’ Masquerade Ball, which took place Friday evening, the 16th of January, was a huge success and the big event of the New Year. The costumes were varied and created a pretty color scheme. There were six prizes awarded. Miss Gertrude Cooper as a Japanese lady, and Mr. D. Briggs, as a soldier, were awarded the prize for the best dancers. Mrs. Charles Bailey, representing a Gypsy fortune teller, was awarded first prize for best lady’s costume; Miss Viola Rowe, representing a country maid with her quaint hat, dress and crook was awarded second prize. Dr. A.J. Little, representing a colored dude was awarded first prize for best gentleman’s costume. Mr. Milton Cooper as Pierrot, was awarded second prize. The prize for best comic costume was awarded to Mr. Norman Shannon, who represented a tramp. The judges were Mrs. T.B. Venables, Mrs. A.J. Little and Mr. Williamson. After the judging and unmasking at midnight refreshments were served.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rawson are moving to Winnipegosis.
Fork River Literary and Debating Society met at the home of Mrs. A.J. Little, Saturday evening last to discuss the next debate, which will be held Wednesday evening, Feb. 4.
Fork River Women’s Institute met at Mrs. Tuck’s Saturday afternoon for the election of officers and to appoint directors for Agricultural Society. Mrs. A.J. Little was elected Secretary to succeed Mrs. Ina Briggs, Mrs. T.B. Venables and Mrs. McEachern were elected directors.
Mr. Fleming Wilson, Mr. T.B. Venables, Mr. Duncan Briggs, delegates to the Grain Growers’ convention held at Brandon, gave their reports on Tuesday evening’s meeting.

Winnipegois

The Tennis Club is arranging to hold a masquerade ball on Friday, Feb, 18th. A ball is always popular and a masquerade ball doubly so. This dance promises to be the event of the season.
The fish catch has been exceptionally good this winter. The December catch was the largest in the history of the late. Many of the fishermen will return from the north early next month.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 9, 1919

Fork River

Miss Millidge, organizer of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Anglican Church, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. W. King.
Mrs. Vinning and daughter, of Winnipeg, have returned home after spending a week with Mrs. J. Reid.
T.N. Briggs has invested in an oil pull tractor. This power will turn over the land more rapidly. It’s more speed that counts these times.
Bert Little has taken a trip to Chicago. Fred Tilt is in charge of the store during his absence.
The Cypress River paper, in a recent issue contains the following item:
“Mr. and Mrs. N. Little both old time residents of Cypress River and town this week. They left home in May for an overseas tour, and visited the battlefields of France and Belgium, securing many photos of great interest. They sailed to New York on a French boat and went from there to Toronto near which city Mr. Little purchased a new model 1920 McLaughlin 6 cylinder car and motored to Cypress. They are now on their way home. The same cherry Nat as of old looking as young as ever.”

Fork River Fair Prize Winners

The following is a list of the prizes awarded at the Fork River fair, held on the 26th ult.:
HORSES.
Draft stallion, A. Rudkanvitch. Pair draft mares or geldings, P. Toperasky. Draft filly or gelding, Fred King. Pair agricultural, mares or geldings, Fred King; J. Bodnarchuk 2nd. Brood mare, J. Bodnarchuk. Agricultural, 2-year-old, mare or gelding, M. Bayko; T.B. Venables, 2nd. One-year-old, mare or gelding, Chas. Pereski. Foal, John Bodnarchuk. T.B. Venables’ special, foal by Baron Regal, W. Williams. Pair of drivers, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
Beef cattle (pure-bred), bull over 1 year, 1 and 2, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
T.B. Venables took first prize for cow 3 years and over, 2 year-old heifer, bull calf, and heifer calf.
Grade cattle (beef type), heifer, 1 year old, S. Narvasod; W. Williams 2.
Dairy cattle (pure-bred), bull, 1 year old and over, F.F. Hafenbrak. Grade dairy cattle, cow 3 years old, 1 and 2, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
Fat cattle, yearling steer, W. Williams.
Sheep—Ram, 1 year and over, D.F. Wilson and Sons; T.B. Venables 2nd. Pair of ewes D.F. Wilson and Sons; T.B. Venables 2nd. D.F. Wilson and Sons took first and 2nd prizes for pair shearling ewes, pair ewe lambs and pair fat sheep. Ram, any age, P. Soloman.
Pigs, bacon types—Boar under 1 year, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Sow, under 1 year, D.F. Wilson and Sons, 1st and 2nd. Pair pigs, under 6 months, F.F. Hafenbrak. Lard type—Boar under 1 year, F.F. Hafenbrak. Pair pigs, under 6 months, F.H. Richardson; F.F. Hafenbrak, pair pigs by boar Gladstone, J.H. Richardson.

POULTRY
Wyandottes, white. D.F. Wilson, jr. Buff, 1st and 2nd, D.F. Wilson, sr. Plymouth Rocks, barred, W. King. White, W. King. Leghorns, white, F.H. Benner. Brown, T.B. Venables. Rhode Island Reds, F.F. Hafenbrak. Any other variety, W. King; 2nd, S. Narvasod. Pair spring chickens, any variety, D.F. Wilson, jr; 2nd, W. King. Pair geese, D.F. Wilson; 2nd, T.B. Venables. Pair ducks, S. Narvasod; 2nd, M.A. Munroe. Best collection of poultry, W. King.

DOMESTIC AND DAIRYY PRODUCE.
Homemade bread, Mrs. Pruden; 2nd Mrs. Rawson. Twelve buns, Mrs. A. Rowe. Homemade pickles, Mrs. Rawson; 2nd, Mrs. F.F. Hafenbrak. Collection of preserved and canned fruit, Mrs. Brunsden; 2nd, Mrs. King. 5lbs butter, Mrs. Shiels; 2nd, Mrs. King. Home cured bacon, D.F. Wilson; home cured ham, D.F. Wilson.

GARDEN PRODUCE.
Potatoes, white, G.H. Tilt; 2nd F.H. Benner. Colored, W.H. Johnson; 2nd, T.B. Venables. Turnips, P. Solomon; 3rd W. King. Carrots, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Beets, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd G.H. Tilt. Mangels, T.B. Venables; 2nd, N.H. Johnston, Cabbage, R. Senieuk; 2nd G.H. Tilt; Cauliflowers, Charles Pereski; 2nd, G.H. Tilt. Pumpkins or squash, F.F. Hafenbrak; 2nd W. King. Cucmbers, W. King; 2nd, R. Senieuk. Corn, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd W. King. Tomatoes, F.F. Hafenbrak; 2nd W. King. Parsnips, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Celery, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd G.H. Tilt. Onions, G.H. Tilt. Rhubarb, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Lettuce, S. Narvasod. Beans, T.B. Venables 2nd W. King. Peas, W. King.
Grain and Grana—Sheaf of barley—H. Harrineuk; 2 nd J. Smiduke. Sheaf of oats, L.V. Hafenbrak. Sheaf of rye, F.H. Bennes. Sheaf of flax. H. Herrineuk.

LADIES’ WORK.
Tray cloth, Mrs. Rowe; 2nd Mrs. Eales. Tea cosy, Mrs. McEcheran; 2nd, Ms. A. Rowe. Table centre, Mrs. McEcheran; 2nd Miss K.E. Briggs. Table mats, Miss S. Briggs; 2nd, Mrs. A. Rowe. Eyelet embroidery, Mrs. A. Rowe; 2nd Miss K. E. Briggs. Punch work, Mrs. A. Rowe. Handmade pillow cases, Miss S. Briggs. Homemade towels, Miss S. Briggs. Handmade bedspread, Miss K.E. Briggs. Homemade ladies’ underwear, Miss K. Briggs. Homemade corset cover, Mrs. Pruden; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Sofa cushion, Miss K.E. Briggs; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Fancy workbag, Miss K.E. Briggs; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Knitted stockings, Mrs. Venables; 2nd Miss Lacey.

The baby show brought out 12 entries, Mrs. A. Rowe taking first honors and Mrs. Garnet Lacey second.

Winnipegosis

The Anglican church held a successful entertainment at the Rex hall last week. The programme consisted of a whist drive, musical entertainment and a tombola. Mrs. Paddock won the lady’s prize at whist and Mr. T. Johnason the gentleman’s. Miss E McArthur and Mr. J Campbell’s songs were especially good. Mrs. Campbell’s playing of the violin was greatly applauded. A large crowd was present and the church netted $125. After paying the church debts there is a balance of $75.00 left, which will form a nucleus for a building fund.
The fishermen have pulled up their nets a few days ago on account of the fish being dropped in price. The men subsequently promised that the price would be raised and returned to work and the companies obtained a week’s extension of the fishing period from the Government.
An epidemic of broken legs and arms is going around. Three children and an adult have met with such accidents in the past month.
Hechter Bros. have sold their store to M. Popenski.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 19, 1919

Bootleggers Busy

Bootleggers are enjoying a thriving trade with the construction gangs at work on the railway. A Ste. Rose correspondent writes that much of the liquor being sold is said to be of home manufacture.

Cross Duck Mountain by Auto

A Minitonas automobile party accomplished a feat on Tuesday which will stand as a record. They crossed the Duck Mountain in cars. One car contained Reeve Roy Johnston, Clerk J.H. Cannon, Thos. Tedford and H Bigham, and the other Geo. Hayes, W. Shiels, Mose Leslie and Wm. Sifton. The cars left Minitonas at 7 in the morning and arrived at Pine River on the opposite side of the mountain at 10 p.m. The distance is round about a hundred miles. The road followed was the old Sifton colonization trail. The cars met with no great obstacles on the trip beyond fording a stream or two. The members of the party are enthusiastic in describing the scenery in the mountain.

Fork River

Mrs. L. Rawson and family have arrived from the States. Mr. Rawson intends moving on to his farm which he recently purchased from H. Little. The farm adjoins the townsite.
Councilor Hunt has purchased a car. No doubt he will find the lumps on the road when he speeds up.
Ben Cannon is spending his vacation in Winnipeg.
W. Williams is putting his sawmill in shape to cut the logs brought in last winter.
A good heavy rain fell on Saturday. It was needed and has revived the crops.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Church at 3 p.m. Sunday school meets at 2 o’clock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 20 – 1910

1910 Oct 20 – Chapter of Accidents

Wm. Cruise has Ribs Broken
Wm. Ashmore Leg Broken
Gun Accident
Wm. Ashmore of Sifton, met with a serious accident Saturday. While felling a beef, the animal made an unexpected plunge and fell on one of Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking two bones below the knee. He was brought to the hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1910 Oct 20 – Had Ribs Broken

Robt. Cruise, who recently invested in a power gang plough and why is busy ploughing his farm south of the town, has among the crew operating the plough his son William, aged 17 years. On Saturday night, William attempted to jump from the engine to the plough and was thrown under the wheel and the weight of the plough passing over him, breaking four ribs and slightly injuring him internally. We are glad to report that the young man is now on a fair way recovery.

1910 Oct 20 – Arm Amputated

John Kolodichook of Pine River, was accidentally shot Sunday morning in the left forearm, which resulted in amputation of same just below the elbow. Mr. K was out shooting and had climbed a tree to see if there were any ducks on a nearby pond. Before climbing he laid his gun against the trunk of the tree. When part of the way up the tree he slipped and fell, discharging the gun with the above result. The unfortunate man had no attention for three hours after the accident, and bled from eleven o’clock in the morning until the arrival of Dr. Lineham that evening at seven. He was brought to Dauphin on a special Sunday evening, and taken to the hospital.

1910 Oct 20 – Fork River

Mrs. Lipsky and Mr. Shaffer, from St. Louis, are staying at Mrs. Clawson’s in this village.
Mr. Dallas having disposed of his farm intends to have a sale on November 2nd. Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
A large congregation attended the English Church last Sunday night for Harvest Festival, when a very appropriate sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. The church was very prettily decorated by Mrs. Rowe, Mrs. Scrase, Miss Collins, Miss Gracie Little and Mr. King, Churchwarden.
Mr. Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P for Portage la Prairie and Provincial Secretary, paid us a visit last week and was accompanied by Mr. J. Grenon and Mr. D.F. Wilson looking over land in this district.
Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
Mrs. Crouch and children who have been visiting Mrs. Kennedy, left for Winnipeg last week.
Mrs. Morris, who has been staying here for some time left for Winnipegosis last week.
Mrs. Johnson, from Winnipegosis, is staying with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.

1910 Oct 20 – Sifton

Rev. Dr. Carmichael of Winnipeg and Dr. McLaren, of Toronto, stopped off at Sifton on Saturday on their way east.
Mark Cardiff, Dauphin, paid us a business visit last week.
Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P., passed through here a week ago on his way home from Winnipegosis.
J.G. Harvey, M.P.P., Robt. Hunt, and A.J. Rawson, Dauphin, were among the visitors to Sifton on Sunday.
Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie started up their flour mill on Monday for another season’s operations.
Wm. Ashmore met with a rather serious accident on Saturday last while felling a beef. The animal made an unexpected plunge forward, falling on Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking both bones below the knee in one leg. He was taken to the Dauphin General Hospital for treatment.
Everybody took advantage of the prevailing fine weather and drove in to the Ruthenian Church Services held by His Reverence Archbishop Sczeptycki, of the Greek Orthodox Church, on behalf of the adherents of that rite. The gathering was the largest in Sifton for years.
Mrs. Wm. Ashmore and John Kennedy were visitors to Dauphin on Sunday.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held services at the mission on Sunday, also Rev. Father Perhach at he Greek Orthodox Church.
Rev. Archbishop Scztepski and staff, left Monday evening for Prince Albert.

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In your issue of Oct. 6th, I noticed something about a missing post-office at Fishing River and a P.M. Re the missing P.O. That said P.O. was called Sobeiski and a man named Demko Kasczuk was duly appointed but owing to his moving to Sifton he would not accept that appointment therefore the post office was never opened so I fail to see where it was missing. Re the elevator. We heard a great deal about it in June but since then it has been hors de combat. Re the mail bag. I was always under the impression that the P.M. at the distributing office had the locking up of all mail bags leaving his office so as to prevent such things as tacks etc., getting mixed up with the mail and if that is so the mail carrier would be ignorant of what the mail bag contained.

A Subscriber

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In reply to, and for the information of, “A Fork River Correspondent” whose concoction of misrepresentations appeared in your issue of Oct. 6th, I beg to be allowed to state the following facts regarding the establishing of a post office at Fishing River. That on Sept. 25th, 1905, the post office that the farmers of Fishing River petitioned for on N.W. ¼ 33-28-19 west P. mer. was established under the name of “Sobieski,” and that Demko Kasczuk who was mentioned in the petition as a fit and proper person, was appointed as Postmaster. That the necessary papers, etc., for opening the office were taken to Kasczuk’s place of business at Fishing River, and it was found that Kasczuk had departed for Sifton and had barred the doors and windows, and that he did not intend to return to Fishing River to do business because the R.R. Company would not stop their trains at that point. That as there was no other person asking to take the office over, the matter was allowed to drop for a time; so it will appear that it was the postmaster that was lost, and not the post office as stated. I would also state that a postmaster has been found since in the person of one of Mr. Glen Campbell’s workers at last Dominion election, and that the Fishing River P.O. is in operation. Also on the same date (Sept. 25th, 1905) “Lacey” P.O. was established (since named Oak Brae) 5½ miles east of “Sobieski” and Fred Lacey was appointed Postmaster and still survive, much to the annoyance, it seems, of the Fork Riverite whose letter appeared on Oct. 6th. As to tacks and sugar being put into Oak Brae mail at Fork River, I may say that I am not responsible for what is put into the mail bag at Fork River. I would advise him to complain to Fork River postmaster or to the postmaster general at Ottawa, and state what damage has been done and I am confident he will get satisfaction, also if this correspondent will find out and inform me as to time of making up mail for Winnipegosis at Fork River I will try and get in on time and thus please him has he is the only one who seems to worry about the matter, we have yet to receive the first complaint on this score from any one who has mailed a letter from this office to Winnipegosis. If “A Fork River Correspondent” will call at Oak Brae I will produce documentary evidence to support the statement re establishment of post office which I am certain will convince this reckless individual.

Not many years ago we had in the British House of Commons a set of politicians known as “Little Englanders.” They were opposed to the progress and expansion of the empire and it seems to me that one or two of that party must have got their quietus in the old land and turned up at Fork River, for whenever anything is said or done having for its object the improvement and development of this part of Manitoba, this “Little Fork Riverite” and his kindred spirits oppose it, and set to work to frustrate any movement for the betterment of this country. We remember when a siding was asked for by the farmers of Fishing River district the “Little Fork Riverite clique saw ruination for Fork River in it, and suggested that something ought to be done to prevent that siding being constructed. The farmers of Fishing River and Fork River were encouraged to sign a petition just previous to the election last June, asking the Government to erect an elevator and were told again and again that an elevator would be erected this fall at Fork River is the Roblin Government was returned to power, have we got one? Not on your life and I charge that the action of the “Fork Riverite” clique has discouraged any of the Elevator companies from erecting an elevator at Fork River. I do not bow the knee to the Roblin Government but I signed the petitions for the erection of a Government Elevator and advised others to do the same and intended if it was built, to patronize it because it would be built with the people’s money and it is good policy the patronize any institution that our money is invested in and endeavour to get the best we can out of the investment, there are thousands of bushels of grain in our district this season and we have no local market, I repeat that the Government Elevator is lost to Fork River district and the famers have been fooled once again and I ask the disappointed farmers to become “knockers” along with me and we will get the elevator along with a lot of other good things such as post offices etc., etc.

Fred Lacey,
Post Master, Oak Brae.

1910 Oct 20 – Winnipegosis

On Monday last the “Manitou” left the landing stage at Winnipegosis, heavily laden with fishermen and their equipment. Part of this equipment, and one would think a very important part, consisted of the wives and children of some of the fishermen. Although so many have left the town, the toll of departure is not yet complete but it is expected that this week all the people occupied during the winter in fishing, will have left the town. We wish them luck.
On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will conduct the service in the Fork River Methodist Church at 11 o’clock in the morning instead of 3 p.m.
On Sunday next the Methodist pulpit at Winnipegosis will be occupied by the Rev. Jas. Malley. The subject will be “Buried alive by Devils.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 29 – 1910

1910 Sep 29 – Buried in Well

Kamsack, Sask., Sept. 25 – A funeral service, attended by circumstances that are unique in the history of Canada, took place Saturday on the farm of John Bowes, sixteen miles south of here. At the top of a 73 foot shaft that had been sunk for a well and at the bottom of which lay the remains of Elwer Olson, aged 35, of Yorkton. Rev. J. Morrison conducted a service for the dead. The shaft has been closed up and the body will remain for ever in the deep and improvised grave. Hansen was overcome by gas in the well and attempts to recover the body were fruitless.

1910 Sep 29 – Died from Burns

Miss Mabel Gunn of Makinak, aged 28 years, died Tuesday from burns received last week through an accident in handling coal oil. The young lady was trying to squelch a blaze on the floor with a rug, when her clothing caught on fire, and before it was put out she received terrible burns.
The unfortunate lady lingered nearly a week and everything possible was done to relive her suffering.
The funeral to the Makinak cemetery took place Wednesday.
Miss Gunn was favourably known throughout the Dauphin district, being one of Makinak’s earliest residents and having, with her sister, run a boarding house there for years. Her demise is keenly felt by the citizens of that community.

1910 Sep 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Comber left here for her home in Selkirk last week.
Mr. Frame from Treherne has been visiting friends here.
On Sunday Sept. 18th, Mrs. E. Morris gave birth to a little girl.
Quite a large congregation attended the Harvest Festival Service at Winnipegosis last Sunday night when a special sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Car loads of wheat are being shipped from this point.
Tom Toye’s youngest child died last week and was buried at Winnipegosis. The burial service was taken by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Cattle buyers are busy in this district. Quite a number of cattle have been sold lately and shipped to Winnipeg.
Fleming Wilson from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Harvest Festival Service will be held at the English Church on Sunday evening, October 9th, at 7.30.

1910 Sep 29 – Sifton

Mr. F.E. Nex of Whitemouth, is visiting his father-in-law, Mr. Ludwig Zarowoney. Fred bicycled from Winnipeg to McCreary, where he boarded the train.
Rev. Sabourin was in Winnipeg last week on business.
School Inspector Walker of Dauphin, inspected the village school on Tuesday last.
Miss A. Griffith of Fishguard, Eng., is visiting her brother-in-law, Mr. W Carr.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Barrie have just returned home, after a couple months visit to his parents in “ye auld Scottish hielands” near Aberdeen. Bill reports a vey pleasant trip.
Theo. Stefanik of Winnipeg, addressed a large open air gathering here on Wednesday of last week in the interest of the community. Mr. Rawson of Dauphin was noticed in the gathering.
Charl Holinski is about completing the building of his new home. A fireside gathering is expected to initiate the new house when finished, so no doubt Mr. Jordan of Dauphin will be likely called upon to send up the necessary for the occasion, which is usually quite in evidence at such times.
Mr. and Mrs. T.A. Kitt and son of Valley River, visited Sifton on Sunday.
Miss Bessie Wilson of Fork River, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Paul Wood.
Mr. W. Carr went to Winnipegosis on Saturday on business.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.