Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 7 – 1912

1912 Nov 7 – Fork River

George King, of Dauphin, was here renewing old acquaintances between trains.
Miss Grant of Pine View was visiting her friends at Valley River during the weeks end.
Thos. Ramsay, P.M. of Sifton, was here on business with D. Kennedy.
Walter Clark has returned staying for a short time at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
Rev. H.H. Scrase, who has been visiting his brother at Swan River and attending the mission at Dauphin, returned on Saturday’s train.
S. Briggs, who was here renewing acquaintances for a short time, has returned to Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy and family have returned after visiting friends at Ochre River and Dauphin.
Miss Olive Clark and miss Comber have returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Hallowe’en has passed, and to judge from the looks of the town next morning, those who too part in the the tricks, should be pleased with themselves if they call it fun. Even the church was made to pay toll, which is going the limit.
The elevator gang has left. The elevator is now open for business with Jack Clemens in charge.
What’s the matter with the Bay Centre correspondent of the Press. We must have touched him on a sore spot by the remarks he makes of the Fork River scribe. We would advise him to give up his Hooligan tactics of sandbagging people and to roost with the owls till it freezes up.
One of our enterprising citizens has surrounded his lot on Main Street with an ornamental fence.

1912 Nov 7 – The Fork River Settlement

Pretty much all the history of the Dauphin district dates from the advent of the C.N.R. The actual settlement of the northern part of the country, which includes Fork River and Winnipegosis, commenced in 1897, when the railway entered. It is true there were parties who squatted here and there, but the first settlement amounted to nothing when estimated in figures. It was not until three or four years later that the municipality of Mossey River, which comprises the territory described, was organized. Your correspondent spent a few house at Fork River the other day, and what is more important, spent them pleasantly. It is some fourteen years since the writer first visited the new thriving village of Fork River, and some of those he formed an acquaintance with then, were there to greet him last week. The village of Fork River is located on the Fork and Mossey Rivers, and within a mile or two of its centre, a considerable number of people reside. The land along the Mossey and Fork Rivers is as good as there is to be found anywhere on the American continent, which is saying much. It was but natural then that those who came in first selected the best farms, those along the rivers. The country about was at one time covered with a growth of timber, which included tamarack, spruce and poplar. The latter kind was the most frequently met with. Much of it, of course, has since disappeared before the axe of the lumberman and the wood chopper. Another destructive elements has been fire. In the early days wood had little value and no effort was made to preserve timber. Much timber was needlessly destroyed which would be of considerable value today. But most of us are like the German, if our foresight was as good as our hindsight, we would soon get rich. There is, however, much consolation in the fact that good land will soon produce enough grain to find money to purchase fuel. Like other new districts the Fork River settlement has been up against manta drawbacks, notably wet seasons and poor roads. But somebody remarks, are these not the condition which develop strong men? Yes, truly, but, at times, even the heart of the pioneer sinks. Take the present year as an example. Conditions were such as to try the metal most of us are made of. Even more, the loss of crop is bad enough, but add to this financial obligations incurred and can’t be met, and the burden seems too heavy to bear.
But enough of lamenting. Let us turn to the people themselves. We don’t know where one will find a finer band of pioneers than at Fork River. There is Tom Glendenning, who was there many a day before the railroad. A splendid specimen of the pioneer; good-hearted and a true friend.
Tom Briggs, another who was in the settlement before, we were going say, the war, but we mean before the railroad. The Briggs Bros., Dave and Tom, went though the worst of it, and still wear pleasant faces. Incidentally, it manta be mentioned that Dave is no longer following, like Cincinnatus, the low.
There’s Sam Bailey, who, while not in before the iron horse, has been there long enough to establish his sterling qualities. He’s a good fellow and one can’t meet too often.
Wm. King, pioneer farmer and stock breeder. Has faced difficulties, met them and overcame them. Besides farming on an extensive scale he is bending his energies to improve his own and other people’s stock. Truly a valuable man in any community.
D.F. Wilson – there’s no mistaking him; besides quality he’s got size, both important factors in a new country. He has farmed, is a breeder of stock and fills the important office of municipal clerk. Has also done his share to develop the district.
Nat Little, pioneer merchant. Has been there a long time, and, what’s better, has succeeded. A good fellow with a weakness for the Shetland pony.
Coun. Geo. Nicholson, too, has had the usual ups and downs, seen the rough and the smooth and is still staying with the job.
Reeve Lacey, not such an old-timer as some of the others, but has, in the time he’s been there established his worth and taken a willing hand in the work of development. For several years he has been in the council and is now its head.
W.T. Snelgrove can look quite a ways back. He has seen more than a little of the life of the pioneer. As a hunter he has quite a record in the deer line and can relate some interesting experiences. Some day, when we have time at our disposal and more space we may relate some of W.R.’s exploits.
While speaking of the Snelgroves its opportune to mention morally and Alf. There some pioneers, too.
Alex. Cameron is not exactly one of the prime old-timers, but has been in the distinct quite a few years. There is just this difference between Alex. and most of the other settlers, he had the “dough” and they didn’t. It don’t take long to tell this, but oh, what a world of meaning there is in it. Money is highly important to us all, but when we haven’t got any and need it, words fail to impress its importance on us. May every man who has a healthy pocketbook know how to use its contents as judiciously and generously as Alexander Cameron.
There are many others worthy of a word in this article, but space forbids. They have done their part and performed it well. What more can be said? There’s the Rowe brothers, A. Hunt, Geo. Tilt, W. Northam, C. Clark, F. Cooper, and Frank and Vivan Hafenbrak.
Then, what about the women? Are they, too, not pioneers in the true sense. Yes, indeed; they are worthy of a special article and even then justice could not be done them. They have taken their part, a part which carried its own burden. A burden, no matter how heavy, always cheerfully carried when the interest of their families and their homes was at stake.
Municipal organization should come in for a chapter. Its work is important in our advancement. The reeves and councillors help materially to make history. If they have done their part well and faithfully their names should be writ in large letters.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 10 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 10 – Fork River

Miss S. Lacey, of Oak Brae, returned from a short visit to Mrs. J. Spearing of Valley River.
Mrs. Wm. Ramsay, of Sifton, was a visitor with Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase at the vicarage.
Mrs. Wm. King returned home after a week’s say with her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, who is leaving for the north end of the lake for the winter.
J. Playford and Fleming Wilson were visitors here from Dauphin on business.
S. Biggs has given up the Mowat School and is leaving for Dauphin.
H.H. Benner, an old-timer, is travelling around for a few days in the educational chariot renewing acquaintances. We are all pleased to see Harcourt. He is now a regular walking encyclopaedia on real estate.
The C.N.R. bridge gang spent a few days here pile drying and fixing bridges.
Mr. Lampard, of Dauphin, is busy rounding up a car of fat cattle for shipment.
Duncan Briggs, Professor Robinson and Fred Storrar have left with T. Johnston for the winter’s fishing at Dawson’s Bay.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson, who has been spending a week with her daughter, Mrs. L. Humphreys, of Dauphin, returned home Saturday.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs arrived home from a month’s vacation spent with friends in Brandon.

1918 Oct 10 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Albert Jackson Weir, Valley River, wounded. (Albert Jackson Weir, 1888, 2193343)
Pte. Douglas Wells Bentley, Dauphin, wounded. (Douglas Wells Bentley, 1897, 469933)
Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, wounded. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Robert Stanley Colebeck, Dauphin, wounded. (Robert Stanley Colbeck, 1896, 1072198)
Pte. Charles Winstanley Skinner, Dauphin, was wounded and taken to the dressing station. While being conveyed from the dressing station to the hospital he was struck by a bomb and killed. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1912

1912 Sep 9 – Fork River

George Sumption, of Dauphin; is spending of short time with Mr. J. Clements on the Chase farm.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, who has been spending her holidays with her parents up the Fork, has returned to Dauphin.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs left for a two motions’ holiday with her friends at Brandon.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here lately taking in the sights.
Professor Gorden Weaver and N.H. Johnston returned from a trip to Winnipegosis on business and after the train run off the track. Misfortunes will happen to the best of regulated railways.
Frank Chase, of Dauphin, was here lately looking after his business interests.
The elevator builders have not arrived yet. We think it will be a mistake to build it on the site picked out. The building would be better if it were moved south on to the street next the cattle chute and
Mr. and Mrs. V.O. Weaver, of Vermont, are visiting their brother Gordon, of East Bay.
Wm. Geekie and son passed through here on their return trip from Strathclair to their home at Winnipegosis.
F. Lacey, of Oak Brae, has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Will Davis, who has invested heavily in real estate in Texas, strongly advocates the use of drain tiles. Will always was practical, especially on mail days when its raining.
Mrs. C. Bradley is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Several people from the Lake Town took in the dance in the Orange Hall on Thursday night past. Brother Robinson played the Fisherman’s Horn Pipe and a very pleasant time was spent.
Wm. Williams and Mr. Venables spent the week-end at Dauphin on business.
A meeting of the council will be held at Fork River on Monday, the 23rd inst.

1912 Sep 9 – Sifton

The wet season now appears to be over and all except to get on with the harvest at once.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Good progress is being made with the Kennedy-Barrie store. Once these gentlemen open they are sure of doing a good business.
Frequent shipments of cattle are being made from here. There’s nothing like mixed farming to bring in the cash between seasons.
Geo. Lampard, wholesale butcher, Dauphin, and W.A. Davis were in town on Monday. These gentlemen brought a number of cattle while here.
This end of the district is open to come under the Drainage Act. It pays at any time to make improvements whether they are drains or building better roads.
Paul Wood’s family are going to reside in Dauphin during the winter so that an opportunity will be afforded the children to go to school.
Now that the Herald is giving interesting personal sketches of prominent men who have resided in the district a long time, I hope the prosperous village of Sifton will not be overlooked. We have several pioneers here who had ouch to do with its development and are will known, viz., Paul Wood, John Kennedy, Coun. Peter Ogrislo, Postmaster Thos. Ramsay, Wm. Ashmore and quite a few others that could be named.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 12 – 1912

1912 Sep 12 – Arm Broken in Runaway

A spirited team belonging to Geo. Lampard ran away on Wednesday afternoon. The driver, Thos. McKay, was thrown out of the rig and had his left arm broken.

1912 Sep 12 – Infantry for Dauphin

A movement is on foot in town to organize a military regiment. A preliminary meeting was held in Harvey & Bowman’s office on Monday evening, when Dr. Walker was appointed chairman and L. Shand secretary. It is proposed to have four companies if possible. A public meeting will be held shortly at which Col. Steele will be the speaker and afterwards officers selected.

1912 Sep 12 – Ethelbert

The awful thunderstorm, and the great rain of Wednesday has left things in very bad shape here, and unless we have a spell of fine weather the prospects are none too good.
K. McLean is still improving and is able to be up and about, but he is still very weak and thin.
All the material and engine for the elevator are on the ground, but as yet no signs of the builders. They will have to get a hustle on.
There were two cases before R. Skaife on Saturday. Mrs. J. Rewniak asked that her husband, J. Rewniak, be bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months. The evidence went to show that John had been persistently ill-treating her ever since their marriage over two years ago, and that he had very recently threatened to shoot her father, an old man who is close on seventy, with the handle of a hay fork twice on the arm, making it black because he tried to protect her. He was bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months or forfeit $100.
The next case was a mixed up affair. Marko Dubyk sold a pig to N. Tkatchzuk, for five dollars, the pig to be delivered as soon as possible. Marko brought the pig to town, met some friends; they went and had drinks together, and entrusted the pig to Olexa Stassuk, to take to Tkatchzuk, but instead he took it home. Then he have it to S. Basaraba, who put it in his stye, and kept it for some weeks. Ultimely Olexa asked $3 for Tkatchzuk, and he should have his pig. This Tkatchzuk refused to give, but instead he wanted the pig, and $5.50 as a sort of fine for them keeping the pig. The case was decided as follows: Basaraba was ordered to take the pig to Tkatchzuk, and without any compensation for the feed of the pig. O. Stassuk had to pay the costs of the court, as his share of the fun, and Tkatchzuk as told that it was only the magistrate who had the privilege of extracting penalties.
Later Rewniak wanted the magistrate to order his wife to go back to him, but he was advised to treat her kindly in future, and then perhaps she might go back. But Maru says no, never.
The station has got the name “Ethelbert” printed in bold letters at both ends of the building, so that all who run can read.

1912 Sep 12 – Fork River

Sydney Howlett, of E. Million, spent a few days here and took a trip to Winnipegosis on business.
Garent Lacey has returned home after a few months vacation south looking for a high spot.
“Bishop” McCartney took a trip to Winnipegosis hunting his carriage. “Bejiggered if they get it again,” says the Bishop.
Nat Little has returned from a week’s visit to the States.
Our Mowat friend seems surpassed to see a gasoline boat about the size of a coffee pot, go from Winnipegosis to Lake Dauphin and return, and pats himself on the back, as its the dredge that did the trick. Why good sized boats loaded with freight passed up and down the Mossey, fifteen and twenty years ago.
Mrs. Wm. King who has been visiting at Vancouver and California. She says the Fork looks more like home.
D. Kennedy has purchased another “gee gee” for his delivery wagon. Just see the dust fly.
Duck shooting is the order of the day. It’s hard on the feathers.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from a visit to Dauphin and Sifton.
Thomas Shannon has been treating fall wheat for the farmers for seed and several have commenced sowing it.
We are informed some one is looking for a schooner to find the levels after the storm and he is not alone. There’s schooners and schooners.
Lost or strayed, the minutes of three or four council meetings.
Teacher, “What is it Tommy.” “Dad says we will get them all right if we had an assistant. We must not expect too much after such an electric storm. It’s so depressing.”
John Clements and family of Dauphin, arrived to take off his crop in the Chase farm.
Nat Little has put on a new wagon for delivering cream at the station.
The planer has started up again, and Billy Williams is making the shavings fly.

1912 Sep 12 – Sifton

Stephen Kosy’s stable was struck by lightening last Thursday. There were in the stable, a team of horses, harness and fifty hens. Fortunately the horse broke the board and ran out but the harness and hens were burned. Stephen had his stable insured.
On the same date Hnat Skarnpa’s stable was burned, lightening being the cause.
The harvest has been checked for a few days by bad weather.
Four of our well-known citizens have formed a company and will build a big store. Our Fedor of Blue Store does not like to see any more stores in own. He would rather buy out Pinkas and have the while business to himself.
The rumour is abroad that in a short time some of the Ruthenians intend to organize a co-operative store. Building is to begin next week.
Thos. Ramsay is busy building a new postoffice and boarding house.
Paul Wood has bought three lots in block one from Nicola Haschak.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 6 – 1913

1913 Mar 6 – 100 Years Old

An old resident of Ethelbert, named Hogg, died this week. He was believed to be 100 years old.

1913 Mar 6 – Baran Pleads Not Guilty

The assizes opened on Tuesday at Portage la Prairie. The Baran case is the most important one on the docket. Contrary to expectations Baran has put in a plea of “not guilty.” The witnesses from here are Mary Peleck, the woman who was in the house at the time the shot was fired, E.A. Munson, S.A. McLean, J. Tomoski, A. Rzesnoski and Dr. Harrington.

1913 Mar 6 – Fork River

A. Hunt returned from Ottawa having spent two months visiting with his parents and friends. While in Ottawa he located our friend, “Bob” Cruise in his seat in the house. Ab. will know where his seat is when he goes to Ottawa again.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ramsay, of Sifton, were visitors at the home of Dunc Kennedy this week.
Duncan Briggs returned from Mafeking having spent the winter fishing up north with Theo. Johnston.
Messrs. Johnston, Nowside and King were visitors to the Lake town on business recently.
Sid Howlet, of Million, paid us a visit last week and is returning with a road of supplies to his homestead.
Miss Pearl Wilson has returned from Dauphin after a month’s visit among friends at that point.
Sandy Munro is spending the weekend with his family at Mowat.
The Fork River Quadrille club got a little mixed up on Friday night. Part went to one house and part to another. They all claim to have had a good time. It’s no trouble to have a good time at Fork River.
John Nowsede, after spending two months with his parents, left for Aberdeen, Sask., to take up his duties as teacher for another term.
Miss Gilanders, who has been some time with her sister, Mrs. J. Lockhart, left on a vacation among friends in the south.
George Butler, assistant to Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis, was a visitor at Wm. King’s recently.
Fred and Max King have purchased from the Ontario W.E. & Pump Co., Winnipeg, a 18 horse power gasoline engine of the Stickney manufacture, also a J.T. case separator and are taking them to Fishing River among the Ruthenian farmers to finish their threshing before spring opens.
S. Strasdin, of North Lake, paid us a visit overnight on his way to Winnipegosis and says everything is quiet in his district.
J.P. Grenon, manager of the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis, has purchased the west half of 36-29-19 from Morley Snelgrove.
Mr. Rowe, section foreman of Laurier, is visiting with C. Clark for a few days.
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese will hold baptismal service and holy communion in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon, March 16th, at 2:45. Lenten service every Thursday night at 8 o’clock during the season.