Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 17 – 1921

$300 from Poppy Day Sale

In commemoration of the many Canadian Soldiers who are buried on the battlefields of France and Flanders, and to mark the signing of the armistice, thousands of Red Poppies, replicas of the scarlet flowers which grow in such profusion in the devastated areas, were placed on sale last Friday, all through Manitoba.

In Dauphin the sale ladies were on the street at an early hour, and every pedestrian was politely asked the question, “Will you buy a poppy?” Scarcely a person refused and nearly every man, woman and child, wore a red flower.

Headquarters for the poppy Day campaign were established in the G.W.V.A. Hall. Proceeds of the sale amounted to about $300, half of which goes to the G.W.V.A. Building Fund, and half to the I.O.D.E. War Memorial.

La Verandrye Chapter thanks the Great War Veterans Association for the use of the rooms, the citizens in town and country for their generous response toward the campaign, and lastly the different committees of ladies, who worked so untiringly in their efforts that the sale might be a success.

Dauphin’s Population 3862

The census returns for Manitoba are now to hand. The population for he town is 3862. With the sub-divisions of Westmoore and River Heights it is 4,200. The sub-divisions are really part of the town although in the rural municipality of Dauphin. The increase since the census of 1911 is 37.19 per cent.

The population of the Electoral Division of Dauphin is 35,219. The increase since 1911 is 50.78 per cent.

The population of the province is 613,008, an increase since 1911 of 32.92 per cent.

Grandview town has a population of 846, an increase of 32.81.

Winnipegosis

Mr. Harry W. Grenon returned on Tuesday from a trip to Chicago. He states that the fish market outlook is not very bright. Prices are likely to continue low.

The open winter fishing season started on the 15th. The number of licenses issued is about 150, which is considerably less than last season. No fish, of course, will be brought down from the north until the ice is strong enough to carry the teams.

The wholesale companies operating this season are: The Booth Fisheries, The Armstrong Independent Fisheries and H.W. Grenon.

The prevailing prices for fish are 6 cents a pound for whites and 5c. for yellows.

The meeting in the interest of Mr. Cruise last week was well attended. The speakers were Messrs. Cruise and Bowman.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 10 – 1921

1921 Nov 10 – I.O.D.E.

To-morrow, Armistice Day, as a tribute to Canada’s dead heroes, members of La Verandrye Chapter will flood the streets with their hand-made poppies. Corps of workers have been enlisted for the task, and every citizen will be asked to buy a poppy in memory of a soldier “lying in Flanders fields.”

The Red Poppy was chosen by Canadian women as the fitting bower with which to honor Canada’s army on Armistice Day. It is hoped that the citizens will co-operate with us in making Canadian Poppy Day a huge success. Proceeds of the sale are solely for patriate purposes.

1921 Nov 10 – L.A. to G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting will be held in the new hall on Tuesday, Nov. 15th. A full attendance is request.

The bazaar was a success. This is a feather in the ladies’ hats.

The dance will be held on Saturday as a usual in the Veterans’ new hall. Admission 50c.

1921 Nov 10 – Fork River

Your correspondent missed last week through having the hook worm or some other equally no-good excuse.

The Fork River Women’s institute met on the 5th November to receive the report of the retiring president, Mrs. E. Lockwood. The women are to be commended for the deep interest they are taking in fitting up the school kitchen.

The regular social evening of the Fork River U.F.M. will be held on Friday evening, Nov. 11. Every one turn out and have a good time. Cards and dancing will be the order of the evening.

E.V. Lockwood is disposing of his property north of the town.

Our old resident, “Bill” Tuck, says he is going west and grow up with the country. Hop-to-it, Bill, you have our best wishes.

Mike and Carl Lundy have recently purchased the livery stable of Harry Little. They intend to carry on a general dray and livery business.

The school trustees have just received their winter supply of coal. The kiddies are assured of a comfy building for winter.

The Mossey River Rural Credits Society held a meeting on the first to talk matters over with the members. Each and every member is requested to call and see the secretary on or before the next meeting, which will be held on December 3, 1921.

Mr. and Mrs. J. Peterson have left for Winnipeg, where they expect to spend the winter. Their house is for rent or sale. For terms apply to F.J. Tilt.

Mr. and Mrs. Shuchett have a friend who has just arrived from Russia, having been ten months making the trip. What a difference this lady must find between Russia and her present home.

Tax notices are out and the usual cry is heard up and down the land. Our school rate is high but we believe it could be reduced by bringing the two schools together.

Big game permits will shortly b on sale at the office of Fred J. Tilt.

N. Panagobka is putting on a sale on the 19th inst. here is a chance for those who have some spare cash.

A. Cameron, of Cypress River, was a visitor this week. Sandy is hale and hearty and is always a welcome visitor in our midst.

Our crops are not what we expected this fall but we are in far better shape than some districts in southern Manitoba. Fork River has never known an absolute crop failure and we don’t expect to. Readjustment must come after a war such as we have gone through and we feel that ere long we will be back on a pre-war basis. Good bless (? old kaiser bill.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 3 – 1921

1921 Nov 3 – Fire at Winnipegosis

Fire early Wednesday morning destroyed the stores of Isaac Bradbery and Nate Kessler. The loss will be considerable. Some insurance was carried by the firms.

1921 Nov 3 – G.W.V.A. Notes

The next regular meeting will b held on November 9th –will the members keep this date in mind and attend the meeting.

Anyone who has a supply of magazines that they are done with and have no further use for will oblige by leaving them in the reading room of the home. The reading matter will be much appreciated. The magazines will also be sent to the homesteads where reading matter is always acceptable.

Only a year now left in which to take up the soldiers’ insurance. Have you taken up any of this insurance? Over five thousand returned men have taken up the insurance; there are many more who are entitled to take advantage of it and become insured. It is a good thing to take up while it is going.

Don’t forget to support the “Poppy Ladies” on Armistice Day. Every veteran should have a poppy on that day.

Don’t fail to attend the bazaar of the Ladies’ Auxiliary to the G.W.V.A. on Thursday, November 3rd, as well as the ball at night.

Will every member see to it that he is in good stand if with the local branch. We are trying to get the new home fitted up and need all the help that we can get it.

1921 Nov 3 – H.E. Hunt Loses His Leg

H.E. Hunt, who now resides at Stettler, Alta., met with a bad gun accident on Tuesday, 1st inst. he received the charge of the gun in his leg below the knee and later had to have the leg amputated. Mrs. Hunt left for Stettler this (Thursday) morning.

1921 Nov 3 – Jury Verdict Accidental Death

The coroner’s jury empanelled at Winnipegosis on the 27th ult., to enquire into the death of Duncan Crerar, who was thrown from a wagon when his horses ran away, brought in a verdict that his death resulted from the accident.

1921 Nov 3 – October Police Records

The police records for October show that these were 13 convictions for October as follows: Two were fined for speeding, four drunks, one for breach of license by-law, two for disorderly conduct, two for running autos with cut outs on, two for breach of traffic by-law. The town’s share of the fines amounted to $110.

1921 Nov 3 – Poppies! “Lest we Forget.”

With the world-wide call to prayer for the disarmament of the Nations, there comes through “The Imperial Order Daughters of Empire” a national call to service. The fingers that were used so long to plying the busy knitting needles are not content to remain idle. There is work yet to be done—great and noble work, and every loyal Canadian must feel it a privilege to share the responsibility which the Daughters of Empire have assumed. The Poppies bloom in Flanders Field over the graves of many an unknown hero, who, when he gave his life for his country, have his all; and somewhere under the British flag his children may be struggling through life without the advantages that would make of them men and women worthy to fill the gaps left by the war. Many an inventive genius, many a brilliant mind may be lost to the wold because of the lack of resources to finance an advanced education.

And herein lies the work of The Daughters of Empire for many future years—to maintain the fund established, by them for enabling the worthy sons and daughters of fallen British soldiers, sailors and aviators, to obtain the best educational advantages the country can afford, thus making of them an asset of which the nation may be proud.

Has any monument so grad yet been erected to the memory of our Canadian heroes?

To keep alive the spirit of patriotism, and inspire the sentiment in the minds of the young, the women of our National Chapter, and all its auxiliaries, have, during the past weeks been engaged in marking “Poppies”, which they expect will be purchased and worn on “Armistice Day” by every loyal British subject. Though it is “Only a scrap of paper” it will be the duty of every parent and teacher in the land to wear one and tell the children the “Old Old Story” of that for which the Poppy stands the story of—

“The day when our hearts were wrung

And our Country’s Banner a half-mast hung

For the loss of our lads in brown

‘Twas a Nation’s grief, but an Empire’s gain

For they fell, that Empire to maintain

And that peace and liberty still might reign

In every man’s home town.

How best can we honor our noble dead—

Can storied marble a halo shed

To glorify Khaki Brown?

No! Let us open the doors of learning wide

To the sons and daughters of those who died

At Ypres and Vimy and Somme’s red tide,

For the sake of their own home town.

And in future years when the mists roll by,

And a world shall ask the reason why

These sleep in Khaki Brown,

Old Time will flutter his hoary wing,

And say in a voice with a gladsome ring,

“They died that a nobler race might spring

From the boys of our own home town.”

1921 Nov 3 – Thieves Enter Tailor’s Shop

Solomon’s tailor shop was entered Sunday night and two pair of pants and a grey jacket taken. Entrance was gained through a window in the rear of the shop. The window was being repaired and had been left unsecured.

1921 Nov 3 – Wife Beater Given Two Months

Edward Radford, a homesteader of the Shergrove district, appeared before magistrate Rheaume at Ste. Rose du Lac, on Saturday, October 29th, charged with beating his wife. He was found guilty and sentenced to two months in the Dauphin jail at hard labor.

1921 Nov 3 – Winnipegosis

The hatchery boat is now bringing in the roughfish which were caught while taking spawn.

Messrs. Toye, McDonald, Joe Bickel, Shears, Ketcheson, Sieffert, Denby, Brown, and Giggins attended the Union government convention at Dauphin, when Robert Cruise was again nominated as a government supporter.

A community club is being formed at this point, under the direction of Mr. Shears. Singing will be taken up as one of the first features of the winter’s programme.

Coroner’s juries do some funny things. In his evidence at the inquest of Duncan Crerar, Dr. Bottomley gave it as his opinion that deceased came to his death as a result of apoplexy. Yet in the face of this evidence the jury brought in a verdict that death was due to his being thrown out of a wagon, due to deceased’s horses running away.

Mrs. Theo. Johnson returned to town on Tuesday, from Dauphin. She shortly leaves for Fort William, where she will spend the winter.

The politicians are beginning to get busy. Handshaking has started, but the campaign cigar has not yet made its appearance.