Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 22 – 1921

Dog Race for Dauphin

The First Annual Dog Race will be held on Monday, January 2nd, in the afternoon, for boys and girls. The prizes will be given according to the support received from the public. It is the Committee’s object to have several races this winter and the first will be run on the above date, so the competitors will have time to train their dogs by then. Any subscriptions may be handed to Rev. Hamilton, Pat Muligan, Duncan Pearson or to F.C. Turland, who is acting Secretary-Treasurer, and who will also be pleased to give full particulars upon request. Help to boost the race Supress of the event will mean fun for the kiddies this winter.

Had Hands and Feet Frozen

Jerry Ravensburg, a homesteader in the Crane River district, was found by the provincial police last week, wandering around the lake in an aimless m[?] with his hands and feet badly frozen. Ravensburg had become insane and left his home. He was given medical attention and later taken to the asylum in Brandon.

Needy People in Town

Dauphin has more families in need this winter than in any year in its history. While in some cases it may be attributed to [falis?] of parents, a great deal of the distress can be accounted for by lack of employment. The Town Council, the churches and other organizations have the matter of providing for families well in hand, and their efforts are being supplemented by the endeavor of citizens. The officers of the Salvation Army, have applications for clothing and people who have cast off garments can make good use of same by notifying Capt. Johnson, who will distribute same to the right quarters.

Fork River Festivities

The season opened with a Hallowe’en party to be held in the school. The earliest arrivals, however, found all in darkness and thought that they were Tuck in when a glance down the street showed them the affair had taken a slight Tilt and landed across the way. The organization was well planned for a progressive game of whist fit into the Timewell and introduced the strangers. The sons of Williams, Richards and Will were present and gave a steadiness to the affair. Someone suggested that it would be as well to Lock (the) Wood as the unsteadier element might get Cooper in trouble over the dishes. However Prudens prevailed and the affair passed off quietly with a Little dance. Our worthy seedsman Briggs by name has been heard saying Harlow quite frequently but the young lady herself calls it Halo. His brother’s face is seen to Blanche with fear as he Hunts for a partner for a dance.

The following week a Thanksgiving supper was given and turkey figured largely on the bill of fare. Some hunters in the vicinity who were, commissioned to replenish the larder, report the choicer varieties of game to be very scarce but grouse to be fairly abundant. However a very sumptuous repast was served. The Irish of course could not get along without their Tait(ers). Parker(house) rolls, salads, etc., were served in a lavish manner and the tables fairly groaned under the weight of the good things provided. A Little dash of Curry added brightness as well as spice and flavor to the affair. The Winnipegosis orchestra played during the meal which added greatly to its enjoyment. After the supper they put on a very enjoyable program. The world renowned baritone Prof. Shears rendered a very classic selection in the truly pompus style of such celebrities. Unfortunately he could not Reid his music very well, in fact he read it upside down, i.e., the music; but otherwise it was artistically rendered and heartily encored. Another popular item was given by Mr. Roberts. Mr. Roberts has acquired a truly oriental style both in methods of procedure and delivery for he read it backwards and in a reverse position. A noted trio also figured largely on the program. A famous elocutionist was present and gave a very fine selection, but upon being encored she was so upset by some experience with a young man from Aldershot that she was unable to respond. Her troubled Browse won the sympathy of the audience. We hope that she will soon recover from her unhappy experience and be able to favor the public again in her usual capable manner.

The next event was a farewell to our esteemed friends, the Lockwoods. They will be greatly missed in our midst as they took a very active part in the social life. The evening’s performance opened with a game of whist. This created considerable excitement as the winners were nearing the goal. There was scarcely time to take a Brethour two and no time to Parker round the corners as the winning team was just two lengths ahead and making straight for the goal. The prizes presented were of a useful character. Some of our friends from the north were present for the first time this season and have a very Ven(er)able appearance as well as added distinction to the party. Our new station agent felt very Proud as he danced with the leading belles of the town. A very dainty lunch was served and four leafed clovers were seen among the viands. Later some recitations were given. Mrs. Lockwood gave some really good advice to girls which we hope will receive serious attention.

Sime nature study students from Snell’s Grove brought some specimens for identification. Among them was the lace wing, a very dainty insect with large Lacey wings, and which feeds upon the aphids. Another was the Dobson which is the aquatic larva of the order of insects known as neuropteran. In the larva stage of development it is used largely by fishermen for bait. It is well known along the banks of the Mossy. Eels are also reported to be found along this stream. The Meadows and Lees are full of such insects as the damsel and dragon flies.

The evening’s performance closed with a little dance and as the lights were low it finished up with a dance in the White, moonlight which was streaming in through the windows. Then there was a Russel for to get the wraps. The darkness acted as a Shield to some amusing episodes which were transpiring in the corridors.

The next important event was the recital given by the pupils of Prof. Williamson. The pupils reflected great credit on their teacher by the way the songs and instrumentals were given. Among them was the Flight of the Butterflies and The Thunderstorm. A little lassie of eight played a Scotch selection on the violin and was heartily encored. Representatives were presented from the various countries. The Irish were there from the Shannon while the McLean tartan represented the Highlands. Prof. Williamson represents the Toronto College of Music and his pupils were presented with diplomas from that college during the evening performance. Misses Reid, Bailey, Robertson, Hafenbrak, Munro and Hunt were the fortunate winners and nearly all passed with honors.

After these there was an adjournment and those who did not stay in their Ward at home set out on five year’s cruise on the Meighen and were shipwrecked.

–J.B.

Fork River

The Orangemen will hold their annual New Year’s Ball on January 6th. This is an annual affair and always has been one of the events of the season. Come out and enjoy yourself. The proceeds are to go to a member who lost his all by fire some days ago.

The U.F.M. has elected new officers for the year and will start out with a pie social on January 13th. Do not forget the date.

E.V. Lockwood and family have left for Englefeldt, where Mr. Lockwood will take charge of the C.N. station.

J. Schuchett is moving his old warehouse to the street and all old customers will find him open for business.

The “kiddies” are looking forward to the Christmas holidays with a grin.

Rats are becoming the pest of the village. We would like to see the council put a bounty on them. It might help rid the district of what will be the source of considerable loss of not checked.

See Fred Tilt for fire and life insurance. No one should go without insurance. The cost is small and the security is great.

Winnipegosis

The catch of fish at this point, so far, is below normal. The late mild weather made it very hard to handle the catch at all.

Enearson Bros. have taken a bunch of teams up to the northern part of the make and expect to return with fish about Dec. 20.

The Booth fisheries and the Independent Fisheries have finished storing ice for next season’s operations.

Hay and wood are coming in steadily, at $2.50 to $3 per load for hay and $3.50 to $4 per cord for seasoned poplar.

The trustees are advertising for a new principal of the school. Teachers seem to be ever on the move and keep the trustees guessing all the time. Some day the profession, like other professions, will become more permanent. Of course, in this statement I do not wish to include the gentler sex, whose chief aim (and a worthy one) is to get married.

The United Sunday school Christmas tree and entertainment on the 22nd promises to be a great success. A large number of our young people are taking part in the program. The work of training the children was no small job, and to those who gave their time the thanks of the community are due.

Inspector Martin, of the provincial police, Dauphin, arrived on Tuesday, to participate in a wolf hunt. He was joined here by Constable Black. Timber wolves are reported killing tock in the country north of the town and settlers want these dangerous animals exterminated. An Indian hunter will accompany the two constables on their expedition.

Our community, in sympathy with other places in the West has experienced a poor year. But, many of us in times gone by have seen worse days, so let us cheer up and plan for better things in the coming year.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 5, 1919

Dominion Day Celebration

The Great War Veterans’ association intend holding a big celebration on Tuesday, July 1st (Dominion Day). The programme provides for an elaborate Calithumpain and automobile parade in the forenoon, and splendid sports—baseball, football, track and children’s races in the afternoon. Suitable prizes given in all events. A grand ball will be given in the evening in the town hall.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains unchanged but late news from Winnipeg is hopeful of a settlement being reached. Locally the number of strikers has increased. The freight handlers, car checkers and call boys are the latest to join the strikes.
Supt. R.C. Brown was up from Portage on Tuesday and met the telephone operators, but the conference has not altered the situation and the exchange remains closed.
The best of order, however prevails throughout the town.

Winnipegosis Elections

Winnipegosis village, which has a charter of its own, held their elections on the 30th ult. There were three candidates for the Major’s chair. The vote stood: J.C. Adam 57, J.P. Grenon 19 and S. Sieffert 10. The following councilors were elected: Geo. Lyons Ward 1, Ed. Cartwright Ward 2, Jos. Burrell Ward 3, Sid Dennett Ward 4.

A Returned Soldier’s Lament

We are the boys who have done our bit,
But when we came back we were very hard hit.
The girls of Dauphin say we are tough!
I guess we are, all right enough.

We don’t mind the slams we get from either man or girl.
We just laugh at them, till their minds are in a whirl.
They call us boys instead of men,
But we took our stand with the best of them.

We fought in Belgium and in France,
And we made the wily and brutal Hun dance,
To the tune of the cannon, machine gun and bomb
We boys helped the Hun on the way to his home.

When we went o’er the top we had the best of luck.
Every blessed soldier boy filled with vim and pluck.
Thinking of the girls at home land of the brave and free!
Fight, even unto death, for the dame of Liberty.

Now, comrades, you all will agree with me
That some of these girls are as tough as we
So let us all strive to forgive and forget.
That we may learn to become men yet.

Winnipegosis

Pte. A. Clyne has returned to town from overseas after seeing two years active service.
While Mr. F.G. Shears and a few friends were motoring back from Dauphin they met with an accident. Mr. Archie McDonell was slightly injured.
The Ladies Aid of the Union Church held a very successful picnic on the school grounds. Refreshments and ice cream were served and an interesting baseball game was played between Winnipeg and Fork River, the latter winning by one side score. A crowd was in attendance from Dauphin and Fork River.
A.H. Steele has returned from Mafeking, where he has been fighting bush fires for three days.
C.H. Dixon was in Camperville for three days on business.
J.P. Grenon has taken about 20 fishermen to the Pas to fish in the lakes near Sturgeon, being mile 239 on the Hudson Bay Railway.
Mrs. G.W. Mullhearn and children came on Tuesday’s train to visit Mrs. A.H. Steele for the summer.
Miss A. Wilson has returned from an extended visit to the coast, and has resumed her work at the post office.
Long Shaw house has been burned out through bush fires.
The body of Helger Johnson, who was drowned in the lake six months ago, has just been recovered and was brought to town by Dorie Stevenson, on the boat Odinak.
The municipal election for mayor has just closed. It was a 3cornered contest and was hotly contested. Courad Adam was elected. The vote stood Adam 57, Grenon 19, Sieffert 10.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 6, 1919

Cold Weather

After January furnishing us with a delightful brand of weather. February started in with a falling temperature. The Government thermometer registered as follows: Monday, 10 below zero; Tuesday 19 below and Wednesday 5 below.

The Great Air Battle of Major W.G. Barker

(By Mrs. Thos. Playford)

Among the deeds that have been done
By airmen brave and skilled,
This last great air feat of the war,
With wonder all has filled.

O’er Mormal fores, all alone,
One brave aerial knight,
Flew searching for the British troops,
Or foe air craft in sight.

He soon espied a German plane;
Attacked it then and there,
And soon the enemy machine
Was broken in the air.

But still another hostile craft
Was coming very nigh,
Just then the young Canuck was stunned,
A shot had pierced his thigh!

But soon the major was alert,
There, in the dangerous spot,
For fifteen Hun planes now came near,
To fire the deadly shot.

But the brave boy his shots did fire,
So deftly and so well,
That though against such odds he fought
Three of the foe craft fell.

But he another wound received,
And fainted clean away,
But again he mastered his machine,
And did once more hold sway.

He flew at one great hostile craft,
It fell, but in his pride.
Just then his left arm, bruised and smashed
Hung useless by his side

With one hand left to steer and shoot,
While foes the air did fly
Those watching saw and held their breath,
At that cool, deadly skill.

Some minutes longer in the air
He played the awful game,
Put out of action two more for fair,
Then to the earth he came.

Our boy! Who nigh on sixty plane;
Single handed fought that day,
Now lies a sorely wounded lad
In Rouen far away.

And all who watched him on that day
So nobly act his part,
That he’ll soon recover from his wounds
Is hoped by each brave heart.

Dauphin’s brave boy has laurels won
From our Allies o’er the sea,
But for this great deed of valor done
He got the prized V.C.

And when he comes back home again
Having won so much renown
Won’t be proudly welcome by
Dauphin, his native town!

And while, at home, his parents wait
The coming of their boy,
All hearts that love the Maple Leaf,
Heard of his deeds with joy.

And when she had this story heard,
Of daring, skill and pluck,
Old England bowed her head and said,
“God bless our young Canuck.”

And when in after years we read,
In history, song and story,
Of man a great heroic deed.
That won both fame and glory.

Of all the deeds of airmen brave,
Not many will compare
With this fight of our Major hold,
Knight-errant of the air.

Dauphin, Jan. 31st, 1919.

Fork River

Wm. Williams has left for Lake Winnipegosis, where his new timber limit is located. He intends commencing operations on the limit this winter. C. Bugg and W. Tuck went with him.
Miss H. Lacey has returned from a week’s visit in Winnipeg.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, have left on a trip to the coast.
Owen Pruder, of the Northern elevator, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
A number of cars of baled hay have been shipped from this point this winter. A good price has been realized. This is an industry that might be greatly developed.

Winnipegosis

A delightful old-fashioned evening party was held in the Rex Hall on Wednesday, Jan. 29th, under the direction of Miss McArthur, in aid of the Red Cross Society. Many old-time dresses were resurrected, and especially winning was Mrs. Shears in a costume representing Dickens’ Mrs. Sarah Gamp, Mr. Shears caused many a laugh as Mr. Pickwick. Mrs. Steele, the Misses Grenon, Mrs. (Dr.) Medd, Mrs. Morrison, Mrs. Campbell (of Sifton), Miss Paddock, Mrs. Ummell and many other ladies in old-time dresses made one feel they had stepped back fifty years. Mrs. A. Snelgrove had her hair dressed in a pretty Victorian fashion, while many other styles made one think of the Middle Ages. Everyone was delighted with the violin selections rendered by Mr. Shears and Mrs. Campbell. We would also like to thank Mrs. Medd, Miss Arnason, Miss Macarthur, the Misses Grenon, Mrs. F.S. Giggins and Mr. Wills for their help with the program. The ladies on the refreshment committee also deserve great credit. A dance finished up a most successful event.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 23 – 1913

1913 Jan 23 – Triplets Expired

Mr. and Mrs. Watson Shand were blessed with the birth of triplet daughters last Saturday. The event was regarded as a most important one and strong hopes were held out that they would all live, but fate decreed otherwise and death claimed the babies.

1913 Jan 23 – Will Oppose Military Move

The move to organize a regiment of the militia here will be opposed by those who do not favor it at the meeting tonight. Among those who are expected to speak against it are Messrs. L. Atkin and J. Franssen.

1913 Jan 23 – Sifton

Cold weather and late trains, which keep us waiting for the mails, just about chronicle our daily experiences of late.
Peter Ogryzlo, of the Dominion Lands office, was a visitor here over Sunday. He will shortly remove with his family to Dauphin.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin last week.
Bishop Budka held services here on Sunday last. The attendance was not large as might have been expected owing to the very cold weather.
The concert in the church which was to have been held on Sunday, was put off owing to the visit of Bishop Budka.
Very little wood is coming of late owing to the cold weather.

1913 Jan 23 – Winnipegosis

What’s new? “Well, to tell the truth, there’s nothing.” The weather is cold and la grippe is prevalent, but our snug little town is no worse than elsewhere, which is something to be thankful for. Just for a relief we will dash off a few lines of verse.

Now, should a place become morbid like this;
Though gossip and tale-bearing we greatly miss.
The rocks that abound, yet none on this side;
Suggest native metals well known far and wide.
When they’re unearthed may we properly use
To build up, and adorn the temple of muse,
Besides to know what is good for the mumps
Is truly enough to put one in the dumps
We’ll brush us all up, with pure atmosphere
That should enhance the dullest wit here.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 2 – 1913

1913 Jan 2 – Fred Nex Killed

Fred. Nex, formerly publisher of the Dauphin News, and who afterwards kept a store at Sifton, was killed near Whitemouth, Man., not long since. He and two other parties were riding on the C.P.R. on a gasoline motor, when it collided with a train. All three were killed. Deceased of recent years held the position of secretary-treasurer for the Municipality of Whitemouth. He leaves a widow and several small children.

1913 Jan 2 – Fork River

John Chipla and family returned from Canora, Sask., for the holidays.
Bert Williams left for Moose Jaw to see his brother, who resides there.
Miss Olive and Alice Clark are visiting friends at Laird, Sask., during the holidays.
Miss Muriel Alterton, who taught the Mossey River School the last three years, has left for Winnipeg.
Miss Grant, teacher of Pine View School, has gone home for the holidays.
A. Hunt has gone to Ottawa to spend the holidays with his parents.
There was quite a family re-union at the homestead of D.F. Wilson last week. Paul Wood and family, of Sifton; Fleming Wilson and family of Dauphin and others. It was cheering to see so many familiar faces at Christmas Tide.
Miss Bertha Johnston, of Dauphin, Mrs. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, were the guests of D. Kennedy during the holiday.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is home on a two weeks’ vacation.
Abe Shinks returned from his homestead in Sask., and intends to remain the rest of the winter at Fork River.
The Christmas tree and concert in the hall on Christmas Eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ W.A. and S.S. was a success. It being a nice evening there was a large turnout. Wm. King, warden, was chairman. A good programme of songs, recitations, and drills by the children, after which Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus arrived and distributed the gifts among the children. We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus on the able manner they filled the position. We take this opportunity of thanking all those who took part in the concert and tree. It is encouraging to see everyone turn out on Christmas Eve to give the little folks a good time.
We wish all a Happy New Year.
Rev. H.H. Scrase held service on Christmas morning at Winnipegosis, and at All Saints, Fork River, in the evening.
In the Press we notice our Mowat friend twitting Mr. Borden and his followers for opposing the Transcontinental Railway when they were in opposition. Do you remember Laurier’s election cry in 1904? A national Transcontinental Railway for thirteen million dollars. What do we now find? The National Transcontinental Railway is going to cost us, including interest and charges, payable by the people, nearly eighty million and a cash outlay of close on three hundred million by the time we are through with it. Is it any wonder it was opposed at the time considering the unbusinesslike method adopted by the Laurier government. Our M.C. objects to Borden’s scheme of giving thirty-five millions to England for Dreadnaughts to be manned by Englishmen instead of Canadians. We consider Borden’s scheme the only possible one under the circumstances and far superior to the one Laurier has being playing with for years. What did his amount to? He, Laurier, wanted a strictly Canadian fleet, part on the Atlantic coast, the other half on the Pacific coast. That’s just what he handed down to Borden when he went out of power. The Niobe in the east and the Rainbow in the west. The boats are so powerful you have to take a magnifying glass to see them on a fine day. As for manning our warships with Canadians our friend is talking through his hat. The Marine Department at Ottawa could not find recruits enough in Canada to run those two little steamboats, the Niobe and the Rainbow. They had to be tied up for want of men. Finally they had to import them. Take a rest friend, you must be tired of jumping the fence so often.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

The W.A. entertainment last Friday evening was a success and though the proceeds, were small, more was not anticipated. The orchestra selections render by the Messrs. McArthur, Mrs. A. McArthur, and Mr. Shears were most appropriate, and the representation of Mr. and Mrs. Candle was amusing, while the comedy “Box the Cox” demonstrated the fact that theatrical talent is not lacking amongst us.
If a young “Lochinvar” appears in our midst let no one say they were fully warned.
Mr. Malley, lately from college, addressed the Christian Endeavor League last week.
Harry Parker had the misfortune to sprain his ankle while coming down the lake freighting fish. Hope he will soon be about again.
J.P. Grenon’s youngest son, also sustained an injury from an accident, the nature of which has not been learned.
Mrs. Johnston, of Minitonas, is visiting her friends, the Stuarts. A little one made the festive season.
We are pleased to hear Mrs. Graff has recovered from her illness under Mrs. Johnstone’s efficient nursing.
A.C. Bardley’s late indisposition was the result of cold.
The card circle last Wednesday evening was a pleasing character. Mrs. Burrell now possesses a good time-keeper and we trust Mrs. Crannage may find her work basket useful considering her aptitude with the meddle which was effectively displayed in the doll dressed for the W.A. competition, and won by Miss Hansford. See “Whilimina”.
Mr. Seaforth made a business trip to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Browne also made a trip to meet a friend from Winnipeg.
The Presbyterian S.S. entertainment on the 27th (the most anticipated event of the season), was very successful owing to Santa Claus’ generosity, whom the children admirably presented in a Cantata. It was regretted that Mr. Malley was unable to perform the duties of chairman, but Mr. Noble very kindly filled the place.
The Anglican Christmas service was harmonious. Rev. H.H. Scrase delivered a fine sermon.
This weather might inspire a spring song, considering the gulls are circling up the lake, but undoubtedly the storm that follows such illusive calm is liable to occur any time.
We wonder what the presence of pure white partridges may prognosticate. It is easy to obtain them, and they should look very pretty mounted.
The Armstrong Trading Co. lost a valuable team in the lake last week, and a horse dropped dead the week before. Fortunately they are not likely to feel the loss.
Mr. Ruthledge, formerly of Winnipegosis, spent Christmas in town.
The Misses Bradley spent Christmas here with their parents, and Mr. and Mrs. Saunders enjoyed the company of their sons with a friend from Winnipeg. A dance was given by the latter in Victoria Hall on Thursday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, of the Lake View hotel, returned from Winnipeg on Christmas Eve, where they spent a week on business and visiting.
Mrs. Bradley spent a delightful week-end in Dauphin, and attended the Anglican S.S. entertainment, of which he “Washing Day Cantata” was a particularly enjoyable feature. The trip from their home was suggestive of wedding bells resulting in poetic effusion.
Miss Johnston returned home for the Christmas holidays.

1913 Jan 2 – A REVERIE.

Ye children of the heavenly king,
Imagine that the angels sing,
Send peace on earth for men and driven
To doubt that women have earned a heaven.

As everyone of us should hold,
The truth that’s better far tan gold’
Let dissension meet a final doom,
And perversity by refused a room.

Then trust the Savour’s power to do
All that he said, which well he knew
Would be doubted by impatient men,
Though women believe faithfully till – when!

The world shall be forced to cry, “well done”!
In Him we live, the kingdom’s won!
To exercise faith within the soul
Makes humanity’s love perfectly whole.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

James McNicholl passed quietly away on Friday afternoon last Dec. 27th, after a lingering illness, having been tended faithfully by his wife for whom he showed much affection. The funeral rites were performed by Father Derome on Monday morning. Deceased’s wife, two sons and two daughters were among the mourners.
Miss Clara Bradley is away on a visit to her aunt in Portage la Prairie. Miss Dolly having returned with her.
Miss Shannon has returned from Fork River where she spent the Christmas holidays visiting her parents.
Mr. Scott is leaving on Thursday for Mafeking on business for the Standard Lumber Co.
Mr. and Mrs. Shears are wished joy of their young daughter, born to them on the 28th inst., at the home of Mrs. Johnstone.

1913 Jan 2 – Gulls at Lake Winnipegosis

Numerous sea gulls have, of late, made their appearance at Lake Winnipegosis. It is not known that those birds have ever appeared here at so late a date in any year in the past.