Preparing for a Fourth of July Picnic

This is the last article in June of the School for Housewives 1907 series published on June 9, 1907, and is a fun little article on picnic and the Fourth of July.

Transcribed from the Sunday edition of The Washington Times.

Preparing for a Fourth of July Picnic

IMPRIMIS: A box party at theater or opera conveys the impression of luxury and especially privileges to a favored foe; a box picnic is but a variation of the basket picnic, well known as the simplest form of the summer all-day outing. It is particularly adapted to the Fourth of July outings, which are becoming each year a more favored method of pawing our national holiday.

The box has sundry advantages over the hamper as a means of transporting provisions for the merry excursionists. For weeks in advance of the holiday, there should be a hoarding up of the paper boxes that drift into the house from grocer, florist, shoe merchant, and haberdasher. Select those of medium size, and apportion to each the contents suited to dimensions and shape.

Provide yourself with plenty of tissue paper, also the waxed paper used by confectioners and bakers for wrapping dainties that may ooze or grease. Lay in a stock of light, strong wrapping paper, twine, and the wooden handles that make the carriage of parcels less awkward business than when they are merely tied up with a string.

Boxes Better Than Baskets.

A box is less unwieldy because more compact than a basket; the sight of a party thus laden attracts less attention on train or boat than if every man, woman, and child bore a hamper—a walking advertisement of the day’s business. The box is light and easily tucked under the seat or bestowed in the rack overhead while the passengers are in the train. If they do not wish to be cumbered with empty boxes on the return trip, a bonfire on the camping ground disposes of impedimenta, including wrapping paper, Japanese napkins and the wooden plates, which have saved the picnickers the burden of china platters and plates.

A procession of tired excursionists, bearing disheveled hampers, emptied of edibles, yet which must be carried carefully lest the crockery within jingles itself to pieces, is a dispiriting feature of the return townward when the day’s fun is clean over.

In buying napkins have the thought of “the day we celebrate” in mind. If you can find those that are stamped with the Stars and Stripes or other national emblems get them. Lay in an abundance of narrow ribbons, striped with red, white and blue, for tying up sandwiches and rolls. These and other simple devices for lending a patriotic flavor to the festivities are well worth the exercise of ingenuity and expenditure of time.

Use Wooden Plates.

You may buy wooden plates, such as we used by grocers for sending butter to customers, at an absurdly low price. Also deeper and smaller wooden trenchers, which you will find useful in bestowing your goods in the boxes. All are so cheap that you will not grudge cremating them when they have had their day.

Set aside the largest boxes for sandwiches rolls, and biscuits. The next size should be appropriated by cakes and fruit. Have separate compartments for each. Sandwiches impart odors to plain bread and butter, and cake lends fragrance to its neighbors.

Cut fresh bread as thin as a sharp knife will shave it—having buttered it on the loaf, and roll each slice up neatly, tying it with narrow ribbon. This is “nice” work, requiring deft fingers and a keen blade. Warm the butter slightly for spreading bread. Sandwiches are clumsy when butter is laid on the slices in lumps. Pare the crust from the bread to be rolled or used for sandwiches. When the rolled bread is ready, envelope each ribbon-bound parcel in waxed paper and pack them in the box already lined with tissue paper. If this be done at once, the bread will be soft when the box is opened.

Open long French rolls on one side and scrape out two-thirds of the crumb. Fill the cavities with minced tongue, ham or chicken; close the roll and bind into place with narrow ribbon. Pack the several kinds in separate boxes, marking them “ham,” or “tongue” or “chicken.” It will save confusion in unpacking and serving. Oblong sandwiches are more easily handled in eating than square or triangular. They also pack to better advantage. Wrap each in waxed paper as soon as it is tied up, and lay in the box. Pack securely, but do not crush.

Packing Loaf Cakes.

Cut loaf cakes and lay the slices closely together in the paper-lined box. When it is full, cover by folding the waxed paper about it to exclude the air. Do not wrap the slices separately. Put up cookies, etc., in like manner.

Salads should be prepared at home, and made quite ready for the dressing. If you have a tin biscuit box, line it with several thicknesses of waxed paper; on this lay an interlining of cheesecloth or old muslin. In the box thus prepared pack lettuce or chicken and celery cut up, but not seasoned. It will remain fresh in the hottest weather if you will sprinkle it very lightly with water before fitting on the lid. The dressing—mayonnaise or French—should be put up in a wide-mouthed bottle, securely corked and wrapped in raw cotton. Give it a small box to itself.

Bottles are ticklish articles to carry, and moreover, heavy. Yet there must be beverages at a July picnic. Cold tea and coffee, and ginger ale will add seriously to the weight of the outfit. If you must take them, distribute the bottles among the several boxes and assign them to the stronger members of the party. Pare and slice the lemons at home, and pack with sugar in fruit jars with screw tops and rubbers. Water and ice (if you can procure the latter in the neighborhood of the camping ground) may be added when you are ready to serve the lemonade. Since tumblers are another must-be, get a dozen or so of the cheapest you can find. Then no tears are shed if they come to grief.

You will be surprised when everything is put up to see how much has been packed into a few boxes. The larger cases should be done up separately, each enveloped in paper, tied with twine, and fitted up with a handle. Two or three smaller boxes may be strapped together.

When the joyous company board train or boat, they may be mistaken for town cousins who are bearing gifts to the old homestead on the holiday. They will not look like fruit, candy, and peanut peddlers, bound for a day’s business in the rural districts.

The small silver needed for the luncheon should go into the breast pocket of paterfamilias, or into “mother’s” shopping bag. A dozen teaspoons take little room. Forks and tablespoons will not be required, unless the former are needed for salad.

I append a few recipes for sandwiches that may be a welcome variation upon the stock “chicken, tongue, and ham.”

Cheese Jelly Sandwiches.

Beat the yolks of two eggs light, add a saltspoonful of salt, the same of white pepper and of French mustard. Mix well and stir into mixture a cup of hot milk, to which has been added a pinch of soda. Stir over the fire, in a double boiler, for five or until it heats throughout evenly and thickens into a custard. Have ready a tablespoonful of gelatine, which has soaked tor two hours in a cupful of cold water. Take the custard from the range and beat in the gelatine alternately with a great spoonful of cream. Set in boiling water, and, when it is hot, add a cupful (scant) of grated cheese. When you have a smooth paste, turn out to cool in a deep plate. Do this the day before it is to be used. Slice and lay between buttered slices of bread.

Cream Cheese and Nut Sandwiches.

Work the cheese to a paste with cream and butter, and mix with an equal quantity of sorted pecans, chopped fine. Butter thin slices of graham bread and spread with the mixture.

Egg and Anchovy Sandwiches.

Boil six eggs hard and throw them into cold water. Leave them there for two hours. Take out the yolks and rub to a powder with a silver spoon. Moisten with a dressing made of a tea spoonful of lemon juice rubbed to an emulsion with three tablespoonfuls of salad oil, half a teaspoonful of French mustard and a dash of salt and pepper. Make into a lumpless compound, adding, finally, two teaspoonfuls of anchovy paste.

Whole wheat bread is best for this filling.

Cream Cheese and Olive Sandwiches.

Rub a Philadelphia cream cheese to a paste with two tablespoonfuls of mayonnaise dressing. Add one-third as much chopped olives, and beat all light. This filling is especially nice when spread upon round slices of Boston brown bread.

Lettuce Sandwiches.

Slice white bread thin, when you have cut off the crust and buttered the cut end of the loaf. Lay in between every two slices a leaf of crisp lettuce, dipped in mayonnaise dressing.

If you take these to the picnic, let it be in sections. Butter and pack the bread at home, take the lettuce in one box, the dressing in another, and put them together on the grounds.

Lettuce and Tomato Sandwiches.

Prepare as in the last recipe, adding to the lettuce leaf a slice of raw and peeled tomato.

Pressed Loaf Sandwiches.

A new and appetizing pressed sandwich may be made by removing the crusts from a loaf of bread, either brown or white, and cutting it in four equal-sized pieces. Spread each slice thickly with butter, red peppers sliced in lengthwise strips and plenty of cream or Neufchatel cheese. Now reshape the loaf by putting the slices together again. Wrap in a heavy dry towel, then in a wet one and put between two boards, on which three or four heavy flatirons are placed. Let the loaf remain weighted from six to ten hours; this will compress it into a sold mass three or four inches high, which may be sliced like cake. To pack, wrap whole in waxed paper and cut at the picnic.

OTHER ARTICLES ALSO PUBLISHED…
Family Meals for a Week
Housemothers’ Exchange

The Sensible Family Picnic

AS A preface to our familiar talk of today we will dismiss incontinently all thought of the public picnic, heralded by flaming placards, or by pulpit notices, and accompanied by national and society fags. Young eyes glisten gleefully in the prospect; graver and older folk groan in anticipation, and sigh in relief at the memory thereof. We did not mind “roughing it a bit” when we were young. In fact, there was a relishful spice of the unusual and the forbidden in the al fresco frolic that lasted all day and set at naught all the conventionalities of Sunday clothes and table manners associated with other and indoor convivialities. An old ballad sung in our grandmothers’ day invited one to “take tea in the arbour”-

With roses and posies to scent up your noses;
and lilies and billies and daffydownlillies.

The charmed visitors sough the arbour eagerly and saw the other side of the situation. Among other drawbacks to the pastoral,

A big daddy longlegs fell plump in my cup; the summer house floor was damp and the revellers caught cold, etc. When I was forty years younger, I laughed with others of the party when a New Jersey farmer from whom we had received permission to picnic on the banks of a purling stream flowing through his meadow, appeared as we were unpacking our baskets, with-

A FRIENDLY OFFER

“I say, why don’t you young folks bring all them victuals up to my house and eat them in the dining room, like Christians, where there’s no flies, and where you can set on comfortable chairs and eat out of plates? My old woman seen you from the winder, and how uncomfortable you all was, a sprawling on the damp grass, and sent me down to ask you up to the house. It shan’t cost you a cent.“
We declined civilly and gratefully, and waited until he was out of hearing before we had our laugh out.
I reminded a surviving member of the merry party the other day of the incident.
“How odd it seems now,” she said, reflexively, “to think that you and I ever enjoyed sitting on the ground and eating our luncheon out of pasteboard boxes!”
That summed up what the picnic is to her sophisticated self. I confess secretly i pack the boxes that are to thrill the soul of grandchildren with pure delight, when, in the hottest of the solstitial noontide, they will devour sandwiches, hard-boiled eggs and innumerable cookies in the woods, seated upon stumps and hummocks, spending eight hours in the open air and coming home at evening hungry as hunters, and so tired that they fall asleep as soon as their heads touch the pillows. It is weeks before the tan fades from their cheeks. The glamour of the innocent festa never leaves the memory.
For these and for sundry other reasons- all good and sufficient- I advise the family picnic to dwells in town and country. Get out of the rut at least two or three times while the prodigal summer is abroad upon he earth; set convention at defiance; forget for a few hours the claims of business, forego the attractions of cut-and-dried “functions” in the shape of indoor luncheons, dine and reception, and get at one with Mother Nature.
If the mother of the household does not “feel like going,” insist that she shall be the honoured guest of the day, the one for whom the festival is given. If there are daughters in the family, let them assume the major part of the preparations for luncheon. Do you, our loving and dutiful juniors, dream of the steady strain, the unceasing stress that housekeeping all the year round is to the faithful head of your home? When one and another remarks hastily that “mother’s appetite is falling,” and from the farther down to the youngling of the flock each taxes is invention to suggest and to pro side some delicacy that may tempt it- ices it occur to one of you that her malady may be “kitchenitis”?
By the coined word I would describe the listlessness that befalls appreciation of tempting foods when one knows, for twelve months at a time, exactly what is to be served three times a day; how it will look and taste- and smell! Give the mother a respite for one little day and let her find the lost relish for her daily fare in the out-of-door world. I am putting the girls in her place in the surprise-party that is her holiday.

Sandwiches

Are associated in the mind with picnics as firmly as sugar and cream with tea and coffee.
Cut the bread thin and either round, triangular or oblong- never square. Trim off the crusts; spread evenly with warmed butter, ad fill neatly. The filling should never project beyond the trimmed edges of the bread.

Some Fillings

1. Mince olives fine and work into cream cheese until you have a smooth paste freckled with green. Salt slightly.
2. Prepare as just directed, adding to the paste finely minced pecan-nut kernels.
3. After buttering the bread, spread rather thickly with cream cheese, and lay between the slices thus prepared a crisp leaf of lettuce dipped in French dressing. Wrap these sandwiches in tissue paper.
4. Mince cold veal or chicken, season tot sate with salt and paprika; butter the bread; cover with this mixture and lap crisp lettuce dipped in mayonnaise dressing between the filled slices.
5. Skin sardines; take out the backbone and rub the fish to a paste, adding butter and a little lemon juice. You may, if you like, add a dash of paprika. Spread between skies of bettered bread.
6. Pound the yolks of hard-boiled eggs to a powder. Rub to a paste with better, paprika and a dash of French mustard. Mince the whites of the boiled eggs as fine as possible and blend with the yolk paste. Butter thin skies of whole wheat or of graham bread and fill with this mixture.
Pack each variety of sandwich in a box of its own. Save candy boxes for this purpose. Line them with tissue paper and fold it over the contents.

Salads

Tin biscuit-boxes lined with the oiled paper that comes in candy boxes are useful for holding salads. Or you may line pasteboard cases and other green stuffs in lightly, and take e mixed dressing along in wide-mouthed bottles or in small fruit jars.
A fruit salad will be popular on a hot day. Peel and strip the white skin from the pulp of four or five oranges; separate the lobs gingerly, not tearing them, and cut each into four pieces with a sharp silver knife. Have at hand a cupful of the kernels of English walnuts which have been scalded, then left to get cold and crisp before they are cut into bits. (While they are hot, strip off the bitter skin.) Mix with the fruit and put into a glass jar with a tight top. Take along mayonnaise dressing for this.
A welcome item in the preparation for a picnic is ice. Cut a piece that will fit easily into a stout basket; wrap in canton flannel and then in several folds of newspaper. Wrap and bind tightly to exclude the air.
Finally, the oilcloth about the parcel and put into the basket. Cover all with stout paper and fit the cover upon the basket. Ice thus protected will keep eight or ten hours if the basket be not exposed to the sun. Commission a strong-armed boy to carry this, and should the journey be made by train or carriage, tuck the basket under the seat.
It is better to distribute the eatables among the party, arranged in parcels of in baskets of convenient size, than to pack all into one big hamper. If mother cannot enjoy her midday meal without her “Comfortable cup of tea,” she need not go without it. Hot-scalding hot-tea may be kept at the same temperature all day in the modern and invaluable vacuum bottle. It is not an expensive luxury and beyond price to traveler and excursionist. Hot soups, bouillon and broths may be secured at any hour of the day or night by the ingenious contrivance, and hot tea and coffee- freshly made before bottling, poured into the bottle and instantly corked and shut up in the airtight cover- will lose neither heat nor flavour in twelve hours.
Mother need not fear lest the excursion may deprive her of her tonic beverage. In a special basket may be stored tea, sugar and cream with her very own cup and saucer.
Lemonade may be made on the ground and drunk out of paper cup packed with wooden plates, paper napkins and centrepiece. It is a convenience, but not a necessity, to have also a tablecloth. But linen is heavy and one can do without other napery than what I have named. Pack the Japanese napkins in the lemonade pitcher, and in other ways economize every inch of space. A dress-suit case or two-or three-may be utilized to great advantage by our family of picnickers. They are roomy and light and attract no attention on train of trolley. Bestow your eatables at discretion within them, and let each boy assume the charge of one.
Wooden plates and paper napkins may be burned on the ground when they have served their purpose. And the suitcases may be utilized on the return trip as repositories for woodland treasures- odd fungi, roots and blossoms, oak-galls and mosses and last year’s bird rests.
Above all and before all and through all the outing maintain an cheerful spirit. Make the best of misadventures and turn disasters into jests. The perversion of the title of the frolic into “pleasure exertion” is a stale joke. It contains a biting satire upon the way some people take their pleasure. Perhaps five out of ten know how to enjoy a holiday- as such. See to it that your family outing is genuine recreation. The corn roast, games- in fact, anything to make the picnic a success is suggested. To this end don’t make a toil of what should be a delight.

Marion Harland

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 28 – 1913

1913 Aug 28 – Broke His Leg

John Coleen, of Red Deer Point, Lake Winnipegosis, broke his leg on Tuesday by falling out of a wagon. He was brought to the hospital here on Wednesday by Dr. Medd.

1913 Aug 28 – Ethelbert

Peter Pundy was arraigned before Magistrate Skaife last week charged by George Marantz with plastering manure over he windows of his store. He was found guilty and the fine and costs amounted to $31. There is talk of Pundy appealing the case.
Wheat cutting is going ahead with all possible speed. The bulk of the crop will be cut by Saturday night.
The Ruthenians have organized a Conservative association with a good membership. The following are the officers elected: Sam Hughes, M.P.P., Honorary President; N.A. Hryhorczuk, President; P. Kuzyk, Vice; K.F. Slipetz, sec.-treasurer and organizer.

1913 Aug 28 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens of Dauphin, spent a short time renewing old acquaintances last week.
Mr. Morrison, of the Canadian Oil Co. of Winnipeg, was busy here taking orders for gasoline and oil.
Our weed inspector is busy these days. One of our farmers was mulcted to the tune of twenty-five dollars and costs. We are informed another man at Winnipegosis was put to the trouble of having a gang of men cutting down a common weed for sow thistle. This weed business seems a complicated proposition and needs handling very carefully. The enforcing of the act has become a necessity here.
We are informed that a new fruit store is in operation. Opposition is the life of trade we are told.
Fred. Storrar returned from Winnipegosis, where he had charge of a booth during the picnic and reports a swell time.
Mrs. McEacheron and son, Donny, are spending, a few days with her sister, Mrs. E. Morris, at Winnipegosis.
In the absence of the constable last week we hear the lady suffragettes held a successful meeting and everything passed off quietly till they meet again.
Mrs. Kennedy and family and Miss A. Godkin returned from Winnipegosis, after spending a week at that point among their numerous friends.
Quite a number took in the trainmen’s picnic to Winnipegosis and report having a good time there.
James McDonald returned from a two weeks’ visit among friends in the south and is looking hearty and has resumed charge of the express automobile.
Picture to yourself Main Street east in our little burgh where night after night a band of from twenty to forty head of cattle laying around till there is not room to pass between them and the dwelling houses with a team and the aroma that arises with a hot sun beating down on it every day. Again, a benighted traveller crossing over in the dark and landing in one of those pyramids dedicated to the memory of cowology. A voice calling to be helped out and a pillar of brimstone and fire arises blazoned with it, to the downfall of those who put the herd law out of existence. Is it not a disgrace to a civilized community to put up with such a state of affairs.
Mrs. W. King returned from a short stay at Winnipegosis with her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, during the illness of her little son who died last week.
The Rev. Mr. Roberts held service in the Methodist Church on the 24th.
The Rev. Mr. Wosney will hold service in All Saints’ English Church every Sunday at three in the afternoon till further notice.
The first car of fish of the season passed through here from Lake Winnipegosis last week.
A large assortment of vegetables is shipped from this point which is sampled by the stock running at large to the discomfort of the shipper.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 21 – 1913

1913 Aug 21 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Patrick McLeod, a half-breed, aged 16 years, was drowned at Winnipegosis on Sunday afternoon. He and some other boys were playing about the steamer Manitou, when he fell overboard and was drowned.

1913 Aug 21 – Fork River

Mrs. Jas. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, is spending the week with her daughter at C.E. Bailey’s on the Mossey.
Mr. Noble, Methodist student at Mafeking, is here renewing acquaintances for a few days.
The Methodist picnic was held on the 13th. It was an ideal picnic day and a good crowd turned out considering the busy season. There were sports of all kinds and the booth did a roaring trade. The baseball game between the married and single ladies was won by the single ladies.
Professor Sas Poo was kept busy telling fortunes during his stay here. There is some thing he ken and there’s other things he don’ ken, as the Scotchman would say.
Professor Weaver has severed his connection with the A.T. Co. and is making for his farm at Million. Whether there’s millions in it for Gordon remains to be seen.
Gerald Stuart has left for Winnipeg, where he intends taking up school teaching.
Dunk. Kennedy and wife and S. Bailey returned from the Stampede at Winnipeg and report a lively time.
Mrs. Tallbath and family of Winnipeg, and visiting at the home of her sister, Mrs. Sam Reid, on the Mossey River.
The Power Co. of Dauphin have their survey party busy taking levels on the Mossey River one mile north of town.
The farmers are busy cutting their fall wheat and barley now and by the end of this week cutting will be general. Thee are some fields of real good fall wheat in this district and prospects are away ahead of what was expected considering the wet season.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 17– 1913

1913 Jul 17 – Fork River

Mr. Munson of the Massey-Harris Agency, returned to Winnipeg after having spent a week here on business for the company.
D.F. Wilson has returned from taking in the Winnipeg exhibition. He says the show was passable.
F.B. Lacey returned from a trip south on business.
Me. Vineing, of Australia, who spent a few days with Mr. Venables has left for Winnipeg.
“Say, Mike, can ye tell us what that anchor-like instrument with handles that was unloaded on the platform is?” “Well. Pat, I believe its a municipal tooth pick; its to accompany those two grading plows that were bought three years ago and have been at rest up not in the scrub for two years; no one uses them.” “Well, Mike, that’s the outcome of so many attending municipal conventions; then a banquet, then a large head and along comes pipes and other useless tools instead of getting a car of good tamarack planks to make culverts to take off the surplus water. Good-day.”
Jack McLean took a few days off to attend the parade on the 12th at Brandon.

1913 Jul 17 – Fork River

Mrs. D.F. Wilson is spending the week with friends at Dauphin.
Vivian Hafenbrak has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Fred King is off on a short vacation from a business trip to Dauphin.
John Stark and Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, are spending a few days renewing acquaintances.
The 12th of July was very wet, rain falling all day and the Orangemen’s picnic was postponed till the roads dry up some. Several of our Winnipegosis friends and their ladies came. One of the drawing cards was the fishermen’s parade with the big drum in the lead. It was a swell affair, no one hurt. If there was any objection it was on the drum’s part. We trust our municipal fathers will see fit to extend our sidewalks on both sides of Main Street.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 3 – 1913

1913 Jul 3 – Fork River

Fred Tilt had the misfortune to lose most of his household effects by fire which started in an unaccounted way.
G. O’Neill, who has been staying with friends at Mowat for some time, has returned to his home at Rainy River.
Mrs. Fred Cooper is spending a weeks’ vacation with friends at Dauphin.
Mrs. C. Clark and family left for their new home at Paswagan, Sask., with a car of household effects. We wish them prosperity in their new home.
Miss Eva Storrar and Miss Pearl Cooper are taking a trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. Gunnies and family, of Roblin arrived with a car of effects and to tend making their home at Fork River for the present.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, of Dauphin, is spending her summer vacation at home on the Fork River.
Don’t forget the Orangemen’s 11th annual basket picnic at Fork River, July 12th. Sports of all kinds. All welcome. Bring your baskets and have a day’s recreation.
Mr. Worsey arrived from St. John’s College, Winnipeg, to take up the work in the Fork River Mission. Service was held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, 20th, and Winnipegosis and will continue to be held at Sifton at 10.30 in the morning and at Fork River at 3 in the afternoon and Winnipegosis school house in the evening at 7.30, every Sunday till further notice.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 26 – 1913

1913 Jun 26 – Soldiers Leave For Sewell

There was a lively scene about the station on Sunday evening when the Manitoba 32nd Light Horse embarked by special train for Sewell. The train brought in 100 troopers and horses from Roblin and they were joined here by the numbers of the Dauphin troop, numbering 74. Col. H.I. Stevenson is in command. The other officers are Major G.C.J. Walker and Capt. H.K. Newcombe. The train was made up of twenty cars including men, horses, supplies, etc. The soldiers were given an ovation by the crowd as the train moved out of the station.

1913 Jun 26 – Fork River

Charles Clark, section foreman here for a number of years, left for Paswegan, Sask., to take on a section there and to arrange for moving his family to that point.
Mrs. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are spending their summer vacation with N. Johnston at Mowat Centre.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, spent a short time in town last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, the latter was formerly Miss Olive Clark, took in Fork River, on their honeymoon trip visiting Mrs. Clark. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston will make their home at Edmonton. We wish them a life of happiness and prosperity.
The herd law will come into force in August in a portion of wards on and three. This has become necessary on account of stock of all kinds being let run and not looked after by the owners as they should be.
At a meeting of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, it was decided to hold their 12th annual picnic at Fork River July 12. A special meeting is called for Saturday night, June 28th, to arrange for the picnic and other business. All members are requested to attend.
Mr. Gunness, of Robin, has arrived here to take over the section left vacant by C. Clark.
Mrs. Capt. Coffey, of Dauphin, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
George says those weeds will have to go or he will know the reason why. Some person with an inquisitive turn of mind is anxious to know if it was necessary to drive around delivering notices before the weeds were up, when a one cent stamp would suffice as heretofore and the travelling around come later on.
Now seeding is over, road making is being talked of. Can our intelligent municipal Daddy and his assistant tell us where to find the tools or have they gone off in the bush browsing as usual. Information on this matter will be thankfully received by a large number of ratepayers.
Sam Hughes, M.P.P., spent a few hours between rains, listening to the wants and troubles of this part of his constituency. No doubt his visit will be beneficial to our neighbourhood.
The Government Agricultural train was here, but owing to general train coming in, it delayed the starting of business, which made the time short. A large number turned out and the ladies had a good time. The addresses though they had to be cut short, were very instructive. The horses and stock were very good and an improvement on last year and credit is due to those in charge. The train left for Winnipegosis at 5.30 in charge of the Prof. of Minnokin Experimental weed farm and Prof. O’Malley, of the Agricultural College.
Prof. G. Weaver, of Millions was renewing acquaintances here for a short time lately.
Saturday was a red letter day here in the departing of two wedding parties, our M.P.P. and this agricultural train. It was a bright day suitable for such occasions and everything passed off quietly.
The football match between the married and single teams has been postponed.
Wm. King returned from court of revision at Gilbert Plains and states that everything passed off quietly.