Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 6 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 6 – Fork River

Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. They report a very pleasant time.
F.B. Lacey from Mowat Centre, returned from a visit to Dauphin on business and to attend the teachers’ convention.
We are informed that Capt. Cain, of Mowat, left for Dauphin to take out a license of some sort. Time will tell whether it is for fish, flesh or fowl.
Mrs. Frost and daughter, of Rathwell, are visiting her daughter, Mrs. Reid, on the Mossey River.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey, is spending the week in Dauphin, with friends.
Archie McDonald, who has been busy with a gang ditching on the company’s farm here, has returned to Winnipegosis, the ground having frozen too hard to do any more work this season.
Miss J. Weatherhead, teacher of the Mossey River School, spent the weekend with friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Roe, of Neepawa, has left for the west with his second consignment of cattle from this point.
John Seiffert, and Steve Letwyn, of Winnipegosis, are busy among the farmers, buying cattle for the company’s at South Bay.
Wm. Coultas has invested in stock and intends stall feeding them for Xmas beef. We believe Billy is on the road to become a millionaire in the near future. Farmers take notice and follow suit.
Frank Clawson, of Dauphin, is here renewing old acquaintances.
Mrs. N. Little, and daughter, Miss Grace, took a trip south on business for a few days.
Mr. O’Callagan, of Portage la prairie, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is visiting the Co.’s store on his semi-annual tour of inspection, and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Messrs. Sturdy, White and Shears, of Winnipegosis, are busy at the Co.’s store this week taking stock.
Mrs. Stonehouse and daughter, Miss Sylvia paid the lake town a visit this week.
Hallowe’en passed off with the usual result. Some are minus their gates, others are looking for strayed buggies. The bell of All Saints’ received its annual visit and was fixed up as usual to keep it from running away, while the other building is left in peace as usual. This is where unity comes in, we suppose; yes, with a vengeance.
Our Winnipegosis friends seem to be grieved at the way they are used by the Mossey River municipal board and would like to know if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map. Better ask somebody else, I guess. But one thing we do know at tax paying time we are not allowed to forget our residence. Not very likely Mike.

1913 Nov 6 – Winnipegosis

Capt. Coffey was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday’s train.
The ice on the lake is firm enough to permit travel between the mainland and Snake Island. If the weather becomes warm again which it threatens now, navigation will be resumed.
Frank Hechter left for Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday. Frank is up and down pretty often and helps keep the C.N.R. running.
J.P. Grenon is off to Quebec, where he will study mink farming. The mink farm at Macaza has proved a decided success and he is anxious to learn something of the methods employed in rearing this little animal which produces such a fine grade of fur. The fox branch of Mr. G’s ranch is making progress, and there is every prospect of it becoming a profitable industry. Fish and fur producing animals abound in this part of the West and if the industries flourish as we hope they will there is no reason why the people here should not become prosperous, if not wealthy. The fishing industry is a great asset and the timber resources are large and are being profitable exploited. With good land for farming and cattle raising at the back of all, no part of he West offers better inducements for settlers than this town and district.
The telephone line is now completed and it is sure to prove a great convenience. Postmaster Ketcheson is in charge of the service. The connections are small at present but they are sure to grow. Those connected up with the service are Canadian Lakes Fishing Co., The Armstrong Trading Co. and Frank Hechter. Dauphin is the Central checking office.
Cattle buyers have been in the district of late but have not secured many animals as that canna Scot, Capt. Dugald McAuley, usually covers the district like a blanket.

1919 Nov 6 – Soldiers Banqueted at Fork River

One of the largest banquets held in Northern Manitoba took place at Fork River on Friday night, the 31st ult. The banquet was gotten up by the people of the Mossey River municipality and tendered to the returned soldiers. The supper was held in the Orange Hall, and it is estimated that fully two hundred and fifty people sat down to the splendid spread prepared by the ladies of the district.
Mossey River municipality was well represented by her sturdy sons in France and Flanders, and, like all Canadians, they did their part well. Some of the boys were destined not to return and today rest under the sod across the ocean. Others survived their wounds. The occasion was one for rejoicing.
Each soldier was remembered in a tangible form and presented with either a gold watch and guard or a well-filled purse. It was a recognition of the men well worthy of any community.

TOAST LIST.
Following the supper there was a short toast list. Mr. Geo. King, of Dauphin, was toastmaster. The list included “The King.”
“The British Empire,” proposed by Geo. Spence, of Winnipegosis, and responded to by Principal Jonasson, of Winnipegosis, and the Rev. Mr. Roberts.
“The Municipality of Mossey River,” proposed by ex-Reeve F.B. Lacey, and responded to by Coun. Hunt and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
“Our Hosts and Hostesses,” was proposed by the Rev. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin.
The address to the soldiers was read by Mr. Wm. King, and the presentations made by Sergt. Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
The men made suitable replies, in which they each returned their heartfelt thanks.
At the conclusion of the speech making the hall was cleared and the young people indulged in a dance.
There were a number of guests present from Dauphin, Winnipegosis and other points.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 22 – 1913

1913 May 22 – Baran Executed

Portage la Prairie, May 20 – John Baran at one minute past eight o’clock this morning paid the death penalty in the yard of the Portage la Prairie jail for the murder of Constable Rooke. He walked to his death without a murmur and without even an expression of regret for his deed, and three-quarters of an hour after the drop on the scaffold he was buried in the corner of the jail yard in quick lime, no friends having made claim to his body. Baran spent a sleepless night, dozing off for a few minutes at a time, and at 7:30 this morning asked for his breakfast, which consisted of porridge, eggs, toast and coffee.
He did not eat it with a relish and was left quietly alone for his last meal. It was just 7:55 when Deputy Sheriff Muir read the death warrant to the condemned man, and preparations for the march to the scaffold was then begun.

1913 May 22 – Boy Lost

On Saturday last Mrs. Alex. Genik, who lives on the Drifting River north of Ashville, sent her seven year old son out for some wood. That was the last time he was seen. Search parties have since been organized and the country roundabout scoured, but no trace of the boy has been found. It is feared that he has been drowned.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 8 – 1913

1913 May 8 – Fork River

Seeding is the order of the day. The land is getting in good order and everyone is as busy as bees and expects to put in a large crop if the fine weather continues.
John Clemens, of Dauphin, was up inspecting his farm and intends putting in a crop.
“Say, Mike, did yees notice the state of the crossing in front of the express office? It looks like Paddy’s pants, “more holy than righteous.” Some one will get hurt there yet.”
“Well, Pat, I am told it is caused by the heavy mail passing over it to the municipal office. Shure they are mistaken as I notice all the crossings in Winnipegosis are about busted up, too. They have only been down one year.”
“Well, Mike, its either those heavy draft horses of Josies that’s playing the divel with them crossings or their not built right. We’ll have to see the reeve about it. Fancy building crossings on Main Street with two inch spruce plank.”
We notice in last week’s issue a paragraph about early hatching of eggs in Manitoba given as the 11th April and we would like to inform our readers that Dunc Kennedy had chicks out on the 1st of March and are now well grown. What about Fork River for poultry raising. There were raised by the hen.
Mrs. A. Cameron and Mrs. G. Shannon of Mowat Centre were visitors to the Lake Town this week.
R.C. Sparling, real estate agent of Dauphin, paid us a short visit on business.
Mrs. Wm. King returned from a two weeks’ visit to her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, at Winnipegosis.
W. Williams, lumber merchant, returned from Dauphin and states Mrs. William is improving in health.
Miss Ena Fredrickson has been transferred to the Armstrong Trading Co. store at Winnipegosis. She will be missed her and her numerous friends wish her a pleasant time in her new position.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has received word from the Synod that he and his family are to be transferred to Kinisota on Lake Manitoba as soon as arrangements are completed.
We are pleased to see Sam Baily around town again after being confined to the house for some time.
Wm. King, having been appointed registration clerk for this district, is busy posting up the bills and starts registration at Winnipegosis, on May 27th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 24 – 1913

1913 Apr 24 – Ethelbert

Mr. and Mrs. L.W. Saunders and children left last week for Herbert, Sask., where Mr. Saunders will operate a steam plough during the summer. The family have been residents of this district since the settlement was opened and carry the best wishes of many friends to their new home.
Geo. P. Metz, another of our old-timers, has also left for Saskatchewan.

1913 Apr 24 – Fork River

Alfred Snelgrove has left for Regina to work on the government dredge at that point for the summer.
Wm. David has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Archie McMillan returned to his home at Kindersley on Saturday.
Howard Armstrong and nephew, have arrived from Dauphin and intend farming on a larger scale this summer.
Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, is busy taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co., store.
D. Kennedy’s little boy was taken suddenly ill with convulsions and had to get Dr. Harrington, of Dauphin to meet him at Sifton. We are pleased to hear the lad is recovering.
W. Williams, lumber merchant, was a visitor to the Lake Town recently on important business.
C. Clark is spending the weekend at Dauphin attending the railway mens’ meeting at that point.
We are sorry to hear friend George’s new bridge went down stream.
Charles White, fish inspector of Winnipegosis, is a visitor at D. Kennedy’s.
Mrs. T. Johnson is visiting with her friends in town for a few days.
If you want a horse call at Kennedy’s new emporium. He has all sorts and sizes. You pay your money and get your choice. A bargain every time.
“Say, Mike, they had quite a picnic at Monday’s council meeting. I am told the boundary bridge was laid over for the present.”
“Well, Pat, the doc gets a bonus of $600 for the coming year. That’s equal to three miles of graded road and the fun of it is in many cases we have to send to Dauphin for a doctor on account of not being able to get him when wanted.”
“Well, Mike, Winnipegosis, was represented by the Mayor and Alderman and they claim the doc will be around at all ball games. That’s something we are thankful to know. Then there’s our genial friend, the town orator; he gets the price of another 4 miles of graded road to sit on the sidewalk and sun himself while we flaunter through the mud.”
“Well, Pat, it does look as if things were shure going to the divel, but there’s a good time coming by and by.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 27 – 1913

1913 Mar 27 – Military Men For Winnipeg

Dr. Walker, Percy Willson, and Ed. Manby, officers, and A.C. Wade, Geo. Astley, T. Coghlan and D.C. Boire, non-commissioned officers, left this morning for Winnipeg, where they will take a two weeks’ course at the military school. The men belong to the 32nd Manitoba Light Horse with headquarters at Dauphin.

1913 Mar 27 – Fork River

B. Venables shipped by express a very fine yearling Holstein bull to a farmer in Saskatchewan.
Miss Grant, of Pine View School and Miss Weatherhead left for their homes where they intend spending the Easter holidays.
“Say, Mike, did you hear the opposition bluffed Borden about that memorandum?”
“No, Pat.”
“Well, one fine morning Borden laid it on the table and the opposition took a chill and dear Wilfy took a cold after and did not go down to the house for several days. Bill Pugsley undertook to run the opposition and the government too, but the Hon. Bob sat on him. Micky Clark, of Red Deer, got fresh and the speaker threatened to name him. Jack Turriff, says, name and be damned, and there was the divel to pay, just like old Dounybroos. Next day Bill Pugsley and some more kinder smoothed it over and in the meantime Bob, having nothing to do, took a Cruise home for Easter holidays, where we hope he’ll have a good time.”
“Well, Pat, if Glen had been there to throw a little Cree into them the Naval bill would have been passed long ago. There’s nothing like education.”
Edwin King is spending Easter at his home and renewing acquaintances.
Easter service was held in All Saints’ Church in the evening last Sunday and Rev. Scrase preached a most appropriate sermon, the text being, “He is risen.” The alter was tastefully decorated with beautiful white Easter lilies supplied by Mr. A.C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis.
The farmers are rushing the grain into the elevator as it is to close next week.
Harcourt Benner, one of Dauphin’s prominent real estate agents, is renewing old acquaintances here.
We now have a veterinary surgeon which is a long felt want in this burgh and being proficient in wood work, artificial limbs can be supplied on shortest notice.
Ed Morris and family, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend with Mrs. Wm. King.
D. Kennedy received a nice bunch of barred Plymouth Rock fowl from C.F. Brewer of Ashville, and F. Hafenbrak received a fine pair of black Minorcas from an Eastern breeder.
Quite a number from here took in the St. Patrick’s ball, given by Mr. McInnes, of the Winnipegosis hotel. They report a swell time.
Miss Gertrude Cooper and Miss Clark, of Dauphin, are spending their Easter holidays with their friends.
The Fork River correspondent in the Press of the 20 inquires for his friends Joe Fahey and Bishop Langevin. They are well. Can our friend tell us if there is any profit keeping a pig after paying Cox’s fee of one hundred and forty dollars. They keeping heifers, friend, and don’t get too fresh.
Miss Pearl Wilson and Miss Woods returned from Sifton, where they have been visiting friends.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 20 – 1913

1913 Mar 20 – Baran Now Praying

John Baran, condemned to be hanged for the murder of Constable Rooke, now spends his time in prayer.

1913 Mar 20 – Fork River

Geo. Esplen was a visitor with W. King on his return from Mafeking, where he spent the winter in charge of one of the fishing posts on the north end of the lake.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove left for Dauphin to visit among friends on her way to Dryden, Ontario.
Miss Pearl Wilson is taking a short vacation among friends at Sifton.
John Bykilo returned home after a two months rest for the good of his health at Portage.
Fred Storrar, of Mowat, has resumed his duties as assistant manager of the A.T. Co. Fred’s all right, a pleasant smile for everyone.
Miss Ena Fredrickson and Miss Kennedy returned from a visit to their folks at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that Professor Ike Robinson was scalded the other day while experimenting with a boiler, which exploded throwing the contents in his face. He is doing nicely. Ike says he don’t mind having solved the tea experiment.
The C.N.Ry. bridge gang is busy renewing the bridge on the creek north of town.
The vaudeville performance which the Laurier troupe has been putting on at the National Play house on Parliament Hill, is costly for the country. Ten thousand dollars a day or sixty thousand dollars for the week is the bill which the people of the Dominion will have to foot for the little game of politics which the Opposition has been staging for the first week in the opposition to the navy bill. That’s Liberal economy and loyalty everytime.
“Say, Mike, we overheard the Admiral trying to explain the need of that boundary bridge the other day and several took a hand in the debate.”
“Well, Pat, by what I see of the affair it is a fraud to take our taxes to build a bridge to accommodate one man and it on private property. He must have caught the rest of them napping to be able to carry such a measure.”
“Now, you’ve put your foot in it, Mike, sure. The Fork River Philosopher’s idea is to bridge the whole municipality and throw the dirt on top. Gee, what next.”
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese, held Communion and Baptismal service at All Saints’, Fork River, Winnipegosis and Sifton. There were large congregations at each service. The Rev. H.H. Scrase assisted.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

Charles Johnson, of Makinak, was a visitor to Rev. Father Derome last week. He was much interested in his visit and inspected the hatchery on Snake Island, where he enjoyed himself. His father is interested in the management of a hatchery in Norway, Europe.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

The ball in the Winnipegosis hotel on the 17th proves that the anniversary of St. Patrick is becoming very dear to the hearts of some, it being patronized by the elite, graced by those who love to trip the light fantastic, and enlivened by an appreciative crowd of onlookers. Many wore a souvenir badge supplied by willing workers of the W.A. and assistants. Fork River social element added materially to its success.
At the Christian League last Thursday Mr. Scott read a paper on “Commerce” touching on the German menace, that was worthy of a much larger crowd of understanding. He defined minutely the fundamental principles of commerce making it more interesting by apt illustrations, ably leading one’s interest up to appreciate the Empire’s present position. His reflections on England from Germany’s attitude served to illuminate her domain and in no way detracted from her greatness.
Mr. Mullens was the recipient of a handsome gift from his many friends in Winnipegosis last Wednesday evening as a token of their esteem and regret at his departure.
Mr. Hulme returns home for Easter holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson are rejoicing in the possession of a young son, which was privileged to be baptized by the Rev. Dr. Page, archdeacon and general missioner of the diocese. A baptismal service was also held in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walmsley on Sunday evening last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 27 – 1913

1913 Feb 27 – Fork River

Wm. Paddock spent several days here among the farmers buying and dressing beef and pork for his meat emporium at Winnipegosis.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from Sifton, where he held divine service. He states that he has good congregations at that point.
The Fork River correspondent in the Press states one of our citizens changed his office from the Armstrong T. Co., which is not so, as he is quite at home at the A.T. Co. Don’t get annoyed friend because he didn’t move right over your way. Come in and warm yourself, we don’t mind it if you don’t want to talk.
Mrs. T. Johnson, who has been spending two weeks with friends, returned home to Winnipegosis last week.
“Say, Mike, did you hear the latest? A customer from the country went into one of our department stores and “Buttons” stepped up and asked him if he would take the elevator. He accepted; “elevate it. I’ll take it without any water” and it was elevated. “Buttons” is there anything else we can do for you. We have some fresh case goods and we take in minors and flats, where we can.”
Several of the councillors took the train to attend the municipal meeting at Winnipegosis. “Admiral Turnover” accompanied them and they returned on a special.
Fred. and Max King took a business trip to Winnipegosis this week.
Wm. Davis and Sid Craighill are home from the fish haul. Too much snow to fish now.
We wish to say to the Mowat correspondent that his scurrilous remarks are not true. We wish to remind him before he was a member of the council he was the one that set the ball rolling by his weekly tirade against the council because he could not get what he wanted. Any remarks we have made are mild compared to opinions we hear from other ratepayers regarding the blunders and unbusinesslike transactions that have been done and we are sorry to say we have to admit what they say is true in most cases. As you have told us before you don’t wish to hurt people’s feelings, but just do it to remind us, so its up to you to take it in the same spirit. You say, “hands off.” Don’t get alarmed M.C. as we are never anxious to touch pitch as it sticks. Kind regards M.C. and we trust you will be all right after the change of the moon.
F.B. Lacey went south on the train and intends combining pleasure with business while absent. A pleasant time, Fred.
The Lenten services are held in All Saints’ Church Tuesday nights at 8 o’clock. Everyone welcome. Service at 3 o’clock Sunday, March 2nd.
The weekly dance party came off at the home of Mr. and Mrs. S. Reid over the Mossey River and a pleasant time was spent and that tired feeling chased away for the time being.
“Say, Mike, a stranger wanted to know what those pipes were for on the river bank and what they were worth to the people as a money maker.” “Can’t say Pat, what they are worth but the “Admiral” ordered them we believe to do duck shooting with.”
Miss M. Shannon, of Winnipegosis, paid a visit to her parents on the Mossey on Friday.

1913 Feb 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishermen are arriving down the lake each day. At present Mr. and Mrs. Christianson, Mr. and Mrs. Arrowsmith, Mr. and Mrs. Holly Burrell, Mr. and Mrs. Schaldermouse and family, Leo Hjalmarson, and Jack Angus have arrived.
H. Burrell has opened a pool room at the north end of the town.
R. McLean, an old timer freighter, is back in town on business.
Mrs. J. McAuley, of Dauphin, is the guest of Mrs. Whale since the 22nd.
Mr. Lloyd Younghusband, of Dauphin, is a guest of Mrs. Bradley.
Miss Irma Bradley, of Bowsman, is making a few weeks visit with Miss. C. Bradley.
Some of the young folk are greatly enjoying snowshoe tramps.
J. McArthur recently spent a few weeks in Winnipeg and saw his parents off on a southern trip from which we hope they will return greatly befitted.
Mr. Mullens, station agent, is leaving us for a more lucrative position in Minitonas. His departure is to be regretted.
Mrs. Grenon, Sr. is enjoying the visit of her brother from Montreal.
Last week the Christian League’s monthly social meeting was held in the Methodist Church, where a large number gathered to hear a debate on Woman’s Suffrage. It is to be hoped the parties wishing to espouse the movement (which might better be ignored as one of our prominent young men thinks) are not greatly in earnest. Mr. Grenon, Mr. Hechter and Mrs. Dempsey acted as judges, giving honors to the negative side.
Being the Lenten season it is regretted that an arrangement has not been made for weekly services here; we know Rev. Mr. Scrase does his best.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 13 – 1913

1913 Feb 13 – Baran Committed For Murder

The adjourned preliminary trial of John Baran, under arrest for the murder of Constable Rooke, was concluded on Saturday. Magistrate Munson remanded the prisoner to Portage la Prairie, to stand his trial at the next criminal court on a charge of murder.
The court was called to order at eleven o’clock, the court house being crowded by a throng who were anxious to hear the outcome of the trial.
The prisoner had to be assisted into the court by two officers and appeared in a very weak condition. Later he fell from his chair to the floor, where he was allowed to lie during the trial.
Dr. Harrington gave evidence as to his attendance on Constable Rooke, and stated death to have been caused by the bullet wound, and resultant weakness.
When the charge was read the prisoner declined to make any statement. Bertram Ryan, for the defence, admitted that Baran had fired the shot which killed Constable Rooke, but pleaded justification on a plea of provocation, claiming Baran could not have known it was an officer of the law who was demanding entrance and then breaking in the door of his house, and that Baran had a right to defend his home and had fired the shot with the intention only of frightening away whoever was forcing his door. He asked to have the charge at least modified to one of manslaughter.
In passing sentence, Magistrate Munson severely criticized the past character of the prisoner and had no hesitation in committing him on a charge of murder to stand his trial at the Portage spring assizes.

1913 Feb 13 – Salt Wells to be Worked

That there is abundance of salt in the Lake Winnipegosis region is well known. For years the springs there have been running freely with brine and thousands of tons of the best salt going to waste each year. It is now proposed to tap the springs and install machinery to reduce the brine and manufacture the output into salt for various uses. The quality of the salt, after it has gone through a purifying process is reported by those who have made experiments with it, to be of the highest grade. It is probable that a salt reducing plant will be built at Winnipegosis town. The salt can be brought down the lake in its raw state and later manufactured into various grades to suit the market demand. During the past three months three entries were made at the Dominion Lands office here for mines and as the capital to develop them is already assured the enterprise will undoubtedly be established.

1913 Feb 13 – Section Foreman Loses His Life

Harry Mushynski, section foreman for the C.N.R. at Pine River lost his life on Saturday in a peculiar manner. The pipes at the water tank froze up and Mushynski and another man descended into the well with a pot of live coals to thaw them out. When the two men got down the well the gas from the pot became too strong for them and Mushynski was overcome and fell into the water and was drowned. His companion managed to get out of the well. Coroner Harrington held an inquest on Mushynski on Sunday and the jury rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts.
Mushynski was highly spoken of by Supt. Irwin as a faithful employee of the company. He was 28 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.

1913 Feb 13 – Fork River

Howard Armstrong left for a trip up the lake teaming.
Herman Godkin, one of Dauphin’s energetic real estate agents, is spending the weekend at W. Williams.
C.E. Bailey and Wm. King returned from attending the county L.O.L. meeting at Dauphin.
Pat Powers, who has been running a threshing outfit at Winnipegosis, returned and is renewing acquaintances.
Henry Benner left here with a car of cows and young cattle for his ranch at Lloydminster.
Professor G. Weaver of East Bay, passed through here en route to the North Pole to lecture on diversified farming, etc.
Mr. and Mrs. C. White, of Winnipegosis, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s on Sunday.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson is visiting her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, of Neepawa, returned home after spending a few weeks with A. Cameron at Mowat Centre.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, was in town on business lately.
Sid Howlett and family have returned from the north end of the lake, where he spent the winter fishing and reports fishing good. He is going out on his homestead at Million.
“Say, Pat, it seems too bad the Mowat correspondent cant’s get his proper rest lately.” “What’s the matter now Mike?” “Well, he says the blooming politicians at Ottawa will keep haggling over the $35,000,000 Borden is sending to the dear old mother country after the assistance she has given us financially and otherwise for years. You remember a short time ago in the Press the M.C. wanted and howled for an all-Canadian navy. Now he turns around and poses for peace and spend the money in P.O. and roads.” Pat, “Well, I prefer it in Dreadnoughts as we have had enough of the sort of roads he has been instrumental in dishing up to us the last two or three years. I wonder which way he will jump next.” Mike, “Don’t be too hard on him, chure you know he handled the Liberal cheque book for years and there is a few blank forms left and our friend expected to be Admiral of Sir Wilfy’s dinky navy, but the election knocked that into a cocked hat and the blank cheques are no use now and the P.O. is like the elevator he twitted us about some time ago lost, strayed or stolen. When dear T.A. got licked we lost our telegraph office here and now we are getting the peace racket put up to us. Now someone has got to the end of their rope.” “Say, Pat, did yees notice divil a word does our Liberal friends print or say regarding the dredge contract let by the late Liberal government and that is being looked into by Borden.” “Oh, that’s a horse of another color.” M.C. stop grouching.
Wm. Amos, of Deloraine, travelling agent for the Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., was a visitor at Wm. King’s.
Miss Lizzie Clark paid a short visit to her parents here.
J. McAulay, traveller for the Massey-Harris Co., stopped over to see D. Kennedy on business for that firm.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church every Thursday evening at 8 o’clock during Lent and next Sunday, Feb. 16, at 3 o’clock, D.D. at 2 o’clock.
Geo. Dickason, of Dauphin, is around soliciting patronage for the Laurentia Milk Co., at Neepawa, and offers these prices till Mar 1st. $2.50 per hundred lbs, of sour cream; thirty-seven cents per pound of butter fat; sweet cream; forty-two cents per pound butter fat.
Our genial friend, Andrew Powers, is wearing a broad smile these days owning to the arrival of a new baby girl and Bob Rowe is also the happy father of a little baby girl. We wish them both the best of luck.
We notice in the correspondence from our Mowat friend in the Press of last week’s issue some very sensational items, more especially the one referring to so much grouching at outside points on account of the high cost of living and would like to say the prices quoted are far from correct. We always were under the impression that our Mowat friend was at all times ready to advertise this district at its truth worth and endeavor to get more land settled up, but by the remarks referred to we are at a loss to know just what is meant by this sarcasm and would refer him to some time ago and his remarks regarding the loss of the late P.O. at Oak Brae to the district and the damage it would do to this part of Manitoba in the way of getting this land settled up. For the benefit of our Mowat friends and the public in general we would like to give the correct prices of the products of the farm and forest at Fork River today. He quotes wheat 50c to 60c, barley 25c, potatoes 35c, pork 9c, beef 6c, seasoned wood $1.65, greed wood, $1.25. Now the correct prices of these are as follows: (Elevator prices), wheat 89c, 88c, ble, according to grades. Barley 32c and 40c being offered by outside parties and refused. Green pole wood $1.75 a cord and season poplar $1.75; butter 30c, eggs 30c, pork 10c, beef 7c and 7 ½ in trade.
Council meets at Winnipegosis on Thursday, the 20th inst.