Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 17 – 1914

1914 Dec 17 – Another 110 Men Wanted

Another large force for overseas service is to be raised in Canada at once. Major G.C.J. Walker received a wire this Thursday morning to this effect. The telegram read as follows:
“You are authorized to mobilize immediately one company of infantry a total 110 men for overseas service. Standard height, 5 feet 4 inches; age, 18 to 45; chest, 33 ½ inches.”

1914 Dec 17 – Injured Man Getting Better

Thos. Free, who was badly injured in a collision at Kamsack a couple of weeks ago and had to have one of his legs amputated, is making excellent progress towards recovery. It is probably he will be able to return o his home next week.

1914 Dec 17 – Jack Myers Shot in Leg

Jack Myers, a well-known resident of Gilbert Plains, was shot in the leg last week while hunting in the Riding Mountains by a young fellow named Coulter. Coulter saw the bushes move and before his companion, a man named Morran, could stop him, fired and dropped Myers.

1914 Dec 17 – Ruthenian Patriotism

An evidence of the patriotism of some of the Ruthenian settlers was given on Saturday when two of them. Panko Schnuyk and Peter Toporoski came to town to tender their mites for their country. Each gave a dollar towards the patriotic fund and also gave their promise to contribute a dollar a month each to the fund as long as the war lasted.

1914 Dec 17 – Fork River

Mr. W. Williams returned from a visit to Mrs. Williams who has been very sick for some time in the Dauphin Hospital. We are all pleased to hear that Mrs. Williams has recovered enough to be able to return home next week.
Mr. George O’Neill, of Mowat, returned from a visit to Winnipegosis and is delighted with the lake Town.
Mr. F. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, one of the candidates for the reeveship arrived in this burg in company with Mr. Steve Lytwyn, a representative of the Armstrong Trading Co. Mr. Lytwyn is assisting Mr. Hechter in his campaign to get control of the municipality.
Mr. Duncan Kennedy, late manager of the Armstrong Trading Company, has accepted a position with Mr. Hechter, of Winnipegosis. Mr. Kennedy has been here for the company for several years and attended strictly to business ear in year out. Although we are sorry to see Mr. Kennedy and his family leave, his friends wish him all kinds of good luck.
The box social under the auspices of All Saints’ Woman’s Auxiliary on the 11th, was fairly well attended. The boxes realized good prices in the hands of our friend, “Scotty,” who acted as auctioneer, and a nice sum was realized. It was, we believe, one of the most enjoyable times ever held in the hall. Credit us due the ladies for the nice display of boxes to tempt the boys. The social came to a close at 4.30 in the wee small hours.
There will be a public Christmas tree under the auspices of All Saints’ Sunday school on Wednesday evening, Dec. 23rd, to commence at 8.30 sharp. Everybody is invited to come and help give the kiddies a good time. Admission, adults 23 cents, children free. Proceeds to go towards maintaining the Sunday school.
Mr. Thomas, travelling Missionary of the Anglican Church, will preach in All Saints’ Church on Dec. 20th at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. Everyone invited.
Rev. Mr. Thomas will hold a meeting in All Saints’ Anglican Church on December the 19th, at 2.30 p.m. sharp. All members and those who are in sympathy


1914 Dec 17 – Sifton

The Grain Growers’ Patriotic concert held here last Friday met with great success. There was very good talent from Dauphin, also West Bay and Fairville. There was a very good attendance indeed from the outlying districts. The Sifton boys proved themselves very good in their little play, “Christmas night at the Front.”
Mr. Robt. Brewer shipped another car of stock on Monday. Quite a rustler is “Bobs.”
We all regret that Mr. William Birch, late station agent, has left town for good. We understand he is going to Invermay, Sask., and we all wish him the best of luck.
Mr. Caldwell, of Dauphin, was a visitor in town last week on business.
We understand that Mr. John Aller, of Fairville, is holding a social next Saturday in aid of the Red Cross Society. We trust it will be a success.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt, the well drillers, are now busy canvassing orders as they expect their drilling outfit this week. They are deserving of success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 2 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 2 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River, on Wednesday, 17th inst. Councillors Richardson and Seiffert absent. The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Union of Manitoba Municipalities, Dauphin Hospital, Heaton’s Agency Co., N.R., the solicitor, Dominion Lands Office, the Minister of Interior, the Department of Education, Standard Lumber Co., T.A. Burrows Lumber Co. and land commissioner of Hudson Co.
Hunt – Bickle – That the clerk investigate the Dauphin Hospital accounts and pay all claims for which the municipality is liable.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk make the necessary entry with the Dominion government, paying the fees, for two acres of the S.E. 4-29-17 for cemetery purposes.
Hunt – Toye – That the reeve and clerk inspect ditch between sections 2 and 11, tp. 30, rge. 19, with a view to having it cleared out.
Bickle – Robertson – That the account for lumber of the Standard Lumber Co. amounting to $29.71 be paid and charged to ward 4.
Robertson – Toye – That the account authorized by Road Commissioner Bailey for deepening the Lockhart ditch and due J.W. Lockhart be paid.
Toye – Robertson – That the following resolution be forwarded to the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities to be brought before the annual Convention:
“That section 644, sub-section of the Municipal Act be amended by striking out the words “or any ward or any portion of a ward thereof” in the second and third lines thereof.”
Hunt – Bickle – That the following resolution be forwarded to Union of Manitoba Municipalities for consideration at the annual convention.
“That section 148 of the Municipal Assessment Act be amended by adding the words, “during the past two years” after the ‘taxes’ in the eighth line ??? ???.”
Toye – Robertson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye – Robertson – That the clerk put up notices that all arrears of taxes must be paid before the first day of November, 1913, or proceedings will be taken to collect.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk order one twenty-four inch corrugated culvert eighteen feet long for the Cooper crossing.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk be authorized to have the pile driver repaired as soon as possible.
A by-law authorizing the purchase of a roadway along the south side of the N.W. 26 and a portion of the N.E. 27-29-19 was passed; also a by-law striking the rate for 1913 as follows: municipal rate 10 mills, municipal commissioner’s rate ½ mill and general school rate 5 mills.
Toye – Bickle – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1913 Oct 2 – Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from Weyburn, where he has been for the summer months. He reports good crops there.
Geo. Tilt paid the Lake Town a visit on important business lately.
Willie Johnston returned from the summer fishing up the lake and reports a fair catch.
E. Williams, of Liverpool, England, has arrived to take up the work of the Anglican mission here.
F.B. Lacey returned from a trip south.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys.
Miss Pearl Wood has left for Winnipeg for a short stay with friends.
Mrs. O’Neill has arrived from Rainy River and is visiting her sister, Mrs. F.B. Lacey, of Mowat.
One of our Winnipegosis friends is of the opinion that the fishing at Fork River is ahead of Winnipegosis. We agree with him every time.
Mr. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, visited our burgh between trains.
Wm. Stonehouse left for Winnipegosis to follow his occupation as inspector for the A.T. Co.
Bert Cooper has returned from Winnipegosis, having spent the summer on the government dredge.
Mrs. Paul Pugon, of Lake Dauphin, while milking a cow was badly hurt, the cow having turned on her. Dr. Medd was sent for but could not go and by the time other assistance arrived it was too late, the woman died. She leaves a family of twelve children.
T.A. Worsey preached his farewell sermon on Sunday evening, the 28th, in All Saints’ Church. There was a good turnout. Mr. Worsey is leaving for St. John’s College to resume his studies. His many friends appreciate the good work he has done here this summer and all wish him prosperity.

1913 Oct 2 – Winnipegosis

The fishing season closes on Oct. 1st. The catch has been good. Fifty cars have been shipped out.
A monster jackfish, weighing 35 lbs., was caught in one of the hauls in Dawson Bay.
A Galician is in the lock-up having stabbed his wife in the arm with a knife. His mind is supposed to be unbalanced.
Ducks are numerous and the shooting is good.
Jos. Grenon is having the grounds around his fine new residence laid out by Mr. Sadler, of Dauphin. The grounds will be planted with hardy perennials this fall which will bloom early in the spring and summer.
Theo. Johnston returned on Wednesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1919 Oct 2 – Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

1919 Oct 2 – Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork Rive did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

1919 Oct 2 – Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Craighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 3 – 1913

1913 Jul 3 – Fork River

Fred Tilt had the misfortune to lose most of his household effects by fire which started in an unaccounted way.
G. O’Neill, who has been staying with friends at Mowat for some time, has returned to his home at Rainy River.
Mrs. Fred Cooper is spending a weeks’ vacation with friends at Dauphin.
Mrs. C. Clark and family left for their new home at Paswagan, Sask., with a car of household effects. We wish them prosperity in their new home.
Miss Eva Storrar and Miss Pearl Cooper are taking a trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. Gunnies and family, of Roblin arrived with a car of effects and to tend making their home at Fork River for the present.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, of Dauphin, is spending her summer vacation at home on the Fork River.
Don’t forget the Orangemen’s 11th annual basket picnic at Fork River, July 12th. Sports of all kinds. All welcome. Bring your baskets and have a day’s recreation.
Mr. Worsey arrived from St. John’s College, Winnipeg, to take up the work in the Fork River Mission. Service was held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, 20th, and Winnipegosis and will continue to be held at Sifton at 10.30 in the morning and at Fork River at 3 in the afternoon and Winnipegosis school house in the evening at 7.30, every Sunday till further notice.