Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 1, 1919

Clubb Sentenced to One Year

Norman Clubb and Fred Beach, the two boys who pleaded guilty to breaking into Benedickson’s store, came up for sentence before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday. Clubb, who has a bad record was sentenced to one year in jail. Beach was let off on suspended sentence.

G.W.V.A.

All members of the above association and other returned soldiers wishing to exercise their soldier rights with regard to the land scheme are requested to attend a meeting to be held on Thursday, May 1st, at 8.30 p.m. Important information will be imparted.
(Signed)
J.M. Chalmers,
Sec. G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Sowing and ploughing is the order of the day. The land is in good shape and there will be a large acreage sown if the fine weather continues.
Mr. Andy Rowe received an Easter gift. It’s a wee daughter.
Miss Stella and Ina Briggs, teachers of Pine View and Mossey River Schools, returned from their Easter holidays to Winnipeg and Rathwell.
The stork left a little girl at the home of Robert Rowe the other evening.
Mr. J.H. Lowes has returned from Makinak.
This is to be clean up week around the village by the order of the health officer. All should join heartily in the good work.
On Friday evening last, April 25th, the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.B. Lacey, at Oak Brae, on the Mossey, was besieged and taken possession of for the evening by about eighty old-time friends of Private L.H. Lacey, late of 226th Battalion and who enlisted in Dauphin in April 1916. He went overseas with the battalion and later joined the 44th Battalion and was sent to France. He was at Vimy Ridge and after at Lens where he was taken prisoner on the 23rd of August, 1917. He remained a prisoner to the close of the war. On April 5th last he had the pleasure of stepping off the local at Fork River to be greeted by 84 old-time friends. Previous to this a committee had been formed and about one year ago they appointed canvassers to collect fund for the purpose of providing a suitable present to every boy that had enlisted from Fork River and the southern portion of the municipality. It was arranged that the sum of $50, or its equivalent, should be presented to each of the boys after their return in recognition of their services overseas. A public reception has taken place as a rule and the presentation has been made, but owing to the frail condition of Lorne’s mother and out of deference to her, the presentation of a valuable gold watch was made to him at his home. Mr. Wm. King, (whose three sons were “over there” and did their bit gallantly), is the sec.-treasurer of the fund, and who with other members of the committee, drove in from Fork River and at about 10 p.m. Mr. King called for Lorne and presented him with an inspiring address and a gold watch as a token from the people. Young and old had a good time that night over one of the returned, but we thought that night of the many anxious mothers that are still waiting for those they love, and many that wait until the resurrection for their loved ones.
Mrs. and Mr. F.B. Lacey desire to thank Mr. King and the committee for their kindness and consideration in acceding to their wishes and making the presentation at their home.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 20 – 1914

1914 Aug 20 – Dauphin Contingent

During the past week Lieut. Ed. Manby, of the 32nd Manitoba Horse, has been engaged drilling the Dauphin contingent so as to familiarize them with their work and have the men in readiness for the call when it comes to them. Thirty-one have passed the medical examiner and are drilling. The following compose the number:
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand, Sergt. G. Fraser, Sergt. W Code, Corp. D. Wetmore, Corp. N.C. Chard, Corp. C.S. Wiltshire, and Privates H.A. Bray, H.H. Moore, A.J. Pudifin, Garth Johnston, N. Munson, W.S. Gilbert, C. Curtis, H. Izon, S. Laker, J.E. Greenaway, A.J. Johnson, D. Powell, E. Sonnenburg, E. Classen, E. Herrick, E. McNab, J.F. Lewis, C.S. Van Tuyll, D. McVey, A.E. Pickering, A. Redgate, F.A. Matthews, H. Pollard.
Sergt. Major A.C. Goodall and Sergt. F. Highfield, who are also on the volunteer list here, will probably be assigned another squadron.

1914 Aug 20 – Little Shots

Col. Steele will command all western troops.
Dauphin has 31 soldiers drilling daily and ready for the call.
A Minitonas correspondent writes: “The patriotic spirit of Minitonas is evident. Messrs. C. Smith, V. Walker, J. Maltman, E. Koons, S. Henderson and R. Henderson having volunteered for the front.”

1914 Aug 20 – Fork River

Miss Alice Godkin has returned from spending a few days in Dauphin.
Wm. Hunkins, of Winnipegosis, was a visitor here lately.
Archie McDonald, manager of the A.T. Co. farm, reports having finished cutting a half section of oats and barley.
Geo. Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He states he is delighted with the fine weather, which leaves the roads in good shape to Oak Brae.
King brothers started up their threshing outfit to thresh a few loads for the farmers and judging from the way the grain turned out it will be an improvement on last year’s yield.
We learn that Mr. W. Howitson will have charge of the elevator and that Mr. D. Kennedy will pay out the cash for grain.

1914 Aug 20 – Winnipegosis

It is just a question in the minds of sportsmen here whether the change of the date for duck shooting from Sept. 1st to Sept. 15th, is not a mistake. Experiences goes to show that many of the ducks take their flight south about this time of the year.
There was a consternation among the people lately when a report was circulated that our new school was not to be completed owing to the commencement of the war and the difficult of selling the bond. It is understood, however, that the work will go on, the money being supplied from private sources. It would have been too bad, as the new building is needed to accommodate our growing school population.
Despite the dry season the quantities of hay put up for feed in the district is large.
The war, of course, is the great topic here and some of our boys have got the fever and want to go to the front. Patriotism is a fine thing and we are glad to see it displayed in all parts of the country.
War news has been scarce of late, but we feel that we had better get no news than much of the bogus stuff that was being sent out.
We were glad to welcome the Dauphin excursionists ere on Tuesday. The railway employees brought a fine crowd and all seemed to enjoy themselves. The chief attraction was the water and nearly everyone enjoyed a sail. Our town possess many advantages for picnic parties and we hope more societies will be induced to hold their outings here. The people here as well as the excursionists enjoyed the music of the band and before long we hope to welcome them back.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 30 – 1914

1914 Jul 30 – Mossey River Council

Council met in the municipal office, July 18th. Coun. Richardson absent.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from W. Murray, re Children’s Aid society of Dauphin, and Davidson & McRae, re continuation of 3rd Ave., Fork River.
Hunt-Hechter – That’s grant of $25 be made to the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the offer of the townsite department of the C.N.R., of the continuation of 3rd Ave. to the northwest corner of the Fork River townsite for the consideration of $1 be accepted.
Toye-Robertson – That the accounts of T. Burns, $24 and D. Stephenson $11.25, for work on the German Bridge be paid.
Bickle-Hunt – That the Public Works committee inspect the Williams Bridge and if satisfactory to report to the clerk who is then authorized to pay the contractor.
Toye-Robertson – The W. King be allowed to do his statue labour between sections 34 and 35, tp. 29, rge. 19, for the year 1914.
Hunt-Bickle – That the accounts of the reeve, $27.30; Coun. Hunt, $22.90; Coun. Toye $22.90, and Coun. Robertson $25.65 for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Coun. Robertson being about to leave the municipality for an indefinite time tendered his resignation as councillor to ward 6.
Hunt-Bickle – That Coun. Robertson resignation be accepted and that it take effect July 22nd, 1914.
Hunt-Toye – That the council tender Mr. J.D. Robertson a vote of thanks for the manner in which he has handled the affairs of the municipality while councillor for ward 6.
Robertson-Toye – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee passed.
A by-law was passed placing the standard width of the road grades at 21 feet.
Toye-Bickle – That the council now adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jul 30 – Fork River

Sam Bailey has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. Frank Chase and family returned to Dauphin after spending a week with friends on the Mossey.
Mrs. John Phycola is building a dwelling house south of the Fork River.
Nat Little is putting in a foundation for a livery stable.
Mrs. Sam Reid and family have returned from a week’s holiday in Winnipeg with friends.
One of our Mowat farmers stated it was ninety-one in the shade, which no doubt accounts for ravings of Fork River and Oak Brae Ex.-P.M.’s in the Press, which have been disgusting and not worthy of further notice on our part.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid this burgh a short visit lately.
Robert Hunt, of Dauphin, Government timber inspector, was here in connection with the Williams Lumber Co.
A band of horses got into a garden the other night and the owner of the garden asked the horsemen to after his stock and was told they would get nothing as they were only squatters thereby adding insult to injury. While, the said party, at the same time, has his fence and gates and part of his buildings on the road, and has been a squatter for years; he must not kick if he gets a dose of his own medicine for unneighbourly actions.
Can the ex-p.m. of Oak Brae, show where the present p.m. of Fork River ever received anything at an election campaign, and can he tell us whose bills the money he received at an election a few years ago went to pay. If he cannot, ask the ex-p.m. of Fork River, who told us at the time where this money went. The present p.m. at Fork River can speak the Ruthenian language and his many customers come to him and ask explanations around election time regarding the political questions and I am sure he does his best to explain them to them.
When the time comes for the present p.m. at Fork River to sign the papers answering the questions asked, he will be right there, Mr. Lacey, and will be able to decide whether to sign or not.
Billy King and his friends are still looking after the Conservative interests here and do not require imported assistance from Saskatchewan and Alberta. We have opinions of our own and are able to express same.

1914 Jul 30 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. Cunliffe left Monday for the Pas, where they will take up their residence.
The Manitou started out on her first trip of the season this week. She will stop at various points to make docks prior to the opening of the fishing season.
The fishermen are making active preparation for the opening of the summer fishing season.
The Rex Theatre is now completed and was formally opened with a dance on Friday night. The theatre is one of the best in northern Manitoba. Manager Coffey is up-to-date and is installing an electric dynamic and waterworks.
The municipal officers have given 20 days’ notice that persons keeping pigs in town will have to remove them outside of the village limited it is time but why 20 days’ notice? One man was heard to remark that it was to give the little pigs a chance to grow.
Miss Hazel Coffey, of Dauphin, is visiting with friends in town.
Miss Woodard, a recent graduate nurse of the Dauphin General Hospital, spent a few days in town the guest of nurse Marcroft. She left for her home at Neepawa on Monday.
Mrs. W.D. King and Nurse Cummings, of Dauphin, where guests at the home of the former’s mother, Mrs. Theo. Johnson. They returned to Dauphin on Monday’s local.
Mrs. Hall Burrell returned the latter end of the week, from spending a few days in Dauphin, the guest of Mrs. A.V. Benoit.
The dredgemen completed the work of making a channel at Snake Island on Saturday and leave this week to commence dredging at Pine Creek.
Mrs. Cranage and two daughters, left Monday for Prince Albert, where they will spend a few days visiting with friends.
Mrs. Schaldemose, who was visiting at the home of Mrs. J.W. McAulay, Dauphin, returned to town Monday.
Frank Hechter left for the Pas on Saturday. It wouldn’t do for Frank not to be in the swim when an election is on.
J.P. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Tuesday. He reports that he and Capt. Coffey had a breakdown in the Cap.’s automobile after they had left Dauphin to make the trip by road.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 4 – 1912

1912 Apr 4 – Fork River

Duncan Kennedy has been appointed a commissioner for taking affidavits for use in the courts of the province.
Mr. Jangerman, who has been homesteading east of the Mossey, left for Dauphin with his family for a few months.
Mr. and Mrs. J. McAuley of South Bay, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s.
Mr. Combers of Selkirk, a relative of Capt. D. McLean, arrived here with a car of settlers’ effects and intends farming in this vicinity.
Mr. and Mrs. J McMillian and family who have been spending the winter here, have left for the west.
J. Seiffert of Winnipegosis, was here attending Court of Revision and Council meeting.
The bridge gang of the Canadian Northern Railway are busy fixing bridges in this vicinity.
Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, held their general meeting on Thursday night last. A. McKerchar, J. Bickle and Martin, Winnipegosis, and W. Weir of Dauphin, visited the lodge and an interesting evening was spent.
The heaviest fall of snow of the season occurred on Friday, and puts an early spring out of the question. The horses and cattle are looking fairly well considering the long winter.
Our Mowat friend of the Press evidently declines our advice. We wish to tell him that we had a short conversation with the Dr. as he wished. The Dr. did not seem to be ??? all over the scribe’s health ?? not be a benefit to the public ??? health officer would take a trip ??? to the vicinity of Oak Brae and investigate the nuisance there, and have it removed as soon as possible before the hot weather sets in.
What has been become of the Fork River correspondent to the Press? Did he get snowed under as he has not been heard of lately. He must have gone across the herring pond for those letters that never arrived. Quite a fake.
Our friend Jimmy Johnston stole a march on the boys. We congratulate him and his bride and wish them a long life and a happy one. So say all.
A. Cameron is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
The council meeting held last week went off quiet well.
A nice little children’s party was held at the home of Mrs. Scrase, when Mr. McCartney gave a magic lantern entertainment. The pictures shown consisted of St. Paul’s Cathedral, Japan and Jessica’s first Prayer. When this was over the children had candies, cakes &c. and played all kind of games. At 10 o’clock they all went home after having enjoyed themselves.
Mr. McCartney returned from visiting friends at Grandview.

1912 Apr 4 – Sifton

The roads are very poor where Galicians live. They are not doing their share to advance these country places. There is a marked difference in the roads where English speaking people live. One hears that Canadians and English settlers give their time and their horses gratis for so many days each year to “grade” the roads. The Galicians are unwilling to help in any way unless they get from $1.50 to $2 daily. They, however, use the roads that others make. This is unfair! We need extra laws and to have them enforced. If a man does not help the country that helps him and he at “loggerheads” with the community in which he dwells he ought to leave the country. We have too many such in Canada now. They take all they get and hinder all progress to wit, the effort to get money for bridges in the municipality, etc.
The school at Sifton is making great progress under Capt. A. Russell. Sifton is fortunate in getting such an able man. He has an average of 59, a far from easy task daily instructing them. He must be congratulated in one feature especially the teaching of patriotism and love for the country. The exercising of his thoroughbred stallion keeps his health up. “Bunkus” is the pride of the place.
Nurses Goforth and Reid do excellent work at Sifton. They are always busy, and work on so untiringly in caring for Galicians. Not all the heroes work along the plaudits of the crowd. Many heroes work on unknown by the many. We wonder if Galicians are grateful enough for the services given them in these hospitals.
The mill formerly owned by Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie is now being run by Galicians.

1912 Apr 4 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Munro, who has been working for the Presbyterian Church in Winnipegosis, South Bay, Fairville and Sifton, for the Winter, closed his ministry last Sunday, March 31. He had large attendances at his closing services at each place, including people of all denominations. Attendances were favourable right through the winter. He never before experienced such a beautiful winter. He leaves soon for Saskatchewan Presbytery, where he takes up work for the Summer months.
The Presbyterian Church at Winnipegosis voted in favour of union unanimous all but two. Some did not vote. Those who voted against union and those who did not vote have the greatest standing in the church. At the closing service, which was a united one, Mr. Munro urged union for Winnipegosis even if organic union failed to be realized.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 3 – 1910

1910 Mar 3 – Fined $20 and Costs

The Chinese night cook at C.N.R. restaurant assaulted one of the visiting girls last week. He appeared before the P.M. Friday and was fined $20 and costs.

1910 Mar 3 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Fleming Wilson from Dauphin paid us a flying visit last Friday.
Mr. Hunt took out some of he ladies of the Women’s Auxiliary to Mrs. Lacey’s, Oak Brae, and a meeting was held when some important business was done. The drive was enjoyed by all.
Mrs. Wilson and Mrs. Rowe visited Dauphin last Friday.
Miss Pearl Wilson and miss K. Dallas are visiting Mrs. Woods at Sifton.
Mr. and Mrs. Northam from Weyburn are visiting Mrs. T. Briggs here for a short time.
Miss Nixon, who has been here for some time, will take up her duties this month as teacher of the South Bay School. We shall all miss her here.
Mr. H.H. Benner has been appointed to Soboyski School. We all wish him success.
Mr. Paraski and family, who have been here for some time, left last Friday for Winnipeg.
Mrs. Parks returned from North Dakota last week.
Mr. J. Spearing from North Lake, was here last Saturday. He reports having been suffering with a bad cold.

1910 Mar 3 – Winnipegosis

A very large audience gathered in the Methodist Church on Saturday evening, to hear Dr. Medd lecture on “Tuberculosis.” The chair was occupied by the Rev. W.R. Rowan, minister of the church, who in introducing the lecturer took the trouble of saying that it was the Doctor’s first attempt at public speaking and trusted that the audience would give him their best attention and sympathy. This the audience did and the lecture proved to be highly interesting and instructive. The lecturer laid great stress on the fact that dirt and dust were the principal carrying factor of tubercular germs and made a strong appeal for the admittance into the home-life of sunlight, fresh air and space, which he sad were the deadly enemies of tuberculosis. Other important matters were touched upon in the course of the lecture, and the information and advise given should prove to be of great benefit to the people of Winnipegosis.
On the proposition of W.E. Rowan, seconded by Mr. Shannon, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded the Dr. for his interesting lecture. Cake and ice cream were afterwards served. The proceeds amounted to twenty dollars.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 26 – 1914

1914 Feb 26 – Arrested on Murder Charge

The following dispatch was received from Edmonton on Saturday and concerns two parties which are well known around Sifton and Dauphin, Charles Turcunuk and his wife, who is better known as Mrs. Lena Wilson.
About four years ago Turcunuk worked for the railway being engaged cleaning out cars. He afterwards went West to Edmonton, where he started a boarding house among the foreigners and has been doing well up to the time of the advent of his wife a weeks ago. Those who were acquainted with him while he was in Dauphin speak highly of him.
Mrs. Turcunuk, or Wilson, as she was known about town, only left here a few weeks ago for Edmonton. During the Rooke trial she acted as interpreter for the crown.
Charles Turcunuk, a boarding and lodging housekeeper, was arrested this morning on a charge of murdering his four-months-old child in Sifton.
Mrs. Wilson has made a statement that Turcunuk murdered their four-months-old child and afterwards made her promise not to tell the police, or anyone else. She heard the child crying, and all of a sudden it stopped. She ran upstairs to the bedroom and found the child dead on the bed; her husband was standing a few feet away and looking at the corpse. It was then that he grabbed a carving knife and holding it over her head while she knelt on the floor commanded that her mouth be sealed and her tongue be silent forever.

SHE TOLD SECRET

Convinced that her husband would carry out his terrible threat, Mrs. Wilson obeyed and promised to keep the secret, and this morning after seeing Turcunuk escorted to the prisoner’s dock to answer to a charge of non-support, she told the story to Deputy Chief Wright, and other police officials and in doing so submitted a written statement that will be used in evidence at the preliminary hearing next Tuesday morning.
The charge of non-support had just finished and the man fined $75 and costs, when Magistrate Massie commanded him to stand up to listen to a second charge.

1914 Feb 26 – Fork River

Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have left on a trip east on business.
W.J. Johnston, of Mowat, has returned from Mafeking where he spent the winter fishing.
W. King returned the latter end of last week from a business trip to Winnipeg, and states there are a large number there taking in the bonspiel and the Agricultural college course.
Prof. J. Robinson returned from fishing up north and there is little doubt but he will soon have the Fork River band in shape for any emergency.
We notice the minutes of the municipal meeting were published the following week after the meeting in the Herald. This is as it should be Promptness is what the people look for and appreciate.
Mr. T. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days in this burgh.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son, Donnie, are spending a week in Winnipeg.
“B and K” are not breaking any law of the country, Mowat friend. So try again. We have no doubt that the late Oak Brae mail carrier thought it an interesting event every Saturday and we are also sure though it a more interesting and wonderful stroke of luck when the cheques came along. It is not everyone gets paid for carrying their own mail. We don’t hold our meeting on Sunday friend. Get wise and shake yourself. Nuff for this time. Practice what you preach.

1914 Feb 26 – Winnipegosis

The bonspiel will open on Wednesday at one o’clock with sixteen rinks. Keen competition is looked for, as there is a large number of very valuable prizes. Some of the fellows that have been saying all winter what they would do if they wee only skips, will have a chance to try their hand now.
A very serious shooting accident took place about 25 miles south east of here on Monday. A Galician by the name of Kusyk, being shot through the back with a 44. Calibre rifle. The bullet passed through his abdomen. Dr. Medd was sent for and advised him to go to Dauphin Hospital to undergo operations. Since it is learned he has died.
Mrs. A.E. Groff, who has been on the sick list, we are glad to report is much better.
Frank Hechter arrived home from the Winnipeg bonspiel on Friday looking as hearty as ever.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Winnipeg and points east.
The W.A. are giving an alphabet party at the home of Mrs. Bradley on Tuesday evening.
Since the parcel post rates went into effect there is a large increase in parcels passing through the mail. The mail carrier is talking about getting a horse. But we see that Eaton’s still left Morten handle their catalogues.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 10 – 1910

1910 Feb 10 – Fork River

Mr. Wm. King returned on Saturday from Gilbert Plains after attending Country Lodge meeting and the Liberal Conservative Association. A good time reported.
The Rev. W. Walser, Rector of Dauphin, visited here last Friday and a special service of Baptism and Holy Communion was held at the Parish Church.
Mr. J. Spearing from North Lake was here last week putting the weekend in at Mr. W. King’s.
Special Lenten services on Wednesday evenings will be given in All Saints’ Church at 8 o’clock.
A Women’s Auxiliary meeting was held at Mrs. Hunt’s last Tuesday, and some good business was done. Next meeting at Mrs. Lacey’s, Oak Brae, Feb. 22nd.
Armstrong Trading Co. have opened a store at Fishing River.
Mrs. Geo. Tilt came up on last Friday’s train on a visit.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 20 – 1910

1910 Jan 20 – Jammed to Death

Thos. Michael a teamster at one of Barrows lumber camps at Grandview, was jammed Tuesday between two sleigh loads of logs on a runway and crushed so badly that he died shortly after the accident. Dr. Shortreed brought him to the hospital here Wednesday morning and he expired shortly after arriving. He is an American and his home is in Wisconsin.

1910 Jan 20 – Fork River

The Rev. H.H. and Mrs. Scrase and Mrs. King visited Mowat and Oak Brae district last week.
Services are held at Mowat schoolhouse fortnightly by the Rev. H.H. Scrase regularly at 11 o’clock. The missioner welcomes everybody in the district to these services.
The Englishman’s rest at Fishing River is now opened with Mr. A.B. Hodgson in charge.
We are sorry to hear that Mr. W. Benner is down with typhoid fever. We hope to hear that he will soon be around again.
Some of our ratepayers would like to ask our Mossey River Council if the December meeting has been published or was it of so little importance being the wind up of the year we have not seen it yet.
Another matter under the old Reeve and council a yearly report was published and distributed to the ratepayers showing the amount awarded to each ward and how it was spent, the amount of salary and mileage to each councillor and the amount paid to each road commissioner for letting work and mileage in each ward. If such a report of 1909 were published it would prove interesting reading for the ratepayers. The auditors report printed on a piece of paper four inches square is not enough for the amount of taxes raised. E should have a fuller report gotten out by the Sec.-Treas. at the end of each year.

1910 Jan 20 – To the Editor of the Herald

SIR: – We notice in last week’s press our genial friend the Mowat correspondent, is on the war-path again after a couple of months rest. It is the ministers this time. He must be short of material when he says he seldom sees a minister now days. Where does the fault lie when a man attends divine worship only once or twice a year at most?
The English church ministers stationed here have held fortnightly services for ears at the Mowat schoolhouse, about two miles from our Mowat friend, except when roads were impassable to walk or drive. The majority of the people have been visited three or more times a year considering he has to walk unless come friend drives him occasionally. I consider our minister has done his duty well and if there is any kick coming it is from the ministers for the indifference a great many people show regarding church matters and as to the way they are carried on and how the ministers of bot denominations get around to the different stations they are expected to preach and visit in fair or stormy weather, in a large field like ours, comprising Fork River, Mowat, Winnipegosis and Sifton. Let us put ourselves in these men’s places. Would we put up with the same hardship on the small salary we dole out to them? I say no, we would not. Then let us help them instead of grousing. The great secret of help is encouragement.

Wm. King.
Minister’s Warden and Fin. Sec.