Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 24 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 24 – Typhoid Fever Outbreak

Typhoid fever has broken out among the school children at Winnipegosis and the school has been closed.

1912 Oct 24 – Fork River

J.H. Martinson, of Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, real estate agent, was here on business last week.
Alex. Cameron, of Mowat Centre, was a visitor to Dauphin on business a few days ago.
Mr. Sturdy, who has been all summer at the A.T. Co. store at Winnipegosis, is assisting Mr. Kennedy in the store here now.
Samuel Reid, returned home after a week’s holiday with friends at Brandon.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family spent a few days in Dauphin lately with friends.
J. Parker, of the Stark farm, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Captain Russell, of Sifton, was a visitor at D. Kennedy’s lately.
Miss Comber returned home after spending the summer at Selkirk.
Mr. Silverwood, of Dauphin, was in town for a short stay the guest of Wm. Williams, lumber merchant.
George Sumpton, of Dauphin, is here for a short stay with Mr. Snelgrove.
The railway traffic is getting so heavy on this line that it takes two locomotives to handle a train, especially when they take the side track for it.
The Press of October 17th refers to Macdonald election as a “Howling Farce” and has not got sand enough to print the exact majority.
F. Champion, of Cleveland, England, was here a few days ago in connection with a business transactions.
Harvest festival service at All Saints’ will be held in the church at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon, Oct. 27th.

1918 Oct 24 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Lloyd Winters, Ashville, killed in action. (Lloyd Levi Winters, 1896, 2129348)
Lieut. Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, killed. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Arthur Day, Dauphin, gassed and wounded. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
Pte. J.W. Lane, Dauphin, wounded. (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
Pte. Go.F. King, Dauphin, wounded. (George Francis King, 1891, 151775)
Pte. W.K. Goodman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Wilbert Karl Goodman, 1894, 294203)
Pte. W.J. Bothwell, Makinak, wounded. (Wilfred James Bothwell, 1899, 2184456)
Pte. L. Ward, Grandview, wounded. (Lewis Ward, 1896, 2129152)
Pte. J. Lahaie, Makinak, wounded. (Joseph Lahaie, 1889, 291727)
Lance Corp. D. Stewart, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. E.L. Abrey, Dauphin, wounded. (Ernest Lincoln Abrey, 1889, 865837)
Pte. C.A. Blackmon, Ochre River, wounded. (Charles Alexander Blackmon, 1897, 1001157)

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair was held on Oct. 10th. The weather was perfect but this militated against the attendance for threshing was going on. The attendance of children was good, still some of the schools were very poorly represented owing to the rush of work on the farms. The lack of teachers for some of the schools and the many changes in teachers in others, was a serious handicap to the welfare of the club during the past years.
Lawrence Rowe won the Bank of Commerce prize for the vest pair of pigs at either the Fork River or Winnipegosis fairs, with a very creditable pair of Yorkshires.
It is to be hoped that the club will receive greeter interest from the parents in the coming year and so encourage the children in this work.

PRIZE LIST.
The following is a list of prize winners at the fair:
Grain growing:
Wheat sheaf – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Wheat, 20 lbs – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Rye sheaf – Albert Janowski 1st.

Stock, Calves:
Dairy – Donald McEachern 1st, Arthur Jamieson 2nd, Dave Nowosad 3rd.

Calves:
Beef – Bob Williams 1st, Kate Williams 2nd, Steve Beyko 3rd, Bill Williams 4th.

Pigs:
Pair – Lawrie Rowe 1st, Alice Nowosad 2nd.

Poultry:
Pen of Barred Rocks (3) – Kate Williams 1st, Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Pen Buff Orpingtons – Dave Nowosad 1st, Stanley Lundy 2nd.
Pen White Leghorns – Stanley Benner.
Pen Black Minorcas – Mike Borowski 1st, Bob Williams 2nd.
Pen Brown Leghorns – Bill Williams 1st.
Pen White Rocks – Arthur Jamieson 1st.

Gardening: Half bushel potatoes – Rosie Sowenski 1st, Alex. Zaplitney 2nd, Nicola Poctylo 3rd, Annie Sowinski 4th.
Six carrots – Charlie Jager 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Lawrie Rowe 3rd.
Six turnips – Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Six beets – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Two cabbages – Annie Beyko 1st, Mike Borowski 2nd, Charlie Jager 3rd.
Pumpkins – Nellie Kolokicvk 1st.
Onions – Alice Nowosad 1st, Charlie Jager 2nd.

Cooker:
Loaf of bread – Viola Rower 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Buns – Viola Rowe 1st.

Sewing – Viola Rowe 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Patching – Viola Rowe 1st, Emily Strasdin 2nd.
Fancy work – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Canning – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Longest ??? thistle root – Peter Zaplitney 1st, Fred Jager 2nd.
Woodwork – Bob Williams 1st, Dave Nowosad 2nd, Belle Williams 3rd.
Ducks – Sophie Beyko 1st.
Butter – Rosie Sowskine 1st, Mary Mieke 2nd.
Knitting – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Scribblers – Yumtaska 1st, Annie Chornoboy 2nd, Nellie Karwstski 3rd.

Writing:
Grade I – Horace Thompson 1st, Clara Dewberry 2nd.
Grade II – Ivor Humphreys 1st, Alley Dewberry 2nd.
Grade III – Bernard Hunt 1st, Lulu Thompson 2nd, Golkie Schuchett 3rd.
Map of Manitoba – Dave Nowosad 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Arthur Jamieson 3rd.

Handwork:
Grade I – Mossey School.
Grade II – Mossey School.
Nature Book – Beatrice Rowe 1st.
Collection of butterflies – Irene Bailey 1st.

1918 Oct 24 – Winnipegosis Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Boys’ and Girls’ Cub Fair was held at Winnipegosis on Friday, Oct. 11th. This was the fist event of the kind ever held in this locality and thanks to the efforts of the public school teachers, was a decided success. Keen interest was displayed by the residents of South Bay, and a large number were on hand to view the fair.
The judges were Miss Speechley and Mr. Murray, of the Extension Department of the M.A.C.
The sewing exhibit, largely due to the efforts of Miss M. McMartin, was a credit to Winnipegosis schools. The chickens were good, as were also the display of vegetables. With a greater interest taken by the surrounding schools we hope to double or treble our entries another year.
The secretary and organizer was Mr. H.L. Williams, public school principal.

PRIZE LIST.
Class I: Pair of pigs – Harry Whale 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Single pig – Wallie Pouliet 1st, Evelyn Groff 2nd, Harry Whale 3rd, Gordon Rognvaldson 4th.
Class II, Chicken Raising: Pen of 3 Barred Rocks – Walter Keen, South Bay, 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd, Wilfred Moyer, South Bay, 3rd, Ignace Bobinsky, South Bay, 4th, Mike Samimski, South Bay, 5th, Anthony Bobinsky, South Bay, 6th.
Pen of 3, any other breed – Daisy Walmsley 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Class III, Gardening: One dozen potatoes – Beverly Schaldemose 1st, Elizabeth Moyer, South Bay, 2nd, Ruth Groff 3rd, Evelyn Groff 4th, Mike Verchaski 5th, Gladys Cartwright 6th.
Dozen large onions or 3 large turnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, Elizabeth Moyer 4th.
Dozen parsnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd.
Dozen carrots or beets – Mary Marchenski 1st, Mike Samimski 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, John Moodry 4th, Elizabeth Moyer 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Class IV, Cooking: Two loaves of bread – Lottie Moore 1st, Attie Hechter 2nd.
Dozen oatmeal cookies – Margaret McAuley 1st, Lottie Moore 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd, Alice Hechter 4th.
Dozen cornmeal muffins – Ruth Groff 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Lottie Moore 3rd.
Class V, Sewing: Work bag – Mary Magnuson 1st, Ester Hechter 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd.
Knitted article – Cecil Paddock 1st, Mary Marchinski 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Evolda Whale 4th.
Sewing apron – Mary Magnuson 1st, Verna Denby 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Esther Hechter 4th, Evolda Whale 5th, Charlotte Adam 6th.
Red Cross Collection – Evolda Whale 1st, Mary Magnuson 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Charlotte Adam 4th, Addie Ketcheson 5th.
Night gown or tea apron – Charlotte Adam 1st, Addie Ketcheson 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Amelia Adam 4th.
Table runner – Helen Macaulay 1st, Lenore Denby 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Dust cap and work apron – Lenore Denby 1st, Tina Marchenski 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Piece of crochet work – Attie Hechter 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Lenore Sehaldemose 4th, Mary Marchenski 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Two Red Cross articles – Lenore Sehaldemose 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Ruth Groff 4th.
Middy suit – Lottie Moore 1st, Lenore Sehaldemose 2nd.
Class VII, Weed Contest: Collection of seeds of 10 noxious weeds – Ignace Bobinsky 1st, Mary Fleming 2nd, Ella Martin 3rd, Arthur McLellan 4th.
Class VIII, Woodwork Contest – Stanley Miket 1st, John Wallace 2nd, Nieh Rudiak 3rd, Alec. Ogryzlo 4th.

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River

Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, spent the week-end with his parents.
There was a very good turnout to the Thanksgiving service on Sunday.
Mr. Fred Tilt is building a house next to the Orange Hall. He has retired from farming and will reside in town.
Dunc Kennedy and party from Ochre River passed through the town on Sunday on their way to Winnipegosis.
Pte. Venables, who has just returned from overseas, is visiting his brother, T.B. Venables.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ Church and the attendance was good. It is hopeful sign when interest is taken in our young people.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 18 – 1917

1917 Oct 18 – Births

MUNRO – At Fork River, on Oct. 6th, to Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Munro, twins, both boys.

1917 Oct 18 – Many Fines at Winnipegosis

A number of parties appeared before Magistrate Whale at Winnipegosis on Tuesday at the instance of Inspector Gurton. Seven were fined and one case withdrawn. The fines and costs amounted to $800. One of the parties fined had been doing a thriving business in selling “cordials,” “liniments” and “bunion” cures, all to be taken inwardly.

1917 Oct 18 – Fork River Boys and Girls Club

This fair took place on Friday, Oct. 11th. The conditions were most unfavourable as the weather could not very well have been worse and the settlement being in the middle of the threshing prevented the grownups as well as many of the children from attending and there were numbers of exhibits which the children had no doubt taken great pains with that never appeared at all. The following is the first prize:
Wheat sheaf – 1st, Fred Yager, 2nd, Peter Yepletney.
Twenty pounds threashed wheat – 1st, Peter Yepletney, 2nd, Fred Yager.
Pair of pigs – 1st, Robert Williams.
One pig – Lawrence Shannon.
Half bushel of potatoes – 1st, Nellie Kolikitchka, 2nd, Albert Galcuski, 3rd, Maurice Delcourt, 4th, Peter Yepletney, 5th, Blanche Hunt, 6th, Maurice Delcourt, 7th, Mable Russell, 8th, Peter Zepletney, 9th, Peter Rudkanvitch, 10th, Emilie Strasden.
Trio of white Wyandotts – 1st, Edith Shannon, 2nd, David Nowosad, 3rd, Clara Hunt.
Trio of barred rocks – 1st, Lawrence Rowe, 2nd, Robert Williams.
Trio of buff Orpingtons – 1st, Alice Nowosad, 2nd, Robert Williams.
Trio of white Leghorns – F. Benner.
Trio of black Minorcas – 1st, Jenny Chernowes, 2nd, Metro Yarish.
Trio brown Leghorns – Mike Barcuski.
Sewing, girls over 14 – Alice Nowosad.
Girls under 14 – 1st, Clara Hunt, 2nd, Edith Shannon.
Foal – Joe Shannon.
Loaf of Bread – 1st, Clara Hunt, 2nd, Mable Russell.
Canned peas – 1st, Viola Rowe, 2nd, L. Rowe.
Canned beans – 1st, Karl Shields, 2nd, L. Rowe.
Beast poultry coup (special) – Alice Nowosad.
Crocheting (special) – Emilie Strasden, 2nd, Mary Mazurka.

SCHOOL PRIZE LIST.
Writing:
Grade 1 – 1st, Adolf Redwasky, 2nd, Stephen Nowosad.
Grade 2 – 1st, Charlie Yager, 2nd, John Wowk.
Grade 3 – 1st, Bernice Rowe, 2nd, Michael Michalina Hilash.
Grade 4 – 1st, John Pick, 2nd, Wasyl Fediuk.
Grade 5 – 1st, Aug. Perwin, 2nd, Dave Nowosad.
Grade 6 – 1st, Peter Zapitlney, 2nd, Erma Delcourt.
Grade 7 – Duncan Robertson.
Grade 8 – 1st, Edith Shannon, 2nd, Clara Hunt.

Map Drawing (war map of the world):
Grade 4 – 1st, Viola Rowe, 2nd, Arthur Jamieson.
Grade 6 – 1st, Dorothy Venables, 2nd, Blanche Hunt.
Grade 8 – 1st, Edith Shannon, 2nd, Clara Hunt.

Scribblers:
Grade 8 – 1st, Clara Hunt, 2nd, Edith Shannon.
Grade 6 – 1st, Erma Delcourt, 2nd, Dorothy Venables.
Grade 5 – 1st, Annie Phillipchuk, 2nd, Evelyn Robertson.
Grade 4 – 1st, Viola Rowe, 2nd, Arthur Jamieson.
Grade 3 – 1st, Patty Richardson, 2nd, Bernice Rowe.
Grade 2 – 1st, Goldie Shuchett, 2nd, Victor Forster.
Grade 1 – 1st, Danny Wilson, 2nd, Stephen Nowosad.

Paper folding:
Grade 3 and 4 – 1st, Nellie Saloman, 2nd, Joe Masiowski.
Grade 1 – 1st, Agnus Masiowski, 2nd, Teenie Laporawski.

Raffia Collection: 1st, Mowat School, 2nd, Pine View.

Fancy Flowers: first, Mary Muzyaka, second, Jenny Janowski.

Collection of Leaves:
Grade 8 – 1st, Alice Nowosad, 2nd, Clare Hunt
Grade 6 – 1st, Erma Delcourt, 2nd, Blanche Hunt.
Grade 5 – 1st, Annie Phillichuk, 2nd, Dane Nowosad.
Grade 4 – 1st, Sofia Yaroslawky, 2nd, Joe Nowosad.
Grade 3 – Pearl Reid.
Grade 2 – Bernard Hunt.

Collection of woods:
Grade 2 – Earnest Halfinbrak.
Grade 4 – 1st, Albert Janowski, 2nd, Alexander Zaplatney.
Grade 6 – Peter Zaplatney.

School chorus, 1st, Mossey School, 2nd, Janowski.

1917 Oct 18 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, of Neepawa, are visiting at the home of Mr. Sandy Cameron at Mowat.
The annual S.S. service will be held in All Saints’ Sunday afternoon, Oct. 21st, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cameron, of Neepawa, are visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Nat Little.
Mr. Levins, of Winnipeg, has put in a large pair of scales and is buying wheat for the McLanghlin Co.
Quite a little of the Winnipegosis “cordial” is said to have reached here. It is sure hot stuff.
Renew your subscription to the Herald promptly.

1917 Oct 18 – Winnipegosis

Thanking the people of Winnipegosis for their liberal support and hoping we can make as good a showing in the coming year.
Inspector Gurton was here on Tuesday and Magistrate T.H. Whale disposed of the liquor cases. Seven of the “boys” had to come across with the coin of the realm. The total of the fines and costs amounted to $800.
It was sure hard on “the old man,” who did such a thriving business with his “liniments” and “cordials” and “bunion” cures. The fall business was just beginning to pick up, too.
Magistrate Whale says if the cases keep up he will have to procure a wig and gown.
Most of the fishermen are at the north end of the lake preparing for the winter’s work.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 16 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 16 – Boy Killed

A sad accident happened near Ashville on Friday, when Michael, the 12 year old son of Joseph Sosnowski, who lives near Valley River, was run over by the engine of Winters’ threshing outfit and instantly killed. The boy was following the engine round and jumping on and off it securing rides. At the time the accident happened the boy was standing on it when it suddenly started, throwing him under one of the big wheels which passed over his body instantly killing him.

1913 Oct 16 – Fork River

Bert Cooper left for Winnipeg and expects to spend a few months there on business. D.F. Wilson returned from a trip south on important business. Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre, is on a visit to friends at Neepawa, in company with her grandson, Mr. Monnington, who after paying a visit here left for his home. Thos. Toye, councillor for ward 5 is making an inspection trip. The annual children’s service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, on Oct. 19th. Parents are requested to come and bring the little ones and help make this a hearty service. All are cordially invited. The first fall of snow fell on Friday and stopped threshing for a day or two. This week will about wind up the threshing. Fred. Cooper and W. Northam, returned from a rip to the Lake Town on business. Things are quiet there, most of the fishermen having left for the winter fishing at different points up the lake. Mr. Elliot, the new Methodist student for this mission, who is living at Winnipegosis, is visiting among his people here. T.N. Briggs, municipal road contractor, is busy making the dirt fly. We notice that municipal toothpick has managed to get across the track and the postmaster’s Plymouth Rocks are using it to pick their teeth with after it has been laying all summer on the platform. Mike says up to the present he wondered what it was got for. There are several buyers around rustling up cattle this fall. We have been informed that Harry Little has been appointed bailiff in the absence of W. Stonehouse. John Reid, of Sifton, paid us a visit on Sunday and Mr. Williams returned with him for evening service at that point.

1913 Oct 16 – Sifton

A new house not quite completed, belonging to J.G. Gillies, was burned last week. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Wasyl Felix Marantz returned on Saturday night from Dauphin, where he attended the Jewish service.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

1919 Oct 16 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

1919 Oct 16 – Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 14 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 14 – Political Meetings at Fork River

Glen Campbell held a meeting at Fork River on the 8th inst., which was well attended and much enthusiasm shown. There was no Government speaker and the Grits were conspicuous by their absence.
On the night of the 11th, Mr. Cruise held his meeting supported by Messer. McKinstry and McDonald, and quite unexpectedly Mr. Campbell turned up just before the meeting began. The Orange Hall was well filled as the Conservatives of Fork River were not afraid to hear both sides of the question for they did not know that Glen would be at the meeting. Had they not attended Mr. Cruise’s meeting would have been a small one.

1911 Sep 14 – Fork River

Mr. A. Harvey, an old timer who still owns property in this district, is on a visit to Mr. S. Bailey and renewing acquaintances.
T.N. Briggs’ threshing outfit arrived on Tuesday’s train and is guaranteed to thresh anything in sight from pumpkins to gerkins.
Reciprocity seems to have upset even the clerk of the weather, as we are having very poor harvest weather and a slight tinge of frost.
Mr. Glen Campbell held a meeting in the Orange Hall on the 8th, which was well attended. There were over 100 farmers and a large number of ladies present. Mr. Campbell spoke on reciprocity from a farmer’s standpoint in a plain telling way. His arguments were convincing and plainly showed the audience the reciprocity pact in its true colour and that it would be to Canada’s disadvantage. Mr. Cruise was invited bout did not put in an appearance.
Mr. Forbes of Rivers, has been in the district a few days looking over the land. He is well satisfied with Fork River and is likely to invest in a farm.
The following are a few reasons why the scribe cannot support Cruise, the non-resident candidate and why he objects to the Laurier Government. Look them over and see how few of the ministers retain public confidence. Has there ever been anything worse than Mr. Pugsley in public life in Canada. The corruption exposed in his department exceeds the McGreevy scandal during the Conservative regime. Sir Wilfred has not retired Pugsley as Sir John Thompson retired Langevin. A commission of Liberals has declared the Marine Department under Mr. Broduer, corrupt from end to end, yet he has been retained and now goes not he Supreme Court Bench. The administration of the Militia Department has been as bad as any. The printing bureau scandals have been covered up. The Oliver charges were sidetracked by the dissolution of parliament, notwithstanding pledges given by the Government upon which an adjournment was secured. Sir Wilfred Laurier made the late Mr. Prefontaine, his minister of Marine, when he knew he was corrupt. In fact he had a national reputation for corruption. But Sir Wilfred gave him one of the big spending departments. Mr. Fielding allowed the Farmers’ Bank to open its doors when he had abundance of evidence that it was a crooked organization from its very inception. Look over the ministers in the Laurier Government as it appeals for supper in 1911 and compare the administration with that of 1896 and see how are they mighty fallen. What a descent from Sir Oliver Mowat to Pugsley; from Sir Louis Davis to Broduer; from Sir Henri Joly to Oliver. Sir Wilfred does not want such a comparison to be made. He has introduced the reciprocity issue to cover up the corruption of his colleagues. The Press would try to persuade farmers to vote for the Grit candidate and put back into power Laurier and the most corrupt Government in existence. They might fool a few Jackdaws. The scribe’s advance is turn them out and try a new broom which in our experience always sweeps clean.

1916 Sep 14 – Fork River

P. Zack, of Winnipeg, has purchased the stock of J.S. Nowosad and intends carrying on the business. Mr. Nowosad has accepted a position with the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Sergant, of Kamsack, and late of Dauphin, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. W. Coultas on the Fork River.
Miss Pearl Wilson is teaching the Pine View School for the present.
On Sunday morning Mrs. Archie McMillian passed away after a period of illness. Deceased was one of the old settlers. The last three years the family resided at Kindersley, Sask. Of late Mrs. McMillian has been residing with her daughter, Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
The harvest home festival services in All Saints’ Church were well attended and the services were interesting throughout. The church was tastefully decorated for the occasion with flowers, fruit and vegetables and those who took part deserve credit. Mr. Butler preached his farewell sermon. He left for Wycliffe College on Monday to take up his studies. His departure is regretted.
Rain has delayed thrashing operations.
The duck pond opposite the post office is increasing in area. There should be good shooting when the season opens.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 23 – 1914

1914 Jul 23 – Successful Ethelbert Students

The following students from Ethelbert School were successful in passing:
Entrance – Honours – Ben Brackman and Nessie McNullan
Grade IX – Maggie Hagar and William Mastiuck
Grade X – Waldmar Mastiuck

1914 Jul 23 – Fork River

The Orangemen of Fork River held their 12th annual basket picnic on July 13. The weather was fine for the occasion and there was a large turnout many coming from Winnipegosis, Mowat, Sifton and Melton. There was a parade after dinner. Speeches were made by the Rev. E. Williams and Rev. Brother Clixby, and the chairman Brother William King country master. The sports commenced with a football match between Fork River and Mowat which resulted in two goals to nothing in favour of Fork River. Foot racing and other sports were also indulged in till supper. After supper a football match was played off between Winnipegosis and Fork River teams which ended in favour of Fork River, one goal to nothing. The Winnipegosis automobile was busy all night carrying passengers. There was a good dance at night. Thanks due our Winnipegosis friends for furnishing the music, which was much appreciated.
S, Nowosad and family are away for a short time visiting at Vonda, Sask., where John, the son resides.
Edwin King has returned to Saskatchewan after a week’s visit at his home here.
Milton Cooper has returned from a trip to the Winnipeg exhibition.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, spent last week with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. Brewer, of Ashville, spent a few days here and took a carload of stock south. The man who is raising stock is the one who is making money these days.
Road building is the order of the day.
W. Lockhart, from Ontario, is spending a few days here on business.
Coun. Robertson, of Ward 6, has resigned as he is leaving for the north for a year. Here will be an election to select his successor.
Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Venables both lost valuable clots last week.
There was considerable discussion at the last council meeting by the ratepayers regarding stock running at large and it was decided to enforce the by-law passed. Owners of stock must take care of them during the night or get into trouble.
On Sunday parties driving along Main Street to church had to pass between young men paying baseball, which is dangerous to horse and driver. We would kindly draw the players attention to the last part of clause 3 in by-law No. 5.

1914 Jul 23 – Mr. King replies.

To Editor of the Herald.
Sir – On Friday my attention was drawn to an article in the Press reporting Dr. Shortreed’s meeting at Fork River, said to be written by F.B. Lacey, who presided at that meeting. Personally I have nothing but pity for a man who will write such an untruthful report and makes such uncharitable statements. The meeting was held out on Main Street in front of Mr. Nat Little’s store. Dr. Shortreed was given a good hearing. The doctor quoted some figures he could not prove and Mr. Grenon politely took off his hat to the doctor and asked that a Conservative be allowed to speak. The request was flatly refused. Mr. Little shouted, “Go back to Winnipegosis. What in h-ll did you come here for?” This is the language our friend used in front of his own doorstep to persons who were quietly listening to Dr. Shortreed. When later the doctor repeatedly stated that the Roblin government was kept in power by the rattle his statement was objected to. There was no one there under the influence of liquor unless our Liberal friends. To judge from their pugilistic attitude at times it would lead people to believe they were under the influence of something. Perhaps it was fright, as the 10th was close at hand. At the close of the meeting, the Conservatives offered to pay for the hall and invited Dr. Shortreed and his friends to go there and discuss the matter as long as they liked. The offer was declined. If there was any rowdyism it was not the Conservatives who indulged in it. There were several other misstatements in the article worthy of the man who wrote them. But they are not worthy noticing. We have the greatest respect for a great number of our Liberal friends in Fork River and their opinions are always treated with the consideration they merit and we are sure they do not endorse such tactics.

W. King, President of Conservative Association of Fork River.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.