Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 16, 1919

Dauphin Flour in Belgium

Our readers will remember that shortly after the first reports of the suffering among the Belgian people, due to the Hun invasion in 1914, reached Canada, the Dauphin Milling and Creamery Co. Limited, ground a carload of flour from wheat donated by farmers and others in Dauphin and adjoining municipalities. This carload was duly shipped to Belgium but no official record was ever received of its having reached its destination. The following letter received a few days ago by the company makes very interesting reading, and it is gratifying to note that at least part of the donation reached the people for whom it was intended:
“52 Rue De Mondigny,
“Charleroi, Belgium.
“Dec. 1, 1918.
“Dear Sir,—You will no doubt be greatly surprised to receive this letter from a person that you have never seen nor heard of before, and your surprise will be still greater when you hear that it is written at your request.
“One day, early in 1915, I was present at the opening of a bag of flour which, with several others, had just arrived from Canada. At the bottom of the sack was a strip of paper bearing these words, ‘Whoever gets this bag of flour write and let us know if it is good.’ I would have written at once only the Germans, with their usual kindheartedness, made things so easy for us that letter writing was out of the question. I hope never to see a German again as long as I live. ‘The best of them are bad.’
“Your flour was excellent; it has not been our luck to have such good quality since. For the last three years our bread—it really doesn’t deserve the name of bread—was composed of everything except flour, thanks to Fritz.
“You would not recognize your flour sack. It has been transferred into a beautiful sofa cushion and occupies a prominent place in our drawing-room It is the admiration of all visitors.
“Last week the Canadian troops came to Charleroi; they received a warm welcome on all sides. Everyone here speaks highly of your compatriots, many English regiments passed two or three days in this town before entering Boschland. With every good wish for Xmas and with kindest regards.
“Believe me, yours sincerely,
(Signed) Andree McDonnell.”

Mossey River Council

The first meeting of the council of 1919 took place at Fork River on Jan. 7th.
The clerk swore in the newly elected members – T.B. Venables, reeve; J. Yakavanka, councilor for Ward 1; E.A. Marcroft for Ward 3, and J. Namaka for Ward 5.
Bylaws were passed making the councilors’ fees $4 per day and appointing D.F. Wilson sec.-treasurer at a salary of $875.
The bylaws of 1918 appointing the solicitors and health officer were confirmed for 1919.

COMMITTEES
Finance – Hunt, Marcroft and Paddock.
Bridges – Coun. Reid and Hunt.
Public Works – Coun. Marcroft, Paddock and Namaka be public works committee for Wards 3, 4 and 5, and Coun. Yakavanka, Hunt and Reid be public works committee for Wards 1, 2 and 6.
Paddock-Marcroft – That the bridge committee examine the bridges that are needing repairs and make an estimate of the material that will be required for the season’s bridge work and report to the clerk who is instructed to purchase same.
Hunt-Namaka – That the assistance which has been given to the family of the late Peter Smith be discontinued.
Hunt-Marcroft – That each councilor make a diagram showing the work in his ward which he would prefer to come under the working of the Good Roads Act for the yea 1919, and forward said diagrams to the sec.-treasurer, who is instructed to make a diagram from them showing the whole municipality, which diagram is to be forwarded to the Good Roads board.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the clerk instruct the solicitors to prepare a bill legalizing the assessment roll of 1918, and that the member for the constituency be asked to bring it before the legislature at the coming session.
Marcroft-Hunt – That a grant of $50 be made to ex-Reeve Lacey for miscellaneous expenses.
Hunt-Marcroft – That the assessment roll for the year 1919 is hereby adopted for the years 1919 and 1920.
Reid-Namaka – That Reeve Venables be a delegate to the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and that the delegates receive $25 for expenses.
Council adjourned to meet at the call of the reeve.

Fork River

Mrs. James Rice, of Northlake School, has returned from a trip to Winnipeg.
Mrs. R. McEachren and daughter Helen were recent visitors to Dauphin.
A car of young fat stock was shipped out last train. Good prices were realized by the sellers.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Little have returned from a short visit south.
H. Swartwood, International Implement Co., general agent, was at Fork River last week to hook up the orders of the local agent, W. King, for the coming season. Agent Billy K. is most optimistic as to the coming season’s business and to show his faith, has placed liberal orders.
Sunday school in All Saints Church every Sunday at 2 p.m.
Mr. Jarvis is now teacher of the Mowat School.
The continued fine weather is very favorable to stock and they are in fine condition.
Grain and cordwood are coming to market in considerable quantities every day.
The following are the officers of Purple Star Lodge, L.O.L., No. 1765, for the ensuing term:
W.M., Bro. C.E. Bailey; D.M., W.J. King; chaplain, Edwin King; rec. secretary, Wm. King; fin. Secretary, A. Hunt; D. of O., F. Cooper; treasurer, Sam Bailey; lecturer, F.F. Hanfebrak; dep. lecturer, Sam Reid. Committeemen – M. Cooper, H. Hunter, W. Russell, Ed. Morris, S. King, Jos. Bickel.

Sifton

A crowded schoolroom showed the appreciation of the residents of Sifton district of the Wycliff School Xmas concert. The hit of the evening was a three-piece sketch called “Santa and the Fairies.” Joe Reid acted as Santa, Miss Tilly Farion as Queen of the Fairies, and Witch Doubletongue was impersonated by Mary Braschuk. Patriotic songs opened the program, while several part-song contributed much to the enjoyment of the evening. An effective item was a serenade by the school children, clustering in a semicircle on the platform, with a flashlight playing on them for the darkened auditorium. Mrs. J.A. Campbell contributed the piano and violin accompaniments.
A good old-time dance, at which there was a large attendance, followed the concert. The dance music was given by Mrs. Campbell and Messrs. Marcott, Potoski, Kuczma, Halinski, and others.
The proceeds of the evening, totaling $56.75, have been placed in the bank as the Wycliff School Children’s Amusement fund. Part of it is to be applied at once to the repair of the school toboggan slide, a new concert platform, and ropes for the swings.
The teachers of the school, Mr. Bousfield and Miss Trew, and the children are grateful to the friends who gave the ample and excellent refreshments; to Mr. Paul Wood for the loan of his piano and for the willing assistance given by friends before and during the evening.
The fudge and taffy were provided by the children from their own lunch as a treat to adults, enjoying the Christmas spirit. The artists responsible for the blackboard scenes of the stage were Leslie Kennedy and Tilly Farion.

Winnipegosis

Old Josey Campbell, who resides near Water Hen, had his house and content totally destroyed by fire last Friday. The house was a new frame building, and the loss is ruinous to old Josey.
The council of the Village of Winnipegosis held its regular meeting last Tuesday. The council has been shorthanded for several months but is now complete, being reinforced by the addition of two new councilors, J. Willis and Chas. Denby. The council donated $400 to the Red Cross and discussed the building of a hospital and giving the town better fire protection. These last two matters will come up again at next council meeting.
The interment of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy, Ochre River, formerly of this town, took place on Tuesday. Rev. Mr. Hook conducted the service.

Mowat School District History Spans 64 Years

Below is an interesting article I located about the Mowat School that was published on Aug 4, 1967 in the Dauphin Herald. Mentioned is my 2nd great-grandfather, Noah Johnston, as well as my great-grand uncle, George Basham. The article mentions that it cost $600 to furnish the school-house in 1903 and by using the Bank of Canada’s inflation calculator based on the year 1914 (earliest year available) it would have cost them over $12,430 based on today’s standards.

Mowat School District History Spans 64 Years

When Peter Rudkevitch of Whitehorse, Yukon, arrived in Fork River for his grand-niece’s wedding, everyone began renewing acquaintances and memories went back to school days. School days where? At Mowat school!

The general feeling was “Let’s get together and have some pictures taken for Centennial year.” The old school chums and classmates phoned around and the gathering took place at the new school, as they called it, on Tuesday, July 25. The result was the following history of Mowat school:

This is the original Mowat school located on the boundary of Mossey River and Dauphin.

This is the original Mowat school located on the boundary of Mossey River and Dauphin. Seen grouped in front of it are former pupils who attended school there prior to World War II.

From left to right, front row, are Joe Masiowski, Peter Rudkevitch, Jim Richardson, Joe Rudkevitch; second row, Metro Brezden, Jim Johnston; back row, Tom Miller, George Miller and Mike Brezden.

Mowat school was organized by George Lacey in the year 1903. He spent many days walking from home to home by trails, as there were may children of school age, but no roads or phones, but he felt the necessity of an education for all, and his many miles of walking resulted in a first general meeting being held at the home of Noah Johnston, N.E. ½ S12-29-19 in June of 1903.

The first trustees were George Lacey, Charles Clarke and Noah Johnston, with George Frame as chairman and Thomas Richardson as secretary.

The first school was built and furnished for approximately $600. The name was chosen to honour Sir Oliver Mowat who served as one of the Fathers of Confederation.

Students prior to 1939

This is a group of former pupils shown at the present school. They attended prior to World War I and prior to 1939.

They are from left to right, front row, Joe Masiowski, Joe Rudkevitch, John Zabiaka, Fred Solomon, Mike Brezden; second row, Earl Gower, Tom Miller, Jim Johnston, Mrs. Joe Masiowski, Henry Solomon; third row, Ernest Johnston, Metro Boreyko, Peter Rudkevitch, Mrs. L. Carriere, Mrs. Jim Johnston; back row, Jim Richardson and William Zabiaka.

In the Mowat school vicinity still reside Mrs. W. Mullen, formerly Hattie Lacey, and Joe Rudkevitch, who entered school when the doors were first opened in 1904 with George Basham as teacher. Mrs. Emma Rice and Jim Lintick were teachers well remembered prior to World War I.

Between the two World Wars, teachers who were spoken of at the reunion were: Miss Grace Beach, Mr. Jarvis, John Main, Miss Reta Breaker, and C.D. Voigt Others were mentioned, but names seemed difficult to recall.

  • In 1920 a new school containing two rooms was built to accommodate some 80 pupils. The primary room included grades 1 to 4, and the secondary room grades 5 to 11. in 1921 the present school inspector, C.D. Voigt was the primary teacher and D.A. Dahlgren (brother of C.N. Dahlgren, Dauphin) was the principal.
  • Since the Second World War, the two-room school was destroyed by fire and a one-room school was replaced by the Dauphin-Ochre Area board in 1951.

Many prominent men and women of Canada have been products of this country school. One in our Canada’s present field of education, John Slobodzian is federal inspector of Indian schools.

In September 1967, one hundred years after Sir Oliver Mowat prominently figured in Confederation, the school doors will open again for another year with Mrs. Stanley behind the desk to teach grades 1 to 7.

And so the school bell will still ring for Mowat school after a history dating back to 1903.

Fred Solomon and Peter Rudkevitch

It is a note of interest to learn that Fred Solomon and Peter Rudkevitch, right and left respectively, sat in a double desk in the school for seven successive years. The two seen here in happy frame of mind, no doubt have been reminiscing about some of the mischief they got into when teacher had her back turned.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 8 – 1910

1915 Dec 8 – Shot for a Deer

What might have proved a fatal accident to a hunter occurred in the Riding Mountain south of Gilbert Plains on Friday last. William, the 18-year-old son of Jas. D. Sutherland was hunting in the mountain and was attired in white. He was coming through the scrub when the white of his legs was noticed by another hunter, by the name of Dimmick from Roblin, who at a distance of 2200 yards fired at him for a deer and hit him in the right leg, the ball breaking it. Sutherland immediately ell and yelled loudly which prevented Dimmick from again firing as he had the rifle to his shoulder a second time when he heard the yells. As the two men were a long distance away from any habitation, Dimmick had to carry the wounded man three miles to a farmer’s house when medical aid was procured and young Sutherland brought to the Dauphin Hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1915 Dec 8 – Fork River

Miss Lane, from Dauphin is spending a few days up here before proceeding to her home in Winnipeg.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of Mowat School was taken seriously ill last week and returned to Dauphin to be under the doctor’s hands. We all hope she will soon be herself again.
F. Storrar paid a visit Dauphin lately.
A Christmas tree and entertainment will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the English Church, on Friday evening, December 23rd, at eight o’clock. A good time is expected for the children. Admission all children free, but a charge for admission will be made to adults.
Mr. Letwin has been appointed as assistant to Mr. D. Kennedy in the Armstrong Store here.

1915 Dec 8 – Sifton

Bert Kennedy, of Canora, Sask., who was a patient in the Dauphin Hospital with typhoid, was a visitor to his brother John Kennedy for a few days before returning to his house at Canora.
Miss Scott, Neepawa, was a visitor at the Presbyterian mission house for a couple of days. Miss Scott is always welcomed at the mission house.
Rev. Johnston, of Gilbert Plains, held services here on Wednesday evening last. The sermon was well put and much appreciated.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held service on Thursday evening. Quite a large crowd congregated.
The moose shooting season is on again. Rudolph Spruhs is one of the number to leave for the haunts of the antlered monarch.
The Manitoba Government Telephones have a construction gang camped in the village doing construction work east of town.
On Tuesday Messrs. Buckwold & Levin shipped out three cars of cattle to Winnipeg.
The elevator of the British America Elevator Co. had to close down on Saturday for lack of cars to ship out. This is said to be the first experience of this kind since the elevator was erected. The opportune arrival of empty cars has now, however relieved the situation.
Rev. J.A. Sabourin is having a furnace and hot water heating system installed by M. Cardiff, of Dauphin, in his new building which is being rapidly completed. A new R.C. Church is expected to be erected next summer.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Melynik a few days ago a pair of twin girls. All three doing well.
With the late fall of snow the farmers are quickly taking advantage of the good sleighing and hustling their grain to market.

1915 Dec 8 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit of the Methodist Church, Winnipegosis, on Sunday next. Subject: The Call to Advance.
Teamsters here have been busy freighting fish from the various fishing grounds up the lake. They are impartment men and must needs be well catered for. Recognizing this fact the Misses Geekie and Black have opened a new restaurant at which good, solid, substantial meals are served at all hours. This is just what was needed in our busy little town. The fact that hot meals can be obtained at all hours, would see to be a guarantee of success. We wish them luck.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 18 – 1917

1917 Oct 18 – Births

MUNRO – At Fork River, on Oct. 6th, to Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Munro, twins, both boys.

1917 Oct 18 – Many Fines at Winnipegosis

A number of parties appeared before Magistrate Whale at Winnipegosis on Tuesday at the instance of Inspector Gurton. Seven were fined and one case withdrawn. The fines and costs amounted to $800. One of the parties fined had been doing a thriving business in selling “cordials,” “liniments” and “bunion” cures, all to be taken inwardly.

1917 Oct 18 – Fork River Boys and Girls Club

This fair took place on Friday, Oct. 11th. The conditions were most unfavourable as the weather could not very well have been worse and the settlement being in the middle of the threshing prevented the grownups as well as many of the children from attending and there were numbers of exhibits which the children had no doubt taken great pains with that never appeared at all. The following is the first prize:
Wheat sheaf – 1st, Fred Yager, 2nd, Peter Yepletney.
Twenty pounds threashed wheat – 1st, Peter Yepletney, 2nd, Fred Yager.
Pair of pigs – 1st, Robert Williams.
One pig – Lawrence Shannon.
Half bushel of potatoes – 1st, Nellie Kolikitchka, 2nd, Albert Galcuski, 3rd, Maurice Delcourt, 4th, Peter Yepletney, 5th, Blanche Hunt, 6th, Maurice Delcourt, 7th, Mable Russell, 8th, Peter Zepletney, 9th, Peter Rudkanvitch, 10th, Emilie Strasden.
Trio of white Wyandotts – 1st, Edith Shannon, 2nd, David Nowosad, 3rd, Clara Hunt.
Trio of barred rocks – 1st, Lawrence Rowe, 2nd, Robert Williams.
Trio of buff Orpingtons – 1st, Alice Nowosad, 2nd, Robert Williams.
Trio of white Leghorns – F. Benner.
Trio of black Minorcas – 1st, Jenny Chernowes, 2nd, Metro Yarish.
Trio brown Leghorns – Mike Barcuski.
Sewing, girls over 14 – Alice Nowosad.
Girls under 14 – 1st, Clara Hunt, 2nd, Edith Shannon.
Foal – Joe Shannon.
Loaf of Bread – 1st, Clara Hunt, 2nd, Mable Russell.
Canned peas – 1st, Viola Rowe, 2nd, L. Rowe.
Canned beans – 1st, Karl Shields, 2nd, L. Rowe.
Beast poultry coup (special) – Alice Nowosad.
Crocheting (special) – Emilie Strasden, 2nd, Mary Mazurka.

SCHOOL PRIZE LIST.
Writing:
Grade 1 – 1st, Adolf Redwasky, 2nd, Stephen Nowosad.
Grade 2 – 1st, Charlie Yager, 2nd, John Wowk.
Grade 3 – 1st, Bernice Rowe, 2nd, Michael Michalina Hilash.
Grade 4 – 1st, John Pick, 2nd, Wasyl Fediuk.
Grade 5 – 1st, Aug. Perwin, 2nd, Dave Nowosad.
Grade 6 – 1st, Peter Zapitlney, 2nd, Erma Delcourt.
Grade 7 – Duncan Robertson.
Grade 8 – 1st, Edith Shannon, 2nd, Clara Hunt.

Map Drawing (war map of the world):
Grade 4 – 1st, Viola Rowe, 2nd, Arthur Jamieson.
Grade 6 – 1st, Dorothy Venables, 2nd, Blanche Hunt.
Grade 8 – 1st, Edith Shannon, 2nd, Clara Hunt.

Scribblers:
Grade 8 – 1st, Clara Hunt, 2nd, Edith Shannon.
Grade 6 – 1st, Erma Delcourt, 2nd, Dorothy Venables.
Grade 5 – 1st, Annie Phillipchuk, 2nd, Evelyn Robertson.
Grade 4 – 1st, Viola Rowe, 2nd, Arthur Jamieson.
Grade 3 – 1st, Patty Richardson, 2nd, Bernice Rowe.
Grade 2 – 1st, Goldie Shuchett, 2nd, Victor Forster.
Grade 1 – 1st, Danny Wilson, 2nd, Stephen Nowosad.

Paper folding:
Grade 3 and 4 – 1st, Nellie Saloman, 2nd, Joe Masiowski.
Grade 1 – 1st, Agnus Masiowski, 2nd, Teenie Laporawski.

Raffia Collection: 1st, Mowat School, 2nd, Pine View.

Fancy Flowers: first, Mary Muzyaka, second, Jenny Janowski.

Collection of Leaves:
Grade 8 – 1st, Alice Nowosad, 2nd, Clare Hunt
Grade 6 – 1st, Erma Delcourt, 2nd, Blanche Hunt.
Grade 5 – 1st, Annie Phillichuk, 2nd, Dane Nowosad.
Grade 4 – 1st, Sofia Yaroslawky, 2nd, Joe Nowosad.
Grade 3 – Pearl Reid.
Grade 2 – Bernard Hunt.

Collection of woods:
Grade 2 – Earnest Halfinbrak.
Grade 4 – 1st, Albert Janowski, 2nd, Alexander Zaplatney.
Grade 6 – Peter Zaplatney.

School chorus, 1st, Mossey School, 2nd, Janowski.

1917 Oct 18 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, of Neepawa, are visiting at the home of Mr. Sandy Cameron at Mowat.
The annual S.S. service will be held in All Saints’ Sunday afternoon, Oct. 21st, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cameron, of Neepawa, are visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Nat Little.
Mr. Levins, of Winnipeg, has put in a large pair of scales and is buying wheat for the McLanghlin Co.
Quite a little of the Winnipegosis “cordial” is said to have reached here. It is sure hot stuff.
Renew your subscription to the Herald promptly.

1917 Oct 18 – Winnipegosis

Thanking the people of Winnipegosis for their liberal support and hoping we can make as good a showing in the coming year.
Inspector Gurton was here on Tuesday and Magistrate T.H. Whale disposed of the liquor cases. Seven of the “boys” had to come across with the coin of the realm. The total of the fines and costs amounted to $800.
It was sure hard on “the old man,” who did such a thriving business with his “liniments” and “cordials” and “bunion” cures. The fall business was just beginning to pick up, too.
Magistrate Whale says if the cases keep up he will have to procure a wig and gown.
Most of the fishermen are at the north end of the lake preparing for the winter’s work.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 10 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 10 – Fork River

Miss S. Lacey, of Oak Brae, returned from a short visit to Mrs. J. Spearing of Valley River.
Mrs. Wm. Ramsay, of Sifton, was a visitor with Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase at the vicarage.
Mrs. Wm. King returned home after a week’s say with her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, who is leaving for the north end of the lake for the winter.
J. Playford and Fleming Wilson were visitors here from Dauphin on business.
S. Biggs has given up the Mowat School and is leaving for Dauphin.
H.H. Benner, an old-timer, is travelling around for a few days in the educational chariot renewing acquaintances. We are all pleased to see Harcourt. He is now a regular walking encyclopaedia on real estate.
The C.N.R. bridge gang spent a few days here pile drying and fixing bridges.
Mr. Lampard, of Dauphin, is busy rounding up a car of fat cattle for shipment.
Duncan Briggs, Professor Robinson and Fred Storrar have left with T. Johnston for the winter’s fishing at Dawson’s Bay.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson, who has been spending a week with her daughter, Mrs. L. Humphreys, of Dauphin, returned home Saturday.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs arrived home from a month’s vacation spent with friends in Brandon.

1918 Oct 10 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Albert Jackson Weir, Valley River, wounded. (Albert Jackson Weir, 1888, 2193343)
Pte. Douglas Wells Bentley, Dauphin, wounded. (Douglas Wells Bentley, 1897, 469933)
Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, wounded. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Robert Stanley Colebeck, Dauphin, wounded. (Robert Stanley Colbeck, 1896, 1072198)
Pte. Charles Winstanley Skinner, Dauphin, was wounded and taken to the dressing station. While being conveyed from the dressing station to the hospital he was struck by a bomb and killed. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 6 – 1910

1910 Oct 6 – First Automobile Accident

The first automobile accident in town to write of happened Friday evening. Eric Nicholson driving his father’s (H.P. Nicholson) horse on Vermillion Street, collided with J.W. Johnston’s automobile just as it was coming over the crossing at his lane on the ave, N.W., Mr. Johnston immediately put on the emergency break but the machine struck the horse before it was stopped. On examination for casualties it was found that the animal had received a broken leg. The two veterinary, Dr. Bryant, was telephoned for to dispatch the animal.

1910 Oct 6 – Thresher Fatally Injured

Gilbert Plains, Man., Oct. 1 – Mike Genik, who was working on the threshing machine of Frank Morris, on the farm of Fred Manns, was run over by the front wheel of the engine last night, receiving internal injuries which, it is said, will prove fatal.

1910 Oct 6 – Fork River

A meeting of the Council was held here last week, when some important business was done.
Miss Hansford of Winnipegosis, paid us a visit was done.
Rev. H.H. and Scrase visited Mr. and Mrs. Lacey at Oak Brae last week.
Mowat School house was prettily decorated last Sunday on the occasion of their Harvest Festival. A nice congregation attended.
We are all wondering if the Fork River and Winnipegosis road will be ready for use this coming winter. Slow progress seemed to be made on account of scarcity of teams and men.
A spark from the engine was the cause of a load of wheat being burned up in the wagon owned by Mr. W. King was badly damaged.
Mrs. Tilt from Dauphin, came up last week.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very eloquent sermon to the congregation of All Saints Church which was greatly appreciated. His subject was “The Holy Eucharist Congress at Montreal” and replied to Father Vaughan, who said that Protestantism is a soulless religion and that Canadian public schools are Godless schools. Mr. Scrase handled the subject well.

1910 Oct 6 – To the Herald:

SIR – I notice in the press an article dated September 17th, from a Mowat correspondent, re Government Elevator, which he thinks is lost, strayed or stolen. If either of these three things have happened it, the people of this vicinity would not be surprised to hear of it dropping out of the Mowat mail bag some day as it is remarkable what that mail bag will consume – tacks, sugar and other things too numerous to mention.
I have never heard of such a thing happening an elevator but we have had an experience like that in post offices up here. Fishing River being mentioned in the Mowat article reminds me what happened a few years ago, the settlers of Fishing River petitioned the Ottawa Government for a post office. Did they get the post-office at Fishing River? Not your life! It was lost, strayed or stolen as a new post office was located shortly after, not a hundred miles from Fishing River. If our Oak Brae P.M. would put the same energy behind the mail cart as he uses on his pen, knocking at the Provincial Government, the Winnipegosis mail it carries would get here before the train leaves and not have to lay over and the people would appreciate it very much.

A Fork River Correspondent

1910 Oct 6 – North Lake

Councillor Lacey has let quite a few contracts for road work lately, which will help the Galicians to get around easier.
John Bolinski is erecting a dwelling and stable on his farm on the lake shore.
Rev. H.H. Scrase conducted harvest thanksgiving service at Mowat School house last week. His text was very appropriate. The school house was tastefully decorated by Misses Charlotte and Harriet Lacey.
If any person comes in contract with a threshing outfit looking for work, be so kind as to show them the way here in case they get lost.

1910 Oct 6 – Sifton

Fine weather continues. Threshing progressing very nicely.
Mr. Carruthers and gentlemen friend from Valley River, paid our village a visit on Tuesday evening. “Me thinks” a fair inducement.
The Rev. Sabourin is moving the R.C. Church to a property across the road from the present location.
The Rev. Archbishop of Lemburg, Galicia accompanied by Archbishop Langevin, St. Boniface, is expected at Sifton in the near future, in the interests of the Greek rite of the R.C. Church.
A number of our villagers went out to Lake Dauphin on Saturday for the day’s shooting.
The Sifton village mock council met on Wednesday of last week. After the minutes of the previous meeting were read and several very important communications were brought up and read before the council after which some heated discussions followed.
The matter of the excessive use of the Comfort Soap miniature wagons on the sidewalks of the village, was brought to the attention of the council, that the practice be immediately stopped, thus lessen the dangers to pedestrians exceeding the speed limit by law. After due discussion the motion was seconded by Alderman Dneufre, that the constable be ordered to put the by-law in force respecting this and in failure of that recommended that the family production be curtailed.
A complaint was also read from some residing in the farther wards east, of a nuisance of late in that locality. The west winds of late are heavily laden with the smell of carrion. The constable was ordered to investigate and see that all dead mosquitos, horses or horse flies, be buried at once by or at the expense of the parties responsible.
Alderman Pantoline thought that the nuisance ground was being moved too near the centre of the town anyway and wanted to know of the constable what was being done re the manure heaps which were called to his attention some time ago and demanded to know why he was not taking action. Alderman Dneufre thought the constable very dilatory in the performance of the duties of his position and said that he could produce a more competent party at less salary to take the place of the present policeman. Some charged graft repeatedly in the way of that officer’s position, others demanded investigation.
It was then moved by Alderman Dneufre and seconded by Pinkas that the matter of graft in the police commissioner’s office be investigated and reported to the council at the next meeting. Council then adjourned to again meet at the usual date.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 20 – 1917

1917 Sep 20 – Week’s Casualties

Sergt. Weeks, Makinak, killed. The sergeant was one of the first to enlist at Dauphin three years ago. Two years age he recruited in town during the winter.
Pte. Leslie Lintick, Dauphin, wounded.
Pte. W.R. Lawson, Swan River, killed.
Pte. Wilford Lee, Dauphin, missing.
Pte. L. Trotignon, Ste. Rose, missing.

1917 Sep 20 – Fork River

Mr. Timewell has received word from his son who was wounded that he is recovering in a hospital in England.
Adolf Rudiwick has purchased a Case threshing outfit and intends to make his “pile” this fall.
W.S. Spillett, post office inspector, paid postmaster King a visit and found everything in good shape.
Tony Boyko has purchased Fred. Cooper’s threshing outfit and intends working in the western section.
Miss Grace Beach returned from Dauphin and Mowat School opened on Monday.
Mr. Timewell has purchased the A. Snelgrove residence in town, and W. Williams’ tractor it up north to Mr. T’s farm.
Postmaster King received word from his son, Pte. Aubrey King, who was gassed and is in hospital that he is better and expects to be back in service in two or three months.
The train service is providing unsatisfactory of late. Trains are late frequently.
Owners of stock should remember that there is a herd law in operation and it is the intention of residents to impound the animals.
Rev. A.S. Russell is attending the rural deanery meeting at Swan River this week.
It is learned that the Winnipegosis council has made overtures to our council to bonus a doctor to settle in the district. The move is one that will be supported by all. It is crying shame that an epidemic like the one at Winnipegosis should be allowed to exist in any civilized community.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 14 – 1910

1910 Jul 14 – Carmen Strike Still On

The Carmen on the Canadian Northern Railway system are out on strike, and at the present indication the strike will be a protracted one as both sides are being firm. The number of men out on strike at Dauphin is 15. The situation here is quiet and the men are behaving orderly.

1910 Jul 14 – Fork River

Miss L. Collins teacher of Pine View School left here last week to spend her vacation at McCreary.
Mrs. J. Rice teacher of Mowat School left here last week to spend her vacation in Ashville.
Harcourt Benner is visiting friends on Saskatchewan.
Fork River Conservatives gave Mr. Hughes a handsome majority.
Harold Clarke came up from Dauphin last week.
Eva Clarke is visiting friends at Duck Lake.
Mrs. Scrase spent a few hours in Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 11 – 1912

1912 Apr 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the Council held in the Council chamber, Fork River, Wednesday, March 27, 1912, all member present.
The minutes, having been read were adopted as read on motion of Coun. Nicholson, seconded by Coun. Seiffert. Carried.
Nicholson-Robertson – That this Council donate ten bags of flour to Sefat Mochka and that Councillors McAuley and Seiffert be requested to see that the same is delivered. Carried.

COURT OF REVISION
McAuley – Hunt – That protests No. 10, No. 12, No. 16 and No. 17, respectively, be lowered from $880 assess to $800; and that in protest No. 15 the assessment be lowered from $800 to $720. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That all other protests remain as they are. Carried.
McAuley – Seiffert – That W.H. Paddock’s assessment be changed from 150 acres to 100 acres. Carried.

REGULAR BUSINESS
McAuley – Nicholson – That the taxes of John Frend, N.E., 1-29-20, be reduced by $40. Carried.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the taxes on N.E. 25-29-20 be reduced rom $82.25 to $22.24, owing to taxes having been charged on abandoned homestead. Carried.
Seiffert – Hunt – That Wm. Walmslay be asked to move his house off the public streets of Winnipegosis at once. Carried.
Sieffert – Robertson – That the Health Officer at Winnipegosis be asked to see that all back-yards and out-houses are cleaned up at an early date. Carried.
Sieffert – McAuley – That Wm. Hunking be asked to see that all cattle and horses be kept off the sidewalks in Winnipegosis; also that all parties found driving over the same be prosecuted. Carried.
Sieffert – Robertson – That Peter Saunders be appointed pound-keeper for Winnipegosis for the year 1912, in the place of Archie Stuart, resigned. Carried.
McAuley – Hunt – That the accounts of T.R. Nicholson ($11) and F.B. Lacey ($15.75) be passed. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That sections 3 and 4 of dog by-law No. 84 be amended as follows: That the words “sleigh dogs” be struck out and the words “all dogs in village of Winnipegosis” be interred in their place. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That J.A. Snelgrove’s account of $77.47 for tamarack piling and stringer, be paid, and that $15 be deducted from the same in payment for cable. Carried.
Hunt – Sieffert – That the council procure six comfortable chairs for the Council chamber at Fork River, and that the clerk be instructed to get the same without delay. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That Panko Solomon be instructed to furnish material and build fence at the north end of sec. 1-29-19; all posts for same to be sound tamarack, to be placed 1 rod apart, and 3 wires to be used. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That the Council now adjourn to meet again at Winnipegosis at call of Reeve. Carried.
H.H. Benner,
Sec.-treasurer, pro tem.

1912 Apr 11 – Ethelbert

Mrs. A. Willey is visiting Ethelbert during Easter and is visiting Mrs. A. McPhedran.
Miss Shaw, of Gilbert Plains, stayed a day at James Miller’s on her way home to the Plains.
Mrs. A. Clark is visiting her parents and nursing her mother. Mrs. Skaife, who has been seriously ill for the last month.
Taking advantage of the fine weather Mrs. Skaife is now able to take short walks.
Both Catholic Churches are having their usual Easter services, and the attendance at both are good.
The Union Church of Ethelbert members invited Mr. Smith Jackson to preach the Easter sermons. Special Easter hymns were provided by the choir all of which went well. Mr. Smith Jack spoke in the afternoon basing his remarks upon Paul’s words to Timothy, “Lay Hold on Eternal Life,” and he gave a powerful and sympathetic exposition of his subject. There was also a quartet “The Portals of Glory” rendered by the following: Mrs. A. Phedran, soprano; Mrs. A. Clark, contralto; R. Skaife, tenor; and Kenneth McLean, basso. It is needless to say all did well and the music, which was accompanied by Miss Ella May was rendered with harmony and precision. In the evening Mr. Jackson spoke from Revelations and took for his Text “He that Overcometh,” and again gave a good and impressive discourse. The musical numbers were also well rendered and included a duet, “Go Home and Tell,” Mrs. C.F. Munro taking the soprano and Mrs. A. Clark the contralto. The voices blended together well, and it was a treat to hear such music. There was a good attendance of hearers at both services, and the general verdict was that the services had even very successful and reflected credit on all concerned. There are also Evangelistic meetings being held at John McLean’s by Evangelists Howard and Fleming May. The old story is being proclaimed to good audiences. The meetings will be continued on Tuesday and Wednesday nights this week.
Everybody is decked out in Easter holiday attire, and the village has quite a festive appearance and all seem disposed to make the season one of general rejoicing.
The snow has nearly all gone. Spring is with us in earnest and soon every one will be busy turning over the land and preparing for a bumper crop.
I almost forgot to say we have got a new police magistrate, so now the people will be able to spend their money at home. Patronize home industries is a good motto far all.

1912 Apr 11 – Fork River

Mr. Briggs, teacher of the Mowat School, is visiting Dauphin this week.
P. Ellis is leaving this week to take up a position at Miles’ store, Kamsack.
Rev. H.H. Scrase was a visitor at W. King’s last Monday.
A magic lantern show entertainment was given by Mr. McCartney at the Orange Hall last Thursday. Some very nice pictures were shown, consisting of the Passion of our Lord. Owing to the bad roads only a small attendance turned out.
The farmers are getting ready for ploughing. Quite a lot to be done in this district.
Mrs. Rice from East Bay has been visiting Mrs. Cameron’s, Mowat.
Fleming Wilson and Paul Wood paid Fork River a visit on Tuesday.
G. Shannon, F. Cooper and R. Rowe were visitors to Dauphin on business.
Mr. Walker of Dauphin, is around inspecting Mossey River, Mowat and Pine View Schools.
Edwin King returned home from a week spent in Winnipeg and states that the trains going west are crowded with new comers. Lots of room here for them.
Mrs. T. Shannon returned from visiting friends in Dauphin.
Mrs. Comber and daughter arrived here from Selkirk and are staying with Mrs. McQuay for the present.
Miss Gertie Cooper and Miss Clark came up from Dauphin and are spending the Easter holidays at the homes of their parents.
Our Mowat friend of the Press invites the scribe to see these documents which is unnecessary as we have some of his documents covering the last six years, also his savings for the Press for about eight years and when we sum them up her reminds us of a Biblical charade who betrayed his friend and master. What a pity he seems to have these spells worst coming on spring. We sincerely hope he will be recovered in time to plant his onions.
The Hon. Joseph Lockhart returned from spending some time in the south and is looking as healthy as ever.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove, who has spent some time with Mrs. F. Chase in Dauphin, returned home Tuesday.
There are lots of wild geese on the wing, to judge from the reports it is harder on the ammunition that the geese.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 8 – 1912

1912 Feb 8 – Girl’s Clothes Caught Fire
In a Moment She was Aflame
Father to Rescue Both Burn

What might have been a fatal burning accident occurred at the home of Robt. Fair, whose farm is located about 10 miles south east of Dauphin the later end of last week. His daughter Hattie, who is 22 yeas of age, was suffering from a pain in her face, and her mother advised her to soak a rag in coal oil, heat it and apply. The young woman took the oil can near to the stove and kept pouring the oil on the rag and then placing it on the stove to warm. In doing this some of the oil dripped over her clothes. The last time she applied the rag to the stove it suddenly ignited and in a twinkling her clothes were a mass of flame. She screamed and her father, who had just gone to bed, rushed to her rescue ad with the assistance of a sheet endeavoured to smother the flames. Before the fire was extinguished the fire was burned considerably about the legs, hands and face.
Mr. Fair also had his hands badly burnt. It was a miraculous escape. Had Mr. Fair not been right at hand his daughter would have been burned to death in less than two minutes as the coal oil on her clothes added greatly to the rapidity with which the flames spread over her body.

1912 Feb 8 – Fork River

Mr. Biggs has returned after a month’s stay at Bethans and has accepted the position of teacher of the Mowat School for another term, which is satisfactory to the ratepayers.
We are pleased to hear Rev. H.H. Scrase is making good progress at home.
The Leap Year ball in the Orange Hall on Friday, Jan. 26th, under the management of the ladies of Fork River, was a big success. “Wall flowers” were conspicuous by their absence. Most of the evening the ladies attended to that part of the programme and deserve great credit as the hall was well filled with people from Winnipegosis, Mowat, East Bay and all parts and every one seems to have enjoyed themselves. The break-up came at six o’clock in the morning to the strains of the “Home sweet home waltz”: and a frosty drive.
Mrs. Wm. King and son Roland, returned home after a three months’ stay at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Morris, of Mosse Island, Winnipegosis.
A. Rowe’s little girl was unfortunate enough to have her arm broke in two places while playing. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, was sent for and the patient id progressing nicely.
Mr. Powers, provincial government auditor, spent a few days at the municipal office going over the books of the municipality. Which means getting out another financial report three inches by four. It should be larger and more comprehensive.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy and little son returned from Dauphin after a two weeks’ visit.
Fred Cooper, with Peter Ellis, paid a flying visit to Dauphin on business; also D.F. Wilson in connection with his immigration trip. Not knowing the time of the trains arrival the Fork River band was not in attendance. Still we gave them a hearty welcome.

1912 Feb 8 – Winnipegosis

If the man from Roblin, who skinned out about the middle of January would be kind enough to come back and settle for his board bill and also for the hay and oats he took from the freighters the people of Winnipegosis would be very grateful.
It would be far better for the fish companies to let the people here freight the fish than send out for freighters.
Born on Jan. 8th, 1912, to Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Morris, a son.
Some of the fishermen are complaining of the timber wolves breaking open their boxes and eating the fish.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 6 – 1913

1913 Feb 6 – Baran Fired Fatal Shot

Monday was the most fateful in the life of John Baran. It opened with the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke in morning and in the afternoon the coroner’s jury found Baran guilty of the shooting.
Coroner Harrington held an inquest in the afternoon, when the following composed the jury: Geo. King, foreman; H.F. Caldwell, John Cole, A.B. Buie, Nelson Taylor, Stewart Baird, Thos. Shaw, F.J. McDonald, R.G. Ferguson, Thos. Jordan, Frank Beely, and Arch. Esplen. Witnesses examined were Dr. Culbertson, as to immediate cause of death; John Tomaski, the man who drove the sleigh that carried Constable Rooke to Baran’s house where he was shot, and Marie Pelech, the woman who lived with Baran.
The jury, in order to receive the woman’s evidence, proceeded to the hospital and for an hour listened to a well connected and intelligent reciting of the incidents which led up to the shooting.
The woman testified that Baran fired two shots from a rifle through the door when Rooke attempted to force an entrance; that she knew that one of the bullets took effect for she examined the spot where Rooke fell exhausted in the snow, when the man who accompanied him left to secure assistance. She stated that she found a pool of blood. She also testified that Baran forced her to state that she fired two shot through the door. The whole affair was brought home to Baran in a most vivid manner.

THE JURY’S VERDICT

The following is the verdict of the jury:
“We, the jury empanelled to hear the evidence as to the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke, find that the said Charles Rooke on Sunday, Jan. 26, 1913, received a bullet in the breast from a rifle in the hands of John Baran and that the said Charles Rooke died on Monday, Feb. 3, 1913, from the effects of this shot.”
The death of Constable Rooke has cast a gloom over the community as he was a good citizen, as well a good officer, unassuming and kind to all.
Marie Pelech, who lived with Baran, is still in the hospital, but is doing as well as can be expected. If she recovers she will have to have her right arm amputated at the shoulder. Her brother, Michael, arrived from Winnipeg Monday morning and was overcome with grief to find his sister in such a pitiable condition. He says he has been looking for her for three years.
Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Munson on Monday on the charge of murder. He was remanded until Friday for trial.
Rooke was born at Redhill, Surrey, England. May 5, 1876, being the son of Inspector-General Rooke, of the Indian army, who was honorary physician to Queen Victoria, and was educated at Willington College. He came to Western Canada in 1895, and served five years with the Northwest Mounted Police. In 1905 the Manitoba government gave him the job of organizing the Manitoba mounted police, a body whose efforts were mainly directed to the suppression of lawlessness along the international boundary line. He made his name a terror to horse thieves, yeggmen and smugglers and soon made the frontier as safe as any other part of the province. Latterly, his headquarters have been here, where he had jurisdiction over much of the north country. In 1909 he married Elizabeth Surrey, who, with one son, survives him.
A brother, E.G. Rooke, news editor of the Nelson News, and former publisher of the Port Hope., Ont. Times, is here to attend the funeral as are also Mr. Geo. Surry, Victoria, B.C., Mrs. Rooke’s brother, and Miss Ellen Surrey, of Galt., Ont., sister of Mrs. Rooke.

1913 Feb 6 – Funeral Today

The funeral of the late Constable Charles Rooke is taking place this afternoon from the family residence 8th Ave., N.E. Vermillion Lodge No, 68, A.F. & A.M., of which deceased was a member having charge of the services. Rev. A.S. Wiley will conduct the service. Interment will be made at Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fraser Given Two Months

Wm. Fraser, who attempted suicide last week by cutting his throat, appeared before P.M. Munson on the 30th ult., and was sentenced to two months in jail. He was taken to Portage by Constable McLean.

1913 Feb 6 – Died From Bullet Wound

Fred Bichardson, a Barnardo boy who was working for Arthur Lee, a farmer at Togo, shot himself in the head Friday with a 22 rifle. He was brought to the hospital here on Saturday, but died shortly after his arrival. The remains were interred in Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fork River

Henry Benner, of Lloydminster, is visiting his parents up the Fork River. He is wanting a car of young cattle to take back with him. No objections to females being among them.
Howard Armstrong has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Dony, left for Bayhead, Nova Scotia, for a two months visit among relations and friends.
D. Kennedy’s high flyer got kicked the other day and is out of business for a short time, consequently Dunk had to fall back on the old reliables for a trip to Winnipegosis.
All the threshing outfits got cold feet early this fall except for Fred Cooper and he is on his last job. Fred’s a stayer and there should be no kick from the farmers as there’s no money in it for either this year as far as threshing goes.
We were out the other day looking for a stray heifer and didn’t find her, but came across someone looking for a pig. They did not mention whether it was a live pig, or dead pig or a blind pig and judging from their track a few hours after they must have run across a pig of some kind. Moral, don’t try to carry more pig than you can handle unless you cover up your tracks.
There is considerable kicking being done among the owners of gasoline engines re the poor gasoline sent up here from Dauphin. It not only wastes our time but puts the engines out of order.
We notice in the Press a long rigmarole about compulsory education also an ad for a teacher for Mowat School. We hear there has been several application received. It seems a pity this school should be closed since the summer holidays, it being in the centre of a settlement where there is a large number of children. The parents seem to be anything but delighted to have the kids miss all the nice weather we have had. We bet dollars to doughnuts that the head push has no children to send or we would have heard of it every week for the last five months.
Can anyone tell us what benefit the majority of the ratepayers receive for their taxes in the Municipality. Of course there are some who go on a pilgrimage to all the meetings looking for snaps and they get them, by gum. The clerk has had a rise of fifty. Oh well, I believe he published the minutes of one council meeting since last June. The municipal auditor was around so look out for the statement three inches by four. We received a copy of the Auditor’s report in book form of 47 pages from Ochre River Municipality. Its good reading and looks like business. A few dollars expended like this would be more appreciated by the ratepayers than paying two road commissioners in ward five, as there has been done the last three years to spend two or three hundred dollars.
The new Oak Brae postoffice as officially opened today. It is situated at Janowski schoolhouse and should prove a great boon to the people of that locality as it has been a deeply felt want. Geo. Basham is postmaster and we feel sure he will fill the bill to all satisfactorily. We hear Billy is sore, but we can’t help these things, so Billy, please remember the little saying “No use crying over spilt milk.” Such is life in the Wolly West.
The annual clearance sale started today 1st Feb. at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store and they are sure slaughtering the prices. This has been a poor year for the farmer so now is your chance to buy right.
Wanted, a boarding house right away for the travelling public.

1913 Feb 6 – Sifton

A ball was held in the Kennedy hall in aid of the English church; about forty couples were present, and a very enjoyable time was spent.
Elaborate arrangements were made for a wedding here on the 31st ult. A large number of guests had assembled and everything was in readiness for the ceremony when it was found that the would-be bride was missing. Consternation reigned for a time and great disappointment was felt, especially by the intended groom.