Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 2 – 1911

1911 Nov 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron of Mowat Centre is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mat Little has finished his implement warehouse on Main Street and has his machinery under cover.
Miss Alterton, teacher of Mossey River School; Miss M. Nixon, of Pine View; H. Benner, of Tobeski School; J Spearing, of North Lake School and John Nowside are attending the teachers’ convention at Dauphin and no doubt education will advance by leaps and bounds on their return.
D. Kennedy, manager of the Armstrong Trading Co., is busy preparing for winter with an up-to-date stock of all kinds. Miss Pearl Wilson has charge of the dry goods department, and Carpenter Stonehouse is erecting a wood house and tin house and other improvements, while Prof. Gordon is busy wielding the paintbrush trying to beat Jack Frost.
Our Grit friends seem to be having a high old time hunting mission ballot boxes. When Fork River disfranchised the deputy returning officer was missing. They seem to have a way of losing something every election and now Sir Wilfy missed the premiership and since then Joe has been missing and the other little fellow was floundering around in the Press a week ago and he’ll soon be missing too if this weather continues.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 22 – 1914

1914 Oct 22 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughter, are spending a few days in Winnipeg with friends.
Miss Gertrude Cooper spent the week-end with her parents and returned to Dauphin on Monday.
Mrs. I. Humphreys has left for a few days visit to Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin. They were accompanied by Mrs. W. Johnston, of Fork William.
Mrs. W. Davis’ sale on Thursday, was a very successful one. Dan Hamilton, of Dauphin, wielded he hammer and good prices were realized on everything put up, particularly his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Joe Johnston, of Fort William, is spending a few days here visiting his sister, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end here with Miss Gertrude Bradley, teacher of Mossey River School.
The mayor and alderman of Winnipegosis, were visitors to this burgh one day last week.
Mr. Simpson, of Winnipeg, was here lately paying the money for work done in this municipality. The Armstrong Trading Co.’s store was used as a paying office.
The first dance of the season came off in the Orange Hall on Friday last. It was well attended and all had an enjoyable time.
Alex. Cameron returned on Wednesday from a business trip to Dauphin.

1914 Oct 22 – Winnipegosis

Our town is again assuming the even tenor of its way now that many of the fishermen are at the north end of the lake.
Mrs. P. McArthur has gone to the Pas to visit her daughter.
Inspector James made an inspection of the post office here last week. He stated that Postmaster Ketcheson had everything in good order.
J.W. McAuley took a carload of cattle to Winnipeg a few days ago.
Coun. F. Hechter was a Dauphin visitor in the early part of the week.
It is learned that there is every prospect of the township of swamp lads on the west of the town being thrown open for homesteading. Should the Dept. of the Interior consent to do this it will do much to help the development of the town. The land is good and with thrifty settlers on it would yield prolifle crops.
Mrs. W. Johnston has returned from Dauphin.
The sensation of late was the arrest of the man who had charge of the dredge here during the summer. He pleaded guilty and was let off on suspended sentence by the police magistrate at Winnipeg. It is learned that when the total of the goods taken was summed up to amounted to a large sum. The question now comes up, who was it that squealed, and did the squealer participate in the spoils. Yes, there is going to be further developments and one sensation is likely to follow another.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 1 – 1914

1914 Oct 1 – Fork River

Mr. Lintick and F. Storrar attended the Teachers’ Convention and report an interesting time. What with summer, Christmas, Easter and Bank holidays and conventions, there are very few teaching days left, and yet we are told the teachers have a hard time and are underpaid and grant us a favour to teach our rural schools a few weeks for a year’s pay. Where does the farmer’s holidays come in who has to pay the piper.
George Lyons, weed inspector for ward 5, paid this burgh a visit on business with the necessary documents.
A fire set out by some of our western friends has been raging the last week and considerable hay has gone up in smoke. Where are all our fire rangers? They generally turn up in winter time.
Mrs. Venables and daughter, who have been spending a few weeks with Mr. T. Venables, on the Mossey River, left for their home at Boissevain.
Mr. D. Kennedy has received from Winnipeg another bow wow for his dog emporium. No doubt a large cash prize will be offered for a suitable name for his dogship.
Miss Brady left for her home at Winnipegosis, the health officer having closed the Mossey River School for a short time on account of chicken pox. The kiddies are having a high old time singing “everyday will be a holiday in the sweet by and by.”
Mr. Swartwood, agent for the International Harvester Machine Co., is here taking stock of the surplus machinery and repairs.
Mrs. R. McEachern has returned from a few days visit with friends at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that D.F. and F.R. are to draw cuts to see which shall climb and fix the pulley on to of ??? staff. The gate receipts are to be donated to the ??? fund. It will be quite a climb for such featherweights. Next.
One day last week some evil disposed person broke into the house of Mr. T. Glendenning at Lake Dauphin and turned everything over, but failed to find what they were looking for. We trust the parties will be found and made an example of.

1914 Oct 1 – Winnipegosis

The school will be finished this week.
Frank Hechter was a passenger to Dauphin on Tuesday.
D.G. McAuley returned from Dauphin on Wednesday.
The teachers from these parts who attended the convention at Dauphin returned home on Saturday.
The fishing season closes this week and the fishermen are returning. The fishing was exceptionally good and everyone appears to be satisfied. Forty cars were shipped out. About 175 men were engaged in the work.
Boys shooting about the neighbourhood make it dangerous for parties who are about. A bullet the other day struck Harold Bradley’s house. The gun was taken from the boys.
John Tidsberry, high constable of Dauphin, was here on Wednesday. John says “we’ll lick the Germans or know the reason why.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 5 – 1912

1912 Sep 5 – Heavy Rain

A heavy rain set in early this (Thursday) morning and canted for several hours. The rain has put a stop to harvesting operations for this week at least. Indications now point to better weather.

1912 Sep 5 – A Note of Warning

There has been issued, by direction of the Minister of Agriculture at Ottawa, a conspicuous poster calling the attention of potato growers to the importance of examining their crop to ascertain whether or not is infected with potato canker. The hanger shows in natural colours a potato plant the whole yield of which is affected by the ideas. It also shows the appearance of individual tubers in which the canker has started to work. Growers who discover suspicious symptoms of the ideas in their crop are requested to send affected specimens to the Dauphin Botanist, Experimental Farm, Ottawa. The poster is issued as farmers’ circular No. 3 of the Division of Botany and is being distributed by the Publications Branch of the Department of Agricultural.

1912 Sep 5 – Fork River

The crops around this district are now looking excellent and the binders are now busily at work. If only we have good weather from now on we shall have a good average. If this district had a good ditch made to let off the water from the west, the farmers would not have to complain of so much water on their land. Perhaps something will be done one of these days.
Miss Alderton, teacher of Mossey River School, spent a few days in Dauphin last week.
Nat Little and his daughter, Gracie, are taking a little holiday in the States. We all hope they will have a pleasant time.
Wm. King is busy these days finishing off that new stable he has been building. It looks fine.
Mr. H.H. Scrase spent a few days visiting friends in Dauphin. He looks well.
Miss Fredrickson, of Winnipegosis, is now helping at the Armstrong Trading Co. in place of Miss Pearl Wilson resigned.
Mrs. F. Hafenbrak gave birth to a little son last week.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, came to Fork River, last Sunday and visited Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase.
We are glad to see the ??? ??? the elevator and hope to see ??? this fall.
Mrs. S. Bailey, who spent a month with friends in Ontario, has returned reports having a pleasant time there.
John Stacey, of Snowflake, Man., is visiting at S. Bailey’s and renewing old acquaintances.
S.E. Briggs, who had the misfortune to lose his horse with fever, has purchased another driver.
Hugh Armstrong spent a few days at the Company’s store on his return from the Pas.
Sydney Gower, electrical engineer, was renewing old acquaintances for a few days.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family returned home after a visit to her home at Brandon.
Theodore Johnston has returned from the south and is staying a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Professor John Robinson has returned and is looking well. We expect to see the band out in full force in future.
[1 line is rubbed out] the position of municipal critic. Not at all; we just noted a few remarks that were brought to our notice ??? friend don’t seem to relish ???. Before he ??? into the council ??? [9-10 lines are rubbed out] and all is forgotten ??? ??? ??? then they strike ??? ???. “Anything else Tommy.” “Yes, dad says the taxes amount to a rent and there ain’t no ex-rays powerful enough to discover where they go.” “That will do Tommy, dear; you must have meant beaver instead of municipality, as the beaver’s head looks wise and his tail is to carry the mud. The M.C. goes on to say we should suggest something. What’s the use. Several grants were got for the south road and the M.C. sent a three page letter to the man in charge and stopped the work as laid out by the Government engineer because he was not in the council he was held up and yet the M.C. whines about not getting assistance to overcome these difficulties. Rats, keep quiet M.C. and things will be all right later on and we’ll meet you on the south road with the band.

Today in the Dapuhin Herald – Sep 3 – 1914

1914 Sep 3 – Thousands are Being Killed

LONDON, SEPT. 3RD – While little or no official news has been allowed to pass the censors, it is known for the past three days that tremendous fighting has taken place between the Allies and the Germans. One authority places the number killed at 100 000, seventy percent being Germans.

1914 Sep 3 – Germans will be Licked

If the Germans can’t reach Paris by the end of the week they will not be able to reach it all. Emperor William is urging her generals to take the city at all costs. The English and French troops are being reinforced and there is no fear at headquarters that they will not be able to repulse the invaders and later drive them out of the country.

1914 Sep 3 – Ethelbert

Houses are scarce in our village. There is a good opening here for some enterprising contractor to build a half dozen dwellings.
There is a large supply of wood on hand. Pretty nearly everything else is affected by the war but it is not likely wood will soar. We are thankful for this small favour.
W.H. White, principal of our school returned on Monday from Dauphin. Mr. W. has not moved his family from Dauphin yet being unable tog et a house.
Threshing has commenced. The quality of the grain is good but the yields are on the light sight.

1914 Sep 3 – Fork River

Mrs. Minocan and Mrs. Carter returned to Montana, U.S. having spent the summer with Mrs. Nat. Little.
Wm. Howitson, assistant clerk at the A.T. Co. store, received an urgent call to headquarters at Winnipegosis to take charge of the manager’s gold fish emporium. “Scotty’s” all right and will will miss him around here.
E. Thomas, of Veregin, Sask., has arrived here to take charge of the elevator. He reports many elevators have been closed down in Saskatchewan. D. Kennedy will handle the finances.
Mrs. Rice, of North Lake, was in town on Saturday.
We overheard Mrs. Manglewortzel top giving His Majesty hail Columbia because she had not got her Eaton catalog the other day as the T.E. Co. had informed her that several copies had been sent to members of her illustrious family and she wanted them. Strange to say, two hours after two bags of the catalogs were seen on the platform addressed to the express agent. We trust her ladyship received her Sunday reading ere this. Some people are busy looking for imaginary trouble.
Miss M. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, has accepted the position of teacher to the Mossey River School for a time.
The few showery days have put back the harvesting but have put out the fires in most places. We should have a fire guardian here.
W. King, reeve, was a visitor to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Sep 3 – Winnipegosis

There has been a bad outbreak of diphtheria among the Galicians in this district and already several deaths have occurred. It appears that these people will not obey the instructions of the health officer in regard to quarantine and as a result the disease has spread. The services of Constable Hunking have been required and he will endeavour to reinforce the law. A supply of antitoxin has been secured from Dauphin.
Negotiations have been completed for funds and work has been resumed on the school. What a power the mighty dollar has.
The fishing is very good and the fishermen seem to be fairly satisfied, which counts for something. When you find a satisfied fishermen then the end of the universe is in sight.
The war is likely to do several things for this district. One is that the farmers will bend their efforts to raise more cattle and hogs and another is that a larger area of land will be got ready for crop next year.
J.S. Seiffert has been appointed police magistrate for the district. The office is an important one and if properly filled requires judicial talent. We sure have had a variety of P.M.’s – good, bad and indifferent.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.